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Mk VI
Procedural Notes
Finding a Signal Name on a Cimplicity Screen
As with all things Windows, there are a number of ways to achieve the same result. This
axiom holds true in this case also. This procedure will detail one way of determining the
signal name of some data box or function box on a Cimplicity screen. The first thing that
must be understood is that the Cimplicity screens have been developed and are held
inside of a frame container. It is not the purpose of this document to strip the mystery
from that description. If you are unfamiliar with Cimplicity frame containers much of
this procedure will be lacking in sufficient detail for you to be successful in your
immediate objective (finding a point name). With that understanding, a brief explanation
of a frame container is that it is a way of binding and linking a number of common
Cimplicity display files. When you view a Cimplicity graphic you are viewing one file
(or graphic files) within a collection of files (graphic files). Further, part of that screen is
the detail of a specific frame and other parts of it are part of the main frame container
itself. Getting details from a screen depends on your understanding of whether you are
looking for a signal name embedded in a frame or on the frame container itself.
The first and easiest method of getting such details is from a point on the frame
container. The following graphic shows a representative operator screen. As an example
we will determine the signal name that data-populates the box EXHAUST.

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Right-button click on the data field (shown in this next screen shot) to select Point
Control Panel from the pop-up menu.

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This will pull up a separate window with a Cimplicity Point Control panel with that data
point displayed.

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Some items that should be discussed at this point:

It is important that Point Control Panel (PCP) is selected. If someone wants to cut
corners and go straight to the Quick-Trend (QT) display (described later in this
document) they risk locking up the HMI. If not done carefully, the selection of either
PCP or QT will deliver every point configured for the frame container. This could be
thousands of points. If this happens the PCP will be busy for a number of seconds as
it develops the points. The QT, on the other hand, will be very busy trying to develop
a time plot of all of these points with different color lines and second-by-second data
up-dates. This will inevitably lock-up the HMI as it gets much too busy. The way to
avoid such a thing is to build the PCP first then select QT from the PCP window for
the data point(s) desired.

The careful selection reference is to point out that you have to be very careful where
the mouse cursor is positioned before right-button selecting the PCP.

If you have selected a data field that is actually embedded inside a frame container,
the PCP will populate with all of the data points in the frame. In that case there is no
easy way to pull the point off of the screen but you have locked up the HMI. You
will then only be left with the second method (described later in this document).

The PCP, in this example, has two data points. One is the actual data and the other
is the label which is the way Cimplicity handles scaling units (psi or F, etc.).

If a time plot of this data is desired: in the PCP, right-button-select on the data point and
select Quick Trend. Easy as pie.
This method works for data points on the graphic that are configured outside of the frame
container and is something that the control operator can do independent of the control
technician. If there are points that are part of the frame container another method is
required and this method is much more detailed.
The second method requires looking at the graphic file in edit mode. To do this, open the
Cimplicity Workbench and select the Screens category. In that listing of files you will
select the main control screen file (it is actually the much-discussed frame container file).
To select this file, right-button click on the file and select Edit (see following screen
shot).

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With the editor window open:

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The next step will be to open the frame container and to do that you must select the
frame. Notice in the previous screen shot that the open frame icon (circled) is grayedout, indicating it is not available. We must select the frame container by clicking on a
component of the frame container. In this case the container is selected by clicking once
on the corner of one of the button box groups (master control, mode select, fuel select,
etc.). If this is done properly the frame will be identified with the gray bracket box
(arrows point to this on the following screen shot). Also, the open frame container icon
is now available (circled).

Click on the open frame container icon. A tool icon bar opens on the left side of the
screen. Using left and right arrows of this tool bar you can move through the individual
frames looking for the display that has the item the you are investigating for signal name.
NOTE: Be careful with this toolbar, the X icon (the one without the box around it)

deletes the current frame from the container. That would be a bad thing. If someone you

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know does this tell them to close out of the editor without saving anything and youll be
right as rain.
In this example we will determine the signal that is triggered when the start button is
activated. To do this we will select the Master Control object (when selected it will have
the gray bracket box) and right button select Properties on this object.

With the properties window open (see next screen shot) select the Group tab and expand
the group to find the start button object.

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Right-button select Properties to get the next Dialog box. In selecting such components
you will continue to open property boxes and select the Group tab until there are no more
Group tabs to select. In this case we have drilled down to the Start button properties.
With an Object Property box open you now select the correct tab for the information you
are looking for. As examples:

If it was a data field you were looking for the signal is probably found under the Text
tab in the Display Value window.

If you are looking for what changes a color or fills a bar graph you would probably
select the Color Animation tab and then select the Edit button in the Expression list.

In this example we are looking for the signal that changes when the object is clicked-on.
That is considered an event so the Event tab is the puppy we will click on.

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This window identifies that the event is a mouse up (when you let your finger off the
mouse button). On that event the action that takes place is identified in the
Ctrl_Master_Start procedure. To see what is involved in that we select right arrow
(circled) and select Edit Procedure.
With this new dialog box open we see immediately that the signal that is changed on a
Start click is the signal L1START_CPB.

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With that we are finished. Cancel out of all of the open dialog boxes, close the frame
container (the boxed X icon on the tool bar) and close out of the editor without saving
any changes. Bobs your uncle.

