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Welcome to Wonderland: Lessons on Alice in Wonderland

Grade Level:
Written by:
Length of Unit:

Third grade
Tricia Williford, Lincoln Academy, Arvada, CO
Ten lessons (approximately three weeks or 15 days, one day = 45-60 minutes)

I.

ABSTRACT
Welcome to Wonderland! Take your students on an exciting adventure as you go on an in-depth
walk through Lewis Carrolls Alice in Wonderland. They too will wish to follow the White
Rabbit down a hole into a nonsensical underworld where anything can happenand most often
does! Introduce your students to enchanting characters, let them observe Alices magical events,
and let them fall in love with this classic, timeless fairy tale.

II.

OVERVIEW
A.
Concept Objectives
1.
Students will demonstrate knowledge of the plots and major characters of
selected fairy tales.
2.
Students will develop an appreciation for fairy tales and poetry.
3.
Students will gain an awareness of how to write and speak using conventional
grammar, usage, sentence structure, punctuation, capitalization, and spelling.
(adapted from Colorado Model Content Standards for Reading and Writing,
standard 3, Third Grade)
4.
Students will understand how to write and speak for a variety of purposes and
audiences. (adapted from Colorado Model Content Standards for Reading and
Writing, Standard 2, Third Grade)
5.
Students will recognize how to apply thinking skills to their reading and
listening. (adapted from Colorado Model Content Standards for Reading and
Writing, Standard 4, Third Grade)
B.
Content from the Core Knowledge Sequence
1.
Language Arts: Fiction (p. 67)
a.
Stories
i.
Alice in Wonderland (Lewis Carroll)
2.
Language Arts: Writing (p. 65)
a.
Produce a variety of types of writing such as stories, reports, poems,
letters, descriptions and make reasonable judgments about what to
include in his or her own written works based on the purpose and type of
composition.
b.
Produce written work with a beginning, middle and end.
c.
Organize material in paragraphs and understand how to use a topic
sentence, how to develop a paragraph with examples and details, and that
each new paragraph is indented.
d.
In some writings, proceed with guidance through a process of gathering
information, organizing thoughts, composing a draft, revising to clarify
and refine his or her meaning, and proofreading with attention to
spelling, mechanics, and presentation of a final draft.
3.
Language Arts: Poetry (p. 67)
a.
The Bee (Isaac Watts)
b.
The Crocodile (Lewis Carroll)
c.
Father William (Lewis Carroll)

Third Grade, Alice in Wonderland

2003 Colorado Summer Writing Institute

C.

Skill Objectives
1.
Students will read and understand a variety of materials.
2.
Students will observe samples of fairy tales.
3.
Students will list and identify the common elements of fairy tales.
4.
Students will read and recall given fairy tales and determine that they are
unrealistic.
5.
Students will observe that most fairy tales begin with phrases like Once upon a
time
6.
Students will collaboratively complete a bulletin board web to display the
common elements of fairy tales.
7.
Students will be able to describe at least three facts about Lewis Carroll and his
inspiration in writing Alice in Wonderland.
8.
Students will rewrite a well-known fairy tale, using their own words, and
substituting the names of friends and family members.
9.
Students will identify examples of nonsense in the story.
10.
Students will evaluate Alices actions in the story.
11.
Students will listen to new words and determine their meanings by using context
clues.
12.
Students will write a tall tale or short tale.
13.
Students will write a story with a beginning, middle and end.
14.
Students will identify examples of cause and effect in the story Alice in
Wonderland.
15.
Students will explore how the story may have changed if Alice had made
different choices.
16.
Students will identify the message in the poem.
17.
Students will observe that the poem has two parts that discuss two different, but
related ideas.
18.
Students will write a paragraph (or poem) about another model creature.
19.
Students will recognize and identify similarities between The Crocodile and
The Bee.
20.
Students will be introduced to the term parody.
21.
Students will compose a letter to Lewis Carroll in response to the poem, The
Crocodile.
22.
Students will identify rhyming words in the poem.
23.
Students will recognize and identify the pattern rhyme scheme in a poem.
24.
Students will write a friendly letter. (Include in content?)
25.
Students will answer questions about the poem.
26.
Students will identify the speakers.
27.
Students will gather evidence of humor.
28.
Students will write about a favorite stanza of the poem.
29.
Students will identify and list the main characters of Alice in Wonderland.
30.
Students will list at least three attributes for each character.
31.
Students will complete a diagram to describe each of the characters
32.
Students will design, decorate, and complete a character mobile to hang in the
classroom.
33.
Students will identify, rewrite, and illustrate the key events in the story.
34.
Students will sequence the key events, from beginning to end, to create a class
book.

Third Grade, Alice in Wonderland

2003 Colorado Summer Writing Institute

III.

BACKGROUND KNOWLEDGE
A.
For Teachers
1.
Carroll, Lewis. Alices Adventures in Wonderland. New York: Philomel Books,
1989. 0-399-22241-3.
2.
Blishen, Edward. Chidrens Classics to Read Aloud. New York: Kingfisher
Books, 1991. 1-85697-825-7
3.
Pfeffer, Susan B. Who Were They Really? The True Stories Behind Famous
Characters. Brookfield, CT: The Millbrook Press, 1999. 0-7613-0405-3.
B.
For Students
1.
Students need to have heard the stories Goldilocks and the Three Bears, Chicken
Little, Jack and the Beanstalk, and The Three Little Pigs.
2.
Students need to have prior instruction in using context clues to recognize
meaning of an unknown word.
3.
Students need to have prior instruction in story writing.
4.
Students need to have prior instruction in listening skills, as story may be read
aloud.
5.
Students need to have prior instruction in writing sentences and paragraphs.
6.
Students need to have prior instruction in writing or reading Tall Tales.
7.
Students need to have prior instruction in writing friendly letters.

IV.

RESOURCES
A.
The Random House Book of Nursery Stories, retold and illustrated by Helen Craig
(Lesson One)
B.
Alices Adventures in Wonderland, by Lewis Carroll, illustrated by Peter Weevers
(Lessons Two-Nine)
C.
Who Were They Really? The True Stories Behind Famous Characters, by Susan B.
Pfeffer (Lesson Two)
D.
Lewis Carroll, Author of Alice in Wonderland, by Carole Greene (Lesson Two)
E.
The Walrus and the Carpenter and other poems, by Lewis Carroll (Lessons Six and
Seven)

V.

LESSONS
Lesson One: Fairy Tale Detectives! (one day, 30-45 minutes)
A.
Daily Objectives
1.
Concept Objective(s)
a.
Students will demonstrate a knowledge of the plots and major characters
of selected fairy tales.
b.
Students will develop an appreciation for fairy tales and poetry.
c.
Students will recognize how to apply thinking skills to their reading and
listening. (adapted from Colorado Model Content Standards for Reading
and Writing, Standard 4, Third Grade)
2.
Lesson Content
a.
Lesson One will introduce the common elements of fairy tales. (Not in
Core Knowledge Sequence)
b.
Fiction
i.
Stories
a)
Alice in Wonderland
3.
Skill Objective(s)
a.
Students will read and understand a variety of materials.
b.
Students will observe samples of fairy tales.
c.
Students will list and identify the common elements of fairy tales.

Third Grade, Alice in Wonderland

2003 Colorado Summer Writing Institute

d.
e.
f.
B.

C.
D.

Students will read and recall given fairy tales and determine that they are
unrealistic.
Students will observe that most fairy tales begin with phrases like Once
upon a time
Students will collaboratively complete a bulletin board web to display
the common elements of fairy tales.

Materials
1.
Classroom bulletin board, prepared with only background paper and border
2.
Colored construction paper, posterboard, or tagboard to complete bulletin board
display (eight large pages)
3.
Colored chalk or dry erase markers
4.
Stapler or another temporary adhesive to mount display items to bulletin board
5.
Yarn, to visibly connect parts of the web on the bulletin board
6.
Sufficient copies of the four fairy tales, one version for each group of three to
four students; see Appendices A-D
7.
Student copies of the Fairy Tale Web; see Appendix E
Key Vocabulary
1.
Literature: written works that have lasting value or interest
Procedures/Activities
1.
Prior to the lesson, prepare a bulletin board in the classroom with background
paper and a decorative border. On one page of construction paper or
posterboard, write Fairy Tales in sizeable, attractive writing. Mount this in the
center of the bulletin board. The bulletin board will be completed with the
students throughout the lesson.
2.
Say to the students, Today, we are going to be story detectives! We are going to
read some fairytales, and while we read, we are going to put on our imaginary
magnifying glasses and look for clues in those stories. You see, there are clues in
every fairy tale that shows us that it is, in fact, a fairy tale. So, get your thinking
caps on, and get ready to uncover these fairy tale clues!
3.
Group the students in teams of 3-4, if their desks are not already positioned as
such. Distribute copies of each fairy tale to the groups; be sure that each student
has a copy and that all members of a group are reading the same version.
Remind the students to read the story with their classmates, and watch for
possible clues as they read! Give students sufficient amount of time to read and
reflect on the elements of the story.
4.
When students have finished reading, draw their attention to you. Invite one
group at a time to retell the story, in their own words. As they tell the story, ask
them to tell what clues they found that lead them to believe this story is a fairy
tale. Listen for and list key words on the board. Make one column for each
story. Include words such as wicked witch, three wishes, good boy, Once upon
a time and so on. (You may need to ask leading questions to produce the
best answers to reveal the elements youre looking for! For instance, What are
the very first words of your story? Who are the characters in your story? Are
they good or evil?)
5.
When each group has shared their story, focus students attention to the four
columns of key words on the board. Tell the students, Excellent work,
detectives! We have found the clues! Now, its our job to see what these stories
have in common we need to make categories. Does every story have a happy
ending? Choose one category at a time, and use colored chalk or marker to
show these parts in each column. Use a different color for each category.
Continue until you have identified all the elements, which are:

Third Grade, Alice in Wonderland

2003 Colorado Summer Writing Institute

a.

E.

