Anda di halaman 1dari 53

ILJOUDAL

WINTER 1995

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center
Butch Cassidy's Family, The Parkers

In This Issue:
Lula Parker Betenson
Bandit Hunter-F.M. Hans
Frontiersman-W.B. TenBroeck
More on Butch

$5.00

Published By The Outlaw Trail History Association

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

THE OUTLAW TRAIL JOURNAL

Managing Editor: Joy T. Horton

Associate Editor: Dorts K. Burton

OUTLAW TRAIL HISTORY ASSOCIATION

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Richard Wm. Horton, Chairman

Doris K. Burton, Secretary

Joy Horton, Treasurer

John D. Barton

ADVISORY BOARD

Edward M. Kirby

Kenneth Jessen

Gail Olson

Jim Beckstead

Roy P. O'dell

Jesse Cole Kenworth

H. Bert Jenson

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

The OUTLAW TRAIL JOURNAL is supplied to all members of the


Outlaw Trail History Association, and is also available through
purchase. Membership in the association is open to anyone
interested in the history and culture of the West. Applications for
membership should be sent to Doris Burton, Uintah County
Library, Outlaw Trail History Association and Center, 155 East
Main Street, Vernal, Utah 84078. Annual Dues are $15.00.
Members receive the JOURNAL, newsletters, and reduced rates
for research and copying fees through the CENTER.

Publication of the OUTLAW TRAIL JOURNAL is made possible


through grants and assistance from:
Uintah County Library
Uintah County
Utah State University; Uintah Basin Education Center
The Outlaw Trail History Association

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

J
Winter 1995

Contents
Lula Parker Betenson
Frederick M. Hans, the Bandit Hlmter
William B. TenBroeck

Bill Betenson

Roy O'Dell

12

From the files of the 21


Outlaw Trail Center

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

Pat's Hole named for Pat Lynch

Doris Karren Burton 27

Folktales from the Outlaw Trail

36

Books Reviewed:

Sometimes Cassidy"

41

In depth eview by Bill Buchanan

New Books received at the Outlaw Trail Center

48

Cover Photo:@ Furnished by Bill Betenson whose article appears on


Page 2 of this journal. Parker family taken in ji"ont of their brick home in
1923 at the time of Nina's funeral. Left to Right: Dan, Blanch, Bill, Lula,
Max, Leona, Mark, Knell, len, Rawlins, Eb.

"The Outlaw Trail Journal" is a jO~trnal of history publisl,('d semi-annually by the Outlaw Trail
History Association. It is a journal dedicated to the preservation and research of the history of the
Outlaw Trail, the greater Uintah Basin region and the Intermountain West. Historic interpretation
of articles are the allthors' and do not necessanly reflect those of the Outlaw Trail History
Association. Manuscripts for journal articles or folk-tales are welcome. Article manllscripts should
be submitted in duplicate, double-spaced, with footnotes following the Turabian style of annotation
Folk Tale manuscripts need not be annotated. If possible, please nclude a copy of the manuscript
on a disk if typed on WordPerfect. Please send all manuscripts Jor consideration of publication to
the Managing Editor, The Outlaw Trail History Center, 155 East Main Street, Vernal, Ut. 84078.
Manuscripts will not be returned unless a self addressed, stamped envelope is included.

Copyright 1995

The Outlaw Trail History Associati n

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

THE OUTLA W TRAIL JOURNAL

(The author, Bill Betenson is a project engineerfor Questar Pipeline


Co and a great grandson of Lula Parker Betenson. Bill lives in
Bountiful, Utah where he grew up and he and his wife, Elizabeth
have four children. Bill attended Brigham Young University at
Provo, Utah. He plans to re-publish Lula's book, Butch Cassidy,
NIl! Brother, with updates and a new section on Dan Parker.)

LULA PARKER BETENSON


1995, Bill Betenson
It is the summer of 1968 and filming of the movie, Bu tch Cassidy and
the Sundance Kid on location in Snow Canyon near St. George, Utah is
under way. The film company representatives have just learned that
Butch Cassidy's real sister is alive and living in the nearby town of
Circleville, Utah. They decide to invite her to the set. At 85 years of
age, Lula Parker Betenson, active and eager to get out and meet new
people, considers it a privilege to be invited to the set. Lula especially
loves the opportunity to talk about her br th 1". She arrives at the set
and is introduced to the actor, Paul Newman, who is portraying her
brother in the movie. Paul jokingly greets Lula with a smile and says,
"Hi, lim Butch." Lula wittingly replies, "Hi, I'm your sister."l
GROWING UP
Lula was born Lula Christine Parker on April 5, 1884, in the tiny
southern Utah town of Spry.2 Her mother was working at the time on
the nearby Marshall Ranch, which was considered a part of the town
of Spry.3 She was the ninth of thirteen children born to Maximillian
and Ann Gillies Parker. Of course, her oldest brother, Robert Leroy
Parker (or Bob as the family called him), later became known as one
of the most famous outlaws of all time, Butch Cass' dy. Following Bob
in age by nineteen months was Daniel Sinclair Parker. Dan was also
an outlaw for a short time. Following Dan in age was Arthur, Jen, Bill,
Knell, Eb, Blanch, then Lula, and follOWing Lula was Mark, Nina,
Leona, and Rawlins. 4
Lula grew up on the Parker Ranch in Circle Valley! which is still
loca ted three miles south of the town of Circleville, Utah. Lilla loved
her family and was proud to be a Parker. T e Parkers were an
extremely close-knit family. Because the ranch was somewhat iso
lated from town, the family had to furnish their own hm. Lula
recalled that the family gathered together every night. Both
Maximillian and Annie wo Id sing and tell stones to the c ldren. 5

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

THE OUTLA W TRAIL JOURNAL

Parkers with "Old Jack", Left to right: Leona, Mark (an Old Jack), Eb
(standing infront of Old Jack), Rawlings (in buggy), Lula (face blurred),
Annie (mother), Nina, Knell. This photo was taken about 1895 at the
Parker Ranch. Lula moved her head during the exposure and later
scratched her face out on her copy. (Photo courtesy the author).

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

Lula & Jose Betenson


near Kanab, Utah, 1930,
(Photo CDtlrtesy the
author).

Lula Parker Berenson


taken when she was young,.
(Photo courtesy the
author).

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

THE OUTLAW TRAIL JOURNAL

Music seemed to be an important part of growing up in th Park r


family.
Times were tough, in terms of money, growing up in eircl Valley.
The Parkers were rather poor. Maximillian and Annie were forced to
take jobs that often took them away from home. Annie worked
summers on the Marshall Ranch, which was about twelve miles outh
of Circleville. She ran a dairy, making cheese and butter to seU. 6
Maximillian hauled cord wood to the charcoal burners in Fri co, Utah
and Pioche, Nevada.? He also carried the mail fr m Beaver to
Panguitch, Utah. 8 Lula says she remembers having to get by with
homemade items like their winter sleigh. She said when the Parker
children went to town and "saw so many fancy boughten sl ighs, we
felt we weren't as good as the other people in town."9
The Parkers had an uncommon knack for giving everyone and
everything "nicknames". For example, everyone in the family usually
went by their nicknames and not by their given names. Lula's
nicknames were "Cute" and "Hag" depending on what type of mood
her brothers were in. I always knew Lula by the nickname," ana."
Lula also went by the nickname, "Lulu." Lula's sons, Mark and Scott
worked for Lula's brothers on the Parker Ranch and their nicknames
where, "Sam Bass" and "Alonzo Hancock," respectively. Mark'
paychecks were, in fact, made out to "Sam Bass" and not Mark
Betenson. lO
The Parkers were great lovers of horses. This was demon trated
by the fact that many of her brothers, incl uding Butch had a good sense
for "fine horse flesh." In recalling her childho d, Lula tells the story
of "Old Jack", the family horse. Lula recalled that her sister, ina, her
brother, Mark, and herself had gone into town in their homemade
sleigh, on their return trip a terrible blizzard hit. The drifting snow
was so dense, that they could not see where they were going. Lula said
that "being girl-like", she and Nina started to cry. Mark said to them
"Don't worry. Old Jack knows the way. He'll get us home." SoMark
gave Old Jack his head and sure enough, Old Jack finally pulled the
three into the yard. Lula said, "We were cold and frightened but home
safe at last. There was no place like home, believe me!"l1
When Lula was in her teens, the family moved from the ranch to
a red brick horne in Circleville. 12 The horne is still existing and is
presently being lived in by an unrelated family. This is the same brick
horne, the Parker family was living in, in 1925, when Butch returned
horne.
PERFORMING
Beginning at an early age, Lula was outgoing and social and loved
to perform for people. Growing up, Lula san in glee clubs and for

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

THE OUTLA W TH.AlL JOURNAL

local community prog ams. One of her favorite solos was, "Where the
ilver Colorado Wends Its Way." Lula said that on the 4th of July,
groups of people in town would get up at dawn and load into wagons,
then ride from house to house singing patriotic songs. 13
As a young lady she joined the Walter's Thea trical Stock Company
and traveled with them throughout Utah and Idaho. The company
traveled by horse and buggy from one community to another and
played three or five night stands, doing a different play each night.
Lula said she especially remembered doing, "Jack 0' Diamonds" in
which she had an excellent part. I4
Lula al 0 spent many years as drama director in auxiliaries of the
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. IS
MARRIAGE AND CHILDREN
Lula enjoyed performing so much she found it difficult to leave the
theater. She said) "I had a very happy young life and wasn't anxious
to settle down." However, she met the man of her dreams who was
Iso from Circleville. Lula said, "when Joseph Betenson asked me to
marry him, I knew I couldn't find a better man in the whole world."16
Lul married Joseph Adelbert Betenson ("Jose" rhymes with close) on
New Years Eve, December 31, 1907.17 Lula and Jose settled in
Circleville and raised five children, three boys and two girls, Pauline,
Mark, Scott, John and Barbara. Lula was an extremely devoted wife
and mother. 511. loved children dearly.
After forty years of marriage, Jose died unexpectedly of a heart
ttack on July 8,1948. 8 Lula described his death as the" greatest loss
in my lif ." Jose had made many friends in his life and at his funerat
a neighbor told Lula that, "We have come to mourn the richest man in
own - not in man y, but in respect of his fellowmen and in friends." 19
POLITICS
After her husband's death, Lula kept herself busy in church and
community service. Lula loved her country and was active in politics.
She served as a messenger in the Utah House of Representatives for
two terms 20 and was the democratic chairwoman of Piute County,
Utah for 28 years. 21 Lula loved a heated political debate even into her
later years. 22
In 1962, Governor George D. Clyde appointed Lula as the Piute
County representative to the Utah Legislature upon a vacancy. As a
repre entative, Lula fought hard for better schools, decentralization
of government with more local controt better roads, employment and
education projects for the idle youth and for boosting the economy of
Utah's ral counties. 23

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

FAMILY

Since Lula tayed and raised her family in Circleville, she re

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

THE OUTLAW TRAIL JOURNAL

mained close to her father and cared for him. Lula was the only
daughter that remained in Circleville after marriage. 24 Maximillian
was a widower for 33 years and only two ofLula's se en brothers, Dan
and Bill, married. Three brothers lived with their father in Circleville,
Eb, Mark and Rawlins. Besides raising her own family, Lula "moth
ered" her father and her three brothers.
Maximillian was a kind man. He was a quiet unassuming man and
was often called, "the silent giver."25 He made sure the widows in
town were cared for and often left his homegrown vegetables on their
porches. Lula said he was never cranky or crotchety 26 and never laid
a hand on his children?? His children had grea t respect for him and
when he spoke, they listened.
Maximillian was also popular with th youngpeople. Lula recalls,
"He played marbles with the neighborhood boys until he was ninety
years old and usually beat them too--unless he wanted to inflate some
boy's ego by intentionally losing."28
Lula recalls finding her father bottling, "fresh peaches". She tells,
"One day I went down and he was peeling peaches. I had always
supplied him with bottled fruit. Slowly and carefully he was putting
the peeled peaches into the most haphazard collection of bottles I had
ever seen. I asked what he was doing, since the peaches had all turned
dark from being in the air so long without cooking. He said he was
canning 'fresh' peaches. He intend d to put some lids on them, add
sugar and pretty soon put them on the shelves. I laughed and said,
'But, Dad, they won't keep unless you cook them.' 'Cook them!' he
exclaimed. 'Then why do they call them fresh peaches?/f' So
Maximillian made jam with his fresh peaches. 29
OUTLAWS
As Lula grew older and with her lov for her family and with the
popularity of Butch Cassidy that seemed to explode with the release
of the 1969 movie, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, Lula began to
correspond with many people throughout the world abouther brother,
Butch. She began to grow tired of the outrageous stories and total
untruths that were written in newspapers and books about her
brother.
Several years before the movie was released, Lula had started
writing a book about her brother to set the record straight. Certain
family members opposed her writing a book about Butch because it
had been a great family embarrassment f r many years. In fact, a
family pact was made between Maximillian and the children about
Butch's death. Although discussions about Butch would corne up,
Butch was not discussed openly until the 1950's. After many years
Lula finally published, Butch Cassidy, My Brother in 1975 at the age of

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

THE OUTLAW

RAIL JOURNAL

91.