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Mk VI
Procedural Notes
Changing a Control Constant
You must be online (the Online icon on the Toolbar) to get controller data (the green

numbers) to change the current value. This screen shot presents an example of this (a
picture being worth a thousand dollars, uh, words). Box A identifies the current (RAM)
value of the control constant and Box B identifies the permanent (flash) value of the

A
B

constant. This is the value (B) the controller loads into memory on controller
initialization. We will make the change to the RAM value and then change the flash
value.
To change the control constant, double click on the value to be changed (the green
number). A dialogue box (Send Value) opens. Enter the new value into the Next
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window of the box. If the Turbine is running you do NOT want to introduce instability
into the control by changing a setting too much in a short period of time. (Another way
of saying that we do not want to make any step changes while the machine is running).
If the unit is not operating then you can enter the new value and click on the send and
close button. If the unit is operating then we will change the constant by increments until
we reach the desired setting. Insert the increment value in the value window and then
click on the send button. You will click this send button repeatedly to increment the
value. Dont go at this send button like it was a video game either; give the system a
moment to adjust. In a similar vein, dont be over-generous in the value of the increment
as that may defeat the purpose of the increment.
Once the RAM value has been changed you need to change the permanent (flash) value
to reflect this change. This change would be reflected in Box B of the previous figure but
it is not changed there. The change is made at the pin of that signal / control constant
(where it is identified as a control constant). Further to this, the pin we will change is the
one that is available for edit. There may be two different pins of this signal name, one
would be the macro (or generic) definition, the other would be the in-line (or deviceattached) definition. Where we make the change depends on if the file is structured with
Macro / Instance or Exception / Inline programming. (For an explanation of these
differences see the document Exception Program.doc.)

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In this example we see immediately that this is Macro Programming so we need to make
the change in the macro section and then Instance it down into the Functions. In this
example I will use Finder to locate the correct place for the change. There are other ways
to do this (but I am brilliant, so this is the best way).
With Finder set to search as shown here (note the search Text does not include the device

and Anywhere In is the search method), the results indicate two pin locations (the circle
pin icons; they would be red on your color monitor). Because this is Macro program
structure we will go to the second pin definition (because it has the generic
device-identifier %D\; if it were Exception programming we would select the devicespecific pin definition G1\). It comes down to finding the pin definition location where
we will be allowed to modify the pin.
Use Finder to go to that location (select it in the Finder context window then select the
middle, Go To, icon of the Finder tool bar). At that location double click on the pin
definition (Privilege level 2 required). An Edit Module Pin dialogue box opens to allow
modification of this pin/signal. The value of the constant is specified in the Initial
Settings section of the dialog box. Enter the new setting for the constant in the Value
window of this section. Click OK. Validate the device. Next, Instance this into the
Function section (select Edit on the Menu bar, select Instance and the All option. When
that is complete (it takes a number of minutes), validate the device again, build and
download. For this download you will select the Download to Memory option in
addition to your standard download selections (Permanent storage, symbols and
compressed controller file).
As in all things of a computer and Windows nature, there is more than one way to do
something. We could have made the initial change to the control constant (the RAM
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value) from the aggregate control constants list. This is accessible from the Menu bar as
the following screen shot indicates.

The next window is a list of all of the constants sorted in alphanumeric order. Use the
search tool to find the control constant you are interested in. (The search tool for the
control constants window is the binoculars icon; note that Finder does not apply to this
area so dont use it.) If the controller file is on-line you will have a column of green
numbers beside the column of black numbers (columns value and initial value
respectively).
Double click on the signal name and a change dialogue window opens allowing
changes in the same manner as previously described.

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Mk VI
Procedural Notes
Creating a Pin in Toolbox
Pins in the Toolbox m6b structure are the signals that are passed in to, out of and within
the application software. If a new signal is required for an application a new pin will
have to be created. As mentioned in other procedural explanations there are two types of
program structures (Macro and Exception) and this will determine where a new pin will
be created. Basically, you will have to add the pin in the place where the program allows
you to edit. In Macro programs you will add the pin to the Macro section and Instance
down into the Function. For Exception programs you will add the pin in the Function.
This screen shot shows a Exception program structure.

We will work through adding a pin to the SUPURGE module. I have a general
preference of placing new pins at the end of the pin list but you could put them anywhere
in the list (even if it goes against the practices of someone as wise as me). Wherever you
chose to place the new pin, select that point, right-button select Insert Next.

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A New Pin dialogue box will open. Note that it has a drop-down arrow.

Selecting that will offer all of the pins in this module (that is why they are called module
pins). You may select a pin with a name similar to the one you are adding and then edit it
for proper name. Or, you can just type in the signal name. Be sure to follow the general
structure of the other pins. The one absolute rule is that the device and slash precede a
signal name. (In Exception programming you use the actual device name (i.e. G1\). In
Macro programming you use the generic device holder (%D\).) If you follow our GE
conventions additional identifiers include: a logic signal pin name is expected to start
with L, control constant pin names have a K somewhere in the first three characters of the
signal name and pin names for variable signals do not start with L or K.
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With the point named, click OK. You are left with the cursor on the new (red-lettered)
pin.

Double-click on this pin to complete the configuration. This brings up the Edit Module
dialog box.

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The text windows / configuration items of this dialog should be configured accordingly:
Text box (A on the graphic): This is the description that appears in the Notebar
(lower left of the toolbox screen) when the signal is selected.
Type: drop-down scroll is self-explanatory
Scale: drop-down scroll is self-explanatory
Control Constant: select TRUE for a control constant signal / pin, FALSE for almost
everything else, READ for signal that is a setpoint to be read from an operator input
Initial Value setting is for control constants to assign their value
Selection boxes (B): select if you want the signal / pin associated with the specific
purpose / function.
Connection: dont worry about this, it is for macro pins (not part of this discussion).
Click Ok and the pin has been assigned and configured. Validate, (Instance, if
applicable. You will need to validate again if you Instance). Build the file, download to
the panel and save the file. Done.