Begins with Once upon a time, or Long ago, in a faraway land, or


another similar opening
b.
Happens in the long ago, made of fantasy and make believe
c.
Royalty usually present in the story
d.
Good and evil characters
e.
Magic (giants, elves, genies, fairies, etc.)
f.
Problem to be solved, usually in three tries
g.
Happy endings.
6.
Have students find each of these elements in their stories, and underline, circle,
or highlight them.
7.
Explain to students that not all fairy tales contain all of these elements, but most
of them are usually present.
8.
Have students recall the seven elements for you. As they list them, one at a time,
write each element on a piece of construction paper or poster board. Mount each
piece of paper on the bulletin board, and connect a piece of yarn between it and
the center of the display (Fairy Tales). This will help students to visualize that
each element is part of a fairy tale.
9.
To close, ask students to recall again the seven elements of a fairy tale, and have
them give example(s) of each element. Tell the class, Now that you have
become experts at identifying fairy tales, were going to dive into one that might
be new to you. We will read Alice in Wonderland, a classic fairy tale by Lewis
Carroll. Youre going to love it!
10.
Extension Activity: After reading Alice in Wonderland, revisit this bulletin
board web to see which elements Lewis Carroll used in creating his fairy tale.
Assessment/Evaluation
1.
Fairy Tale Web. See Appendix E. Students will be able to independently
complete the web to show the common elements of fairy tales.

Lesson Two: Who was Lewis Carroll? (adapted from The Baltimore Project, Third Grade,
Literature lessons) (one day, 30-45 minutes)
A.
Daily Objectives
1.
Concept Objective(s)
a.
Students will develop an appreciation for fairy tales and poetry.
b.
Students will develop a knowledge of the plots and major characters of
selected fairy tales.
c.
Students will gain an awareness of how to write and speak using
conventional grammar, usage, sentence structure, punctuation,
capitalization, and spelling. (adapted from Colorado Model Content
Standards for Reading and Writing, standard 3, Third Grade)
d.
Students will understand how to write and speak for a variety of purposes
and audiences. (adapted from Colorado Model Content Standards for
Reading and Writing, Standard 2, Third Grade)
e.
Students will recognize how to apply thinking skills to their reading and
listening. (adapted from Colorado Model Content Standards for Reading
and Writing, Standard 4, Third Grade)
2.
Lesson Content
a.
Lesson Two will provide background information for the student
regarding the author of Alice in Wonderland, Lewis Carroll. (Not in Core
Knowledge Sequence)

Third Grade, Alice in Wonderland

2003 Colorado Summer Writing Institute

b.

B.

C.

D.

Lesson Two will provide background information for the student


regarding Lewis Carrolls inspiration for the characters in Alice in
Wonderland. (Not in Core Knowledge Sequence)
c.
Fiction
i.
Stories (p. 67)
a)
Alice in Wonderland
d.
Writing (p. 65)
i.
Produce a variety of types of writing such as stories, reports,
poems, letters, descriptions and make reasonable judgments
about what to include in his or her own written works based on
the purpose and type of composition.
ii.
Produce written work with a beginning, middle and end.
iii.
Organize material in paragraphs and understand how to use a
topic sentence, how to develop a paragraph with examples and
details, and that each new paragraph is indented.
iv.
In some writings, proceed with guidance through a process of
gathering information, organizing thoughts, composing a draft,
revising to clarify and refine his or her meaning, and
proofreading with attention to spelling, mechanics, and
presentation of a final draft.
3.
Skill Objective(s)
a.
Students will be able to describe at least three facts about Lewis Carroll
and his inspiration in writing Alice in Wonderland.
b.
Students will rewrite a well-known fairy tale, using their own words, and
substituting the names of friends and family members.
Materials
1.
Lewis Carrolls name written in cursive handwriting on a transparency
2.
Overhead projector
3.
Vis--Vis markers
4.
Who Were They Really? The True Stories behind Famous Characters, by Susan
Pfeffer
5.
Several hand-held mirrors
6.
Transparency of Appendix F
Key Vocabulary
1.
Mathematician: a person who specializes in mathematics
2.
Photographer: a person who takes pictures with a camera
3.
Stutter: to speak in a jerky way with involuntary repeating or interruption of
sounds.
Procedures/Activities
1.
Prior to teaching the lesson, write Lewis Carrolls name in cursive on a
transparency. To begin the lesson, flip the transparency over, and put it on the
overhead projector to show his name in reverse. Ask the students if they can
decipher the name that is on the screen. Ask them, What is different about this
name? (It is written backwards!) If the students are not able to identify the
name, turn it over to show them that it reads Lewis Carroll.
2.
Tell the students that Lewis Carroll is the author of the fairy tale we are about to
begin, Alice in Wonderland. One interesting thing about Lewis Carroll is that he
had the ability to mirror write, which means he could write all of his letters
backwards, and he could write words from right to left. People had to use a
mirror to read his writing! Give the students time to try mirror writing their

Third Grade, Alice in Wonderland

2003 Colorado Summer Writing Institute

E.

names, to see just how difficult this skill really is. Distribute mirrors to let
children check the accuracy of their mirror writing.
3.
Tell the children, Lewis Carrolls real name was Charles Dodgson. Just like he
reversed his name in his writing, Charles Dodgson actually reversed his first and
last names, translated them into Latin, and then translated them back to English
to get Lewis Carroll. What an interesting way to choose a secret name to use in
his writing! Give the students an opportunity to read their names backwards
and pronounce the new names as they are written. This will give them an idea of
how Lewis Carroll may have given them secret writing name!
4.
Tell the students that Mr. Carroll was a very clever man who invented games and
stories. He was born in England on January 27, 1832, and he lived until he was
65 years old. He died on January 14, 1898. He was a mathematician and a
photographer, and he had a terrible stutter that caused him to be very selfconscious when he spoke. But, when he was spending time with children,
especially his friend Alice Liddell and her sisters, he lost his speech problems
and spoke just fine. He loved to entertain these little girls by telling them
wonderful stories and riddles with their names in them. He met Alice and her
sisters when they were very young, and he enjoyed playing games with them and
taking pictures of them. The little girls loved Lewis Carroll, and they enjoyed
posing for his pictures and listening to the stories he made up for them. Tell the
students about one lazy afternoon, when Carroll and the Liddell girls were
rowing together on a lake. Carroll made up the story of Alice and her adventures
in Wonderland. When the children said goodbye that day, ten-year-old Alice
asked him to write down her story. Carroll said he would write it down for
herand it took him two years! Although Carroll made up the story without
planning to publish it, he decided to find an illustrator to draw the pictures, and
before he knew it, Alices story became a book.
5.
Ask the children to think for a few minutes about the people they know well
their families, friends, cousins, brothers, sisters, and pets. Ask the children,
Wouldnt it be wonderful to have a fairy tale written about you? Well, today is
your day to write a fairy tale about someone you know!
6.
Talk about the different fairy tales you have discussed in class. Invite the
children to choose one of these fairy tales, or another that they are familiar with.
Have the students rewrite the short story in their own words, putting the names of
their family and friends instead of the characters names in the story.
7.
Post transparency of Appendix F on overhead screen to show students criterion
on which they will be graded. Remind them to self-check their work with this
checklist before turning it in!
8.
Extension: Ask parents and fellow teachers to send in any copies they may have
at home of this classic fairy tale. See how many versions you can collect!
Discuss with the students, Why do you think there are so many versions? Why
would anyone need to write this story again, when its already been written?
What do you think is different in each of these versions?
Assessment/Evaluation
1.
To close the lesson, quickly assess the students knowledge by asking them to
talk to the people at their table and come up with (at least) three things they have
learned about Lewis Carroll. Students will share these verbally, as a review of
the days lesson.
2.
Collect students rewritten fairy tales, and grade with the Family Fairy Tale
Checklist. (See Appendix F.)

Third Grade, Alice in Wonderland

2003 Colorado Summer Writing Institute

Lesson Three: Eat Me! Drink Me! (adapted from The Baltimore Project, Third Grade,
Literature lessons) (one day, 45-60 minutes)
A.
Daily Objectives
1.
Concept Objective(s)
a.
Students will demonstrate a knowledge of the plots and major characters
of selected fairy tales.
b.
Students will develop an appreciation for fairy tales and poetry.
c.
Students will gain an awareness of how to write and speak using
conventional grammar, usage, sentence structure, punctuation,
capitalization, and spelling. (adapted from Colorado Model Content
Standards for Reading and Writing, standard 3, Third Grade)
d.
Students will understand how to write and speak for a variety of purposes
and audiences. (adapted from Colorado Model Content Standards for
Reading and Writing, Standard 2, Third Grade)
e.
Students will recognize how to apply thinking skills to their reading and
listening. (adapted from Colorado Model Content Standards for Reading
and Writing, Standard 4, Third Grade)
2.
Lesson Content
a.
Fiction - Stories (p. 67)
i.
Alice in Wonderland
b.
Writing (p. 65)
i.
Produce a variety of types of writing such as stories, reports,
poems, letters, descriptions and make reasonable judgments
about what to include in his or her own written works based on
the purpose and type of composition.
ii.
Produce written work with a beginning, middle and end.
iii.
Organize material in paragraphs and understand how to use a
topic sentence, how to develop a paragraph with examples and
details, and that each new paragraph is indented.
iv.
In some writings, proceed with guidance through a process of
gathering information, organizing thoughts, composing a draft,
revising to clarify and refine his or her meaning, and
proofreading with attention to spelling, mechanics, and
presentation of a final draft.
3.
Skill Objective(s)
a.
Students will enjoy the story.
b.
Students will identify examples of nonsense in the story.
c.
Students will evaluate Alices actions in the story.
d.
Students will listen to new words and determine their meanings by using
context clues.
e.
Students will write a tall tale or short tale.
f.
Students will write a story with a beginning, middle and end.
B.
Materials
1.
Movie clip from Honey, I Shrunk the Kids (optional)
2.
Student writing materials
3.
Transparency of Appendix H
C.
Key Vocabulary
1.
Poison: a substance that can kill or injure a living thing
2.
Nonsense: foolish words or actions without meaning
3.
Tale: a story told about an imaginary event
D.
Procedures/Activities

Third Grade, Alice in Wonderland

2003 Colorado Summer Writing Institute

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.
6.