There were many th' gs that Lula kept secret about her brother
because of prom'ses she had made to her father and family, many
years earlier. However, most significantly, she revealed that Butch
Cassidy was not killed in South America, but had returned to Circleville
to visit the family in 1925. 30 Lula knew where Butch died and where
he was buried and swore she would never tell where he was buried,

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center
Parker Ranch, 1988. (Photo courtesy the author).

Photo taken in the early 1970's of Lula Parker Betenson. (Photo


courtesy the author).

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

THE OUTLAW TRAIL JOURNAL

in order to protect his grave site. She knew that if she told, his remains
would be disturbed. In the early 1970's, for example, the graves of
outlaws, Joe Walker and Johnny Herring were exhumed in Price,
Utah. This bothered Lula gr atly. She said that Butch had been chased
his whole life and sh wanted his remains to rest in peace. Recently,
the digging up of graves has become even more common with it being
done in South America and here in the United States for D.N.A.
testing.
Lula traveled extensively in her later years. She traveled to New
York and to Conn cticut for the premier of Butch Cassidy and the
Sundance Kid 31 and appeared on radio and television programs. She
also traveled throughout the west to autograph her book and to attend
Outlaw conventions.
Another brother, Dan Parker, who Lula adored, started down the
wrong road like his brother, Butch Cassidy. Dan left home about a
year after Butch had left home. Dan was convicted of robbing the U.s.
mail near Baggs, Wyoming with another outlaw named William
Brown. At the time, the Parkers were particularly poor and were
unable to travel from Circleville to Cheyenne to attend Dan's trial.
Dan wrote to his father pleading for his assistance. Dan had no money
and needed help in securing funds to provide witnesses who lived in
the Vernal area, to att nd the trial and testify in Dan's behalf.
Maximillian was extremely ill at the time. The Parkers were unable
to come up with the funds and the trial went forth without any
witnesses for the defen 'ants. Dan was sentenced to life imprisonment
at hard labor in the Detroit House of Corrections. After nearly seven
years in prison, Dan was pardoned by U. S. President William
McKinley.32 Dan returned home to Utah and was later married and
raised ten childr n. Even though Dan had been an outlaw in his
younger days, he had reformed and raised a family. Lula did not want
to hurt any of his family, so she decided to not write about Dan's
outlaw days in her boo.
Like her brother Butch Cassidy, Lula empathized with the "under
dog" and fought for their cause. She was a classy lady with a lot of
spirit and zest for life, ven into her nineties.
On May 5, 198033 Lilla passed away after suffering a paralyzing
stroke in the Panguitch Hospital at the age of 96. Lula was preceded
in death by her twelv brothers and sisters.
Lula was survived by her five children, Mark Betenson and John
Betenson both of Circlevill , Scott Betenson and Pauline Betenson
(Applegate) both of Kanab and Barbara Betenson (Carlson) of S.L.e.
At th~ time Lula had seven grandchildren, seventeen great grandchil
dren and two great reat grandchildren. 34

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

THE OUTLA W TRAIL JOURNAL

Funeral services were held on a cold overcast spring day at 1:00


pm on Friday May 9,1980 at the Circleville LOS second ward chape1.35
I had the privilege of being one of her pallbearers. Lula was buried in
the Circleville cemetery.
I will always remember what a great and kind lady Lula was. She
had a contagious personality, that made peopl ar01.md her feel good.
She always had a twinkle in her brown eyes. Lula was a dainty lady
who always tried to look her best. She treated all of her friends and
family with respect and kindness.
Lula is sorely missed. She lived a full life and was a great example
to all those who had the privilege to know her.
*

* *
Soon after Lula's death, a local hi torian appeared on the Salt Lake
television news claiming that Lula had confirmed to him from her
hospital bed where Butch was buried. He further claimed that Lula
asked him to not reveal the story until after her death. The n ws
program took the so called "historian" and their camera by helicopter
to Johnny, Nevada and a pile of rocks was identified as Butch's grave.
The sad part of the whole fiasco, was that Lula was paralyzed on one
side of her body and could not speak. I know this to be true because
I visited her in the hospitaL
Other writers have criticized Lula's book and story since her
passing, mainly because she would not reveal where Butch was
buried. Still others claim she was not telling the truth based on
interviews with other family members. These stores are unfounded.
These particu]ar famly members were not in Circleville in 1925. Some
writers seem to twist the facts to support their theories. I have tried
to stay abreast of most of what as been w tten, although a lot has
been written over the years, no definitive proof has been given to
disprove her claims that Butch came back in 1925. There were other
members of th family who saw Butch when he came back and
confirmed Lula's story. For example, her own son.. Mark Betenson
was at the ranch when Butch came back. Mark said he did in fact see
ButchCassidy. Later, during Butch's visit with his family, Butch went
with his brothers up to Dog Valley, located in the mountains west of
the ranch. Mark being a boy of eleven at the time, was sent home when
Butch arrived. Later Butch's brother, Eb told Mark who the man was
when Mark had been sent home from Dog Valley. This experience by
Mark Betenson was recently confirmed to me by Mark's widow,
Vivian Betenson who still live in Circleville, Utah and by my grand
father, who is a brother to Mark, Scott Betenson. 30

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

10

THE OUTLA W TRAIL JOURNAL

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

Lula and Jose in front of the Betenson home in Circleville, Utah.


Standing left to right. Ed Betenso/!, Lula, Jose, Glen Betenson (boy in
front of Jose), Leon Johnson, Addie Gottfredson, nvo boys-Leland and
Blaine Berellson. Sitting: Maggie Peterson, Emma Dalton and Nina
Parker. (Photo courtesy the author).

Parke r brick home, J994. (Photo courtesy the author).

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

THE OUTLAW TRAIL JOURNAL

11

NO TES" 7
l.lnterview with L I. Parker i.~tenson by Dora Flack on October 31, 1974.

2.Family records in the possession of the author.

3.Betenson, Lula Park and Dora Flack, Butch Cassidy. My Brother, (Provo, Utah:

Brigham Young University Press, 1975), 42.


4.Family records in possession of the author.
5.Betenson and Flack, Butch Cassidy, My Brother, 34.
6. Ibid, 40.

7.Piute County News, Marysvale, Utah, August 5, 1938.

8.Betenson and Flack, Butch Cassidy, My Brother, 31.

9, Betenson, Lula Parker and Flack, Dora, (An unpublished manuscript), 97.

10.Conversation between Scott Parker Betenson and the author.

II.Betenson and Flack, (An unpublished manuscript), 97.

12.Betenson and Flack, Butch Cassidy, My Brother, 235.

13,Betenson and Flack, (An unpublished manuscript), I.

14. Ibid, 2,

15,Salt Lake Tribune. Salt Lake City, Utah, May 7, 1980.

16.Betenson and Flack, (An unpublished manuscript), 2.

I7.Family records in the possession of the author.

18.Salt Lake Telegram, Salt Lake City, Utah, July 10, 1948 and family records in

possession of author.
19.Betenson and Flack, (An unpublished manuscript), 4,5.
20.Betenson and Flack,Butch Cassidy. May Brother, dust jacket.
21.Salt Lake Tribune, Salt Lake City, Utah, April 22, 1962
22,Betenson and Flack, Butch Cassidy. My Brother, dust jacket and conversation
between Scott Parker Betenson and the author.
23.Salt Lake Tribune. Salt Lake City, Utah, April 22, 1962.
24.Betenson and Flack Butch Cassidy, My Brother, 175.
25.Piute County News. Marysvale, Utah, August 5, 1938.
26.Betenson and Flack, (An unpublished manuscript), 3.
27.lbid, 4.
28.lbid, 4.
29.lbid, 3.
30.Betenson and Flack, Butch Cassidy. My Brother, 175-196.
31.lnterview with Lula parker Betenson by Dora Flack on October 31, 1974.
32. Frye, Elnora L., Atlas of Wyoming Outlaws at the Territorial Penitentiary, (Laramie,
Wyoming: Jelm Mountain Press, 1990), 259.
33.Lula Parker Betenson 's funeral services program and Deseret News, Salt Lake City,
Utah, May 7-8, 1980.
34.Deseret News, Salt Lake City, Utah, May 7-8, 1980.
35.Lula Parker Betenson 's funeral services program.
36. Conversations between Vivian Betenson and Scott Parker Betenson and the author.
37.0ther items not noted are personal reminiscences and conversations with Luta and
other family members.

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

THE OUTLA W TRAIL JOURNAL

12

(Editors note - This is the first article Mr. O'Dell has written for
the Outlaw Trail Journal. He serves on our Advisory Board and
resides in Cambridge, England. Our last newsletter carried a
story about Roy.)

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

MILD MANNERED BUT DANGEROUS:


FREDERICK M. HANS,
THE BANDIT HUNTER

By Roy O'Dell

Strange as it may seem Frederick M. Hans is all but forgotten today


in the annals of the wild west. During his eventful life he became an
Indian fighter, scout and lawman. 1 Fred Hans started his career at the
early age of sixteen years when he left horne to look for his brother,
who had been kidnapped by the Sioux. Subsequently he became
known by the Indians as "Lone Star."
Within a short time his reputation grew, he became famous fo his
pistol ability, using the cross-draw method and firing not by pulling
the trigger but by fanning the hammer with his thumb, by which
method he claimed he could fire six shots faster than anyone using a
modern automatic.
On January 24, at Custer City, Dakota Territory, about forty-five
miles southwest of Custer a posse of twenty men had a shootout with
nine road agents or bandits, many of the outlaws were killed. The
outlaws were led by Bill Cole and had committed several robberies

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

THE OUTLA W TRAIL JOURNAL

13

and murders as well as stealing horses. Four of the outlaws were not
in the camp and were not captured or killed. The posse was led by
Dick McCormick and sixteen year old Fred Hans, and the posse was
probably the Black Hills Rangers who had been operating since 1875
in the vicinity of Custer in the Black Hills.
Hans first became famous in the Powder River area of Wyoming
in 1879 when he single-handedly killed Shacknasty Jim and gang
members, as the New York Times dated November 4,1900 reported:
"It was Fred Hans who went into the "Hole in the Wall" after

'Shacknasty Jim' and his outlaw band and killed the leader and
two of his companions before he returned. Again Fred Hans
met five members of the famous 'Robbers Roost' gang one
bright morning on the Running Water in South Dakota.
He had but shortly before that been instrumental in piloting a
posse of Custer citizens to the lair of the band where nine of
them had been killed, and they thought to get even. The five
road agents waited until Hans rode close to the sand hill be
hind which they were hiding, then rode down on him firing
their rifles as they galloped. A fortunate shot passed through
the heart of the horse that Hans was riding. Using the animal
for a shield, the railroad bandit hunter got out his heavy pistols
and began business right there. He only shot four times. The
first bullet he fired pass through the heart of the nearest bandit,
the next one struck one of the horses of the oncoming gang
and killed it, the third bullet passed through the head of
another bandit killing him instantly, and the fourth passed
through the body of one of the gang and he died later. The two
remaining members of the band surrendered and were taken
into Custer by Hans. The men killed on the spot were known
as "Texas Fleet-Foot" and "Mountain Pete." The other two
"Long Torn" and "Skinny," were sent to the penitentiary for
life. "