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Mk VI
Procedural Notes
Macro / Instance / Exception / Inline Programs
As you know, the difference in the two methods is where the programming is done. As
might be expected, the Macro / Instance method requires programming in the Macro
section of the .m6b file and then Instance the change into the Function section (attaching
all of the signals / pins to the device (G1 in this example). The Exception / Inline method
has the programming done at the Function level where you attach the device to the
signals / pins during the editing. (Another procedure discusses some of these items.)
If editing of the Mk VI controller file (the .m6b file) is considered it is vital that there is
an understanding of the difference between the two types of programming possible. The
two types:
Macro (also referred to as Instance).
Exception (also referred to as Inline).
An understanding of these two methods is crucial so as to know where changes are made.
There is a visual identifier for the program method used.

B
A

Figure 1

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Item A in Figure 1 shows the Macro program identifier (the colon : in the module name).
Note that this identifier is at the Module level inside of the Functions. The screen shot
also shows the mechanism for changing the program method to Exception. Double-click
on the specific module (Privilege level 2) for the Edit Module dialogue box. Check box
B on this window, click OK and the module is now Exception / Inline programming.
This program method is identified with the @ symbol in the place of the colon (:) symbol
as shown on Figure 2.

Figure 2

The module is now open for editing. In this example we will add some sequencing
steps after block 55 (_meng_f). The first thing we do is click on the location where the
addition or edit will be made. Right-button select the Insert Next choice. At that point a
new dialog box - Select Block Type - will open (Figure 3). Notice 57 in the Number box.
This is an automatic placement in the program based on our choice of where to insert the
addition. The block selection is split into two categories Blocks and Macros. As you are
aware, the blocks are the standard program components and the macros are the special
program components that may have been developed at site or by GE (Salem) specifically
for turbine application. What this means is that you need to have an idea of what you
want to program before you begin programming.

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Figure 3

The first element we wish to add is a comment about what it is we are adding. That takes
the form of a comment block (duh). The next part is far from a duh, though. The
comment block is found in the block section under the pseudo control elements. To
find this, scroll down in the Blocks Categories window to the PseudoControl section. As
Figure 4 shows, with a category selected, the other window in the Blocks section
identifies the library source for the element and your choices within this category.

Figure 4

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Notice also that there is a Note box in the lower portion of this window. It offers some
details of the particular element selected in the window. With the desired element
selected in that second window (under the Library: SBLIB header in Figure 4) click on
OK and that element is inserted into the sequencing.
We could go back to edit this element and admire our craftsmanship but were
professionals and were going to keeping marching toward our ultimate goal (getting the
job done, right?). So, we will immediately add the rest of the program elements we want
for our little modification. Do this by right button clicking on the newest element we just
added (#57, remember? Come on, try to stay with me here kay?). Select Insert Next as
we have done previous and continue adding elements. This time well add a logic block
(called a Boolean engine, B_ENG). (Figure 5.)

Figure 5

With this element selected click OK. We now see the result of these two inserts in Figure
6.
The two elements are identified with the A and B characters (A: comment block 57,
B: logic block). Note the correlation between the Summary view graphic and the
placement in the Outline view. The next step will be to edit these elements for the needs
of the sequencing. To initiate this editing mode double-click on the element that needs to
be changed. (This double-click can be done on either the Summary view item or the
name of the element in the Outline view.)

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Figure 6

We now have an edit window open (Edit Block Connections) for that element (Figure 7).

Figure 7

In Figure 7 block 57 (comment) was selected. In this case the only thing we are
interested in for this element is adding whatever comment it is we want inserted. (e.g.
The date of and reason for the addition, who did the edit, etc.) With the comment
complete click OK. The comment will appear on the Summary view as green lettering
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and the Outline view will add a blue note sheet to the left of the element. We will now
edit the logic block. Double click on that item and it will open an edit window for that
element. In the case of this logic sequence block the ladder-logic window opens
allowing us to draw the sequencing (Figure 8).

AA
CC

BB
DD

Figure 8

The logic sequence is drawn using the toolbar at the top of the screen (AA on Figure 8).
You would click on the element you want to use (an open contact) and then click on the
section of the block you want the open contact to be placed. It is not visible on this image
but there is a faint grid in the edit block so the elements are placed in accordance with
those grid sections. It is important to note that the rung must start in the upper left of the
element (CC) and must end in the upper right corner. The coil of this element is far to
the right (you would need to use the horizontal scroll bar to view / name it). Once the
logic rung has been configured (drawn), as you require you can then go back and name
the contacts. Click on the arrow icon (BB) this is the selection tool and double click
on the contact you want to name. (You can also name the contacts by just doubleclicking on them as you place them; as with many programming systems there is usually
more than one way to do something.) In this screen shot I have clicked on the first
contact (it has turned blue) and the connect contact pop-up has appeared (DD). This
pop-up will allow me to select a pin (signal name) for this contact. To simplify this
documentation we will assume that the signal name has already been configured (as
documented in the create pin procedure).
There are three ways to assign a signal to the contact: selection of the Signal button,
Block Pin button, or Module Pin button (see Figure 9).