7.

Prior to teaching this lesson, read aloud a portion of Alice in Wonderland; tell
the students that as you read Alice in Wonderland, they may need to think of
themselves as detectives once again. Lewis Carroll often writes with nonsense,
making things backwards, upside down, and just plain silly. They need to listen
carefully for those parts that are nonsense, or make believe. Read through
chapter two, The Pool of Tears, after which Alice eats food and drinks liquids to
become bigger or smaller. As you read aloud, identify unknown words in the
story. Stop reading at these parts; encourage children to use context clues in the
surrounding sentences to determine the definition of the unknown word. (See
Appendix G for a list of words and definitions in the story.)
In several places in the story, Alices size is affected by what she has to eat or
drink. To begin the lesson, ask the students, Why do you think Alice drank or
ate those things? Did she know they would make her bigger or smaller? Do you
think it was wise of her to eat or drink them without knowing what they were?
Yes, she looked to see if they had the word POISON on them, but she didnt
really know what they were or what might happen to her. Do you think that was
wise? What should Alice have done differently to make a safer choice? Give
students time and opportunities to share their thoughts on the questions.
Have the students respond to Alices changing size. Ask them, Alice became
very small in the story only a few inches tall. Can you think of any other
stories in which this is true of the characters? Gather their responses. (Ask,
How did Thumbelina get so small? What was Tom Thumb able to do in spite of
his small size?) Some students may have seen the Disney movie, Honey, I
Shrunk the Kids. Ask them to tell about similarities and differences between
Alices situation and the children in that movie. (Now is a good time to show a
clip from Honey, I Shrunk the Kids, to reveal how small the characters truly are,
and to get the students thinking about what that may feel like.)
Say to the students, Weve talked about Alice becoming very small, but she also
becomes very tall in the story, tall enough to tower over everyone even the
trees! Ask students to compare her problems as a tall person to other giants they
can remember from stories (Jack and the Beanstalk, The Selfish Giant). Some
students may have seen the Disney movie, Honey, I Blew Up the Kid. Ask them
to tell about similarities and differences between Alices situation and the
children in that movie. (Now is a good time to show a clip from Honey, I Blew
Up the Kid, to reveal how tall the character truly is, and to get the students
thinking about what that may feel like.)
Ask the students, How would your life be different if you were very tall or very
small? What kind of adjustments would you have to make, if it happened to you
very suddenly, like Alice?
Pair students and allow them to brainstorm some ideas to answer these questions.
After brainstorming with a partner, students will work independently to write a
Tall Tale or a Short Tale, whichever they choose. Remind them to include the
details of life that would be different for a person who is so tall or small. They
need to include four things that would be different if they were that size. Remind
them that their story must have a beginning, middle, and end; they need to write
with correct grammar usage, punctuation, and capitalization. Give students time
to brainstorm with partner, to write the story, and to proofread their work.
Post transparency of Appendix H on overhead screen to show students criterion
on which they will be graded. Remind them to self-check their work with this
checklist before turning it in!

Third Grade, Alice in Wonderland

2003 Colorado Summer Writing Institute

8.
E.

Invite students to share their Tall/Short Tales with their classmates. Collect
stories.
Assessment/Evaluation
1.
Students are able to write a Tall/Short Tale, and describe at least four details that
would be different for a person who is very tall or small. Students stories should
have a beginning, middle, and end, and should include correct grammar usage,
capitalization, and punctuation. Grade using the checklist in Appendix H.

Lesson Four: Cause and EffectWhat Else Might Have Happened? (adapted from The
Baltimore Project, Third Grade, Literature lessons) (one day, 30-45 minutes)
A.
Daily Objectives
1.
Concept Objective(s)
a.
Students will demonstrate knowledge of the plots and major characters of
selected fairy tales.
b.
Students will develop an appreciation for fairy tales and poetry.
c.
Students will gain an awareness of how to write and speak using
conventional grammar, usage, sentence structure, punctuation,
capitalization, and spelling. (adapted from Colorado Model Content
Standards for Reading and Writing, standard 3, Third Grade)
d.
Students will understand how to write and speak for a variety of purposes
and audiences. (adapted from Colorado Model Content Standards for
Reading and Writing, Standard 2, Third Grade)
e.
Students will recognize how to apply thinking skills to their reading and
listening. (adapted from Colorado Model Content Standards for Reading
and Writing, Standard 4, Third Grade)
2.
Lesson Content
a.
Fiction
i.
Stories (p. 67)
a)
Alice in Wonderland
b.
Writing (p. 65)
i.
Produce a variety of types of writing such as stories, reports,
poems, letters, descriptions and make reasonable judgments
about what to include in his or her own written works based on
the purpose and type of composition.
ii.
Produce written work with a beginning, middle and end.
iii.
Organize material in paragraphs and understand how to use a
topic sentence, how to develop a paragraph with examples and
details, and that each new paragraph is indented.
iv.
In some writings, proceed with guidance through a process of
gathering information, organizing thoughts, composing a draft,
revising to clarify and refine his or her meaning, and
proofreading with attention to spelling, mechanics, and
presentation of a final draft.
3.
Skill Objective(s)
a.
Students will identify examples of cause and effect in the story Alice in
Wonderland.
b.
Students will explore how the story may have changed if Alice had made
different choices.
c.
Students will enjoy the story.
d.
Students will evaluate Alices actions in the story.

Third Grade, Alice in Wonderland

2003 Colorado Summer Writing Institute

10

B.
C.
D.

E.

Materials
1.
Student writing materials
2.
Exit Slips (see Appendix I)
Key Vocabulary
1.
See Appendix G for unknown words from the story.
Procedures/Activities
1.
Prior to teaching the lesson, read more of the story aloud to the students,
through chapter three, A Caucus-race and a Long Tale. (In this chapter, when
the mouse tells his tale, be sure to display this page for the students; discuss why
Carroll has written the passage in this physical arrangement on the page.) As you
read aloud, identify unknown words in the story. Stop reading at these parts;
encourage children to use context clues in the surrounding sentences to determine
the definition of the unknown word. (See Appendix G for a list of words and
definitions in the story.)
2.
After reading chapter three, say to the students, There are many opportunities
for us to examine causes and effects in this story. Lets talk a bit about some of
the decisions Alice has made so far. What have been some of her choices?
Guide them through discussion: Alice became bored and chose to follow the
White Rabbit down the rabbit hole, which led to her adventures; she drank the
liquid, and it made her ten inches tall; she ate the cake, and it made her tall again;
she held the fan, and it made her shrink again; when she was worried and felt
sorry for herself, she sat down and cried, which created a pool of tears that she
almost drowned in when she was small again. Feel free to name as many as you
and the students can think of!
3.
List cause-effect examples on the board as they happen in the story and be sure to
show students how the effect of one action can become the cause of another.
You may also choose to provide part of the action, and ask the students to fill in
the missing reaction or cause.
4.
Examine with the children: How may the story have changed if Alice had made
different choices? Brainstorm ways that the story may have been different; think
of one cause at a time, think of its opposite, and imagine and discuss how
different the story may have been if this opposite had taken place. For example,
if Alice had not felt sorry for herself and had not cried so much, then she would
not have almost drowned in her tears; she also would not have met the mouse, the
Lory, the Dodo, and the Eaglet, whom she met when she was swimming through
the pool of tears.
5.
To close the lesson, review the cause-effect samples from the story, and why it
was important that they each happened as they did.
Assessment/Evaluation
1.
To assess the students understanding, have them complete an Exit Slip before
leaving class or moving to another subject. On the Exit Slip, students must write
at least one cause-effect from the story, as well as how the story may have
changed if this had happened differently. This Exit Slip is their ticket to move on
either to another subject, to lunch, or home at the end of the day! See Appendix I
for sample, reproducible Exit Slips.

Lesson Five: The Bee A Poem by Isaac Watts (adapted from The Baltimore Project, Third
Grade, Literature lessons) (one day, 45-60 minutes)
A.
Daily Objectives
1.
Concept Objective(s)
a.
Students will develop an appreciation for fairy tales and poetry.

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b.

B.
C.

D.

Students will gain an awareness of how to write and speak using


conventional grammar, usage, sentence structure, punctuation,
capitalization, and spelling. (adapted from Colorado Model Content
Standards for Reading and Writing, standard 3, Third Grade)
c.
Students will understand how to write and speak for a variety of purposes
and audiences. (adapted from Colorado Model Content Standards for
Reading and Writing, Standard 2, Third Grade)
d.
Students will recognize how to apply thinking skills to their reading and
listening. (adapted from Colorado Model Content Standards for Reading
and Writing, Standard 4, Third Grade)
2.
Lesson Content
a.
Fiction
i.
Stories (p. 67)
a)
Alice in Wonderland
b.
Writing (p. 65)
i.
Produce a variety of types of writing such as stories, reports,
poems, letters, descriptions and make reasonable judgments
about what to include in his or her own written works based on
the purpose and type of composition.
ii.
Produce written work with a beginning, middle and end.
iii.
Organize material in paragraphs and understand how to use a
topic sentence, how to develop a paragraph with examples and
details, and that each new paragraph is indented.
iv.
In some writings, proceed with guidance through a process of
gathering information, organizing thoughts, composing a draft,
revising to clarify and refine his or her meaning, and
proofreading with attention to spelling, mechanics, and
presentation of a final draft.
a.
Poetry (p. 67)
i.
The Bee (Isaac Watts)
3.
Skill Objective(s)
a.
Students will identify the message in the poem.
b.
Students will observe that the poem has two parts that discuss two
different, but related ideas.
c.
Students will read the poem, The Bee.
d.
Students will write a paragraph (or poem) about another model creature.
Materials
1.
Copy of The Bee on chart paper
2.
Student writing materials
Key Vocabulary
1.
Honeycomb: a mass of wax cells built by honeybees in their nest to contain
young bees and stores of honey
2.
Idleness: not working, doing nothing
3.
Mischief: behavior that is annoying to others
4.
Diligent: showing earnest care and effort
5.
Doth: a version of the word does
6.
Account: a statement of facts or events
Procedures/Activities
1.
Prior to teaching the lesson, write The Bee on large chart paper to display in
the classroom. If possible, depending on the size of your paper, write the first
two stanzas on one page, and the remaining two stanzas on the second page.