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

This version of events from the above newspaper was not quite
accurate. A shooting did occur on April 12, 1877 at Valentine,
Nebraska, about a mile east of Snake Creek, when sixteen year old
Fred Hans, while scouting for General MacKenzie, was attacked by
five horsemen who killed his horse, so hiding behind the dead animal
Hans first kills one outlaw's horse, his second shot strikes one of them
in the hip and he falls from his horse, firing again Hans shoots another
man in the heart and he is then grazed in the scalp. Hans then shoots

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

14

THE OUTLAW TRAIL JOURNAL

another man in the head and the other two outlaws surrender. The
man shot in the hip was not dead, but was partially paralyzed. Hans
took the wounded man plus the two captives to Fort Sheridan a ride
of 115 miles and had no sleep for fifty hours. The two dead men were
recognized as "Tex" and "Fleetfoot" of the Bill Cole gang and the
wounded man was recognized as "Mountain Pete."
Then during August the same year he was involved in a battle at
Little Missouri near the Black Hills, when he alone killed five Indians,
thus saving the lives of twenty prospectors.
On August 21, 1877 on the Little Missouri River border of South
Dakota and Montana, about seventy-eight Sioux Indians attacked a
party of twenty miners from Deadwood. The Indians killed Thomas
Carr and drove off the miners' horses while suffering seven Indians
killed and about ten wounded, the miners have a one-hundred mile
walk to Deadwood, but were not molested.
On August 26, at Deadwood, South Dakota, Fred Hans and Boone
May recognized five men who rode into town as being stage robbers.
May recognized two of them as the one who had robbed him earlier
in Wyoming, "The Shacknasty Jim Gang." Sheriff Seth Bullock and
May attempted to arrest the men when they left the post office, two
men were taken before they had mounted their horses but three were
mounted and attempted to escape. May wounded one of the outlaws
who shoots May in the left arm, the wounded man was captured but
the other two managed to escape. The local citizens wanted to hang
the three but later allowed the outlaws to be taken to Cheyenne,
Wyoming Territory to stand trial.
In 1878 Hans killed a bandit attempting a robbery at Ainsworth,
Nebraska. On July 2, at Bordeaux Creek, northwest Nebraska, scout
Fred Hans killed two Mexican horse thieves and recovered fifty-two
head of horses, a third horse thief escaped in the night.
On September 30,1878, at Sappa Creek, Kansas, Dull Knife and his
band of Cheyenne Indians killed thirteen settlers and kidnapped
several women. Two women, Mrs. Lou Van Cleave and her daughter
Eve were rescued by scout Fred M. Hans.
On August 9, 1879 at Red Fork tributary of Middle Powder River,
Big Horn Mountains, Wyoming, scout Fred Hans, while trailing horse
thieves, encountered Shacknasty Jim and Bill Cole. In resisting arrest
Jim was shot twice in the chest and Cole in the shoulder. The wounded
outlaws were taken to Fort McKinney, Wyoming arriving on August
12 and Jim died about midnight.
On August 20,1897, at Fort Mckinney, Wyoming, scout Fred Hans
arrived at the fort with outlaws Harry Keys and Tom Lawton. Hans
had captured the two outlaws when trailing horse thieves for the

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

THE OUTLA W TRAIL JOURNAL

15

cavalry. Keys and Lawton were the remnants of the Shacknasty Jim
gang. In the shootout a third outlaw Jack Hawkins was killed.
In 1890, at the battle of Wounded Knee, he reportedly killed eleven
Indians with twelve shots of his revolver, using his famous fanning
method. In 1897 he killed another bandit at Fremont, Nebraska.
All in all he was credited with the killing of eight white men and
twenty Indians, and liked to boast that "I was never beaten on the
draw."
He was Chief scout for General Phil Sh ridan for six years, Chief
Special Agent for the Northwestern Railroad for years, and official
war department investigator after the Custer Massacre. 2 He followed
Sitting Bull for 600 miles and persuaded him to return to the reserva
tion? He was also present at Sitting Bull's death.)
The New York Times dated November 4, 1900, gives us further
details about his career.
Fred Hans is a mild-mannered fellow with blue eyes and of
most affable address. As he saunters along the streets of
Omaha he is about the last man in the world one would pick ou t
for desperate work with rifle and revolver.
Yet this same pleasant appearing fellow, with his careless
smile, has been' mar desperate affrays with road agents,
killed more outlaws, and sent more to the penitentiaries than
any man in the west today. It is his business to locate all these
characters the moment a train is held up in his territory. Thus
he can very nearly place the resp nsibility or a train robbery
in the Northwest the day after it occurs.
Incidentally, it may be said that Fred Hans carries a con id
erable number of bullet wounds on his person, slight testimo
nials of his many desperate fights. He habitually wore a scalp
lock 18 inches long, curled up beneath a skull c p, but he had
it cut off a month before his death, when he wa crush d to
death in an el ator accident while working as a night watch
man in the Omaha-Herald plant at Omaha, Nebraska, on April
17, 1923.

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

The New York Tilnes dated July 10, 1899, gives us an account of
Hans chasing after Butch Cas idy's "Hole in the Wall Gang" a fter the
train robbery at Wilcox, Wyoming.
TRAIN ROBBED IN WYOMING
Express Car n the Union Pacific Blo n Open and Rifled

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

16

THE OUTLA W TRAIL JOURNAL

OMAHA, June 2, -Just before daylight this morning, in the


midst of drenching rain, Union Pacific Train 1, which left
Omaha yesterday morning, was stopped by robbers just be
yond Wilcox, Wyoming.
The robbers blew up the express car with dynamite, se
verely wounding the engineer, and then escaped to the moun
tains, According to the officials of the express company, the
robbers obtained only a very small return for their crime.
A posse under command of the Sheriff of Carbon County is
in pursuit and officers are confident of capturing the robbers.
Union Pacific officials received their first information of the
affair from Engineer Jones of the train which was robbed. His
message was as follows:
"First secti n N . 1 held up a mile west of Wilcox.
Express car blown open, mail car damaged. Safe blown
open; contents gone. We were ordered to pull over bridge
just west of Wilcox, and after we passed the bridge the
explosion occurred. Can't tell how bad bridge was dam
aged. No one hurt except Jones; scalp wound and cut on
hand."

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

The robbers boarded the train at Wilcox at 2:09 a.m. As the bridge
was reached one of them crawled into the cab, and atthe point of a gun
ordered Engineer Jones to pull acros the bridge and stop. Meantime
the rest of the gang were at work in the express car. Just as the engine
pulled off the bridge there was a tremendous explosion that scattered
pieces of express car for a hundred feet in every direction. The end of
the mail car was stove in, and several stringp.rs knocked out of the
bridge. It only required a few minutes for the robbers to rifle the safe,
which was blown open by the explosion.
They took its contents, Signaled their confederate on the engine,
and before the passengers and train crew were aware of what hap
pened were off for the mountains.
It required two hours to clear away the wreckage so that the train
could proceed to Medicine Bow, the next station, from which the
report was sent. The sheriff was notified at once, and with a posse
started in pursuit of the obbers. It is not positively known just how
many there were of them, but as only four were seen by the trainmen
it is believed that number constitutes the party.
The passengers were badly scared, but the robbers made no effort
to molest them. The official her state that the safe contained very
little of value.

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

THE OUTLA W TRAIL JOURNAL

17

F. M. Hans, the well known detective, has returned to Omaha after


a long chase after the six men who held up and dynamited the Union
Pacific express train in Wyoming June 2. Hans fears the men have
escaped for all time, at least as far as present efforts to capture them
are concerned. 3
Hans' opinion is of especial value, because in the past twenty-five
years he has captured some of the most desperate road agents in the
west, and has gone into the "Hole-In-The-Wall," the retreat of these
same robbers, an caught or killed his man. He is both a railroad
detective agent and special agent of the United States Government.
Hans started after the robbers when they killed Sheriff Hazen, his
bosom friend in the beginning of their flight. 4
Speaking of the extraordinary chase Hans said: "These men have
made the most remarkable flight in the criminal history of the west.
They have traveled over 1,500 miles since committing the crime, and
have been chased by 300 or 400 men constantly, yet they escaped.
Time and again they have been surrounded by ten times their number,
yet by the display of their desperate nerve and knowledge of wood
craft have managed each time to get away. They first fled to the "Hole
in-the-Wall." I found, but being so hard pressed, and having such a
large reward on their heads - $18,000 - they did not dare stop among
their old outlaw companions for fear of being betrayed. They kept on
into the Big Horn Basin, then turned back and retraced their steps
through th Powder River country into Jackson's Hole country, the
wildest and most desperate stretch of mountainous country in the
west. Here the Ind ian police under Baldwin got after them and chased
them south toward the Utah mountains, and it was here they were
completely lost track of. Our course they had everything fixed to rush
back to the "Hole-in-the-\Nall," the moment the train was robbed and
they expected the chase after them to stop there, as it has in the past.
They were not prepared to have the National Gua rd of he State called
out for them. That accounts for the swift time they made.
"I found it very difficult to get information about the men. The
honest farmers and ranchers of that section are afraid to inform on
them for fear of being killed. These fellows are the remnants of the
most daring outlaw band in existence."

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

FRED HANS AND THE BANK ROBBERY AT SPEARFI H, S. D.


For many y ars researchers have tried to verify that the bank
robbery at Spearfish, South Dakota, ever took place, and by whom?
The origins of this supposed robbery came from James D. Horan and
Paul Sann's Pic orial History of the Wild West published in 1954. 5

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

18

THE OUTLAW TRAIL JOURNAL

"Before Cassidy, Kid Curry, and the Sundance Kid ap


peared, the leader of the Hole-in-the-Wall was 'Laughing Sam'
Carey, one of the notorious bandits of the Wild West. The New
York World commented that Carey is not the jovial, laughing,
good-natured individual his name would indicate. On the
contrary he is grim faced with a long string of murders to his
credit.
"Carey was an evil-looking character with a long knife scar
under his right eye, the mark of a wound inflicted by a fellow
'with whom he had a disagreement.' The demise of the fellow
was hastened when the top of his head was blown off by
Laughing Sam's revolver, fired almost point blank.
"Badly wounded, he managed to reached Hole-in-the
Wall, where one of the outlaw 'surgeons' dug out bullets from
his back, shoulder, and arm. Carey's riders included the
Taylor brother who murdered the Meeks family in Carrollton,
Missouri, H. Wilcox, the train robber, the Bud Denslow, who
made a specialty of robbing the Union Pacific."

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

To add to the confusion Fred Hans reported in the newspapers as


saymg:
"I knew Curry, their leader, whenhewas an honest rancher.

It was but ten years ago he has been in a number of desperate


games. It was he and his gang that held up the Spearfish (S.D.)