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Figure 9

Signal selection offers every defined pin in the .m6b application (Figure 10). Module pin
selection offers only the defined pins for that Module of the program (Figure 11) and
Block pin selection offers only the pins for that Task of the program (Figure 12).

Figure 10

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Figure 11

Figure 12

You will select the appropriate method of assigning a connection to the contact and
continue with the remainder of your programming. When you are done, click OK to close
out of the Block editor program. You should have something similar to Figure 13.

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Figure 13

Because the code we have just programmed has not been compiled and downloaded the
new signal G1\Laa of Figure 13 is shown with the ****. Once all of your programming is
complete that is the next step: Validate, Build (compile) and Download (see note below).
NOTE: If you have added points to the EGD network in this program you will need to do
a Put and a Get with your SDB before doing a Build and Download.

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TRIP HISTORY
This procedure document will detail the functionality of the Mk VI Toolbox feature, Trip
History.
Briefly, the Trip History feature of Toolbox offers a way to archive and capture specific
data samples on a turbine trip. Analyzed properly, this data might offer some insight into
the cause of the turbine trip. The data is reviewed graphically, using the Trender feature
of Toolbox.
The trip history data is recorded through capture block program elements. This block
may be placed anywhere in the sequencing code but are, typically, placed at the end of
the program in again typically a Function group with a name somewhat similar to the
phrase trip history (i.e. Trp_Hist, TRP_HST, etc.)(arrow on screen shot). Inside this
function are the modules that contain the Trip History capture blocks (arrow on screen
shot). As the following screen shot shows, you must drill down to see the actual
blocks.

You can use the Toolbox help file on this capture block to review its features. Briefly,
each block is configurable to a maximum of 32 points and a .m6b program file may be
configured with a maximum of 200 capture blocks (6400 data points total).
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Click on one of the capture block elements (A on the following screen shot). Well now
review the components of the capture block on this next screen shot.

F
B
G

Arrow B points to one of the 32 data points configured for this block. In this example the
signal DWATT has been assigned to #2 point. Arrow C is identified as the status but it is
really the name of the data file for this block. This is the name (TH1 in this case) that
we will request when we want to upload the data of these 32 points. Arrow D is the
name of the signal that triggers the data capture for this block. In our trip history
configuration, all of the blocks will trigger on the same signal (L4T). Arrow E indicates
the signal that is used to enable the beginning of a new round of data collection. This
enabling signal begins the process that overwrites the old data. Arrow F identifies the
control constant that establishes the number of data samples that will be recorded for
each of the configured data points. (In this example, if SAMPLES is set to 5000 there
would be 5000 values for DWATT, 5000 samples for CPD, etc.) Arrow G identifies the
amount of these total samples that will be recorded as pre-trigger data. (In this case it is
the number of data samples leading up to the turbine trip.) The larger this number is,
within the limit established by the SAMPLES setting, the more information you will have
on the possible cause of the trip. There are more points to be made on the configuration
of this block but this is a procedural document not a definitive explanation of all features.

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If you want to know something more like sample rate or whatever, use the help file and
look the stuff up for yourself; dont be so darn lazy.
When the trip occurs this block automatically stores this information in a panel controller
RAM buffer. To review this data we need to use another Toolbox feature, Trender. It is
not the purpose of this procedure to discuss the use of Trender outside of its application
with a capture block (so dont whine about not knowing how to do it, thats documented
somewhere else.)

As you are well aware, you can launch Trender a number of different ways (2
immediately come to mind I am sure). One possible way is, from the Toolbox menu bar,
click on VIEW and select Trend Recorder (easy, huh?). Refer to the following screen
shot.
Dont panic if what you have is not what is displayed here (ease up on the coffee maybe,
huh?). We need to configure this trend for use as a capture block data display. To do this
click on the Wrench icon (indicated by the arrow). This pops up the configuration
window. Select the Block Collected Trend Type option. This configuration window then
changes to the type shown in the next screen shot (isnt this fun?).

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1

The first thing you may have to do is link this trend to the correct controller device
(Arrow 1). If you have multiple units to work with you will have to select the correct
device (if you dont know what this is, you need to come back to class for a refresher).
To select the correct device click on the Change button in Block Collector Device
section. With the correct device identified as shown here, we now need to select the
capture block we want the data for. This is the signal name identified as arrow C on a
previous screen shot. To select the appropriate Capture Buffer (Arrow 2) either type the
correct name in the window or select Browse and select from the list (this is the
recommended method since youll probably screw up the type-in method and then try to
blame me with some lame excuse like bad instructions). With the configuration
configured correctly click on OK.
If done correctly, you should now be back at the trend screen and data points should have
pulled into the window at the bottom of the screen but you probably dont have any data
displayed on the trend plot. Notice the red up-arrow in the icon toolbar at the bottom of
the trend screen. This is the data upload which is a request to the controller to data dump
the RAM buffer to this plot. Click on this icon. You should now have data on your plot
as shown in this final screen shot.

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You will repeat the Trender configuration process for each of the data capture blocks you
have configured in the .m6b file. There is no way at this time (that does not imply that
there ever will be, either) to display, on one trend plot multiple capture blocks of data.
Oh, by the way, were done with this.

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SDB EXCHANGE
SDB Exchange replaces the SDB Utilities for populating the Cimplicity Project with
points / signals from Toolbox.
SDB Exchange is launched from:
Start / Programs / GE Control System Solutions / SDB Exchange / SDB Exchange

You will need to either load an existing project exchange file or create a new one.
If you are selecting an existing exchange file you will not get the message of Step 1 and
may skip the set up of Steps 2 to 8, jumping direct to Step 9.