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2.
3.

Explain to the students that you will be covering a new poem today; this poem is
not included in Alice in Wonderland, but it is very similar to one that is included,
one that you will study later (The Crocodile).
Display the first two stanzas of the poem and read them aloud to the students.
The Bee
Isaac Watts
How doth the little busy bee
Improve each shining hour
And gather honey all the day
From every passing flower!
How skillfully she builds her cell;
How neat she spreads the wax!
And labors hard to store it well
With the sweet food she makes.

4.

5.

Ask students to share what they believe the poem is about. (Acceptable
responses indicate that the poet is writing about what bees do.) Discuss the cycle
of bees with a honeycomb, how the bees carry nectar from flowers into the hive
where it is stored as honey. Tell the students to look at the second stanza, and
read silently the first line. Ask, What kind of bee do you think the poet is
talking about? (a female bee she) Explain to the students that the female
worker bees are the only ones whose bodies can make nectar into honey. The
poet is showing us that bees make good use of each day (improve each shining
hour) to complete their work. Ask the students, Do bees choose their jobs? Or
does nature choose it for them? What do you think would happen if a bee didnt
do its job? (It would probably die.)
Display and read the next two stanzas of the poem.
In works of labor or of skill
I would be busy, too;
For Satan finds some mischief still
For idle hands to do.
In books, or work, or healthful play,
Let my first years be past;
That I may give for every day
Some good account at last.

6.

7.

Ask the students, Do you think the poet is still talking about the bee? Why or
why not? (No, because he uses the pronoun I, which tells us he is talking about
himself.) Ask, What is he saying? (Answers should include that the poet
wants to choose to use his time wisely, to do what he should do, and not to sit
around doing nothing or making unwise choices.)
Ask the students, Do you think this poem was written for children or adults?
Discuss any thoughtful answers. Tell the students that this poem is also called
Against Idleness and Mischief. Write this title on the board and discuss what
each of these words mean. Ask, Why would we want and need to be against
idleness and mischief? Does this title give you a better idea of who this poem
may be written to? Why?

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8.

E.

Explain to students that long ago, when this poem was written, poetry was
considered a good way to learn. People wrote poems to help them remember
things, and they learned the skill of memorization. Back in those days, a person
was considered very intelligent if they would recite a poem or verse for a specific
occasion. This poem is an example of that; someone may have recited this poem
to correct a person who was not using his or her time wisely.
9.
Ask the students if they can think of another creature or animal that could be
compared to the busy bee in the poem. An ant? A housefly? A fish? A cat? A
rabbit? Can they think of something we could learn by watching these animals?
Accept answers, and write these creatures on the board.
10.
Have students select a creature from the list on the board, and write a short
paragraph or poem about the behavior traits demonstrated by this creatures
actions.
Assessment/Evaluation
1.
Students will write a poem about a creature that is diligent with its behavior,
choosing to make quality actions.

Lesson Six: The Crocodile a Poem by Lewis Carroll (adapted from The Baltimore Project,
Third Grade, Literature lessons) (one day, 45-60 minutes)
A.
Daily Objectives
1.
Concept Objective(s)
a.
Students will develop an appreciation for fairy tales and poetry.
b.
Students will gain an awareness of how to write and speak using
conventional grammar, usage, sentence structure, punctuation,
capitalization, and spelling. (adapted from Colorado Model Content
Standards for Reading and Writing, standard 3, Third Grade)
c.
Students will understand how to write and speak for a variety of purposes
and audiences. (adapted from Colorado Model Content Standards for
Reading and Writing, Standard 2, Third Grade)
d.
Students will recognize how to apply thinking skills to their reading and
listening. (adapted from Colorado Model Content Standards for Reading
and Writing, Standard 4, Third Grade)
2.
Lesson Content
a.
Fiction
i.
Stories (p. 67)
a)
Alice in Wonderland
b.
Writing (p. 65)
i.
Produce a variety of types of writing such as stories, reports,
poems, letters, descriptions and make reasonable judgments
about what to include in his or her own written works based on
the purpose and type of composition.
ii.
Produce written work with a beginning, middle and end.
iii.
Organize material in paragraphs and understand how to use a
topic sentence, how to develop a paragraph with examples and
details, and that each new paragraph is indented.
iv.
In some writings, proceed with guidance through a process of
gathering information, organizing thoughts, composing a draft,
revising to clarify and refine his or her meaning, and
proofreading with attention to spelling, mechanics, and
presentation of a final draft.

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3.

B.
C.

D.

Skill Objective(s)
a.
Students will read the poem, The Crocodile.
b.
Students will recognize and identify similarities to The Bee.
c.
Students will be introduced to the term parody.
d.
Students will compose a letter to Lewis Carroll in response to the poem,
The Crocodile.
e.
Students will identify rhyming words in the poem.
f.
Students will recognize and identify the pattern rhyme scheme in a poem.
g.
Students will write a friendly letter.
Materials
1.
Copy of the poem, The Crocodile on chart paper
2.
Student writing materials
Key Vocabulary
1.
Doth: a version of the word does
2.
Nile: a river in Egypt, the longest river in the world
3.
Parody: a funny story or poem written to poke fun at a more serious version
Procedures/Activities
1.
Prior to teaching this lesson, teach the lesson on The Bee and read aloud at
least through chapter 3 in Alice in Wonderland. As you read aloud, identify
unknown words in the story. Stop reading at these parts; encourage children to
use context clues in the surrounding sentences to determine the definition of the
unknown word. (See Appendix G for a list of words and definitions in the story.)
Also, write The Crocodile on chart paper.
2.
Read the poem aloud to the students.
The Crocodile
Lewis Carroll
How doth the little crocodile
Improve his shining tail,
And pour the waters of the Nile
On every golden scale!
How cheerfully he seems to grin!
How neatly spreads his claws,
And welcomes little fishes in
With gently smiling jaws!
2.

3.
4.

Ask the students, Does this poem remind you of another we have studied? (The
Bee, by Isaac Watts) What is this poem about? (a crocodile) Do you think this
is a serious poem, like The Bee? (no) Is there a lesson for the reader in this
poem? (no) The writer has taken a serious idea, like in The Bee, and written
about it in a funny way. This is called a parody. Write parody on the board.
Discuss the definition.
In the story, Alice in Wonderland, Alice tries to recite the poem The Bee, but
instead, The Crocodile comes out! This is how Alice knows that something
about her is different, and she is not herself.
Identify the rhyming words in the poem, and identify the patterned rhyme
scheme that Carroll uses in the poem (ABAB, CDCD). Ask the students to share
if they like the poem, and invite them to tell why or why not. Ask the students,
How do you think Isaac Watts may have felt about Carrolls parody of his

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E.

poem? Do you think he may have thought it was funny? Or might he have been
angry? Hurt?
5.
Write Lewis Carrolls name on the board, and remind them that Carroll was a
man who loved writing letters. In honor of his love for letter writing, we are
going to write a letter to him! But theres a catch: youre not writing from your
perspective, but from Isaac Watts, the author of The Bee. (Write Isaac Watts
name on the board.) Remind the students that Mr. Watts died in 1748, and Mr.
Carroll wasnt born until 1832, so they never met each other. Tell students that
they may write from Isaacs point of view, and they may say that he felt anyway
they choose, but they need to explain in their letter why they feel that way.
6.
Allow students to discuss what Mr. Watts might say to Mr. Carroll; write their
ideas on the board. Tell the students that this assignment will have three
requirements: 1) The letter should tell whether they liked or disliked the poem, 2)
it should give at least two reasons to support that opinion, and 3) it should be
written in the proper form, from Mr. Watts to Mr. Carroll, and should contain
proper spelling. Write these requirements on the board, and remind students to
check this list before turning in their friendly letter.
7.
Give students time to write a friendly letter to Lewis Carroll from Isaac Watts
point of view.
Assessment/Evaluation
1.
See Appendix J for rubric with which to grade students friendly letters.

Lesson Seven: Father William a poem by Lewis Carroll (adapted from The Baltimore
Project, Third Grade, Literature lessons) (one day, 45-60 minutes)
A.
Daily Objectives
1.
Concept Objective(s)
a.
Students will develop an appreciation for fairy tales and poetry.
b.
Students will gain an awareness of how to write and speak using
conventional grammar, usage, sentence structure, punctuation,
capitalization, and spelling. (adapted from Colorado Model Content
Standards for Reading and Writing, standard 3, Third Grade)
c.
Students will understand how to write and speak for a variety of purposes
and audiences. (adapted from Colorado Model Content Standards for
Reading and Writing, Standard 2, Third Grade)
d.
Students will recognize how to apply thinking skills to their reading and
listening. (adapted from Colorado Model Content Standards for Reading
and Writing, Standard 4, Third Grade)
2.
Lesson Content
a.
Fiction
i.
Stories (p. 67)
a)
Alice in Wonderland
b.
Writing (p. 65)
i.
Produce a variety of types of writing such as stories, reports,
poems, letters, descriptions and make reasonable judgments
about what to include in his or her own written works based on
the purpose and type of composition.
ii.
Produce written work with a beginning, middle and end.
iii.
Organize material in paragraphs and understand how to use a
topic sentence, how to develop a paragraph with examples and
details, and that each new paragraph is indented.

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iv.

In some writings, proceed with guidance through a process of


gathering information, organizing thoughts, composing a draft,
revising to clarify and refine his or her meaning, and
proofreading with attention to spelling, mechanics, and
presentation of a final draft.

c.

B.
C.

D.

