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Emergent Guided Reading (Text Levels A C)

Grandpa by Alison Hawes

RL.1.1 Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.


RF.1.2.d Segment spoken single-syllable words into their complete sequence of individual sounds
(phonemes).
RF.1.3.b Decode regularly spelled one-syllable words.
RF.1.3.g Recognize and read grade-appropriate irregularly spelled words.
RF.1.4. Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.
W.1.8 With guidance and support from adults, recall information from experiences or gather
information from provided sources to answer a question.
SL.1.1 Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 1 topics and texts
with peers and adults in small and larger groups.

Students will be able to demonstrate one to one match by pointing to each word while reading with
100% accuracy.
Students will be able to write fluently the new sight word (you) with 100% accuracy.
Students will be able to write the phonics feature st when provided the target orally 3 out of 4 times.
At the very beginning of the lesson (before the sight word review), I will say, Today we are
going to be practicing some spelling words that you have already learned. The words you will practice
are going to show up in the book we are going to read today. After we read the book, we are going to
practice doing something that I have seen all of you do before-point to words as you read. Then we are
going to learn a new word part that sounds like /st/ by sorting words. All of you have done a sort with
me before, but well go over how to do it again in case you forgot. Are you ready to begin?

Sight Word Review Writing

Student
J

put, his, get


Write _________.
Check it with your finger (st. runs finger under word while saying word).
Are you right?

Whats Missing
Mix & Fix Check it with your finger.
word after making it.

o
o

Table Writing
Whiteboards

Student
S

put
his
get

Teach 1 New Sight Word you


o

Student
L

Student Student Student


J
L
S
Be sure student reads the

Wrote
you
fluently
with
100%
accuracy?

Introduction of New Book


Gyst Statement: This book is about a boy named Ross
who put his stuff down at a carnival. His grandpa helps
him get on carnival rides. Lets read to find out what
Ross put down.
New Vocabulary: down Lets turn to page 2 and look at
a tricky word. This word is down. What word am I
pointing to?
Predicts and Locates: PL pg. 10 bear, PL pg. 14 up
What would you expect to see at the beginning of the word ________?
Find _______.

Text Reading With Prompting


o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o

Check the picture. Would that make sense?


(meaning)
Get your mouth ready (pointing to initial letter).
(using visual cues first letter)
Does that make sense and look right? (cross
checking)
It could be _______ or it could be _________?
(using visual cues first letter)
Show me the word ___________. (using known
words)
Check the word with your finger. Does it look right?
(using visual cues)
Try reading without pointing with your finger.
(fluency)
How would the character say that? (expression)
Other:

Teaching Points After The Reading


(based on what students need during text reading)
o 1 to 1 matching (discourage pointing when 1:1 solid)
o Use picture cues.
o Monitor with known words.
o Et mouth ready for initial sound
o Cross-Check Picture and first letter (students read
page chorally while teacher covers picture).
o Visual Scanning (Show st. how to run finger under
word while saying it. Did you see the _D__ when
you said /d/__?
o Expression
o Other:

Discussion Prompt
How did Grandpa help Ross? How has someone helped
you?

Student Student Student


J
L
S
1-1
match on
pg 8 with
100%
accuracy?

Word Study (Choose Just 1)


o
o
o
o

Picture Sorts:____________________________
Making Words:___________________________
Sound Boxes:_____________________________
Other: __teacher directed closed writing sort__