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To create a new file:
1. Click on New File and select SdbExchange HMI. (Cause youre working with the
HMI, sheesh.) You will get a message that the project file (.gef) does not exist.
Okay the dialog box.

Select this one

2. Once the raw file is open we will now set it up as a working file. Select File and
Save As. Name the file the same as the Cimplicity project file. This file will end with
a different extension (.xhm) than the Cimplicity Project file (.gef). (i.e. project file is
stevie.gef, you will name the exchange file stevie.xhm)
3. With the new file saved, expand the Project section. Double click on the Project
name item and change the project name (it will default to SdbExch#) to your
Cimplicity project name and browse to the correct data location. (This will typically
be Site \ Cimproj.)

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4. Expand the HMI Net Info section. You will enter the Device Name that will serve as
the host for the Cimplicity Project. This is typically the HMI you are working on but
may not be if you are working on a network that utilizes a HMI server setup.
Whatever the case, the name entered has to also be listed in the Host file (in Winnt /
System32 / Drivers / Etc). The TCP/IP address is the one for the Device youve just
listed.

5. Double click on the HMI Net Connections. You will fill in the info required. The
Net Name is the name of the EGD network as list in Toolbox (i.e. EGD1). Select the
correct network type from the drop down menu (typically EGD).

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6. Double click on the SDB Server item. The server is the device name of the box
(HMI) that hosts the SDB. (Typically, it will be the computer you are on but if you
have a server network use the name of that server and ensure that name is crossreferenced in the Host file with its TCP/IP address.) Name is the path to that SDB
and its name (that was created in Toolbox). (Typically, the name is SDB and its path
is directly off the drive but may be inside the Site folder. All that said, the SDB can
be placed anywhere on the computer (or the Network) you just have to direct the file
to that location with this path information.)

7. Options are just that, not necessary for the function of this exchange.

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8. Resources: double click and select the resource that is appropriate for your Cimplicity
and Toolbox projects. As soon as you direct this exchange to the proper SDB
location the file has a listing of the resources that are available. If the list of
resources here doesnt agree with the resources of the Cimplicity project (youll know
that when you run the exchange) you may have selected wrong here or the Toolbox
file has to have other resources listed for it. (That is done in Toolbox with the System
Information file and loading it (a PUT) into the SDB.) For more on troubleshooting
this see the Appendix.

9. With the file now configured you can now GET the information from the SDB and
insert it into this Cimplicity project. This is done by selection from the Menu bar
selection item Tools.

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10. The Tools selection allows a choice of GET for points, etc. You will typically
select the Points option and GET the information by resource and by device.

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11. The log view window at the bottom of the screen display should update with the
status of the information transfer.

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APPENDIX
Troubleshooting the lack of a resource (Step 8):
If the Exchange does not list the proper resource that is because the database (SDB) does
not have the resource inside of it. You may verify that by using the SDB browser of
Toolbox or from the GE Control System Solutions (sort of in the same area as where you
found the SDB Exchange). These details are not listed here.
To get the proper resource inserted into the SDB (expanding on the brief note in Step 8):
a.)
The resource is inserted into the SDB from the system information file. (Typically
the system information file is named sys#.syb, where # is a number but it may
have any name you wish. The important part of the name and the defining
property of the file is the .syb file extension.) If this file exists you will open it
in Toolbox and step through the steps that follow here. If it does not exist you
have bigger problems than can be addressed in this SDB Exchange procedure. In
fact, I am not sure how you even managed to have a working SDB without a
resource file.
b.)
So you have found the resource file and it is now open in Toolbox. You are
looking at a file that has sys# in the uppermost position of the Outline view
(where the device is in the .m6b file). There is a category identified as Type
Definitions. Under it is the group Resource. Select Resource. The summary
view (the gray banner table) should now identify the resources attached to this file
(in the Enum Name column). If the resource you need is listed there you are
forgetful but in good shape. Meet us at the step e. If the resource is not there,
that is the reason SDB Exchange cant find it, huh? So, we now need to get it
attached to this file.
c.)
Double click on Resource. A Type Definition window opens with the name
Resource. This is good. Lower in this open window is a field group with the
label Enumeration definition. This is where we want to make our changes. (A
lot of neophytes will end up making the change to the name section (the
Resource). This is bad, wrong and not going to work so dont do it, kay?) In the
Enumeration definition section, click on the Value name box and type in the
resource you need (for instance, G1). In the Value box under this Value name
box there is a number, probably 0. Notice also, that there is probably already a
resource list on the right side of this window (Default [0]). That means the
Default resource (meaningless) is the value 0. If you are going to leave the
default resource in the file then you are going to have to change the value of this
new resource you are about to insert. In that case, click on the Value box and
change the 0 to 1 (or whatever). Then click on the Add-> button. If you dont
want the default resource in the file then dont change the value of your new
resource, just click on the Add button. In either case you will now be staring at
the right window with two resources listed (Default [0] and G1 [n]). G1 is the
resource I offer as an example, you will insert whatever resource it is you need.
The n character is the number of the value you typed in the value box previous.
You do not want two resources with the same value so, if your default has the
same number as your new, valid resource youse gots to rid your poor self of it.

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d.)
e.)

f.)
g.)
h.)

i.)

j.)