Bank when several of them were killed. I believe this will


nearly wind them up, for they have got to put in an appearance
at some town in the west some day, and when they do they will
be shot down."
Which Curry does he mean, for he states that:
"I know George Curry very well. It is foolishness to talk of
that bandit being taken alive. He and his companions will
never surrender."6

During the 1970s this writer flooded South Dakota with numerous
requests for any information concerning Carey and this supposed
robbery, only to end up with nothing. Since then I have found through
research a "Laughing Sam" but his surname was Hartman.
Laughing Sam Hartman was a Blackhills road agent associated

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

19

THE OUTLA W TRAIL OURNAL

with Duncan Blackl urn! Billy Webster! and Clark Pelton.? The Taylor
involved ir '1e gang! or Taylor Brothers! I have found reference to in
A. B. McDorld!s Th _Taylor Brothers. published by Ryan! Walker!
1896. Bill anL. George ~'aylor operated in Kansas City! Missouri! and
were responsible for the killing of the Meeks family. No references
have been found for H. Wilcox! and Bud Denslow.
In 1988 I wrote to author and researcher Mark Dugan! who
informed me that: "Regarding your question about Laughing Sam
Carey! I am afraid he was only a figment of imagination in the mind
of James Horan or Pa ul Sann. A few years back! I went to South Dakota
and thoroughly checked him out. According to what has been
written! Carey was supposed to have robbed a bank in Spearfish. I
exhausted every record I could find in Spearfish and found no record
of the robbery. Also I checked in Rapid City and Deadwood for Carey
but again found nothing. 1f8
In 1994 I wrote to researcher/writer Kerry Ross Boren who offered
his findings: "To b gin with! I could never find verification of the
robbery at Spearfish! S.D.! and I finally came to the assumption that it
was actually an error nd was confused with the Belle Fourche
robbery - but that is just a personal opinion. For example! Harvey
Logan and his brother Lonnie often used the alias of 'Taylor! and I
believe they were sometimes confused with the Taylor Brothers for
that cause.!!9

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center
NOTES

I.Sometimes referred to as Frederick S. HailS.


2. Tulsa Dailv World dated April 19, 1923; Fred Hans worked as a detective for the
Fremont, Elkhorn & Missouri Valley Railroad & Sioux City and Pacific Railroad.
3. The Wilcox train robbery is usuall credited to Butch Cassidy, but the robbers are
believed to have heen Harvey" Kid Curry" Logan, his brother Lonnie Logan, alias
"Lonnie Curry," and their cousin, Robert E. (Bob) Lee, alias "R. E. Curry." Other
accounts which cannot be ignored claim tlwt Kid Curry, Harry "The Sundance
Kid" Longabaugh, Flatnose George Curry, and Bill Cruzan were the actual
robbers. References consulted F. Bruce Lamb, The Life and
Times of Harvey Logan and the Wild Bunch, published by Johnson Books,' Boulder,
Colorado, J 990; Richard Patter on. The Train RobbeD' Era, published by Pruett
Publishing Company, Boulder, Colorado, 1991; Larry Pointer, In Search of Butch
Cassidy, published by University of Oklahoma Press, 1977.
4.0n June 5,1899 at Red Fork Of/he Powder River, Wyoming, after the Wilcox train
robbery, George Cuny, Hanley Logan and Sundance were trailed by a posse
headed by Sheriff Joe Hazen, who is killed by Logan. Keith Kochran - American

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

20

THE OUTLA W TRAIL JOURNAL

West: A Historical Chronology published by Cochran Pub. Company, Rapid City,


South Dakota, 1992.
5.James D. Horan & Paul Sann, Pictorial History of the Wild West, published by
Bonanza Books, N. Y. 1954.
6.Ne\1J York Times dated Ju.ne 3, 1899.
7. Very little is known of Laughing Sam Hartman in comparison to the others of the
same yolk, 1 have consulted Agnes Wright Spring,
The Cheyenne & Black Hills Stage & Express Routes, published by University of
Nebraska Press, 1948; Doug Engebretson, E!JJJ2.!:L
Saddles. Forgotten Names, published by North Plains Press, 1892.
8.Mark i)ugan to Roy O'Dell, dated February 4, 1988.
9.1n a letter to this writer d-ued March 7, 1994, from Kerry Ross Boren. the following
details were given: "Fred Hesse, Jr., who twenty years ago resided in Cheyenne,
Wyoming, informed me that "Frederick M. Hans" was in reality his father,
Frederick G. Hesse. Fred Hesse was a notorious hardcase and gunman when he
arrived in Dacotah Territory during the early seventies. Hesse was well
acquainted with Flatnose George Currie and other members of the Hole-in-the
Wall gang of rustlers.
Fred George S. Hesse was born on April 3, 1853. Born in Essex, England, he came to
the U. S. in 1863. Hesse as far as can be certain was active in Wyoming, especially
during the Johnson County War. He is not known to have worked in Nebraska.
Fred Hesse died in Buffalo, Wyoming, on March 3, 1929. Dan L. Thrapp
Encyclopedia of Frontier Biography, Vol. 2, published by University of Nebraska
Press, Lincoln, 1988.

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

THE OUTLA W TRAIL JOURNAL

21

FRONTIERSMAN, W. B. TENBROECK

Taken from the January 21, 1937 issue of The Vernal Express

UINTAH BASIN

CIVIL WAR

VETERAN DIES

W. B. TenBroeck of Fort Duchesne Succumbs during visit in East.


Served as messenger Boy in Civil War.

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

W. B. TenBroeck of Ft. Duchesne died Jan. 4 at Williamsport,


Pennsylvania, where he had gone to spend the holidays with his
brother, H. H. TenBroeck.
William B. TenBroeck was born in New York on March 16, 1848,
a son of a prominent judge of the district. His early boyhood was spent
in the eastern part of the country. Although he had little schooling, in
later years he educated himself. He was a great reader and had a
wonderful memory.
Still a youngster when the civil war broke out, he s rved as a
messenger boy for the Union army and saw President Lincoln and his
son, Tad, in Washington, D.C., during his service. After the Civil war,
he traveled down the coast of the United States, around the gulf and
through parts of Mexico and South America. Returning to the United
States he spent several years in the eastern part of the country and the
Mississippi valley.
In later years he joined the U. S. Cavalry where he served two
enlistments. During this service he was active in the later Indian wars
and while engaged in the Indian campaigns rode over a great part of
the western United States including the states of Utah, Wyoming,
Colorado, Idaho Montana, Oregon, Washington, California, New
Mexico and Nevada.
After his discharge from the army he spent some time prospecting,
making a strike in the Black H:lls country. He also made some early

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

22

THE OUTLAW TRAIL JOURNAL

locations of gilsonite in the


district south of Ouray. He
was instrumental in locating
the copper prospects below
Ouray on the Green River.
Mr. TenBroeck drove the
first ambulance into the
Uintah Basin when the first
soldiers entered. The trip
was made from Park City
thru Heber, Daniel's canyon,
and across the Duchesne
river at a point miles above
the site of the town of
Duchesne. Their course then
followed the river to a point
opposite Ouray. Some of the
buildings erected by the sol
diers still stand and are in
Merle Curtis, William

use there. Later when Fort


TenBroeck, Marguerite

Thornburgh was moved to


Ashley creek above Vernal TenBroeck acted as teamster and helped to
establish the fort in its new location. When the soldiers moved to Fort
Duchesne, he moved with them and r mained there for several years
working for the government. When Fort Duchesne was abandoned in
1912 he moved to a ranch near there where he has made his home
since.
In 1935 after fifty years away h returned to new York and visited
his brother at Kingston and another brother at Williamsport, Pennsyl
vania. While he was on this trip his older brother in Kingston passed
away. William was admitted to the Old Soldier's home in Washing
ton, D.C. in 1936, buthe got lonesome and didnot like the co finement
so after a few weeks he returned to the Uintah Basin. In the spring of
1936 at the age of 89, he made a second trip to the east staying only a
few days. He left Ft. Duchesne for his third trip in little more than a
year on December 21 and passed away on January 4th. Mr. TenBroeck
had never married.
Surviving him are his brother, H. H. TenBroeck, a niece Helen
TenBroeck of Williamsport and some nieces and nephews in New
York. He was buried at Willia sport.
William TenBroeck was a very interesting character. He was
generous to a fault and had no desire to acquire wealth. What income
he had was usually given to the needy. He had a lovable character, an

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

THE OUTLAW TRAIL JOURNAL

23

even temper and was kind to animals and anyone in want.


Mr. TenBroeck was a subscriber to the Uintah Pappoose and
Ven~al Express continuously since publication started.

FROM THE FILES OF THE OUTLAW TRAIL HISTORY CENTER

INTERVIEW WITH W. B. TENBROECK,


FORT DUCHESNE, UTAH
I was born in 1849, in Delaware County, New York state. I served
in the Signal Corps during the Civil War. \Ve stretched rubber-coated
wire through the trees for telegraph stations. When Lee was sur
rounding Washington, we were sent to Annapolis. Later we camped
at Alexandria just across the river from Washington. We also camped
at Warington Brandy station near CUlpepper when it was Meade's
headquarters. I didn't join until after Gettysburg. I was in the fight
at Mine Run and Meade would have won that battle if General French
had not got lost. We in the Signal Corps knew these things better than
the soldiers did. I was at Newport News right after the Merrimack
knocked hell out of the Union wooden gun boats and everybody
thought the Rebels would capture Washington, New York and Bos
ton. I was in Richmond when Sherman's army arrived from the south.
A military guard was stationed on the pontoon bridge to keep them
from coming to town. It made them pretty hot. I was still in Richmond
when Lee surrendered. There were thousands and thousands of guns
captured. Sherman's army went to Washington for the parade. They
herded them down Pennsylvania Ave. They raised some hell in
Washington, but not as much as was expected.
After the war I went home for a spell. Then I enlisted at Cincinnati.
I was sent across the Panama Canal to Angel Island in California.
When I got there I was assigned to Troop D, 1st Cavalry, stationed in
Idaho. As soon as I got there we were sent to Arizona to fight Cochise.
Most of our fighting was chasing little bands of Indians that were
stealing cattle. We followed one bunch down into Old Mexico to Santa
Cruz, but we were across the line only twenty-four hours and got back
before the Mexican government knew anything about it.
The Apaches were funny. They would kill some men, and not
others. Now there was Riley...war parties went across his ranch, and
killed other men, but they never touched him. There was another

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

24

THE OUTLAW TRAIL JOURNAL

fellow just like that too.


I remember once a lot of Mexicans lined up along a ditch to wash
their feet before going into town. One of them looked p from the
water and saw some Apaches corning. He yelled and they all started
to run with their shoes in their hands. One man stepped on a cactus.
He could not stand to run any further, but the Apaches were right
behind him so he dived into a chaparral thicket, right onto a big
rattlesnake. They man lay still and then the Apaches carne by he heard
one say, "We better look in there." But the snake was buzzing so the
rest said, "No, there is a snake in there." So they all ran on and fought
and killed the rest of the Mexicans. The man in the bush heard them
laughing and talking as they carne back
A bugler in F. Troop in the 5th Cavalry had an Apachejump at him
from a bush once and catch his horse by the tail. He knocked him loose
by hitting him with his bugle. He was glad to get away, but he lost his
$12.00 silver bugle. Sometimes the Apaches tortured prisoners. It
would have made you sic.K to have seen Black They ran spears into
his back and into his legs and then twisted them, and they hacked at
his breast as that they had been going to curt his heart out. They got
some other people once and cut off their eyelids and their finger nails.
A pal of mine was killed by the Apaches. I went to look at his grave
after he had been buried a year, and the coyote and gophers had dug
it up pretty bad, so I took a shovel and was fixing it when a woman
carne along. I told her, 1/1 don't have to do this. I am just doing it for
a friend."
She said, "Who are you? I have never met you that 1 can remem
beL" Some time after that we had an Indian scare. She met me and
she said, "Sergeant, I am so glad that you are here to protect us.
I said to her, "Who are you? I have never met you that I can
remember."
From Arizona I was sent north to Idah to take part in t e Modoc
War, but when I got there my time had expired and I was discharged.
I went back horne. Next, I enlisted in the 3rd Cavalry and was sent to
the Black Hills to run the miners off the Indian lands in the Jennie
Expedition. Calamity Jane was along with us. I went in swimmin'
with her once in the Rawhide. When we p lIed out she was ordered
to be left behind, but she borrowed a sergea t's uniform and hor~e
while he hid in a wagon. The officer-of-the-day rode up to her and
said, "Sergeant, it has been reported that there is a woman in this
command. Have you seen her?"
And Calamity replied, "No Sir!"
CalamI got sick near where Rapid City is now and an ambulance
took her back to Fort Laramie.

