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Bachelor of Technology (Civil Engineering)

Programme Code: BTCE


Duration 4 Years Full Time

Programme Structure
and
Curriculum & Scheme of Examination
2013-14

AMITY UNIVERSITY
MADHYA PRADESH

PREAMBLE

Amity University aims to achieve academic excellence by providing multi-faceted education


to students and encourage them to reach the pinnacle of success. The University has designed
a system that would provide rigorous academic programme with necessary skills to enable
them to excel in their careers.
This booklet contains the Programme Structure, the Detailed Curriculum and the Scheme of
Examination. The Programme Structure includes the courses (Core and Elective), arranged
semester wise. The importance of each course is defined in terms of credits attached to it. The
credit units attached to each course has been further defined in terms of contact hours i.e.
Lecture Hours (L), Tutorial Hours (T), Practical Hours (P). Towards earning credits in terms
of contact hours, 1 Lecture and 1 Tutorial per week are rated as 1 credit each and 2 Practical
hours per week are rated as 1 credit. Thus, for example, an L-T-P structure of 3-0-0 will have
3 credits, 3-1-0 will have 4 credits, and 3-1-2 will have 5 credits.
The Curriculum and Scheme of Examination of each course includes the course objectives,
course contents, scheme of examination and the list of text and references. The scheme of
examination defines the various components of evaluation and the weightage attached to each
component. The different codes used for the components of evaluation and the weightage
attached to them are:
Components
Case Discussion/ Presentation/ Analysis
Home Assignment
Project
Seminar
Viva
Quiz
Class Test
Attendance
End Semester Examination

Codes
C
H
P
S
V
Q
CT
A
EE

Weightage (%)
05 - 10
05 - 10
05 - 10
05 - 10
05 - 10
05 - 10
10 - 15
05
70

It is hoped that it will help the students study in a planned and a structured manner and
promote effective learning. Wishing you an intellectually stimulating stay at Amity
University.

July, 2013

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE- B.Tech(Civil)


FIRST SEMESTER
Course
Code

Course Title

BTCE 101
BTCE 102
BTCE 103
BTCE 104

Applied Mathematics - I
Applied Physics - I Fields & Waves
Elements of Mechanical Engineering
Introduction
to
Computers
&
Programming in C
Electrical Science
Environmental Studies-I
Applied Physics Lab - I
Elements of Mechanical Engineering
Lab
Programming in C Lab
Electrical Science Lab
Engineering Graphics Lab
English
Behavioural Sciences - I
Foreign Language - I
French
German
Spanish
Japanese
Chinese
TOTAL

BTCE 105
BTCE 106
BTCE 120
BTCE 121
BTCE 122
BTCE 123
BTCE 124
BTCE 143
BTCE 144
BTCE 145
BTCE 146
BTCE 147
BTCE 148

Lecture
(L) Hours
Per Week
3
2
2
2

Tutorial
(T) Hours
Per Week
1
1
1

Practical
(P) Hours
Per Week
-

Total
Credits

2
2
-

1
-

2
2

3
2
1
1

1
1
2

2
2
2
-

1
1
1
1
2

4
3
2
3

25

SECOND SEMESTER
BTCE 201
BTCE 202
BTCE 203
BTCE 204
BTCE 205
BTCE 206
BTCE 220
BTCE 221
BTCE 222
BTCE 223
BTCE 240
BTCE 243
BTCE 244
BTCE 245
BTCE 246
BTCE 247
BTCE 248

Applied Mathematics - II
Applied Physics - II Modern Physics
Applied Chemistry
Object Oriented Programming in C++
Engineering Mechanics
Environmental Studies II
Applied Physics Lab - II
Applied Chemistry Lab
Object Oriented Programming in C++
Lab
Engineering Mechanics Lab
English
Behavioural Science II
Foreign Language - II
French
German
Spanish
Japanese
Chinese
TOTAL

TERM PAPER DURING SUMMER BREAK

3
2
2
2
2
2
-

1
1
1
1
1
-

2
2
2

4
3
3
3
3
2
1
1
1

1
1
2

2
-

1
1
1
2

26

Page
No.