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Click on the default resource in this right hand box. It will now be highlighted.
Click on the Remove button. Bobs your uncle (that means youre doing good).
The file has been changed (the device Sys# - is red lettered) and we need to
validate this change. Click on the device in the Outline view and select the check
mark icon on the Tool bar. Save the file. (Click on the disk icon on the Tool bar.)
Put this file into the SDB. Make sure that you have selected the sys# in the
Outline view. Click on Device in the Menu bar. Select Put into Database. A
confirmation window pops up. Ensure that the location for the SDB in this
confirmation is correct. If it is, click OK. Go to step 6. If the location is not
correct, cancel this action, select Options (Menu bar), Settings and the Database
tab. In the Server Name and Path/Name boxes enter the correct information and
click OK. Then repeat this step (step e).
Ensure that the download is successful (information in the Log view).
Close out of this resource file (save the file if asked).
Open up the applicable .m6b file and expand the Hardware and I/O Definitions
section of the Outline view. Select the EGD1 category and expand it. Click on
the first page (for example, EXCH1). The Summary view should list all of the
points tagged to this page. Pay attention to the Cimplicity Resource column. You
want to confirm that all of the points that should be tagged to that Cimplicity
resource you just inserted are, in fact, attached to it. Any that are not must be
edited to add that resource (not a subject of this procedure).
With all points resource confirmed, select the device (e.g. top of the Outline
view, G1), validate if applicable and then perform a Put and a Get. (Two separate
actions in that order, selected from the Device Menu bar option.) After the Get
you will have to do another validate and save of the file.
Return to the SDB Exchange and repeat from step 8. You should be good to go.

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HMI Device
GE has supplied another software tool to replace the SDB exchange. This tool is the HMI
Device file (hence the name of this document; see, things do make sense). The HMI
Device tool has been developed to serve a number of purposes. In addition to replacing
the SDB exchange tool (to transfer signal configuration information between the .m6b
file (the Toolbox file) and the .gef file (the Cimplicity file) there are a number of other
procedures fulfilled by the HMI Device.
In addition to the import of signals into the Cimplicity project the HMI Device tool also
updates the following components:
HOST file for the Windows operating system
Cleans unnecessary (i.e. old / unused) signals out of the SDB
Builds (writes) new / updated SOE.dat file in the appropriate UNITn folder.
Builds (writes) new / updated Alarm.dat file in the appropriate UNITn folder.
Builds (writes) new / updated Hold.dat file in the appropriate UNITn folder.
Builds (writes) new / updated Unit_EGD.dat file in the appropriate UNITn folder.
Builds (writes) new / updated ENETALM.dat file in the Site folder.
Builds new memory map files (Unitdata.dat / Unit.dd)
Some of these updates are of significance only for the commissioning engineers and of
little importance to owners of this equipment. With that qualification, these file updates
will save additional manual file editing and reduce the chance for a change to slip
through the cracks due to an oversight. All of the .dat file updates will insert new
changes as appropriate. For example, if you changed an alarm description in the Toolbox
file (the description of the alarm signal is expected to also be the alarm message) you
would have to manually edit the Alarm.dat file for that appropriate alarm message. The
HMI Device now eliminates this requirement. The program takes the information from
the .m6b file (through the SDB) and edits the Alarm.dat file. In updating the Alarm.dat
file it writes that new description into the alarm message field for that alarm.
The resource file for this tool is identified with the extension .hmb and should be located
in the F drive. The file may be inside a HMB folder on that F drive (see Figure 1 for
reference). If you do not have the .hmb file you will have to use the SDB exchange
procedure documented elsewhere.

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Figure 1: Location and identification of HMI Device configuration file.

The use of the tool is simple provided that the configuration file (the .hmb file) has been
set up properly. The assumption of the procedure documented here is that the file is
functional and correct. There is no intention of this procedure to develop a functioning
.hmb file. Another assumption of this document is that there is an existing, accurate and
functional SDB and Toolbox is setup to access this resource. This should be the case for
the standard GE-commissioned site. If this is not the case please refer to the procedure
document on working with the SDB.
With this understanding, the first thing to do is to open the file in Toolbox. You may do
this by double-clicking on the file (xxx.hmb) in Explorer (as in Figure 1) or open
Toolbox and then open the .hmb file the conventional Windows method (with file open,
etc.). In any case, with the HMI Device file open in Toolbox you should have something
that looks similar to Figure 2.

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LOGVIEW

Figure 2: HMI Device configuration file open in Toolbox

Figure 2 has highlighted a couple of areas relevant to the current description. The
Logview is the same as in any Toolbox file (the location for program progress reports).
The red box in Figure 2 is to highlight an area of the toolbar that is expanded in Figure 3.

Figure 3: Toolbar icons for HMI Device configuration tool.

The three icons identified in Figure 3 are the action buttons for the update activities. The
circled icon is the Put action button. This is the same Put action described in the SDB
section of this course. The Put sends file / data information into the SDB. The A icon
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is the Get action button. This brings information from the SDB into the HMI Device
configuration file. The red-boxed icon is the build action button. When the build icon is
selected the HMI Device tool performs all of the file updates as described previously.
With the .hmb file open in Toolbox (as shown in Figure 2) you will now select the Put
icon. You will receive a progress report in the Logview window indicating the success of
this action (Figure 4).

Figure 4: Logview report of Put action by the HMI device.

With this successfully complete now perform a Get. You will receive a progress report
in the Logview as to the success of this action (Figure 5). Note that the file has been
highlighted in red (just as with any other Toolbox Get). With a successful Get you
may now Validate the file (the checkmark icon in Figure 3). A successful validation will
remove the red highlight from the file.