Poetry
i.
Father William (Lewis Carroll)
3.
Skill Objective(s)
a.
Students will read the poem, Father William.
b.
Students will answer questions about the poem.
c.
Students will identify the speakers.
d.
Students will gather evidence of humor.
e.
Students will write about a favorite stanza of the poem.
Materials
1.
Student copies of the poem, Father William (see Appendix K)
2.
Student writing materials
Key Vocabulary
1.
Incessantly: without stopping
2.
Pray: an expression that means, I beg of you
3.
Sage: a wise person
4.
Limbs: arms or legs
5.
Supple: flexible, easily bent
6.
Shilling: a coin that was used in England
7.
Suet: fatty part of the meat of beef or sheep
8.
Airs: snobbiness, show-off (Dont give yourself airs.)
Procedures/Activities
1.
Prior to teaching the lesson, read aloud Alice in Wonderland, through chapter
five, Advice from a Caterpillar. As you read aloud, identify unknown words in
the story. Stop reading at these parts; encourage children to use context clues in
the surrounding sentences to determine the definition of the unknown word. (See
Appendix G for a list of words and definitions in the story.)
2.
To begin, ask students to review and recall some of the things we have learned
about Lewis Carroll, the author and poet. Tell the students that today they will
read another poem by Carroll, The Crocodile. This poem is in Chapter 5,
Advice from a Caterpillar. Remind the students that The Crocodile was
written to make fun of the poem The Bee. Explain that Father William
makes fun of another poem, The Old Mans Comforts and How He Gained
Them, by Robert Southey.
3.
Write the key vocabulary words on the board, and discuss their definitions before
inviting students to read the poem. This will give them prior knowledge for
unknown words they may encounter in their reading.
4.
Distribute the poem, Father William. Give students time to read the poem
silently.
5.
When students have read the poem independently, draw their attention to you.
Divide them into two groups: Father William and the son. Have the students
chorally read the poem, alternating stanzas and characters.
6.
Ask the students, Who were the speakers in this poem? (Father William, his
son) What is different about what they have to say to each other? (The son asks
questions; the father gives answers.) Can you find some examples of humor in
the poem? (Allow time to discuss ideas.) Who is the funny speaker in the
poem? (Father William)

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7.

E.

Ask students, After reading this poem, do you have a different opinion of Lewis
Carroll? Invite students to share their responses.
8.
Have students write about or illustrate their favorite stanza of the poem.
Assessment/Evaluation
1.
Students will write about or illustrate their favorite stanza of the poem.

Lesson Eight: Carrolls Crazy Characters! (two days, 30-45 minutes each)
A.
Daily Objectives
1.
Concept Objective(s)
a.
Students will demonstrate knowledge of the plots and major characters of
selected fairy tales.
b.
Students will develop an appreciation for fairy tales and poetry.
c.
Students will gain an awareness of how to write and speak using
conventional grammar, usage, sentence structure, punctuation,
capitalization, and spelling. (adapted from Colorado Model Content
Standards for Reading and Writing, standard 3, Third Grade)
d.
Students will understand how to write and speak for a variety of purposes
and audiences. (adapted from Colorado Model Content Standards for
Reading and Writing, Standard 2, Third Grade)
e.
Students will recognize how to apply thinking skills to their reading and
listening. (adapted from Colorado Model Content Standards for Reading
and Writing, Standard 4, Third Grade)
2.
Lesson Content
a.
Fiction
i.
Stories (p. 67)
a)
Alice in Wonderland
b.
Writing (p. 65)
i.
Produce a variety of types of writing such as stories, reports,
poems, letters, descriptions and make reasonable judgments
about what to include in his or her own written works based on
the purpose and type of composition.
ii.
Produce written work with a beginning, middle and end.
iii.
Organize material in paragraphs and understand how to use a
topic sentence, how to develop a paragraph with examples and
details, and that each new paragraph is indented.
iv.
In some writings, proceed with guidance through a process of
gathering information, organizing thoughts, composing a draft,
revising to clarify and refine his or her meaning, and
proofreading with attention to spelling, mechanics, and
presentation of a final draft.
3.
Skill Objective(s)
a.
Students will identify and list the main characters of Alice in
Wonderland.
b.
Students will list at least three attributes for each character.
c.
Students will complete a diagram to describe each of the characters
d.
Students will design, decorate, and complete a character mobile to hang
in the classroom.
B.
Materials
1.
Student writing materials
2.
Construction paper, crayons, markers, scissors, hole-puncher and yarn for
mobiles

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3.
4.

C.
D.

E.

Student copies of Character Diagram page (see Appendix L)


Completed Character Mobile, as a sample for students (see Appendix N for
sample)
Key Vocabulary
1.
See Appendix G for terms and definitions from the story.
Procedures/Activities
1.
Prior to teaching the lesson, finish reading Alice in Wonderland aloud to the
students. As you read aloud, identify unknown words in the story. Stop reading
at these parts; encourage children to use context clues in the surrounding
sentences to determine the definition of the unknown word. (See Appendix G for
a list of words and definitions in the story.) Also, complete a character mobile to
display for the students; this will help them to visualize the final product they
will complete.
2.
Say to the children, Now that we have finished reading this classic fairy tale,
lets take a closer look at each of these characters. Ask the students to name as
many of the main characters as they are able; list these on the board.
3.
When the list is complete, distribute the Character Diagram to the students. This
will be completed together. (See Appendices L and M for a blank diagram and a
completed one.) Explain to the students that this diagram covers each of the
characters in Alice in Wonderland, and we are going to list things we know about
each one.
4.
Complete the diagram together.
5.
(Continue the rest on day two, if necessary.) When finished with the diagram,
review it together to review each of the characters. Say to the students, These
are some pretty crazy characters, arent they? They are very unusual, and they
certainly show us some outlandish behavior in the story! Now that weve looked
so closely at them, I want you to choose which one is the most like you. Are you
sneaky, like the Cheshire Cat? Are you sleepy, like the Dormouse? Are you
nervous and in a hurry, like the White Rabbit? Are you mean to others, like the
Queen of Hearts? Choose which one is like you! Give students some time to
think about the characters and determine which one is most similar to himself or
herself.
6.
Show the students your completed Character Mobile. Explain to them that they
will be able to create a mobile for the character of their choice, the one that is
most similar to themselves. The top square of the mobile is the characters name
and an illustration of that character. The second, third, and fourth squares tell
attributes about that character. The fourth square, on the bottom, tells how this
character is like the reader. Explain this to the students, provide them with
materials, and let them get busy!
7.
Collect students mobiles and display them in the classroom. Its wonderful if
you can hang them from the ceiling!
Assessment/Evaluation
1.
Students will create a Character Mobile to reveal their knowledge of that
characters attributes. (See Appendix O for rubric for grading this assignment.)

Lesson Nine: Alice in Wonderland, by Our Class (two days, 30-45 minutes each)
A.
Daily Objectives
1.
Concept Objective(s)
a.
Students will demonstrate knowledge of the plots and major characters of
selected fairy tales.
b.
Students will develop an appreciation for fairy tales and poetry.

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c.

B.

C.
D.

Students will gain an awareness of how to write and speak using


conventional grammar, usage, sentence structure, punctuation,
capitalization, and spelling. (adapted from Colorado Model Content
Standards for Reading and Writing, standard 3, Third Grade)
d.
Students will understand how to write and speak for a variety of purposes
and audiences. (adapted from Colorado Model Content Standards for
Reading and Writing, Standard 2, Third Grade)
e.
Students will recognize how to apply thinking skills to their reading and
listening. (adapted from Colorado Model Content Standards for Reading
and Writing, Standard 4, Third Grade)
2.
Lesson Content
a.
Lesson Nine will allow students to identify the key events in the story,
write about them in their own words, illustrate them, and sequence them
into a class copy of Alice in Wonderland. (Not in Core Knowledge
Sequence)
b.
Fiction
i.
Stories (p. 67)
a)
Alice in Wonderland
c.
Writing (p. 65)
i.
Produce a variety of types of writing such as stories, reports,
poems, letters, descriptions and make reasonable judgments
about what to include in his or her own written works based on
the purpose and type of composition.
ii.
Produce written work with a beginning, middle and end.
iii.
Organize material in paragraphs and understand how to use a
topic sentence, how to develop a paragraph with examples and
details, and that each new paragraph is indented.
iv.
In some writings, proceed with guidance through a process of
gathering information, organizing thoughts, composing a draft,
revising to clarify and refine his or her meaning, and
proofreading with attention to spelling, mechanics, and
presentation of a final draft.
3.
Skill Objective(s)
a.
Students will identify the key events in the story.
b.
Students will rewrite that event in their own words.
c.
Students will illustrate key events in the story.
d.
Students will sequence the key events, from beginning to end, to create a
class book.
Materials
1.
White paper or chart paper, depending on the size of book you plan to publish
approximately 10 pages
2.
Crayons and markers
3.
Student writing materials
Key Vocabulary
1.
See Appendix G for terms and definitions from the story.
Procedures/Activities
1.
Prior to the lesson, you should have finished reading aloud Alice in Wonderland
to the class.
2.
Say to the students, Great job! We have read Alice in Wonderland, we have
studied Lewis Carroll, we have studied the poems from the story, and we have
focused on each of his unusual characters. Now were ready for another great

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E.

VI.

task: were going to make our very own class-written version of Alice in
Wonderland! We are going to think of the most important key events in the
story, and we are going to write about them to make our own version of the book.
Lets get started! (Remember, students will reflect your enthusiasm, so show
them youre excited!)
3.
Ask the students to tell you some of the major events that happened to Alice in
the story. As they list them, write each on the board. At this point, sequential
order is not important; you just want to get their ideas up there.
4.
Have the students sequence the storys events, from first to last.
5.
Students will work with a partner to write about and illustrate an event. Either
assign partners or allow them to choose, if their seats are not already arranged in
such a way to give them an assumed partner. Assign one event to each pair.
6.
(Continue the remainder of the lesson on day two, if necessary.) Tell students
that this is their chance to tell what happened during this part of the story they
can tell it in their own words. Remind them to write only about what happened
during this event, as their classmates will write about what happened before and
after. Give students time to draft a page (on notebook paper). Remind them to
proofread it, and then have them bring it to you for final approval.
7.
When students are finished with their draft, give them a page to do their final
work on either 8 x 11 or chart paper, if you want a big book! When all of
the pairs are finished writing and illustrating their page, put all of the pages on
display. Have students organize them sequentially, and then you bind them
together with staples, or yarn.
Assessment/Evaluation
1.
Students identified the key events in the story, wrote about them in their own
words, illustrated them, and sequenced them into a class copy of Alice in
Wonderland. (See Appendix P for rubric to grade this assignment.)