THIRD SEMESTER
BTCE 301
BTCE 302
BTCE 303
BTCE 304
BTCE 305
BTCE 306
BTCE 320
BTCE 321
BTCE 322
BTCE 341
BTCE 343
BTCE 344
BTCE 345
BTCE 346
BTCE 347
BTCE 348
BTCE 330

Applied Mathematics - III


Engineering Geology
Mechanics of Solids
Mechanics of Fluids
Building Technology
Surveying
Mechanics of Solids & Fluids Lab
Civil Engineering Drawing Lab
Surveying Practical - I
Communication Skills I
Behavioural Science - III
Foreign Language III
French
German
Spanish
Japanese
Chinese
Term Paper (Evaluation)
TOTAL

3
3
2
3
3
2
1
1
2

1
1
1
-

2
2
2
-

4
3
3
4
3
2
1
1
1
1
1
2

2
28

FOURTH SEMESTER
BTCE 401 Numerical Analysis & Programming

BTCE 402 Structural Analysis - I

BTCE 403
BTCE 404
BTCE 405
BTCE 406

3
2
2
3

1
1
-

3
3
3
3

BTCE 420 Numerical Analysis Lab (Programming


Lab)
BTCE 421 Material Testing Lab - I

BTCE 422 Surveying Practical - II

BTCE 441 Communication Skills - II


BTCE 443 Behavioural Science IV

1
1

1
1

BTCE 444
BTCE 445
BTCE 446
BTCE 447
BTCE 448

Hydro Systems
Geo Informatics
Functional Design of Buildings
Transportation Engineering - I

Foreign Language IV
French
German
Spanish
Japanese
Chinese
TOTAL

26

INDUSTRIAL PRACTICAL TRAINING DURING SUMMER BREAK (6-8 WEEKS)


FIFTH SEMESTER
BTCE 501
BTCE 502
BTCE 503
BTCE 504
BTCE 505
BTCE 520
BTCE 521
BTCE 541
BTCE 543
BTCE 544

Structural Analysis - II
Principles of Structural Design
Geotechnical Engineering - I
Transportation Engineering - II
Hydraulic Machines
Material Testing Lab - II
Hydraulic Machines Lab
Communication Skills - III
Behavioural Science V
Foreign Language V
French

3
3
3
3
3
1
1
2

1
1
-

2
2
-

3
4
3
4
3
1
1
1
1
2

BTCE 545
BTCE 546
BTCE 547
BTCE 548
BTCE 550

German
Spanish
Japanese
Chinese
Industrial Practical Training
(Evaluation)
TOTAL

4
27

SIXTH SEMESTER
BTCE 601
BTCE 602
BTCE 603
BTCE 604
BTCE 605
BTCE 606
BTCE 620
BTCE 621
BTCE 641
BTCE 643
BTCE 644
BTCE 645
BTCE 646
BTCE 647
BTCE 648

Environmental Engineering - I
Structural Concrete Design
Geotechnical Engineering II
Computer Application in Civil
Engineering
Concrete Technology
Building Design & Drawing
Computer Applications Lab
Geotechnical Engineering Lab
Communication Skills - IV
Behavioural Science VI
Foreign Language VI
French
German
Spanish
Japanese
Chinese
TOTAL

3
3
3
3

1
-

3
3
4
3

3
3
1
1
2

2
2
2
-

3
4
1
1
1
1
2

26

SUMMER TRAINING (6- 8 WEEKS)


SEVENTH SEMESTER
BTCE 701
BTCE 702
BTCE 703
BTCE 720
BTCE 721
BTCE 741
BTCE 743

Structural Steel Design


Environmental Engineering II
Water Resource Engineering
Environmental Engineering Lab
Structural Detailing Lab
Communication Skills - V
Behavioural Science VII
Foreign Language VI I
BTCE 744
French
BTCE 745
German
BTCE 746
Spanish
BTCE 747
Japanese
BTCE 748
Chinese
BTCE 760
Project
BTCE 750
Industrial Training (Evaluation)
ELECTIVE-I (Any one from the Elective list)
BTCE 704
Prestressed Concrete
BTCE 705
Remote Sensing & Geographic
Information Systems
BTCE 706
Advanced Structural Analysis
BTCE 707
Hydrology & Flood Control
BTCE 708
Environmental Pollution Control
Engineering
BTCE 709
Computer Aided Analysis & Design in
Civil Engineering
TOTAL