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Figure 5: The results of a Get action in the HMI Device.

The next step is to Build the device. This will send all of the applicable signal
configuration information from the SDB into the Cimplicity project and update the files
as identified earlier (the Hosts files, alarm.dat, etc.) To build, you will click on the
hammer icon as shown in Figure 3. The results of this build will be reported in the
Logview as shown in Figures 6 and 7.

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Figure 6: Results of the Build action.

Figure 7: Details of the Build action of Figure 6. Note the various files that are updated.

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This completes the steps for updating all of the peripheral files associated with the
Toolbox file. The Cimplicity project will need to be stopped and the configuration
updated. Start the project again and Cimplicity signal points will reflect the .m6b points
configuration.

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Mk VI
Alarm Trace Procedure
This procedure is provided as a guide to working your way through the files and software
tools of the Mk VI technology. Due to the nature of turbine control sequencing software
and turbine alarms this procedure will not be inclusive of all alarms or situations. There is
the hope that this guide will serve as a reminder of troubleshooting procedures taught in
the training class but there is no guarantee since you probably slept through that part (if
you even bothered to show up that day).
The alarm troubleshooting process will start with the alarm message that appears on the
operator interface (HMI):

Figure 1: Operator interface (the HMI). Alarm window highlighted.

Clicking on the red Alarms icon of the alarm window will produce an alarm window
pop-up as in Figure 2.

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Figure 2: Alarm window pop-up.

Note the difference in the way the alarms are presented here. The State column of the
window identifies if the alarm condition still exists (ALARM) or if the condition has
cleared (NORMAL). Typically, you will only be interested in the active alarm states. The
ACK column identifies if the alarm has been acknowledged; N: alarm has not been
acknowledged, Y: alarm has been acknowledged. The coloring of the alarms themselves
also indicate states; red / white indicates an active alarm; black lettering indicates an
alarm condition that has cleared. If the alarm field is red lettering with white background
the alarm has been acknowledged, if that coloring is reversed (red lettering, white
background) the alarm has not been acknowledged. If an individual alarm has been
selected it is highlighted with the blue field. There is no assurance that your site alarm
window will follow the same conventions but they will be similar.
Note the Unit column. This identifies which turbine has the alarm condition. This twocharacter identifier is important in knowing where to find the necessary files for this
process.
Finally, note the Alarm ID column. This is important, as this identifier is your key into
the software of the MK VI as shown in the following figures.

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Figure 3: Close-up of alarm screen. Two alarms to note: P48 and P467.

Procedure
1.) Note The Alarm Number (drop number, Alarm ID) and unit identifier.
As shown in Figure 3 this is alarm # 467 on unit G1.
2.) Open controller file (m6b) in Toolbox
This can be done any of a number of ways. The one shown here is to use the
desktop shortcut. Alternately, you can launch it from within Explorer as shown in
Figure 5.

Figure 4: Launching Toolbox controller file

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Figure 5: Files and folders that contain the controller file

Figure 6: Controller file open in Toolbox. File is on-line and equal.

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3.) With the .m6b file open in Toolbox, go online and ensure that the file is equal. If it is
not take appropriate actions to resolve this (discussed in other procedures). Only
troubleshoot alarms with files that are equal. See Figure 6.
4.) Open the alarm list (report) as shown in Figure 7. Note that if the alarm file / report is
already open you do not need to open it again. (Click on Window and select Alarm
Report as in Figure 8.)

Figure 7: Generating the alarm report

Figure 8: Viewing the alarm list report after it has been created.

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5.) (Reference Figure 9.) Look for the alarm you are dealing with. Typically this will be
done with the number that you noted in Step 1 or Figure 3. You may also do a text search
on the alarm message itself using the search tool of the report (the binocular icon).

Figure 9: Looking up the alarm of concern in the alarm report

6.) With the alarm located double-click on the signal and the report switches back into
the .m6b file (Figure 10) to begin the software trace of the alarm condition.

Finder

Figure 10: The alarm pin identified

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You will now follow this signal through the software using the Finder tool. Launch
Finder with the binocular icon on the toolbar as shown in Figure 10. In Finder (pin it to
the desktop first) you will select the Signal/Variable Usage tab. This window will
identify all the locations the signal is used. You want to follow the asterix (*). (See
Figure 11.)

!
Pi n I t

Figure 11: Finder (the search engine for Toolbox) and the signal that we will trace.

Note the various components of Finder if you are unfamiliar with it. You will click on the
asterix reference and then click on the middle icon of the toolbar (the one that has the ! in
Figure 11). This middle icon is the Go To trigger. You are now sent to the location
identified by the *. As you know, the * is the location of the source for the signal (in this
case the alarm) and this will identify the path of software signals that lead back to the
cause of the fault. Figure 12 shows the result of this action.

Figure 12: Alarm signal source, tracing back through the sequencing by "following" the Finder
asterix (*).