CULMINATING ACTIVITY
A.

B.

C.
D.

Lets have a Mad Tea Party! Invite students to dress as their favorite character from
Alice in Wonderland, which should be the character they created the mobile about.
Arrange the desks in a table-like fashion, where everyone can sit together and face each
other, just as the Mad Hatter and the March Hare did at their tea party. This tea party is
the students opportunity to share what they have learned about Alice in Wonderland.
Invite them to share their character mobiles, tell about the character they studied, that
characters attributes, and how he/she is similar to the student. Also, this is a great
setting in which to read the published class version of Alice in Wonderland! Just for fun,
announce at various times that youre ready for a new place setting, and have everyone
shift one chair to the rightjust like the Dormouse, March Hare, and Mad Hatter! Have
a tea party to remember!
Alice in Wonderland, a Class Play! Willard Simms has written a childrens dramatic
version of Alice in Wonderland, with a cast of characters that includes Sarah (Alices
sister), Alice, White Rabbit, Caterpillar, Dodo bird, and the Queen. This play may lend a
good opportunity to compare how the story is different from or similar to the version read
aloud in class. The students could perform this for younger students in your school!
A final option may be to view Disneys video version of Alice in Wonderland. After
watching the video, discuss the similarities and differences between the movie and the
book. Ask students which one they liked better and encourage them to share why.
Students complete a written assessment (Appendix Q Test on Alice in Wonderland).
These will be graded on a percentage basis for accuracy of understanding.

Third Grade, Alice in Wonderland

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VII.

HANDOUTS/WORKSHEETS
A.
Appendix A: Goldilocks and the Three Bears
B.
Appendix B: The Three Little Pigs
C.
Appendix C: Chicken Little
D.
Appendix D: The Shoemaker and the Elves
E.
Appendix E: Fairy Tales Web
F.
Appendix F:
Checklist for Family Fairy Tales
G.
Appendix G: Words & Definitions from Alice in Wonderland
H.
Appendix H: Tall Tale or Short Tale Checklist
I.
Appendix I:
Exit Slips
J.
Appendix J:
Friendly Letter Rubric
K.
Appendix K: Father William (Lewis Carroll)
L.
Appendix L: Character Diagram for students
M.
Appendix M: Character Diagram for teachers
N.
Appendix N: Sample Character Mobile
O.
Appendix O: Character Mobile Rubric
P.
Appendix P:
Class Version of Alice in Wonderland Rubric
Q.
Appendix Q: Test on Alice in Wonderland

VIII. BIBLIOGRAPHY
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
F.
G.
H.
I.

Bassett, Lisa. Very Truly Yours, Charles L. Dodgson, Alias Lewis Carroll: A Biography.
New York: Lee & Shepard Books, 1987. 0-688-06091-9.
Bjork, Christina and Eriksson, Inga-Karin. The Other Alice. Sweden: Raben & Sjogren,
1993. 91-29-62242-5.
Carroll, Lewis. Alices Adventures in Wonderland. New York: Philomel Books, 1989.
0-399-22241-3.
Carroll, Lewis. The Walrus and the Carpenter and other poems. Great Britain: Faber
and Faber, 1968. 69-10834.
Craig, Helen. The Random House Book of Nursery Stories. New York: Random House,
1999. 0-375-80586-9.
Greene, Carol. Lewis Carroll: Author of Alice in Wonderland. Chicago: Childrens
Press, 1992. 0-516-04227-0.
Pfeffer, Susan B. Who Were They Really? The True Stories Behind Famous Characters.
Brookfield, CT: The Millbrook Press, 1999. 0-7613-0405-3.
Simms, Willard. Alice in Wonderland, a Participation Play for Children. Denver, CO:
Pioneer Drama Service, 1975.
http://www.ruthannzaroff.com/wonderland

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Appendix A, page one

Goldilocks and the Three Bears


Adapted from The Random House Book of Nursery Stories

Once upon a time, there was a little girl called Goldilocks. She lived with her father and
mother on the edge of the forest.
When can I go into the forest? she asked her parents. They replied, You are too little.
One day, when you are older, we will take you there.
But Goldilocks couldnt wait, and when nobody was looking, she slipped away into the
forest. At first she enjoyed running in and out of the trees, but very soon she realized that she
was lost.
She was frightened that she would never find her way back home. Then, through the
trees, she saw a little house.
Oh, good! Now I can get some help, she thought.
The little house belonged to three bears. One was a great big bear, one was a middlesized bear, and one was a small baby bear. They loved their little house, and they kept it neat
and tidy.
The Great Big Bear had just made a large pot of steaming hot porridge, which he poured
into their bowls.
The porridge is too hot to eat right now, he said in his big voice. Lets go for a walk
while it cools.
As the three bears left for their walk, Goldilocks arrived on the other side of the clearing.
She went up to the little house and rang the bell. There was no answer. She tapped on the
window. There was no reply. So she gave the door a little push. It opened, and she went in.

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Appendix A, page two


The porridge in the bowls smelled delicious. Im so hungry, said Goldilocks. But Ill
only take a little bit.
First she tried a spoonful from the Big Bears large bowl, but it was too hot. Next, she
tried a spoonful from the Middle Bears medium-sized bowl, but it was too cold. Then she tried
a spoonful from the Baby Bears little bowl. It was just right, so she ate it all up!
Now Goldilocks was tired. First she sat in the Big Bears huge armchair, but it was too
soft. Next she sat in the Middle Bears medium-sized chair, but it was too hard. Then she sat in
the Baby Bears little rocking chair. It was just right. She rocked backward and forward until
CRASH! - the bottom of the chair broke.
Goldilocks went upstairs to the bears neat little bedroom. First she tried the Big Bears
enormous bed, but the pillows were too high. Next she tried the Middle Bears medium-sized
bed, but the pillow was too low. Finally, she tried the Baby Bears little bed. It was perfect, and
she fell fast asleep.
She was so fast asleep that she did not hear the three bears come home. The Great Big
Bear sniffed the air. Someone has been here, he said.
They saw the spoons in the bowls of porridge.
Whos been eating my porridge? said the Great Big Bear.
Whos been eating my porridge? said the Middle-Sized Bear.
And whos been eating my porridge and eaten it all up? cried the Small Baby Bear.
Then the three bears saw that the cushions in the armchairs were out of place.
Whos been sitting in my chair? rumbled the Great Big Bear.
Whos been sitting in my chair? grumbled the Middle-Sized Bear.

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Appendix A, page three


And whos been sitting in my chair and BROKEN it? squeaked the small Baby Bear.
They ran upstairs and saw the rumpled beds.
Whos been sleeping in MY bed? roared the Great Big Bear. Goldilocks slept on,
dreaming of thunderstorms.
Whos been sleeping in MY bed? growled the Middle-Sized Bear. Goldilocks dreamed
a fierce wind was blowing.
Look whos sleeping in MY bed and is still here! squealed the Small Baby Bear. His
voice was so high and piercing that Goldilocks woke up with a start. She was so frightened that
she leapt from the bed, jumped out of the window, and slid down the porch roof to the ground
below.
She ran and she ran and didnt stop running until she heard voices calling her name. It
was her father and mother, and they were so pleased to see Goldilocks that they forgot to be
cross with her for going into the forest alone. Goldilocks was so happy to see them that she
promised never to go off on her own again.
The End

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Appendix B, page one

The Three Little Pigs


Adapted from The Random House Book of Nursery Stories

There once were three little pigs, and each little pig wanted to build himself a house. The
first pig collected some bundles of straw. These will make a fine house, he said. When he was
finished, his straw house did look fine, and he moved in. He had just made himself a nice cup of
tea when he heard the voice of the big bad wolf outside.
Little pig, little pig, can I come in? called the wolf in his sweetest voice.
No, you cannot, not by the hair of my chinny-chin-chin, cried the little pig.
Then Ill huff and Ill puff and Ill blow your house down, growled the wolf.
Just you try, said the little pig, thinking he was good and safe in his fine straw house.
So the wolf huffed and he puffed and he blew that little straw house down.
Oh, help! Help! cried the little pig, and he ran all the way back to his mother.
You got it all wrong, said the second pig to his brother. I shall build my house of
brushwood, and you can come and live with me.
So the second pig collected a great heap of brushwood. This will make me a fine
house, he said.
When he had finished, his brushwood house did look fine, and he moved in. He was just
settling down to a large slice of apple tart when he heard the big bad wolf outside.
Little pig, little pig, can I come in? called the wolf in his sweetest voice.
No, you cannot, not by the hair of my chinny-chin-chin, cried the second little pig.
Then Ill huff and Ill puff and Ill blow your house down, growled the wolf.
Just you try, said the little pig, thinking his brushwood house was strong and safe.
So the wolf huffed and he puffed and he blew that little brushwood house down.