3
3
3
1
1
2

1
-

2
2
-

4
3
3
1
1
1
1
2

2
6

3
4

1
-

4
4

3
3
4

1
1
-

4
4
4

4
28

EIGHTH SEMESTER
BTCE 801

Construction Management & Quantity


Surveying
BTCE 802
Engineering Economics &
Management
BTCE 860
Project (Dissertation)
BTCE 841
Communication Skills - VI
BTCE 843
Behavioural Science VIII
Foreign Language VI II
BTCE 844
French
BTCE 845
German
BTCE 846
Spanish
BTCE 847
Japanese
BTCE 848
Chinese
ELECTIVES-II (Any one from the Elective list)
BTCE 803
Finite Element Method
BTCE 804
Traffic Engineering & Management
BTCE 805
Computer Application in Hydro
Engineering
BTCE 806
Water Resources Systems Planning &
Design
BTCE 807
Advanced Concrete Design
BTCE 808
Advanced Steel Design
BTCE 809
Architecture & Town Planning
BTCE 810
Industrial Waste Engineering
TOTAL

1
1
2

15
1
1
2

3
3
3

1
1
-

4
4
4

3
3
3

1
1
-

2
-

4
4
4
4
29

Curriculum & Scheme of Examination


APPLIED MATHEMATICS I
Course Code:

BTCE 101

Credit Units: 04

Course Objective:
The knowledge of Mathematics is necessary for a better understanding of almost all the Engineering and
Science subjects. Here our intention is to make the students acquainted with the concept of basic topics from
Mathematics, which they need to pursue their Engineering degree in different disciplines.

Course Contents:
Module I: Differential Calculus
Successive differentiation, Leibnitzs theorem (without proof), Mean value theorem, Taylors theorem (proof),
Remainder terms, Asymptote & Curvature, Partial derivatives, Chain rule, Differentiation of Implicit functions,
Exact differentials, Tangents and Normals, Maxima, Approximations, Differentiation under integral sign,
Jacobians and transformations of coordinates.
Module II: Integral Calculus
Fundamental theorems, Reduction formulae, Properties of definite integrals, Applications to length, area,
volume, surface of revolution, improper integrals, Multiple Integrals-Double integrals, Applications to areas,
volumes.
Module III: Ordinary Differential Equations
Formation of ODEs, Definition of order, degree & solutions, ODE of first order : Method of separation of
variables, homogeneous and non homogeneous equations, Exactness & integrating factors, Linear equations &
Bernoulli equations, General linear ODE of nth order, Solution of homogeneous equations, Operator method,
Method of undetermined coefficients, Solution of simple simultaneous ODE.
Module IV: Vector Calculus
Scalar and Vector Field, Derivative of a Vector, Gradient, Directional Derivative, Divergence and Curl and their
Physical Significance, Arc Length, Tangent, Directional Derivative, Evaluation of Line Integral, Greens
Theorem in Plane (without proof), Representation of Surfaces, Tangent Plane and Surface Normal, Surface
Integral, Stokes Theorem (without proof), Gauss Divergence Theorem (without proof).

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination;
Att: Attendance

Text & References:


Text:
Differential Calculus by Shanti Narain
Integral Calculus by Shanti Narain
References:
Differential Equation by A.R. Forsyth
Higher Engineering Mathematics by H.K. Dass

APPLIED PHYSICS - I - FIELDS AND WAVES


Course Code:

BTCE 102

Credit Units: 03

Course Objective:
Aim of this course is to introduce the students to fundamentals of graduate level physics, which form the basis
of all applied science and engineering