Feature: st

stop

sit

step
stag
stat
stab

sat
set
sad
sip

Student
J

Student
L

Student
S

# of
times st
was
written
correctly

This lesson fits the needs of the three students in Guided Reading level C. The sight word
knowledge table (attached to the lesson) shows what sight words each student knows. The three sight
word review words (put, his, get) were chosen because they all appear in the book. By looking at the
sight word knowledge table, you can see that all three students know all three words. Therefore, they
make for good review words. I chose the new sight word you because the word you appears on almost
every page of the book Grandpa. The sight word knowledge table shows that none of the three students
know the sight word you, so it is a good target to teach. The teaching point after the reading is going to
be one to one match because the running records taken during the week of March 9 show that all three
students need to work on one to one match.
The target feature in the word study section of the lesson is st because the Primary Spelling
Inventory data (attached to the lesson) shows that all three students are in the middle letter name
developmental stage. Students in this stage should be learning about beginning consonants, digraphs
and blends, short vowel families, and the CVC syllable pattern (Bear, Negrete, & Cathey, 2012). All three
students showed that they know initial and final consonant sounds and short vowels. They all began to
struggle when asked to write words that contain blends and digraphs. Since blends are easier to learn
than digraphs because both sounds can be heard in blends, I decided that the next target feature should
be a blend. I chose the feature st because the Letter Sound Checklist shows that all three students know
the sounds of S and T. Additionally, the Primary Spelling Inventory data shows that none of the three
students have learned the st blend yet, making it a good teaching target.
4 whiteboards, 4 dry erase
markers and erasers, 3 sets of magnetic
letters (only need letters y, o, and u),
alphabet chart, and 4 copies of book
Grandpa by Alison Hawes

The academic language target will be match. The teaching point after the reading is one to one
matching. For the teaching point after the reading, I will say to the students, I noticed when you were
reading you pointed to the words. Make sure that your finger matches the word you are reading. Your
finger matches the word you are reading when you say a word and point to that word as you say it.
Watch me. I will then flip to page 4 in the book Grandpa and demonstrate one to one match while
reading the page aloud. At the end of the page I will say, Did you see how when I said the word
Grandpa I was pointing to the word Grandpa? That is making my finger match the word. Now watch me
this time and tell me whether I matched my finger to the words as I read. I will then demonstrate
incorrect one to one matching, where I have an extra word at the end of the page. I will ask the
students, Was that correct? Why or why not? Their answer will let me know whether or not they
understand the academic language target.
I will then tell the students, Turn to page 6 and read the page aloud while making your finger
match the words. This is their guided practice time, and I will use this time as my formative assessment.
If I see a student struggling, I will take notes in the observation portion of the lesson plan next to
teaching points after the reading. Finally, after they complete the guided practice, I will say, Turn to
page 8. When I point to you, I want you to read the page aloud and make your finger match the words
as you read. This is the summative assessment.

As I mentioned above, my formative assessment will be the guided practice when students turn
to page 6 and read the page aloud while demonstrating one to one matching. During this time, I will
help students that are struggling. One way students may struggle is by making up a word and having
their finger land on white space at the end of the page. If this happens, I will say, Did you have enough
words? I will watch them try again. Usually they will self-correct. If they do not self-correct, I will say,
Read it again. Point while you read, and I will point too. I will stop pointing if they make an error to
show them where they made the mistake. Another way students may struggle is by skipping a word and
having a word at the end of the sentence that they have not yet pointed to. If this happens, I will say,
Did that match? Assuming they say no, I will watch them try again. If they do not self-correct, I will
point with them, stopping where they make the error. If that still does not work, I will use hand over
hand to correct them.

I will wrap up the lesson by saying, Today we learned that it is important to match your finger
to each word as you read. Can someone tell me what it means to match your finger to each word? They
will hopefully answer with something like, When you say a word, you point to the word. If the
students answer correctly, I will know that they understand the academic language target. I will then
say, Good. Its important to match your finger to each word while you read so that you dont skip
words or add words to the page. You also did a sort today with the sound /st/. Now you know new
words that you can use in your journals, like stop and step. Nice work today! You may go back to centers
now.

Student S may need additional support with the writing sort because she has a speech and
language learning disability. Student S struggles with keeping her handwriting neat and reasonably sized.

She also struggles with letter formation. She typically makes several letter reversals when she writes, so
to support her learning, I will give her an alphabet chart so that she can make sure she is writing the
letters correctly. In order to help her handwriting stay a decent size, I will write lines on her whiteboard
so that she knows where I want her to write each word during the writing sort.

See the second paragraph under Academic Language for a description of the formative
assessment on one to one matching. All observational notes during the lesson (written on the
observation portion of the lesson plan template) serve as a formative assessment. See the last few
sentences under Academic Language for a description of the summative assessment on one to one
matching. The criteria that demonstrates learning for the summative assessment on one to one
matching is the learning objective that says students will be able to demonstrate one to one match by
pointing to each word while reading with 100% accuracy. The summative assessment for the learning of
the new sight word you is the students writing the word on a whiteboard. If students write the word you
on the whiteboard fluently with 100% accuracy, they have demonstrated that they learned the word.
The summative assessment for the phonics feature st is writing the feature st when given a word that
contains st orally. To demonstrate learning, students must write the feature 3 out of 4 times.