Third Grade, Alice in Wonderland

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Appendix B, page two


Oh, help! Help! cried the second little pig, and he ran all the way back to his mother.
The third little pig didnt say anything, but he had been watching all the time and he had
a plan. He went to the brickyard and bought a big load of bricks and some bags of cement,
strong windows, and an even stronger door, and then he built his house with a fireplace and a
fine chimney. The wolf watched from his hiding place and waited.
At last, when the third little pig had finished his house, he invited his two brothers in to
celebrate.
Bring Mothers big cooking pot, he said, and dont forget the lid.
The little pigs filled the cooking pot with water and set it on the fire to boil. Then they
sat down to enjoy the plum cake their mother had sent them. Just then they heard the big bad
wolf outside.
Little pigs, little pigs, can I come in? called the wolf in his sweetest voice.
No, you cannot, not by the hair of my chinny-chin-chin, said the third little pig.
Then Ill huff and Ill puff and Ill blow your house down, growled the wolf.
Just you try, said the third little pig, calmly.
The wolf huffed and he puffed, but try as he might, he could not blow that little brick
house down. So he tried the door, but it was strong and firmly bolted, and the windows were
locked too. Then he remembered the chimney.
Aha Ill get all three of them yet, he hissed.
The three little pigs heard the wolf scrambling up onto the roof. But the third little pig
was not worried. He got the fire blazing well, so that the water in the pot began to bubble just as
the wolf started to climb down the chimney.

Third Grade, Alice in Wonderland

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Appendix B, page three


Come and get us! called the third little pig.
I will, I will just you wait, growled the wolf, but he was in such a hurry he missed his
footing and fell headfirst down the chimney and into the cooking pot. The third little pig slapped
on the lid, and that was the end of the big bad wolf.
What a mess, said the third little pig to his brothers. Come on, lets clean up and then
we can have tea.
So they did, and from then on, the three little pigs all lived safely together in the little
brick house.
The End

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Appendix C, page one

Chicken Little
Adapted from The Random House Book of Nursery Stories

Once upon a time, Chicken Little was walking in the woods one morning when an acorn
fell on his head.
Oh, my goodness! The sky is falling! cried Chicken Little. I must go and tell the
King. So Chicken Little set off. On the way, he met Henny Penny.
Hello, Chicken Little. Where are you going? she asked.
Oh, Henny Penny, the sky is falling! cried Chicken Little. This morning I was in the
woods when the sky fell on my head, and so I am going to tell the King.
How terrible! exclaimed Henny Penny. I will come too. And they set off together.
On the way, they met Cocky Locky. Hello, you two. Where are you off to? he asked.
Oh, Cocky Locky, the sky is falling! said Henny Penny. I met Chicken Little, who
was in the woods this morning when the sky fell on his head, so we are going to tell the king.
How dreadful! exclaimed Cocky Locky. I will come too. And they set off together.
After a while, they met Ducky Lucky. Hello, you three. Where are you going? she
asked.
Oh, Ducky Lucky, the sky is falling! said Cocky Locky. I met Henny Penny, who met
Chicken Little. He was in the woods this morning when the sky fell on his head, so we are going
to tell the King.
Oh, dear, oh, dear! exclaimed Ducky Lucky. I will come too. And they set off
together.
A little farther on they met Drakey Lakey.
Hello, you four. Where are you off to? he asked.

Third Grade, Alice in Wonderland

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Appendix C, page two


Oh, Drakey Lakey, the sky is falling! said Ducky Lucky. I met Cocky Locky, who
met Henny Penny, who met Chicken Little. He was down in the woods this morning when the
sky fell on his head, so we are going to tell the King.
How awful! exclaimed Drakey Lakey. I will come too. And they set off together.
Along the way, they met Goosey Loosey.
Hello, you five. Where are you off to? she asked.
Oh, Goosey Loosey, the sky is falling! said Drakey Lakey. I met Ducky Lucky, who
met Cocky Locky, who met Henny Penny, who met Chicken Little. He was down in the woods
this morning when the sky fell on his head, so we are going to tell the King.
This is bad news! exclaimed Goosey Loosey. I will come too. And they set off
together.
They had not gone far when they met Turkey Lurkey.
Hello, you six. Where are you off to? he asked.
Oh, Turkey Lurkey, the sky is falling! said Goosey Loosey. I met Drakey Lakey, who
meet Ducky Lucky, who met Cocky Locky, who met Henny Penny, who met Chicken Little. He
was down in the woods this morning when the sky fell on his head, so we are going to tell the
King.
This is very serious! exclaimed Drakey Lakey. I will come too. And they set off
together.
A little way down the road they met Foxy Loxy.
Hello, my seven friends. Where are you off to? he asked. So they told Foxy Loxy that
they sky had fallen on Chicken Littles head and they were going to tell the King.

Third Grade, Alice in Wonderland

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Appendix C, page three


Do you know where the King lives? asked Foxy Loxy.
No, we dont. Can you tell us, please? they replied.
Certainly I can. Just follow me, said the fox.
But Foxy Loxy took them straight to his den, where Mrs. Foxy Loxy and all the little
Foxy Loxys were waiting for their dinner. The foxes ate up poor Chicken Little, Henny Penny,
Cocky Locky, Ducky Lucky, Drakey Lakey, Goosey Loosey, and Turkey Lurkey. So they never
did tell the King that the sky was falling down.
The End

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Appendix D, page one

The Shoemaker and the Elves


Adapted from The Random House Book of Nursery Stories

Long ago there lived an honest shoemaker and his wife. Although they worked hard,
they never had enough money and they grew poorer and poorer. They day came when the
shoemaker had only enough leather to make one more pair of shoes. That evening, as he always
did, he cut out the leather pieces and laid them on the workbench, ready for the next day. Then
he went to bed.
Early next morning, he went back to his bench to start work, but there, to his amazement,
stood a finished pair of shoes! They were perfect not a stitch missing, not a stitch wrong. Who
had done the work?
Later on, a customer came to the little shop. The shoes pleased him so much that he
happily paid double the usual price for them. With the money, the shoemaker was able to buy
enough leather to make two pairs of shoes. That evening he cut the pieces of leather an laid them
out, ready for the next day. When he got up in the morning, once again the work was done!
There on the bench were two pairs of perfect shoes not a stitch missing, not a stitch wrong.
Two customers came that morning and paid a good price for the perfect shoes. Now the
shoemaker was able to buy enough leather for four pairs of shoes. He cut out the leather that
night, and in the morning, as before, the shoes were ready. The shoemaker sold all four pairs for
a good price.
This went on for many months, and the shoemaker and his wife grew very rich. Just
before Christmas they were sitting by the fire, talking.
I would like to stay up tonight, said the shoemaker, and see who is doing the work that
helps us so much.

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Appendix D, page two


His wife agreed, and so they left a candle burning on the workbench, hid themselves
behind a curtain, and waited.
On the stroke of midnight, two tiny elves crept through a gap in the door. Despite the
cold snow outside, the elves wore not a stitch of clothing! They climbed onto the shoemakers
bench and started to work. They stitched and hammered and hammered and stitched at such a
speed that the shoemaker and his wife were amazed.
Soon they were finished. There on the bench stood a whole row of perfect shoes! Not a
stitch missing, not a stitch wrong! The elves jumped down and vanished through the gap in the
door. The next morning the shoemakers wife said, Those little people have made us rich and
comfortable. We ought to do something for them in return. The poor little things have no
clothes to keep them warm. I will make them each a little shirt and a coat, a waistcoat and a pair
of trousers, and you can make them each a pair of little boots.
This idea pleased the shoemaker. He went to choose the softest leather for the little
boots, while his wife searched for the brightest piece of cloth she could find. Then they set to
work, stitching and sewing.
At last, on Christmas Eve, the clothes were ready. The shoemaker and is wife laid out the
garments on the workbench instead of the pieces of leather. Then they hid themselves behind the
curtain again and waited.
On the stroke of midnight, the elves appeared through the gap in the door and went to
start their work. But instead of the pieces of leather, they found the little clothes lying on the
workbench. Quick as lightning, they put them on. Everything fit perfectly not too tight, not

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Appendix D, page three


too loose. They elves were delighted, and they danced around the workshop until they danced
right through the gap in the door, out into the snowy street, and away.
The shoemaker and his wife never saw the elves again. But from that time on, the shoes
the shoemaker stitched and hammered were the best in the land, and he and his wife were never
poor again.
The End

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Appendix E
Name___________________________________________________Date__________________

Fairy Tales Web

Fairy
Tales

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Appendix F

Checklist for Family Fairytale


Name___________________________________________ Date______________
Criterion

Yes

No

Comments

Students name is clearly written


on paper.
Student chose a common fairy
tale to adapt.
Student rewrote fairy tale in
his/her own words.
Student inserted names of family
or friends in place of typical
characters names.
Student used correct
capitalization.
Student used correct
punctuation.
Student showed correct word
usage.
Students story has beginning,
middle, and end.
Student used time wisely and
worked diligently.
Student turned in work on time.

Total points possible:_______ Total points earned: __________

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Appendix G

Words & Definitions from Lewis Carrolls Alice in Wonderland


Antipathies:
Croquet:
Currant:
Curtsey:
Eaglet:
Hatter:
Ignorant:
Incessantly:
Latitude:
Longitude:
Looking glass:
Marmalade:
Pun:
Savage:
Serpent:
Simpleton:
Titter:
Venture:
Verdict:
Vulgar:

Third Grade, Alice in Wonderland

strong feelings of dislike


a game in which players drive wooden balls with mallets through a
series of wickets set out on a lawn
small seedless raisin
an act of politeness or respect made mainly by women; slight
lowering of the body by bending the knees
baby eagle
person who makes, sells, cleans, or repairs hats
having little knowledge
going on without stopping
the distance north or south of the equator measured in degrees
distance measured in degrees east or west of a line drawn between
the north and south poles
mirror
a jam containing pieces of fruit
a joke in which a person uses a word in two senses
a cruel person
a usually large snake
a foolish, stupid person
to giggle
to take a risk
decision reached by a jury
having poor manners

2003 Colorado Summer Writing Institute

37

Appendix H

Tall or Short Tale Checklist


Name___________________________________________ Date______________
Criterion
Students name is clearly written
on paper.

Yes

No

Comments

Student included first detail of


how life would be different if
they were much shorter/taller.
Student included second detail of
how life would be different if
they were much shorter/taller.
Student included third detail of
how life would be different if
they were much shorter/taller.
Student included fourth detail of
how life would be different if
they were much shorter/taller.
Student used correct
capitalization.
Student used correct
punctuation.
Student showed correct word
usage.
Students story has beginning,
middle, and end.
Student used time wisely and
worked diligently.
Student worked well with
partner(s).
Student turned in work on time.