Course Contents:
Module I: Oscillations & Waves
Oscillations: Introduction to S.H.M. Damped Oscillations: Differential Equation and its solution, logarithmic
decrement, Quality Factor, Different conditions of damping of harmonic oscillations. Forced oscillations:
Amplitude and Frequency Response, Resonance, Sharpness of Resonance
Plane Progressive Waves: Differential Equation and Solution, Superposition of Progressive Waves stationary
waves.
Ultrasonics: Generation and application of ultrasonicwaves.
Module II: Wave Nature of Light
Interference: Coherent Sources, Conditions of interference, Interference due to division of wavefront, Fresnels
biprism Interference due to division of amplitude, Newtons rings, Interference due to thin films, .
Diffraction: Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction, Fraunhofer diffraction at a single slit, double slit, N Slits,
Transmission grating, Rayleigh criterion and Resolving power of grating.
Polarization: Birefringence, Nicol prism, Production and analysis of plane, circularly and elliptically polarized
light, Half and quarter wave plates, Optical rotation, Polarimeter.
Module III: Electromagnetics
Scalar and vector fields, gradient of a scalar field, physical significance of gradient, equipotential surface. Line,
surface and volume integrals, Divergence and curl of vector field and mathematical analysis physical
significance, Electric flux, Gauss law, Proof and Applications, Gauss divergence and Stokes theorems.
Differential form of Gauss Law, Amperes Law, Displacement current, Faradays Law, Maxwell equations in
free space & isotropic media (Integral form & differential form), EM wave propagation in free space, Poynting
vector.

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Text & References:

Waves & oscillation, A. P. French


Physics of waves, W. C. Elmore & M. A. Heald
Introduction to Electrodynamics, D. J. Griffith
Electrodynamics, Gupta, Kumar & Singh
Optics, A. K. Ghatak
Engineering Physics, Satya Prakash

ELEMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING


Course Code:

BTCE 103

Credit Units: 02

Course Objective:
The objective of this course is to impart the basic knowledge of thermodynamics, stress- strain, materials & their
properties and various manufacturing processes to the students of all engineering discipline.

Course Contents:
Module I: Fundamental Concepts
Definition of thermodynamics, system, surrounding and universe, phase, concept of continuum, macroscopic &
microscopic point of view, Thermodynamic equilibrium, property, state, path, process, cyclic process, Zeroth,
first and second law of thermodynamics, Carnot Cycle, Introduction to I.C. Engines-two &four stoke S.I. and
C.I. engines. Otto cycle. Diesel cycle.
Module II: Stress And Strain Analysis
Simple stress and strain: introduction, normal shear, and stresses-strain diagrams for ductile and brittle
materials. Elastic constants, one-dimensional loadings of members of varying cross-section, Strain Energy,
Properties of material-strength, elasticity, stiffness, malleability, ductility, brittleness, hardness and plasticity
etc; Concept of stress and strain stress strain diagram, tensile test, impact test and hardness test.
Module III: Casting & Forging
Introduction of casting, pattern, mould making procedures, sand mould casting, casting defects, allowances of
pattern. Forging-introduction, upsetting & drawing out, drop forging, press forging & m/c forging
Module IV: Welding & Sheet metal working
Introduction of welding processes, classification, gas welding, arc welding, resistance welding. Introduction to
sheet metal shop, Shearing, trimming, blanking, piercing, shaving, notching, stretch forming, nibbling coining,
embossing and drawing.

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Text & References:

Engineering thermodynamics, by P.K. Nag, Tata McGraw Hill.


Thermal Engineering, by D.S. Kumar. S.K. Kataria and Sons.
Thermal Engineering by PL Ballaney; Khanna Publishers, Delhi.
Engineering Thermodynamics: Work and Heat Transfer, by Rogers and Mayhew, ELBS Publications
Heine, R.W. C.R. Loper and P.C. Rosenthal, Principles of metal casting McGraw Hill
Welding Technology by R.S. Parmar, Khanna Publishers.
Thermodynamics and Heat Engines Volume-I, by R. Yadav: Central Publications.
Ganesan, V. Internal Combustion Engine, Tata McGraw-Hill.
Mathur, M.L. and Sharma, R.P. Internal Combustion Engine. Dhanpat Rai Publication

INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS AND PROGRAMMING IN C


Course Code:

BTCE 104

Credit Units: 03

Course Objective:
The objective of this course module is to acquaint the students with the basics of computers system, its
components, data representation inside computer and to get them familiar with various important
features of procedure oriented programming language i.e. C.

