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POLARITY

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Density
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Now complete the mini-experiment:


Procedure:

1. Fill one dropper with blue cold water. Poke the end of
the dropper about halfway into the colorless roomtemperature water.
2. While observing from the side, very gently squeeze the
dropper so that the cold water slowly flows into the
room-temperature water.
3. Fill another dropper with yellow hot water. Poke the
end of the dropper about halfway into the roomtemperature water.
4. While observing from the side, very gently squeeze the
dropper so that the hot water slowly flows into the
room-temperature water.
What happened?

Cohesion/Adhesion
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Cohesion Mini-Experiment: Drops on a Penny


1. Using a dropper and a clean penny, count how many
drops of water you can add to the pennys surface
until the surface tension is broken and the water flows
off.
How many drops can your penny hold?
How does this demonstrate cohesion?
Adhesion Mini-Experiment:
1. Place a drop of water on one microscope slide.
2. Place the other slide on top of the drop of water.
3. CAREFULLY try to pull the slides apart. DO NOT
SLIDE THEM APART.
What happened?
How does this demonstrate adhesion?

Heat Capacity
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Heat Capacity: Mini-Experiment

1. Inflate one balloon with air and tie off.


2. Stretch the other balloon over a tap and fill with water
until the balloon is approximately the size of a
grapefruit.
3. To color the water: Add a small amount of water first
so that the balloon is not stretched. Add several drops
of food color to the water in the balloon using a
pipette.
4. Now stretch the mouth of the balloon over the tap
and add more water until it is approximately the size
of a grapefruit.
5. Light the candle Hold the empty, air filled balloon in
the flame. What happens?
6. Lower the water balloon from above to ensure the
flame does not touch the sides of the balloon. What
happens?

Solubility

Solubility Mini-Experiment:
1. Locate the three Labeled clear plastic cups Alcohol,
Oil, and Syrup and pictures of the structures of all
three.
2. Pour water into all three labeled cups until each is
about half-full.
3. While looking at the water from the side, slowly pour
the alcohol into its labeled cup.
4. Without stirring, watch to see if the alcohol dissolves
in the water on its own. Record your observations in
the chart.
5. After waiting about 10 seconds, stir to see if the
alcohol dissolves. Record your observations.
6. Repeat Steps 25 for oil and corn syrup.
Based on your observations, how do the
structures of each of the solutions affect how well
they dissolve?

How do you think this polar part of the molecule


affects the solubility of alcohol?

In some salad dressings a layer of oil, like canola


or olive oil, floats on top of a layer of vinegar,
which is mostly water. If you shake a bottle of this
kind of salad dressing, the liquids will temporarily
combine. But the oil and vinegar do not dissolve in
one another because eventually the two liquids
will separate out again. Knowing what you do
about molecules and dissolving, why doesnt the
oil in these salad dressings dissolve in vinegar?
Why do you think glucose molecules dissolve well
in water?
Some people with diabetes may accidentally let
their sugar level get too low. There are glucose
tablets to help them with this problem. When a
person eats one, do you think it will act quickly to
increase his/her blood sugar level? Why or why
not?