Bear, D. R., Negrete, S., & Cathey, S. (2012). Developmental Literacy Instruction with Struggling Readers
Across Three Stages. New England Reading Association Journal, 48(1), 1-9.

Commentaries for Emergent Guided Reading Level C Lesson Plan


Since the lesson plan contains three objectives, there are three sets of summative assessment
data. The first objective is that students will be able to demonstrate one to one match by pointing to
each word while reading with 100% accuracy. The summative assessment was for students to turn to
page 8 and read the page aloud while making their finger match the words as they read. If students
were able to read the page and point to each word with 100% accuracy, they met the objective. The
table next to the heading Teaching Points After the Reading (on the lesson plan template) shows that all
three students were able to demonstrate 1-1 matching on page 8 with 100% accuracy. The notes above
that table indicate the formative assessment data when the students read page 6 using 1-1 matching to
practice the concept. The note says that no help was needed by any students during the formative
assessment. Both the formative and the summative assessment data for objective 1 show that all three
students understand 1-1 matching very well. Since nobody had any trouble, it is possible that there is a
need for a greater challenge. Because page 8 (the page of the summative assessment) contained
multiple lines of text and still nobody struggled with 1-1 match, it is likely that the students are ready to
move onto reading without pointing.
The second objective of the lesson is for students to be able to write the new sight word (you)
fluently with 100% accuracy. The table next to the heading Teach 1 New Sight Word (on the lesson plan
template) shows that all three students were able to write the sight word you fluently with 100%
accuracy. This shows that the students learned the sight word. Because the word appeared in the book
Grandpa, and there are no notes on the lesson template that say a student struggled with reading the
word you, this lesson not only helped students learn to write the new word, but it also helped them to
be able to read it in the context of a book.
The third and final objective of the lesson is for students to write the phonics feature st when
provided the target orally 3 out of 4 times. The table next to the heading Word Study (on the lesson plan
template) shows that Student J wrote the feature st correctly 4 times while Student L and Student S
wrote the feature correctly 3 times. Because all three of them met the objective, they have shown that
they learned the blend st. My notes show that Student S incorrectly sorted the word sit into the stop
column. This shows that she may still struggle a little bit in hearing the difference between /st/ and /s/
at the beginning of words. My notes also indicate that she made several spelling errors during the
writing sort. These misspellings include ststp for stab, stait for stat, and stup for step. Because she was
able to write st correctly and the purpose of the lesson was not to spell the entire word correctly, it did
not impact her ability to meet the objective. However, it is good to note that she may need work on
hearing medial and final sounds in CVC words. Considering all three objectives and sets of summative
assessment data, the students benefitted from this lesson and met all three objectives.

In the teaching points after the reading, I asked the students to watch me as I read. After
reading and matching my finger to the words correctly, I asked them if I my finger matched the words.

They all said yes. When I demonstrated incorrect 1-1 matching and asked them if I was correct, they all
answered no. When I asked them why I wasnt correct, Student L told me I was wrong because I had an
extra word at the end that I hadnt pointed to. In the closing moves of the lesson, I asked the students
what it means to match your finger to the words. Student S answered, It means you read what is
written on the page. You point to the word you are reading. These answers all prove that the students
have grasped the concept of what it means to make it match. Now, every time my CT or I tells the
students to make their fingers match the page, they will know what is expected of them.

I realized as I was teaching the sight word review that I was forgetting to have them check the
word with their finger. This realization occurred when I told them to write the word get. At least I
remembered in time to have them check the word get with their finger. This is a vital prompt to give
because it allows them to visually analyze the word and make sure they spelled it correctly. By checking
the word with their finger, it will help them memorize the way it is spelled. If I were to teach this lesson
again, I would write down this prompt in big letters and highlight it so it wont be forgotten.
During the formative assessment of 1-1 match where I had each student individually read a page
to me while pointing, I realized that the other two students should have something to keep them
occupied while they are waiting for their turn. On the spot I thought that it would be helpful to do some
more mix and fix work with the sight word you since the magnetic letters were still in front of them. This
kept the students occupied in a meaningful way, and it saved me trouble of keeping the other two
students behaving while I worked with a student one on one.