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

>'

25

THE OUTLA W TRAIL JOURNAL

I first met Thornberg (Thornburgh) when Dull Knife went on a


rampage. The major was a tall, slim fellow and not much of a fighter.
I re<;ollect we came in one day and told him that we had seen Dull
Knife's brav s near Dry Lake. It wasn't a dry lake. You could part the
grasses and get enough water to water a horse. When we told
Thornberg about seeing Dull Knife's band there, h said, All right.
We'll go get him in the morning. Then he crawled into a wagon and
wen t to sleep. We went there in the morning, but of course Dull Knife
had gone.
The War Department sent out a General later and we caught Dull
Knife, that time. I was along. It was stormy and nowing and we
heard some shooting. Whe we got to it we saw that it was Indians
shooting at cattle. We had four troops of cavalry and we surrounded
them. The Indians surrendered right away and gave up their guns.
They only had a few of them, most spears. They wouldn't go in with
us and the next day we saw that they had lots of gu s, and said that
they would fight. They started to build a breast works. They were
pretty well protected behind that, but pretty soon a cannon was sent
up to us from Robinson. We mounted it on one side of their breast
works where they could se it. Then another cannon was sent up from
Camp Sheridan, and we mounted that on the other side of their breast
works. Then the General t ld them to look at them cannons and
surrender. They looked and did. We gave 'em rations and loaded the
women and kids into government wagons and started for Robinson.
It was bitter cold. When we got to Horse Creek the Indians balked and
said they wouldn't go no further. Just then a third cannon that had not
got to us in time came in sight. Th Indians saw it, and said, "We go./I
At Robinson the Indians w re put in. a warm house, and us soldiers
slept out of doors. Some of us froze our ears and feet.
I was fixing a shed at Camp McDowell and fell from a rotten rafter.
It hurt me pretty bad and I was discharged before my time was up. I
was sent home from San Francisco by way of Laramie. I'd got used to
army life by this time, so I stopped at Laramie and hired out as
ambulance driver for the oldiers there. I was teaming in the wagon
train when Thornberg was killed on Milk Creek. I came in with
Merritt's outfit and when we got there it was all over, 0 we went back
to Raw lins. I didn't see anything bu t the smoke. When you are in the
army you have to stay where you are told and you c nnot go up and
look.
Gordan's wagon train was burned, they tell me. He didn't know
there was any trouble with the Indians until he aw them coming. I
don't know whether his men were killed or not. Next summer we
established Fort Thornberg at the junction of White and Green Rivers.
/I

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

26

THE OUTLA W TRAIL JOURNAL

It was a good location. There were a lot of bridge and mine timbers
on the river banks that had washed down from the Union Pacific. vVe
built cabins out of them, but it was to expensive to ship horse feed in
there, so were we ordered out of the country and the infantry was sent
in. There was another Fort Thornberg established in 1882. It was
where Vernal is now. Fort Duchesne was not established until 1886.
Sam Brown and Joe Luxton (Luxton Draw on Blue Mountain is
named for him) were skinners in the same train with me. We each
drove six mules and drawed $35.00 per month. Johnnie McAndrews
was wagon boss. (McAndrews was later very influential with the
Utes). Sam and Joe quit the government at Fort Thornberg and started
a saloon. When the soldiers moved, they kept on runnin' it at Old
Ashley (Vernal). They done well and went in partnership in a cow
ranch on Blue Mountain. Joe Luxton went on the ranch and Sam
stayed in town to run the saloon. One day Joe sent to Sam for some
money and Sam sent back word that he did not have any money...that
the saloon was broke. Joe come to Ashley and they talked it over. Joe
said, "If you can't make this saloon pay without me bein' here let's
split our partnership. I'll take what few cattle we've got left and make
a go of it, and you do the best you can with the saloon."
Sam agreed. He wasn't as bad broke as he let on because the next
day he sent for $2,000 worth of "likker." When Joe heard about it, he
said, "1 don't care. There was more cattle that I let on to him about
anyways./I

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

THE OUTLA W TRAIL JOURNAL

27

(Editor's note: This article was published in Doris' book, Blue


Mountain Folks, Their Lives & Legends, published in 1987 - now out
of print. It is a story ofanother one of the characters living along the
outlaw trail.)

PAT'S HOLE NAMED FOR PAT LYNCH


by Doris Karren Burton
Corning from Ashley Valley was a picturesque character who has
become a legend as the "Hermit of Pat's Hole./I This man was Pat
Lynch, a tall, bushy-browed, dark Irish individualist. 1 Pat was born
in Ireland about 1830 and named James Cooper. His family was very
poor, and in his youth he was apprenticed to a tradesman, but he
didn't like the work and ran away. He got passage on a ship sailing
around Africa. 2 Somewhere along the African coast, the crew went
ashore to find fresh water. Pat and two other men were seized and
enslaved. More than a year later, Pat found an opportunity to kill a
guard and escape. It was something he hated to talk about, being such
a horror in his mind. His friend from Ashley, Hank Ruple, said that
if ever old Pat heard of someone being murdered, he always asked
quickly, "Was he killed with a pick?"3
Another account which was related by Pat Lynch to Henry Shank,
a resident of Lily Park, Colorado, states that he was taken in by a
friendly tribe of African natives after swimming ashore following an
altercation with the first mate of his ship. He fell in with the way of
life of the tribe, and in a battle with a neighboring tribe, he succeeded
in giving such assistance that the natives took him in with open arms.
They offered him a bride from the tribe and a mud hut. Shank then
quoted Pat as saying:
There was one lass who was mostly native but had reddish hair. I picked
her. Evidently some other Irishman had visited the tribe before me. We lived
there together for several years, and I had two sons by her.
Then I got restless and wanted to get away. The tribe picked up a
Portuguese officer and decided that he must be punished for some offense or
other. He was scheduled for execution. They gave me a sword, and I was to
go into the jungle with him and dispatch him. I told him that he'd have to go

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

28

TrIf OLITLA \III TRAIL JOURNAL

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

Pat Lynch, the hermit of Pat's Hole (Echo Park Canyon-Dinosaur


National Monument). (Photo: Uintah County Librm}J Regional History
Collection)

fast andfar ifhe got away. I got some blood on the knife and went back to the
tribe. They thought I had killed him. I guess he got away, as I never heard
of him again. Soon after that, I, too, got away. I went to the coast and got
passage on a ship and finally arrived in America. 4
The Civil War began, and Pat enlisted in the Navy tmder the name
of Pat Lynch. After his naval ervice, he came west wher he worked
on a construction job in St. Luis, MissOlui. Here, he quarreled with
the foreman and "parted his hair" with a claw bar. Thinking he had
killed the man, he continued his westward journey and joined the U.
S. Cavalry, it is said under the name of James Cooper. He served in
southeastern Colorado. He apparently again later used the name of
Pat Lynch. s Patrick Lynch's deposition on his Military Service begins,
(Case of James Cooper, alias Patrick Lynch, No. 38440). It is several
pages long and very interesting.
Soon after Pardon Dodds built the first house in Ashley Valley,
Utah, several bachelors came and prov d up on claims. These were
squatter claims as the government at that time had made no survey of
the land. Al Westover, John Kelly, Charle Bentley and Pat Lynch

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

THE OUTLA W TRAIL JOURNAL

29

were am ng the group. H brought with him a string of well-bred


hor e , most of Morgan breeding. Pat took up land next to Billy
Gibso in Old Ashley. In 1878 Pat traded his homestead to John
Fairchild for three hundred poles. 6
In 1879, when the fort was built where Vernal now stands, Mrs.
Ruple stated that one day there was an Indian scare, and everyone
carne into the fort--including Pat Lynch. That night men took turns
standing guard. The guard heard something tinkle and thought it was
a "jin Ie bell" on an Indian's pony. He raised everyone with an alarm.
A man named Taylor had fixed a b d in the rafters of one of the houses.
He jumped up and knocked hirnsel1 ut on a rafter. 7
Ashley Valley was growing too fast for Pat. He joined the Hank
Ruple family as th y were moving to Island Park in the spring of 1883.
Pat went ahead of the wagons to find passes through the hills. In the
Buckskin Hills, northeast of V rnai, Pat led them up a draw and over
a pass that was negotiated with great difficulty by the ox-teams. The
pass has since beenkIlown as "Paddy's Gap." From there, a route was
scouted outby Adam and Abe Coon, father and brother of Mrs. Ruple.
Mrs. Ruple and her brother, Abe, went ahead on horseback carrying
h r infant son, Arthw. Their first night was spent alone waiting for
the wagon party. Abe and his father, on a previous hunting trip, had
placed bacon and flour in a sack which they hung in a tree. They now
found to their great relief that it was still intact. Their next two or three
meals were cooked on a hot rock, and none had ever tasted better.
Pat and Hank Ruple had run cattle together on Brush Creek
Mountain orth of Vernal. They were scouting around for the best
range land, and Hank scouted further afield than Pa t on one occasion.
When he returned late in the afternoon, cold and hungry, Pat had a hot
dinner ready. Seizing a tin plat, he heaped it high with meat he
thought was rabbit. He ate two or three pieces before he began to
wonder why there were so rnany sections of backbone. The meat was
delicious, no denyi g that, and he ate a couple more pieces before he
asked the question that was troubling him. "What kind of meat is this,
"Pat? Didn't this rabbit have any legs?"
"Rattlesna ke," Pat answered with gusto. "Big fat one he was, too!"
Ruple went up in the r cks and lost his dinner.
Pat continued on with his string of horses eastinto Yampa Canyon.
Near the place where the Green and Yampa rivers meet is a place now
designated on the maps of Dinosaur National Monument as Echo
Park, but which carne to be known s Pat's Hole. Evelyn Mantle said
that Pat claimed the entire Yampa Canyon area from Harper's Corner
to Thanksgiving Gorge, a distance covering roughly twenty miles.
Outlaws and Indians passed through his domain, but they received no

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

30

THE OUTLAW TRAIL JOURNAL

welcome from him. To both, he had but one greeting, "Be gone."
He wanted to live alone, and he did for many years. From time to
time, he had a few cattle, but mostly he lived off the land. He built a
one-room cabin on Pool Creek, a stream which drops down into Echo
Park from the southwest. He built a shelter some miles distant in Echo
Park. This was a three-sided structure. During bad weather, he
retreated into a crevasse in the rock in Echo Park known as Wind Cave.
He had camping places at Hell's Canyon and Johnson's Draw some
miles up the river on the north side of Blue Mountain. In all these
places he kept "jerky," on which he relied almost entirely for his meat.
Deer were plentiful, and he developed a technique for hunting.
Mountain lion lived off the game in the area. Pat would run the lion
off and take the parts of the dead deer which he could use.
Pat's only friends were the wild animals, and he didn't like to kill
them. Pat claimed to have a pet mountain lion, which often brought
a dead deer to his cabin and left it for him. Pat had a special way he
called his pet lion, and it would come out on a high cliff and scream
in answer to Pat's yell. Pat said that the scream it gave was sweeter
than any song Jenny Lind ever sang. This cliff is still called Jenny Lind
Rock.
F. C. Barnes, postmaster at Lily Park for some years and a good
friend to Pat Lynch, said of Pat's lifestyle:
He lived just like acoyote. Ifhefound adead horse, he would take a quarter
or a halfand make jerky out of it. This is the kind of meat he always kept on
hand. I have known him to take a drowned horse out of the river and make
jerky out ofit. He had jerky and bread cached all over the mountains. I have
been riding with him on different trips. He would stop and studyfor aminute,
then turn to one side and go to a rock or cliffand get some meat and bread. The
meat was always jerky, and the bread look like it might have been cooked a year
or more. s
Although Pat applied for an invalid pension as early as 1893, the
record indicates that application was rejected. Pat wrote to the
Commissioner of Pensions on April 13, 1895:
Dear Sir, According to your order of--I got Examined and I Produced a
Hospital Certificet. Your next orer Was for me to be Examined for Pension.
I Was again Examined by Doctor Robinson of Fort Duchesne Military
Hospital about March 101894. I have been waiting since to get some Word
in Regard to My pension, as I was Examined about that time, and have had
no Word. All Winter I have been Unable to help myselfand have been obliged
to axcept the Hospitality of Mr. A. G. Johnson of this Place, and Now Will
have to Shift for My Self. I Would be Obliged if you Could let Me Know if
I am to get My Pension And if Not Why Not. 9
He applied again on January 3, 1907. The Commissioner of