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You will now trace this fault condition back through the software, using that process of
following the asterix, reasoning your way through the sequencing. (In other words, you
are not blindly clicking and following asterix indications.) To expand upon this point
the following example is offered:
Alarm signal

Logic A

Logic
C

Logic
F

OR

OR

Logic D

Logic A

Logic
G

Logic
H

Logic B

Logic B

Logic C

Alarm signal
Logic
D

Logic
C
Logic
C

Logic G

Logic
E

+
OR

Logic
Log

Logic H

Figure 13: Example of alarm logic trace

In Figure 13 the alarm signal is the end result of logical considerations (such as low lube
oil pressure and the turbine is running). Let Logic A represent low pressure and Logic B
turbine running. The logical decision of low pressure may be consideration of measured
low pressure (Logic C) or a pump test (Logic D). The conclusion of measured low
pressure is the consideration of pressure switch input (Logic F) or the result of a
transmitter compared to a setpoint (Logic G) and confirmation that the transmitter is
healthy (Logic H). Tracing back through this logic flow is the point of this procedure
and avoiding the dead-ends and misleads is the art of this process. Within the context
of using the Toolbox tools in this example, we would click on signal A and find an
asterix reference. We would go to that reference and, after analysis of Logics C and D
conclude that C is our bad boy (a pump test, logic D, is not a control fault but an
operational decision). We would do a search on Logic C and the results would show the
coil reference in addition to the other two references that would list as normally open or
normally closed contacts. The contact references are identifying rungs (sequence steps)
that use that logic in reaching a conclusion about some situation. Generally, we are
interested in finding out what made that logic trigger (Logic C in this case) not what
things Logic C triggers. The location (reference) where Logic C is made is listed in the
search (Find) as an asterix. We go to that reference and analyze the logic considerations
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that go into deciding Logic C. In searches of Logics F, G and H we would find that there
are asterix references for G and H but not for F. This is significant and generally the
thing you are looking for in that it indicates a signal that is the result of an outside / real
world input and not the result of software sequencing. The fact that there is no asterix
means that Logic F is probably triggered by a field input. Preferentially, that is what
you are looking for; a sensor that is indicating a condition you are not aware of or has
fallen out of calibration, grounded out or in some other way failed.

In summary you will trace signals back through the software within the Toolbox file,
following asterix references, until you run into the signal that has only contact references,
no asterix, similar to Figure 14. This is the significant point referenced in the previous
paragraph. The lack of an asterix indicates that the software does not produce this
signal, only that it uses the signal in other processing. A signal needs to be produced by
something and, if not produced by the software, it has to be produced by an external
source (such as a field device). As you know from your understanding of the panel
hardware and signal flow, all field devices terminate through the Rack. Figure 14 shows
such a reference to the Rack.

Figure 14: Finder window with rack reference for fault source.

Select the rack reference and go to that location. At this point you will have access to
information similar to that shown in Figure 15. The actual form of this information will
vary with the version of Toolbox you are using. Earlier versions of Toolbox like that
shown in Figure 15 will require you to expand sections of the file to see the details of
that particular circuit. Newer versions of Toolbox place all of the pertinent information in
the Summary View, eliminating the need for any further searching (Figure 16).
At this point you have the information indicating the failed hardware and will take
whatever actions are indicated (calibration, replacement, etc.) to correct the situation.
You are done.
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Figure 15: Older Toolbox version I/O interface window.

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Figure 16: Newer Toolbox version of I/O interface documentation.

At this point you have identified the suspect hardware. Use field device troubleshooting
techniques (calibration, replacement, etc.) to correct the situation. Additional support
documents for this part of the process may include the Device Summary and P&ID /
piping schematics.

Additional notes:
To assist you in deciphering this sequencing Toolbox provides a description for each
signal as you click on it. As shown in Figure 15, when you click on a signal the note bar
at the lower left corner of Toolbox will describe the signal.

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Figure 17: Note section of Toolbox. Use this feature to assist in understanding the logic flow.

Some of these searches will trace through sequencing rungs similar to that shown in
Figure 17. Such coding will require an understanding of ladder logic and the GE update
system (green overlay for closed contact in a sequence rung).
Some of the sequencing will trace through blocks (algorithms) that will require additional
investigation techniques. The alarm-causing signal that comes out of such a block (as
shown in Figure 18) needs to be traced back to its source.
.

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Figure 18: An example of an alarm-generating signal coming from a program block.

This fault condition is not clearly identified from this documentation, requiring additional
steps. As shown in Figures 19 and 20 you will go to a Help screen for the element. The
menu selection for the Help screen is a right-button mouse click on the block title. As
evident in Figure 19 this right-button selection is not available for all elements (see
Figure 20 for an element that has a Help screen). When confronted with an element such
as in Figure 19 (no Help selection available) one possible solution is the following (as
identified in Figure 19).

1
2

Figure 19: Locating the Help screen for a program element (step 1).

Item 1 in Figure 19 shows that there is no Help screen available. When confronted with
this try to expand the element in the outline view (item 2 in Figure 19). Expand the
element by clicking on the + next to the placeholder (the number). If allowed, the
element will expand in the outline view (similar to element 170 in Figure 19). Scroll
down through this expansion to the BLOCKS section (see Figure 20 item A) and click on
this. The summary view will display the components making up this element.

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Figure 20: Program element (Block) expanded or opened for Help screen selection.

Note in Figure 19 there is a signal (L86TXT) circled. This signal is Item B in Figure 20
and the signal that we are tracing. We need to understand the mechanism or calculation
that goes into determining this signals state. To do this we will right-button select Item
Help on the block title as shown in Figure 20. An additional window opens as in Figure
21.

Figure 21: Help screen for element identified in Figure 20.

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With your understanding of logic elements you will then decipher the algorithm that
determines the state of the signal of concern.

Note that on some elements, when you select the BLOCK (item A in Figure 20), you will
encounter sequencing logic similar to that in Figure 17. In such a case you will not have
to employ the Help screen as described above. Good luck and may the Force be with you,
Luke.

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