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Facilitation Technique Category: Assistive Technology

Activity Title: Video Games


Source: Dattilo, J., & McKenney, A. (2016) Facilitation Techniques in Therapeutic
Recreation
State College, PA: Venture Publishing, Inc.
Equipment: Xbox or PlayStation, controllers and Game CDS
Activity Description: Video games are enjoyed by most clients as they are relaxing
and fun. Video games provide motivational properties relevant to learning and
enjoyment of individuals with disabilities because they often include immediate
feedback, equal challenge ratio, no celling on performance, and opportunities for
improvement. The purpose of this activity is to help participants to develop eyehand co-ordination, problem solving, reaction time, scanning and communication.
This activity will last for an hour and can involve two- four participants. Begin the
activity by setting up the Xbox or PlayStation system with the help of participants.
Next, ask participants to choose a game of choice from a selection of four games.
Next, form groups of two to four participants to play together. Then participants will
play the game of choice for at least an hour. End the activity by asking participants
to state what they enjoyed about the activity.

Leadership Considerations: The CTRS will act as the instructor of the activity. CTRS
will explain the rules of the activity as it is important that all participants get a turn
to play the games. CTRS will also engage in the activity by playing with participants
or helping them along as they play the games. CTRS should ensure that the
environment is therapeutic.

Adaptations: Participants with Mild Cognitive Impairment: Mild cognitive impairment


(MCI) is an intermediate stage between the expected cognitive decline of normal
aging and the more-serious decline of dementia. It can involve problems with
memory, language, thinking and judgment that are greater than normal age-related
changes (The Mayo Clinic 2016). In order to adapt this activity for participants with
Mild Cognitive Impairment, CTRS will provide one and one assistance to
participants. CTRS should also focus on long-term memory collection throughout the
activity by using simple direct communication. CTRS should provide validation and
assurance to participants throughout the activity as participants may become
discouraged (Schleien, 1995).

Adaptations: Participants with Cerebral Vascular Accidents(CVA): Cerebrovascular


accident (CVA), also referred to as a stroke, is a disease that affects the arteries in
and around the brain. A CVA occurs when a blood vessel carries oxygen and
nutrients to the brain ruptures or is blocked by a clot (Porter 2015). In order to

adapt this activity for participants with CVA, the CTRS will provide one to one and
hand over hand assistance. This is important as the CTRS is helping participants to
develop eye- hand coordination. Also the arm muscles are weak so the CTRS
providing hand over hand assistance will help participants to engage in the activity.
CTRS will use prompts or cues when engaging in conversation with participants as
they may have little or no speech or difficulty speaking. It is important to use
pictures cues as needed (Schleien, 2015).

Adaptation References

The Mayo Clinic: http://www. Mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/mildcognitive-impairment

Schleien, S., Meyer, L., et al. (1995) Lifelong leisure skills and lifestyles for
persons with developmental disabilities. Baltimore, Maryland: Paul H. Brooks.

Porter, H. (2015) Recreational Therapy for Specific Diagnosis and Conditions.


Idyll Arbor, Inc.

Facilitation Technique Category: Leisure Education


Activity Title: Leisure Bingo
Source: Dattilo, J., & McKenney, A. (2016) Facilitation Techniques in Therapeutic
Recreation
State College, PA: Venture Publishing, Inc.
Equipment: Bingo Cards and pencils

Activity Description: Leisure Ethic is understanding the different aspects of leisure


and how it applies to an individuals life. The purpose of this activity is to help
participants understand and develop an appreciation for leisure by engaging in
conversation with others about some of the benefits they have received from
leisure. This activity will involve ten people and will last for an hour. Start the
activity by giving each person in the group a copy of a bingo card. Introduce the
activity to participants as a support staff member distributes bingo cards and
pencils to all participants. Participants can be instructed that when prompted, their
task is to find people who have participated in various activities on their cards and
to ask what benefits they receive from participating in an activity on the card.
Benefits are written in the square with the activity to which it corresponds. Each
person supplies a benefit for only one square on the activity card, so that when a
card is complete, each participant will have spoken to nine different people. Also,
each person initials only one square per bingo card. The activity continues until the
first person to complete a card announces, Bingo! The activity can be debriefed
by asking participants if they learned about any new or interesting recreation
activities. Participants are encouraged to participate with other group members who
identified an interest in a similar activity.

Leadership Considerations: The CTRS will act as the instructor of the activity along
with the help of one supporting staff. CTRS will make bingo cards before the session
begins by drawing a large square on a piece of paper, then drawing 2 horizontals
and 2 vertical lines so that the square is divided into 9 equally sized boxes. The
CTRS will also write a leisure -related activity in each of the squares using both
common and slightly obscure recreation activities. CTRS will explain the clear rules
of the game before beginning the activity.

Adaptations: Participants with Sickle Cell Disease: Sickle Cell Disease(SCD) is an


inherited blood disorder that affects red blood cells. SCD is caused by a mutated

form of hemoglobin, which results in red blood cell rigidity during low oxygen states
(Porter 2015). In order to adapt this activity for participants with SCD, CTRS will
ensure that the environment is therapeutic. CTRS will also provide assistance to
participants throughout the activity as needed. CTRS may help if participants
struggle with understanding statements found on bingo cards (Schleien 1995).

Adaptations: Participants with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD):


Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a condition that makes it difficult
to breathe (Porter 2015). In order to adapt this activity for participants with COPD,
CTRS will help participants throughout the activity to make sure there is no strain or
pressure placed on the participant. CTRS will ensure that the environment is safe,
clean and therapeutic. There should be no pollutants or liquids around that will
disrupt breathing (Porter 2015).
Adaptation References

Schleien, S., Meyer, L., et al. (1995) Lifelong leisure skills and lifestyles for
persons with developmental disabilities. Baltimore, Maryland: Paul H. Brooks.

Porter, H. (2015) Recreational Therapy for Specific Diagnosis and Conditions.


Idyll Arbor, Inc.