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

THE OUTLA W TRAIL JOURNAL

31

Pensions sent a Special Examiner to Lily Park, Colorado to check on


Pa t' s case. Pat's deposition and the cover letter from the examiner give
much of the biographical information about him. While the deposi
tion is concerned principally with Pat's statements about his military
service, the cover letter pinpoints several significant facts of his life in
this area:
Claimant has lived as a hermit in a canyon ofthe Bear Riverfor more than
thirty years, nearly all of which time his nearest neighbor was forty miles
distant. His mind is affected, however, I believe him to be competent to attend
to his own business. He strenuously resents inquiry relative to his past life.
For years he had no building in which to live, a part of the time sleeping
on a shelf in the rocks and at other times under a brush shelter. He is badly
battered and broken up and is so hard ofhearing that it is almost impossible
to make him understand you. He has a way of conversing audibly with
spirits.
I spent more than halfa day in taking his statement and towards the last
it was hard to get anything out ofhim. He is well known in the section where
he lives and so far as I could learn his reputation for truth is good. It appears
to be the general opinion that there is something in his past life that he is hiding
from ...
When I inquired if he had been married he told me to put it down as I
pleased and would not make a positive statement. His mind appeared to be
fatigued and he stated that the cross-examination was too hard on him. He
finally said that when he was in Africa a Negro chiefgave him a wife and that
she was the only one he ever had, and that he never heard anything about her
after he left Africa in 1860.
Pat was granted a pension of $15 a month. This was raised to $20
in 1911 and to $30 from 1912. It was rumored that he received two
pensions--one in the name of Pat Lynch, and one in the name ofJames
Cooper. I don't find any record of this. In fact the file says:
"Deposition A, Case of James Cooper alias Patrick Lynch." I think it
caused him trouble even getting one pension as he would get mixed
up on where he served under which name.
On numerous rock surfaces, some of which contain early Indian
petroglyphs, Pat had drawn the picture of a sailing ship. This was
probably the one, as he remembered it, in which he made his voyage
to Africa. Below is a sketch of one of these Lynch petroglyphs:
U

II

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

32

TH OUTLA W TRAIL JOURNAL

Evelyn Mantle told me that Pat's cabin was blown up one day
while Pat was after a bucket of water. He thought someone was out
to get him. After the loss of his cabin in Castle Park, Pat preempted the
first few feet of the entrance to one of the caves used many hundreds
of years ago by Indians. Here Evelyn in later years found a sheet of
foolscap--a three by five inch paper, brittle with age, warped, and
curled like a p tato chip. Opening it carefully, she read it. It contained
the following squatter's declaration:
To all who thi may consarn that I Pat Lynch do lay claim on this
bottom for my home and support on he eighth month of 1886.
(signed) P L/yncH.
The P L slash represented Pat's brand. On the other side of the
paper Mrs. Mantle noted the following verse:
IF IN THESE CAVERNS YOU SHELTER TAKE
PLAIS DO TO THEM NO HARlvl
LEVE EVERYTHING YOU Hi D AROUND
H NGING UP OR ON THE GROUND.

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

Joe Haslem said that Pat brought in peach pits from Daniels' Ranch
and planted them at Pool Creek. Oma Jensen Graham mentioned the
good peaches Pat had planted.
Joe told m the following tale:
Pat was a spiritualist. He would come here, and you would give him some
coffee, and then he would want to take a cup home for his spirits, Pus and
Drifus. Pus was the redheaded one, and Drifus was the black one. I think he
must have been thi1lking of his kids. Gawd, he was dirhj. He was filthy as
a pig. Old Bill Oakley tells a story on him. He said that one day old Pat came
ridin' into their dry camp. They had an old time wash dish they had been
washin' their hands in it. Old Pat picked that up and swilled it down his
throat. Old Bill was quite a hand to swear, and he said, JlGawd Damn it Pat!
Don't drink that water, w just washed our hands in it!" "Oh well," Pat says,
JlWhat won't fatten, will fill up!"
He had some pretty good horses. He had brought those mares in herefrom
Arizona or New Mexico. He kept the colts from these. Then, they kinda
petered out. Some of the best horses the guys around here had were ones
started from old Pat's. He didn't leave the hole often. He would come up on
the mountain and come up 10 old Sewell's and visit. He went to Jensen and
stayed with old Sewell a time or two and picked up some flour and stuffthere.
He lived to be real old. That dirty water he drank must have washed out his
kidneys.lo
Val FitzPatrick, author of num rous books made the following
statement in his book, liThe Last Frontier, Volume 11:"

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

THE OUTLA W TRAIL JOURNAL

Henry Templeton said tha' he first knew Pat in 1870 when Pat worked
for Temptleton's father in a rock quarry at Colorado City, at the foot ofPike's
Peak; Pat drifted on to the Hahns Peak mining country. 11
This is about the time records show he was in Ashley Valley. He
may have corne from Colorado to Ashley. Val fitzPatrick worked for
the hite Bear Cattle Company in Lily Park in 1901 on a hay crew.
Here, he met Pat Lynch. He had be n intrigued by the tories he had
heard about Pat.
erefore, he was delighted wh n he showed up at
the ranch one evening. Val told this story:
There was rain during the night and it was too wet for haying the next
morning. After grinding the mowing machine sickle and repairing some
harness, we just waited for the h.ay to dry. Pat was down by the barn using
a curry comb and brush on the coat ofhis horse. I wandered down that way
and stood watching him, hoping he'd talk to me of some of the things I had
heard he could tell. After a while he turned and asked:
"What's yer name, b'y?"
'/FitzPatrick, sir," I told him.
"Oi mane yer whole name. All of it."
"Valentine Stewart Parnell FitzPatrick, sir," I (WSW red giving him my
full baptismal name.
The old gentleman staggered back as if1 had hit lzinl with a club. "Howly
saints alive! By me salOl an' body!" he ejaculated. "Shmall wonder that you
ain't no bigger than a pound ofscapI, packing" around the weigh t ofa name
loike that."
I didn't know what to say, so said nothing. F It regained his poise and
talked to me at I ngth, kindly. He found out all ab ut myfamily and told me
much ofthe lore ofthe canyon. Presently, yeing the ley, he remarked: "Sure
an' I got to be gittin" down the canyon, 'jar the rain begins."
The sky wa cloudless, and I remarked on it.
"Yes, I know," Pat replied. "But Frank says it will rain widin two or three
hours an' Frank ain/t ever wrong on weath r."
By "Frank" I thought he meant Frank Barnes the ranch manager. I had
heard Mr. Barnes say a short while before that he thought the storm was over
and weather would be fair for afew days. I reminded Pat of this.
fly 5, yes," he answered, "Misther Barnes may think he knows about
weather. He knows no more thr me'er you. But Fran k lena us. I never seen
a horse like this one me lad."
I saw nothing unusual about the long-legged bay and told Pat so.
"It ain't what ye ee, 50/1, but what no man but nleselfsee an' hears. Frank
and me talk wid each other. Have ye ive-r seen a horse that shpakes the
language? Have ye iver set yer peep rs all a horse which predicths the comin'
weather?"
I had to admit that conversing quadrupeds and prognosticating ponies

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

!
I

33

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

34

THE OUTLAW TRAIL JOURNAL

were Quantity X to me. Pat patiently explained that Frank indeed had the
power of communication with him and had what today we would hear
described as ESP.
"Goin' beyant down the canyon, one beaucheous day like now," he related,
"Frank cocks his ear back and says to me over his shoulder, says he. Pat, ease
up on the bridle reins an' let me go. A shtorm has been behint us an the wather
will be rollin" down this canyon."
"I aised up on the reins, an' Frank and me goes fast. An' none too soon.
Fer soon a great hoother 07.1 a tremenjus lot ofwather comes, an' 'tis only by
gallopin an' splashin' an' shtrugglin' we raich the bank an 'presave our lives. "
Pat soon rode away headed for the canyon. Three hours later a veritable
cloudburst raised the river to a raging flood!
Henry Shank, a young man looking for a homestead, rode into Lily
Park. This is the story he tells:
It was the fall of1902 that I rode into Lily Park lookingfor some land and
aplace to buildingahome. Igot there just when the Wells Fargo interests were
building up a big ranch, and I wasn't welcomed with open arms. In fact, I was
invited to leave. But I had come to get a place, and I decided to stay. I sorta
got settled, and then in 1903, I got a job with the Moffat Railroad surveying
crew. They were running a survey through the area lookingfor a route to Salt
Lake City. During thewinterof1903 and 1904, it was my job to trail supplies
for the crew from Meeker and Rifle.
It was the spring of 1904 when Ifirst became acquainted with Pat Lynch.
The crew, ofwhich I was amember, moved into one ofhis camps, and he helped
us in every way he could. We needed some potatoes and learned that a man
named Ruple, who had a place near Island Park below Whirlpool Canyon, had
some. I got Pat to act as guide, and we set out with a pack string to go the
twenty miles to get them. Pat told me that he hadn't been over the trail for
seventeen years, but he though he couldfind it. It was one ofthe roughest rides
I ever took. We dropped offBlue Mountain on the right trail, and Pat lost his
bearings only once.
In the years that followed, Igot well acquainted with Pat. He told me the
story ofhis life, and what alife he had lived! He must have been close to seventy
when I got acquainted with him. He was a well-setup man about five feet ten
inches tall. He was rough and wiry, with square shoulders, and he still stood
straight. He wore afull beard and had bright blue eyes. He spoke with a slight
Irish brogue. Even when I knew him, he had a quick temper, and in his
younger years, he must have been extremely hot tempered.
When the survelj crew completed its work in the Echo Park country, we
gave Pat what provisions were on hand and aconsiderable amount ofclothing,
which he finally accepted, although he was not a man who would sponge on
anyone. He wanted to payor earn his own way.
From that time on until his death, we, who lived in Lily Park, and the

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

35

THE OUTLA W TRAIL JOURNAL

Bakers and Chews who lived in the canyon country, saw more ofPat Lynch.
Some years he _..Ime and spent the winter months with some ofthe neighbors,
either the Bakers or Barnes. He never quarreled with his neighbors and was
ready and willing tc help when asked to do so. He was taken seriously ill in
1918 and after about two months died. His last days were spent with the
Bakers caring for him.
During his last illness, when he realized that the end was near, Pat
said, "Just p t me on a boat and start me down the river. I'll get off
at my place. We buried him in Lily Park on the south side of the
river. 1112
II

Notes
1. Untermann, Billie, Unpublished manuscript on Pat Lynch, Uintah County Library
Regional Room.
2. Stoddard, C. A., Craig Empire Courier, "Hermit of Pat's Hole had coloiful Career."
3. Untermann, Billie, Unpublished manuscript on Pat Lynch.
4. Stoddard, C. A., Craig Empire Courier
5. Untermann, Billie, Unpublished manuscript on Pat Lynch.
6.Daughters of Utah Pioneers, "Builders of Uintah," 1947.
7. Beard, D. B. Interview with Mrs. Henry Rupple.
8.Jones, Ada, Interview ,vith F. C. Barnes June 15, 1919.
9. Cooper, Jam s. Letter to Commission of Pension. April 23, 1895. Patrick Lynch
Pension File.
10. Haslem, Joe. Talk given at Uintah Historical Society, Feb. 13, 1982.
11. FitzPatrick, V. S. and Milheim, John. "Blue Mountain and Black Midnight, 1979.
12. Stoddard, C. A. Craig Empire Courier, "Hermit of Pat's Hole had coloiful Career. ..