Total points possible:_______


Third Grade, Alice in Wonderland

Total points earned: __________

2003 Colorado Summer Writing Institute

38

Appendix I

Exit Slips
Exit Slip

Name__________________________________

Exit Slip

Name__________________________________

Exit Slip

Name__________________________________

Third Grade, Alice in Wonderland

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Third Grade, Alice in Wonderland

Student included
three of the four
components of the
correct friendly letter
form.

Student had one or


two misspelled words.

Student had one or


two capitalization or
punctuation
mistake(s).

Student had no misspelled


words.

Student used correct


capitalization and
punctuation.

Student stated
whether they liked the
poem and included
one reason to support
why they liked or
disliked the poem.

Student stated whether they


liked the poem and included
two reasons to support why
they liked or disliked the
poem.

Student wrote letter in


proper form (date, greeting,
body, closing).

2003 Colorado Summer Writing Institute

Student had
three
capitalization or
punctuation
mistake(s).

Student had
three misspelled
words.

Student
included two of
the four
components of
the correct
friendly letter
form.

Student stated
whether they or
not they liked
the poem, but
they did not
include reasons.

Student had four


or more
capitalization or
punctuation
mistake(s).

Student had four


or more
misspelled words.

Student included
one or no
components of the
correct friendly
letter form.

Student did not


include if they
liked the poem,
and they did not
include any
reasons.

Score

Comments

Appendix J

Rubric for Friendly Letters

40

Appendix K, page one

Father William, by Lewis Carroll


You are old, Father William, the young man said.
And your hair has become very white.
And yet you incessantly stand on your head
Do you think at your age, it is right?

In my youth, Father William replied to his son,


I feared it might injure the brain;
But now that Im perfectly sure I have none,
Why, I do it again and again.

You are old, said the youth, as I mentioned before,


And grown most uncommonly fat;
Yet you turned a back somersault in at the door
Pray, what is the reason of that?

In my youth, said the sage, as he shook his gray locks,


I kept all my limbs very supple
By use of this ointment one shilling the box
Allow me to sell you a couple.

You are old, said the youth, and your jaws are too weak
For anything other than suet;

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Appendix K, page two


Yet you finished the goose, with the bones and the beak
Pray, how did you manage to do it?

In my youth, said his father, I took to the law,


And argued each case with my wife;
And the muscular strength, which it gave to my jaw,
Has lasted the rest of my life.

You are old, said the youth, one would hardly suppose
That your eye is as steady as ever;
Yet you balanced an eel on the end of your nose
What makes you so awfully clever?

I have answered three questions, and that is enough,


Said his father, dont give yourself airs!
Do you think I can listen all day to such stuff?
Be off, or Ill kick you down stairs.

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Appendix L

Character Diagram for students


Alice

Cheshire Cat

White Rabbit

Queen of Hearts

King of Hearts

Duchess

Mad Hatter

March Hare

Dormouse

Caterpillar

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Appendix M

Character Diagram for Teachers


Alice

Seven year old girl, active imagination, very smart, polite,


kind, brave

Cheshire Cat

Grinning cat, appears and disappears, claims to be mad, listens


to Alice, becomes her friend

White Rabbit

Nervous, important in Wonderland, in a hurry

Queen of Hearts

Mean woman, queen of Wonderland, orders for everyones


heads to be cut off, but they never are

King of Hearts

Husband to the queen, not really a ruler, self-centered,


stubborn

Duchess

Old woman, mistreats her baby, ugly, abused by her cook

Mad Hatter

Sells hats, stuck in tea-time, often impolite, confusing to people

March Hare

Mad Hatters friend, crazy, rude

Dormouse

Hares friend, Hatters friend, sleepy

Caterpillar

Hookah-smoking, insect, gives Alice the mushroom, which


helps her change her size, unfriendly, but helpful

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Appendix N
Sample Character Mobile

Alice

Alice is smart.

Alice is brave.

Alice is kind.

Alice is like me
because
Third Grade, Alice in Wonderland

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3
Student chose a
character from the
story, only listed two
attributes of that
character, and told
how that character is
similar to self.

Student had one or


two misspelled words.

Student used some


color and detail to
decorate their mobile.

Student used time


wisely, showed good
effort, and turned
assignment in on time.

Student chose a character


from the story, listed three
attributes of that character,
and told how that character
is similar to himself or
herself.

No misspelled words

Third Grade, Alice in Wonderland

Student used much color


and detail to decorate their
mobile.

2003 Colorado Summer Writing Institute

Student used time wisely,


showed excellent effort, and
turned assignment in on
time.

Student used
time wisely,
showed minimal
effort, and
turned
assignment in
on time.

Student used
little color and
detail to
decorate their
mobile.

Student had
three misspelled
words.

Student chose a
character from
the story, listed
one attribute,
and told how
that character is
similar to self.

Student did not


use time wisely,
showed minimal
effort, and turned
assignment in
late.

Student used no
color or detail to
decorate their
mobile.

Student had four


or more
misspelled words.

Student listed no
attributes of that
character, and did
not tell how
character is
similar to self.

Score

Comments

Appendix O

Rubric for Character Mobile

46

Third Grade, Alice in Wonderland

Students illustrated
the event with some
color, detail, and
accuracy.

Students had one or


two misspelled words.

Students had one or


two capitalization or
punctuation
mistake(s).

Student had no misspelled


words.

Student used correct


capitalization and
punctuation.

Students retold event


in their own words,
including some details
important to the
event.

Students retold event in


their own words, including
all details important to the
event.

Students illustrated the


event with much color,
detail, and accuracy.

2003 Colorado Summer Writing Institute

Students had
three
capitalization or
punctuation
mistake(s).

Students had
three misspelled
words.

Students
illustrated the
event with little
color, detail,
and accuracy.

Students retold
event in their
own words,
including few
details
important to the
event.

Students had four


or more
capitalization or
punctuation
mistake(s).

Students had four


or more
misspelled words.

Students
illustrated the
event with no
color, detail, and
accuracy.

Students did not


tell the story in
their own words
and did not
include important
details.

Score

Comments

Appendix P

Rubric for Class Version of Alice in Wonderland

47

Appendix Q, page one

Test on Alice in Wonderland


Name __________________________________ Date______________
Match the following characters with their description.
_____ 1. Alice
a.

Hares friend, Hatters friend, sleepy

b.

Husband to the queen, not really a


ruler, self-centered, stubborn

c.

Nervous, important in Wonderland, in


a hurry

d.

Seven-year-old girl, active


imagination, very smart, polite, kind,
brave.

e.

Sells hats, stuck in tea-time, often


impolite, confusing to people.

f.

Old woman, mistreats her baby, ugly,


abused by her cook.

g.

Mad Hatters friend, crazy, rude

h.

Hookah-smoking, insect, gives Alice


the mushroom, which helps her
change her size, unfriendly, but
helpful

i.

Mean woman, orders everyones head


to be cut off, but they never are

j.

Grinning, appears and disappears,


claims to be mad, listens to Alice,
becomes her friend.

_____ 2. Cheshire Cat


_____ 3. White Rabbit
_____ 4. Queen of Hearts
_____ 5. King of Hearts
_____ 6. Duchess
_____ 7. Mad Hatter
_____ 8. March Hare
_____ 9. Dormouse
_____ 10. Caterpillar

Third Grade, Alice in Wonderland

2003 Colorado Summer Writing Institute

48

Appendix Q, page two

Read each question carefully. Write the best answer on the line.
11.a. There are many examples of cause and effect in the story. List one example.
_________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________
11.b. Tell how you think the story may have changed if this cause and effect had
not happened.
_________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________

12. Which character was your favorite? Why? Tell three attributes about this
character, and how is this character similar to you.
_________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________

Circle the best answer.


13. Alice followed ____________ down the hole into Wonderland.
a. Her cat, Dinah
b. White Rabbit
c. Dormouse
d. A grasshopper

Third Grade, Alice in Wonderland

2003 Colorado Summer Writing Institute

49

Appendix Q, page three

14. What happened to Alice when she drank the bottle that said, Drink Me?
a.
She became very small.
b.
She choked because it was poison.
c.
She became very thirsty.
d.
She became very sleepy.
15. Which poem was NOT included in Alice in Wonderland?
a.
Father William
b.
The Queens Game of Croquet
c.
The Crocodile
16. What is the message to the reader in the poem, The Bee?
a. Its important to water your flowers.
b. Raise your hand before you speak.
c. Obey your parents.
d. Make good choices and use your time wisely, just like bees do.
17. Circle the TWO poems that are similar to each other.
a. The Bee
b. Father William
c. The Crocodile
d. The Queens Game of Croquet

18. Alice in Wonderland is a story filled with many interesting events. On a


separate piece of paper, write a paragraph about one of these events. Be sure to
include:
What led up to the event
Who was involved,
What actually happened
What came right after this event in the story
Why this event was important to the story

Third Grade, Alice in Wonderland

2003 Colorado Summer Writing Institute

50

Appendix Q, page four

Test Answer Key


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

d
j
c
i
b
f
e
g
a
h

11.

Answers will vary. Student should include one cause from the
story, its effect, and how the story may have changed if this had
not happened. For example, if Alice had not drunk the bottle that
said Drink Me, she would not have become small. If she had not
become small, she would not been able to fit through the door to
get into the garden, and she never would have met all of her friends
in Wonderland.

12.

Answers will vary. Student should write about a character from


the story, tell three attributes about that character, and tell how that
character is similar to himself or herself.

13.
14.
15.
16.
17.

b
a
b
d
a, c

18.

Answers will vary. Student should write about an event from the
story. The paragraph should include:
What led up to the event
Who was involved,
What actually happened
What came right after this event in the story
Why this event was important to the story

Third Grade, Alice in Wonderland

2003 Colorado Summer Writing Institute

51