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

36

THE OUTl

W TRAIL JOURNAL

FOLKTALES

FROM THE OUTLAW TRAIL

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

ON THE TRAIL OF BUTCH CASSIDY


By Bill Bete son

On my way home to Salt Lake City from Price, Utah on the evening
of Sunday, September 24, 1995, I stopp d at the "Hilltop Country
Service" store in Colton, Utah, a few miles up the road from H lper,
Utah. I had stopped there before on an earlier occasion to see the
picture on display of "Robert Leroy Pa ker." However, on this
occasion I met the owner, Dennis Finch who was out front watching
his grandchildren play.
I introduced myself and told him of my kinship to "Butch Cassidy."
My great-grandmother was Lula Parker Betenson, who was a younger
sister to Butch Cassidy. Butch Cassidy would then be my great-great
uncle. Dennis immediately got a twinkl in his eye and started to
relate stories from his vast knowledge of the area history. I could tell
that we both had a common love and interest in the colorful loca 1

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

THE OUTLAW TRAIL JOURNAL

37

history.
After we had visited for a
while about the old towns of
Colton, Circleville, and the
outlaws who used to roam the
area, Dennis said, "You know,
'Butch Cassidy' was in this
very store in 1931." I replied,
"Oh really?" Dennis then
started to relate the incident.
Dennis said that at the time
the store was actually down
off th hill to the south of the
present site, in the old town of
Colton. Dennis' grandfather,
Orin Elmer, owned and oper
ated the store. Butchhadcome
to visit Orin, who he knew
cram his boyhood days in
Circleville.
Dennis continued wth the
story saying that there was
another person in the store at the time with Butch and Orin. The other
person recognized Butch and said, "Butch, I thought you w re dead?"
Butch looked at him and replied, "As far as you are concerned, I am!"
I suppose Butch still feared his past after many years and didn't want
knowledge of his being in the area being common knowledge.
Soonoursubjectofco versation turned to D nnis' pictur of Butch
Cassidy. Dennis told me the history behind it. The picture was taken
in Manti in 18 3. In the picture, from left to right is (standing) Robert
Leroy Parker, alias "Butch Cassidy", seated is Ronald Wall and
standing is Orin Elmer. Orin was 21 years old and was getting
married. Butch had come to the wedding and posed in one of the
pietu es with his friend, Orin. Orin was six years younger than Butch,
so Butch would have been about 27 years old in the photograph,
approximately a year before he entered the Wyoming Territorial
Penitentiary in Laramie, Wyoming. Dennis also showed me other
photo - of the wedding howing Orin with his bride, Orin is wearing
the same clothes as he was wearing in the photograph with Butch.
Even though DeIUlis never met Butch because he was born a few
year after Butch's visit in 1931, Dennis said his mother also knew
Butch from her father's (Orin) friendship with Butch and thought he
was a real gentleman.

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

38

THE OUTLAW TRAIL JOURNAL

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

Dennis said that Orin Elmer served as both town Marshal of


Colton, Utah and Utah County Deputy Sherif atthesametimeasMatt
Warner served as Carbon County Deputy Sheriff. Matt would stop at
the store often on his way to Scofield, which was located in Carbon
County. Dennis said he remembers Matt buying 1 im penny candy
and remembers going as a boy with his mother and grandfather to
Matt's funeral in Price.
Dennis said that Orin's father, Henry Elmer settled in Circleville
at about the same time as the Parkers. He said that Henry Elmer and
Butch's father, Maxirnillian were friends and had both fought in the
Black Hawk War together.
Dennis stated the old store was originally built in 1880. The old
town of Colton was settled in 1879 and was originally called "Pleasant
Valley Junction." In 1890, the name changed to Colton. The town of
Colton was quite a town in its day boasting 7 saloons and 4 hotels.
Dennis said that the outlaw, "Gunplay Maxwell" killed two p ople in
a gunfight in one of the Colton saloons.

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

THE OUTLAW TRAIL JOURNAL

39

(Editor's note: In the last journal we included an article depicting just


how wild and rugged this outlaw trail country is even today. Here is
another story which we found interesting and hope you do too.)

SPLIT MOUNTAIN GORGE


HIDDEN CAVE
By: R. Neil Thorne, Silver City, NM

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

In the winter of 1900-01, Eugene (Gene) Daniels and his young son
Shirley were hunting deer in the red hills west of their ranch on Green
River near the mouth of Split Mountain Gorge.
They spooked a small bunch of deer out of the cedars and Gene
took a running shot but only wounded the animal. Following the
tracks down to the river on the edge of the cliffs, they found that the
bank ice was thick enough to support passage around the point of
ledge rock and into the gorge.
The deer took a trail up the talus slope next to the cliff and behind
some large fallen blocks of stone that concealed the mouth of a large
cave. A few hundred yards beyond the cave Gene spotted the
wounded deer lying under a cedar, killed it and dressed it out, then
returned to examine the cave they had passed, fully expecting to find
evidence of early Indian habitation.
Much to this surprise he found a rock laid up toward the back of
the cave, behind which were four pack saddles complete with saddle
pads,panniers and related equipment, two dutch ovens, a coffee pot,
a wooden box of miscellaneous canned goods, a tin box containing
bagged flour, baking powder, salt, sugar and coffee, and a second tin
box of jerky.
Gene surmised that the cache had been established by some of the
nervous outlaws who frequently passed through the area on their
travels between Robbers Roost, Browns Park an Hole in the Wall
country. These fellows had frequently helped themselves to fresh
horses from the Daniels herd, but those horses always seemed to
mysteriously return home at a later date in good condition.

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

40

THE OUTLAW mAlL JOURNAL

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

Mouth of pht Mountain Gorge across from boat ramp (upstream frum
Jensen, Utah) The Entrance to the outlaw cave is hidden by the two large
sandstone blocks indicated by the X mark. (Photo courtesy ofthe author).

Gene left the cache in place for several years, until it became
apparent that the outlaw traffic had ended, at which time he removed
all the material from the cave.
The cave i ' of sufficient size to easily accommodate 6 or 8 horses
and men in complete cone alment, and the river bottom upstream
from the cave would provide ample pa ture for safe night time
grazing of the horses.

Footnote
This information was related to me by my father, Robert Coin
Thorne, who was a choolmate and lifelong friend of Shirley Daniels.
In 1905, Dad's father, George E. Thorne, had purchase the old
LeBeau place on Green River, directly across from the Dinosaur
Quarry. By fording the river, crossing the bench to the north, and
fording the river again above the Daniels ranch it is only 3 or 3-1/2
miles between the two places. Consequently it was very easy for the
boys to visit back and forth, and explore the countryside which they
did for several years.
The last time that I was in the cave was around 1955 but 1am sure
it has not changed much sine the outlaw times.

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

THE OUTLA W TRAIL JOURNAL

41

BOOK REVIEW By Bill Buchanan


"Sometimes" Cassidy: The Real Butch Cassidy Story."
On a lonely sagebrush covered stretch of the Western Nevada desert, two
unmarked graves lie end to end facing north. This odd arrangement is
explained by Arthur Davidson in his new book "Sometimes" CaSSidy: The
Real Butch Cassidy Story." (Arthur Davidson, assisted by James A. Aston,
Hawkes Publishing, Inc., 1994).
According to this account, the upper grave is occupied by the body of Robert
LeRoy Parker (Butch Cassidy), the lower one by his uncle, nine years
younger, "Bob LeRoy Parker". The author says "Bob Parker" was also
known as "Sometimes" Cassidy, and the two were buried end to end facing
north toward the star Kolob. If this all sounds confusing, reading the book
will be equally so.
There is, however, some evidence that Butch Cassidy actually worked at the
Johnnie mine, seventy miles north west of Las Vegas, Nevada, and was
buried nearby in this upper grave.

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

Charlie Overfield, owner of the Overfield Mine, contiguous to the Johnnie


Mine, has lived in Johnnie most of his life. His father bought the mine in
1906. Mr. Overfield says he well remembers Butch Cassidy, and confirms
that he was buried in the upper grave.(l)
This is Art Davidson's story:

The Historical Butch Cassidy, Robert LeRoy Parker of Circleville, Utah,


is called "The Indian" (Family games of Saints and Indians). He was a
gregarious and charming fellow, but an ineffective outlaw. The brains of
the Wild Bunch, and the one who pulled off the uncanny exploits, was
Bob Parker. It was Bob Parker who was photographed at the Wyoming
State Penitentiary in 1894 after taking the rap for his nephew LeRoy
Parker (Butch). Bob Parker would have been seventeen years old in this
famous photo, according to the author. The well known "Wild Bunch
Photograph", taken i For Worth, Texas in 1900 featured the "Indian"
Robert LeRoy Parker, as Butch Cassidy. (2)
Davidson says Bob Parker was born near Joseph, Utah in 1875 of a plural
marriage.(3) His father, Robert Parker, a Mormon immigrant from
Preston, England, was the grandfather of the Circleville Butch Cassidy.
(Reviewers Note: Robert Parker, according to his great granddaughter,
opposed polygamy. Only after pressure fro Mormon leaders did he
take a second wife, Jessimee, an older wom n who lived in Salt Lake City,
not Joseph, Utah. There was no cohabitation and no children born of this

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

42

THE OUTLA W TRAIL JOURNAL

"marriage of convenience". (4)). When Bob Parker was eight years old,
he was sent to live with the family of Max and Ann Parker on their ranch
near Circleville. This is presumably where Bob met his nephew, Robert
LeRoy, soon to leave the ranch for a life as a famous outlaw.
When Bob Parker was twelve years old, he was lost for two years in the
San Rafael Swell while tending a herd of his grandmother's sheep.(5)
This experience honed his survival skills and set him also upon a life of
"honorable outlawry". The first person Bob Parker met when he emerged
from this bewildering terrain was Art Davidson's grandfather, Amasa
Davidson, then a cattle detective. The two became lifelong friends.
During the next twenty five years the paths of Bob Parker and Butch
Cassidy (The Indian) crossed many times. Bob Parker was always the
leader of the bunch. Under his brilliant strategies, all the successful
banditry resulted. The proceeds were channeled to the "Mormon
underground" through "Uncle Brig" (Brigham Young McMullen, who's
wife Ada was the daughter of Robert Parker). For 35 years B. Y.
McMullen was a Bishop in Leeds, Utah, and one of four Mormon bishops
organized to provide funds for the "underground", a large colony of
Mormons living in plural marriage in Northern Mexico.

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

Bob Parker rode with Teddy Roosevelt's Rough Riders ( the book calls
them Teddy's Terrors). He provided Madam Marie Curie with her first
Radium Ore from south east Utah, and he pursued electrical genius
Nicola Tesla's enemies who would steal his technologies. At one point
he fought Jack Dempsey in the ring, winning a $500 prize - settling
instead for Dempsey's championship belt. Finally, the two Butch Cassidys
would team up together with the plan of going straight. They worked
from Johnnie, Nevada to Coalinga, California on various jobs before
joining the Navy in 1901. Both jumped ship in South America, where Bob
Parker worked mines in Peru while "The Indian" set up a ranch in
Patagonia, Argentina. Both re-joined the navy later to provide them legal
re-entry into the USA. Bob Parker was honorably discharged from the
Navy in 1913. LeRoy worked in Mexico and eventually drifted back into
the USA, where he died in Johnnie, Nevada presumably in the late 1930's
or early 1940's.
Davidson says Bob Parker later settled in Leeds, Utah where he worked
at the Log Cabin Inn for one of Brig McMullen's sons, Willard. When Bob
arrived, the McMullen family had to send away Bob Parker McMullen,
another brother, so that Bob Parker could take his place without arousing
suspicion in the small Mormon town.
It was at the Log Cabin Inn that Art Davidson met Bob Parker in the late
1940's. Davidson was a mining man and came to rely heavily on Bob
Parker's mining knowledge for Davidson's developments in the Leeds

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

THE OUTLAW TRAIL IOU, l'

43

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center
Robert Parker McMullin, 1917-1918
(Photo: courtesy of the author)

Silver Reef mining areas. In addi tion to being an expert miner, Bob Parker
was something of a philosopher, and was filled with enigmatic stories.
Davidson says "In all, I list ed to the stories Bob Parker told for a little
over ten years."(6)
"Bob Parker's" cryptic tales led Davidson to fill in the blank spaces, and soon
he believed he had found th true Butch Cassidy. In fact, Bob Parker
McMullen was the first cousin of Circleville's Butch Cassidy. The Parker
McMullen families had very close ties and sometimes" traded" children for
brief periods of time to live with their aunts, uncles and cousins. Ethyl
McMullen George told this reviewer in 1954 that her mother Ada was a

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

44

THE nt/TLA.W TRAIL JOUR. 'AL

favorite aunt of Robert LeRoy Parker, and a number of time h came fr m


Circleville to spend time at their home in Leeds,(7)
It is entirely plausible that Bob Parker McMullen and his b .other Willard,

operating the Log Cabin Inn, had access to family information about Butch
Cassidy - which was not commonly know . Certainly they both followed
the historical record of the Wild Bunch. Davidson concurs, saying that both
"Bob Parker" and Willard knew the history of Butch Cassidy and th Wild
Bunch in intimate detail. Davidson came and went for those many years,
always trying to draw out of "Bob Parker" an acknowledgement that he was
in fact the "LeRoy" or the "Butch Cassidy" in his many stories. To
Davidson's deep regret, the admis ion never came. He says: "Bob Parker
never did say that he was LeRoy. A1 0, he never did claim to be Butch
Cassidy. If anything, Bob seemed to try to give the impression that h wa
not Butch Cassidy. (8)
To Art Davidson the evidence seemed overwhelming: "Bob Parker" knew
too much. There were too many coincidences, the family resemblances were
betraying. The "cousins" were trying desp rately to hold this "secret". In
the end, the author concedes that he has little e idence, but somehow he
hopes the circumstantial material he has gathered will prove his theory.
Davidson says "Bob Parker" died in 1956 before critical information could
be gathered. The author claims he was at the Log Cabin Inn when 5 men
came from Nevada to pick up the body. Th y propp d it up in the rear seat
of a sedan between two passengers and headed for Johnnie, Nevada for the
burial. He further states that Willard McMullen was at the Inn when the
body was taken away - an interesting feat, since Willard had died three years
prior to Bob!

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

In fact, Robert Parker McMull 1 died on December 10, 1966 and is buried in
the Leeds cemetery. Among other family members and townspeople
attending the open casket viewing and interment were Ada Jean Griffith, a
niece, and Glen and Wilma Beal. Glen Beal is the step-son of Alex Colbath,
the mine owner referred to in David, on's account as Harry C Ibath.
A critical issue in the book is the auth r' tatement that "Bob Parker" and
Bob McMullen were two different men. He believed that when "Bob
Parker" died, Bob McMullen came out of exile to Live in his place for another
ten years. This theory has no real factual basis, and would be imp ssible to
implement in such a small community.
The life of Robert Parker McMullen is wen known and documented. He was
born in Leeds, Utah, the 6th child 'of Brigham Young McMullen and hi wife
Ada on April 13, 1887. (Butch Cassidy was born on Aprill3, 1866). He was
born with a cleft upper lip (contrary to Davidson's claim it resulted from a
childhood fight and was the lower lip), This di figurementis clearly absent
from Butch Cassidy's Wyoming penitentiary photo of 1894. Bob lived his

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

THE OUTLA W TRAIL lOUR, At

45

entire li fe in Leeds, and rarely left the


town, except for a stint in the U.s.
Army (not the avy). Tn contrast
with David. n', assertion, there is
monumental evidence that only one
"Bo 1 Parker" Ii ed in Leeds, it was
B b Parker McMullen.
One must question why rthur
Davidson did not publish this ac
count during his lifetime, yet sked
his friend, Jim Aston to do '0 after his
death. It seem clear that Davidson
believed the core of his message, and
wanted to believe he had uncovered
a large piece of hi torical fact. Thi
story would have made interesting
fiction, but as historical contribution
it contain to many flaws to be taken
seriously.

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

McMullen family member have rea


son to believe the book may have
Robert Parker McMullin

been written by mor than one per


1940

son. Information given by Joanne


(Photo:
courtesy
of the author)

Thornton to Jim Aston in 1993, which


was not in Davidson' manuscript,
surfaced in the published book (McMullen's "Craziness", Schizophrenia,
the Gilded Cage, etc.).(10) If true, uch license would explain some of the
book errors, and would brin int question the veracity of the book's central
message. One would also wonder who the real author is.
Davidson claimed "Bob Parker" was lost while herding his grandmother's
sheep, yet, had he been the son of Robert Parker as stated, this would be
impo ::;ible, since neither of his grandmothers left England.(9) Furthermore,
Robert Parker fathered a son Robert Parker, born in Beaver, Utah on January
12, 1858. The infant lived only 13 months. It is unthinkable in a Mormon
family that another son would be given the same name as a deceased
brother.(ll)
The bo k contains too many inconsi tencies to be detailed within this
review. There are, however explanations. The McMullen family experi
enced an unusually hi h incidence of schizophrenia. Of 13 children, four
were diagno 'ed . chizophrenic, and 2 became war s of their brothers or
sisters, owing to this affliction. Bob Parker McMullen was one of the two.
During their early year, Bob and his brother Willard fell in love with the
same girl, Margaret Olson of Leeds. After a serious disagreement, the

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

46

THE OUTLA W TRAIL JOURNAL

brothers both retreated and became confirmed bachelors. Family members


believe it was after this incident that Bob's schizophrenia surfaced.
Willard "looked after" Bob for the rest of his life while Bob worked at the Log
Cabin Inn. Bob McMullen's niece, Joann Georg Thornton worked with
"Uncle Bob" at the Inn. She remembers that he owned and loved his
thoroughbreds, but never rode them (contrary to Davidson's story). Fur
thermore, she denies that Bob Parker knew anything about mining. It was
his brother Willard who was a local mining man, but Frank Willis and Alex
Colbath were actually the mining experts. (12)
When Art Davidson entered the Log Cabin Inn his perspective came in peril.
He was the unsuspecting target of an outrageous prank Little did he know
the rules of the game set up by the men he called" the cousins". These in fact
were several McMullen brothers, plus brother-in-law Jerry George.(13)
Anyone who displayed the childlike curiosity of an Art Davidson was not
left without a good story. The wilder the story, the more joy to its
perpetrators. Joann Thornton recalls how her father and uncles would
replay the stories later, enjoying the sec nd round as much as the first.
These tales were not without some historical basis. Tl e truth often made the
fiction believable. In this case Bob McMullen was the front man for the
stories. Davidson's affection and respect for "Bob Parker" may have
clouded his judgement.

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

This reviewer was well acquainted with some of e characters in Arthur


Davidson's book. During 1953-1954 I was engaged to Brigham McMullen's
grand daughter, Geraldine, and spent much time in the Leeds area. I well
remember the"goings on" at the Log Cabin Inn. These were the years of Art
Davidson's visits, yet we can find no one in the Leeds area who remembers
him or his visits.
During that period, I spent many hours visiting with Queen Ann Bassett,
then living in Leeds. After reading "Sometimes" Cassidy, I was struck by
the fact that in our conversations Ann had always referred to Butch Cassidy
as in a far away dimension. I cannot remember that she e er mentioned Bob
Parker McMullen, yet he was living less than three blocks away at the Log
Cabin Inn. This is curiously at odds with Davidson's statement that Ann
said to him, "It is possible that you do n t know it, but you have been
honored (to know Bob). He isn't Butch, you know. He is "Sometimes".(14)
Davidson somehow took this to mean Bob Parker was "Sometimes" Cassidy
- The Real Butch Cassidy.
This book is difficult to read, since there is no chro ologicalorder. The story
unfolds in bits a d pieces. Still, the plot is fascinating, and the plausibility
of much of Dav'dson's narration is the substance that makes it such
provocative reading. "Sometimes" Cassidy evokes more questions than it
answers. It is filled with new information, some of which may be the seeds

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

47

THE OUTLA W TRAIL JOURNAL

of valuable future research or may prove to be totally fictitious. There are


coincidences which cannot be easily explained - yet the core message is built
upon fables - the stories of one man as remembered years later by the author.
This weak and distorted plot somewhat obscures a very real contribution
the author has made in his historical research. The related mining histories
of Utah and Nevada come alive with Davidson's lifelong experience in the
mining industry. He lived in a time and place still replete with characters
from the outlaw trail. His story is that he knew and brushed paths with
many of them. His grandfather Amasa Davidson rode with Bu tch Cassidy,
and knew most of the Wild Bunch -though he was on the other side of the
law. Some of the lesser findings from the author's research may yet prove
an addition to western history. I do not believe his story of "Bob Parker" will
be one that will survive.
Robert Parker McMullen, Butch Cassidy's cousin was buried in the Leeds
cemetery in December 1966. He was 79 years old and was an incomparable
story teller.

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

Charlie Overfield says the man buried at Johnnie, Nevada at the foot of
Butch Cassidy's grave was a miner from the Labbe claim. He committed
suicide by laying his head on six sticks of dynamite. Overfield was in
Johnnie during the burial, which he says occurred years before Bob Parker
McMullen's death.(15)
Bill Buchanan
Salt Lake City, Utah
December 1, 1995

1. Charles Overfield, interview by The Reviewer, 31 October 1995, Johnnie, Nevada.


2. Art Davidson, "Sometimes" Cassidy, Salt Lake City, Utah: Hawkes Publishing Inc.,
Page 82.
3. Ibid, 129.
4. Joann George Thornton, interview by The Reviewer, 27 October 1995, Leeds, Utah.
5. Art Davidson, "Sometimes" Cassidy, Page 36, 41.
6. Ibid, 60.
7. Ethyl McMullen George, conversation with The Reviewer, 1954, Leeds, Utah.
8. Art Davidson, "Sometimes" Cassidy, page 100.
9. Lula Parker Betenson, interview with The Reviewer, July 1970, Circleville, Utah.
Also: Lula Parker Betenson, Butch Cassidy, My Brother, Brigham Young
University Press, 1975, Pages 10/11.
10. Joanne George Thornton, interview with The Reviewer, 30 November 1995, Leeds,
Utah.
11. Lula Parker Betenson, Butch Cassidy, My Brother, Brigham Young University
Press, 1975, Page 19.

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

48

THE OUTLA W TRAIL JOURNAL

12. Joanne George Thornton. interview with The Reviewer, 27 October 1995, Leeds.
Utah.
13. Bob McMullen. Willard McMullen. Lawrence McMullen. Jerry George.
14. Art Davidson, "Sometimes" Cassidy. page 23.
15. Charles Overfield. interview with The Reviewer, 31 October 1995. Johnnie. Nevada.
(Bill Buchanan lives in Salt Lake City and is a graduate of the University of
Utah. He was in the Marine Corp from 1954-58. Bill travels extensively in his
export and import business. He has a great interest in researching western
history and has done so for as long as he can remember. Knowing some of the
people involved, helps keep him interested.)

NEW BOOKS JUST RECEIVED AT THE


OUTLA W TRAIL mSTORY CENTER:

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

The first issue of Vol. 1 of the NOLA Outlaw-Lawman Research series


enti tled, TRAILING BILLY THE KID, By Philip J. Rasch, just arrived at the
Center as we were going to the printers.

R. Neil Thorne personally delivered a book to the Outlaw Trail Center which
he had published on the events in the history of his father, Robert C. Thorne.
The book is called, LETTERS HOME FROM THE BONE CAMPS, Annals of
a Field Museum Paleontologist Argentina and Bolivia, 1926-27. Anyone would
find this an interesting narrative about life in the mid 1920s whether they are
fossil hunters or not.

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

Outlaw Trail History Center

Research Center for Outlaws & Lawmen


Featuring History oj the Wild Bunch

Housed in the Regional Room at

Uintah County Library

155 East Main

Vernal, Utah 84078

1-801-789-0091

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

There have been ten issues of the Outlaw Trail Journal


published (including this one). We still have a limited
number of back issues available for purchase.

Uintah County Library


A library for all "ages"

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

WINTER 1995

Property of the
Outlaw Trail
History Center
Butch Cassidy's Family, The Parkers

Uintah County Western Heritage Museum


328 East 200 South, Vernal, Utah 84078
www.westernheritagemuseum-uc-ut.org

In This Issue:
Lula Parker Betenso
Bandit Hunter-F.M. H.
Frontiersman-W.B. T:

Minat Terkait