Course Contents:
Module I: Introduction
Introduction to computer, history, von-Neumann architecture, memory system (hierarchy, characteristics and
types), H/W concepts (I/O Devices), S/W concepts (System S/W & Application S/W, utilities). Data
Representation: Number systems, character representation codes, Binary, octal, hexadecimal and their
interconversions. Binary arithmetic, floating point arithmetic, signed and unsigned numbers, Memory storage
unit.
Module II: Programming in C
History of C, Introduction of C, Basic structure of C program, Concept of variables, constants and data types in
C, Operators and expressions: Introduction, arithmetic, relational, Logical, Assignment, Increment and
decrement operator, Conditional, bitwise operators, Expressions, Operator precedence and associativity.
Managing Input and output Operation, formatting I/O.
Module III: Fundamental Features in C
C Statements, conditional executing using if, else, nesting of if, switch and break Concepts of loops, example of
loops in C using for, while and do-while, continue and break. Storage types (automatic, register etc.), predefined
processor, Command Line Argument.
Module IV: Arrays and Functions
One dimensional arrays and example of iterative programs using arrays, 2-D arrays Use in matrix computations.
Concept of Sub-programming, functions Example of user defined functions. Function prototype, Return values
and their types, calling function, function argument, function with variable number of argument, recursion.
Module V: Advanced features in C
Pointers, relationship between arrays and pointers Argument passing using pointers, Array of pointers. Passing
arrays as arguments.
Strings and C string library.
Structure and Union. Defining C structures, Giving values to members, Array of structure, Nested structure,
passing strings as arguments.
File Handling.

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Text & References:


Text:
ANSI C by E Balagurusamy
Yashwant Kanetkar, Let us C, BPB Publications, 2nd Edition, 2001.
Herbert Schildt, C:The complete reference, Osbourne Mcgraw Hill, 4 th Edition, 2002.
V. Raja Raman, Computer Programming in C, Prentice Hall of India, 1995.
References:

Kernighan & Ritchie, C Programming Language, The (Ansi C Version), PHI, 2 nd Edition.
J. B Dixit, Fundamentals of Computers and Programming in C.
P.K. Sinha and Priti Sinha, Computer Fundamentals, BPB publication.

ELECTRICAL SCIENCE
Course Code:

BTCE 105

Credit Units: 03

Course Objective:
The objective of the course is to provide a brief knowledge of Electrical Engineering to students of all
disciplines. This Course includes some theorems related to electrical, some laws related to flow of current,
voltages, basic knowledge of Transformer, basic knowledge of electromagnetism, basic knowledge of electrical
network.

Course Contents:
Module I: Basic Electrical Quantities
Basic Electrical definitions-Energy, Power, Charge, Current, Voltage, Electric Field Strength, Magnetic Flux
Density, etc., Resistance, Inductance and Capacitance. Ideal Source, Independent Source and Controlled Source
Module II: Network Analysis Techniques & Theorems
Circuit Principles: Ohms Law, Kirchoffs Current Law, Kirchoffs Voltage Law Network Reduction: Star
Delta Transformation, Source Transformation, Nodal Analysis, Loop analysis. Superposition theorem
Thevenins Theorem, Nortons theorem and Reciprocity theorem.
Module III: Alternating Current Circuits
Peak, Average and RMS values for alternating currents, Power calculation:
reactive power, active power, Complex power, power factor, impedance, reactance, conductance, susceptance
Resonance: series Resonance, parallel resonance, basic definition of Q factor & Band-width.
Module IV: Transformers
Basic Transformer Operation principle, Construction, Voltage relations, Current relations, Linear circuit models,
Open circuit test, Short circuit test, Transformer Efficiency.

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Text & References:

R.J. Smith, R.C. Dorf: Circuits, devices and Systems


B.L. Thareja: Electrical Technology : Part -1 & 2
V. Deltoro: Electrical Engineering fundamentals
Schaums Series: Electrical Circuits

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES-I
Course Code:

BTCE 106

Credit Units: 02

Course Objective:
The term environment is used to describe, in the aggregate, all the external forces, influences
and conditions, which affect the life, nature, behaviour and the growth, development and
maturity of living organisms. At present a great number of environment issues, have grown in
size and complexity day by day, threatening the survival of mankind on earth. A study of
environmental studies is quite essential in all types of environmental sciences, environmental
engineering and industrial management. The objective of environmental studies is to
enlighten the masses about the importance of the protection and conservation of our
environment and control of human activities which has an adverse effect on the environment.
Course Contents:
Module I: The multidisciplinary nature of environmental studies
Definition, scope and importance
Need for public awareness
Module II: Natural Resources
Renewable and non-renewable resources
Natural resources and associated problems
Forest resources: Use and over-exploitation, deforestation, case studies. Timber extraction,
mining, dams and their effects on forests and tribal people.
Water resources: Use and over-utilization of surface and ground water, floods, drought,
conflicts over water, dams-benefits and problems.
Mineral resources: Use and exploitation, environmental effects of extracting and using
mineral resources, case studies.
Food resources: World food problems, changes caused by agriculture and overgrazing,
effects of modern agriculture, fertilizer-pesticide problems, water logging, salinity, case
studies.
Energy resources: Growing energy needs, renewable and non-renewable energy sources, use
of alternate energy sources, case studies.
Land resources: Land as a resource, land degradation, man induced landslides, soil erosion
and desertification.
Role of an individual in conservation of natural resources.
Equitable use of resources for sustainable lifestyles.
Module III: Ecosystems
Concept of an ecosystem
Structure and function of an ecosystem
Producers, consumers and decomposers
Energy flow in the ecosystem
Ecological succession
Food chains, food webs and ecological pyramids
Introduction, types, characteristic features, structure and function of the following ecosystem:
a. Forest ecosystem
b. Grassland ecosystem
c. Desert ecosystem
d. Aquatic ecosystems (ponds, streams, lakes, rivers, ocean estuaries)
Module IV: Biodiversity and its conservation

Introduction Definition: genetic, species and ecosystem diversity


Biogeographical classification of India
Value of biodiversity: consumptive use, productive use, social, ethical aesthetic and option
values
Biodiversity at global, national and local levels
India as a mega-diversity nation
Hot-spots of biodiversity
Threats to biodiversity: habitat loss, poaching of wildlife, man wildlife conflicts
Endangered and endemic species of India
Conservation of biodiversity: In-situ and Ex-situ conservation of biodiversity

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

CT
15

HA
5

S/V/Q
5

A
5

EE
70

Text & References:

Agarwal, K.C. 2001 Environmental Biology, Nidi Publ. Ltd. Bikaner.


Bharucha Erach, The Biodiversity of India, Mapin Publishing Pvt. Ltd., Ahmedabad 380
013, India, Email:mapin@icenet.net (R)
Brunner R.C., 1989, Hazardous Waste Incineration, McGraw Hill Inc. 480p
Clark R.S., Marine Pollution, Clanderson Press Oxford (TB)
Cunningham, W.P. Cooper, T.H. Gorhani, E & Hepworth, M.T. 2001, Environmental
Encyclopedia, Jaico Publ. House, Mumbai, 1196p
De A.K., Environmental Chemistry, Wiley Eastern Ltd.
Down to Earth, Centre for Science and Environment (R)
Gleick, H.P. 1993. Water in Crisis, Pacific Institute for Studies in Dev., Environment &
Security. Stockholm Env. Institute Oxford Univ. Press. 473p
Hawkins R.E., Encyclopedia of Indian Natural History, Bombay Natural History Society,
Bombay (R)
Heywood, V.H & Waston, R.T. 1995. Global Biodiversity Assessment. Cambridge Univ.
Press 1140p.
Jadhav, H & Bhosale, V.M. 1995. Environmental Protection and Laws. Himalaya Pub.
House, Delhi 284 p.
Mckinney, M.L. & School, R.M. 1996. Environmental Science Systems & Solutions,
Web enhanced edition. 639p.
Mhaskar A.K., Matter Hazardous, Techno-Science Publication (TB)
Miller T.G. Jr. Environmental Science, Wadsworth Publishing Co. (TB)
Odum, E.P. 1971. Fundamentals of Ecology. W.B. Saunders Co. USA, 574p
Rao M N. & Datta, A.K. 1987. Waste Water treatment. Oxford & IBH Publ. Co. Pvt. Ltd.
345p.
Sharma B.K., 2001. Environmental Chemistry. Geol Publ. House, Meerut
Survey of the Environment, The Hindu (M)
Townsend C., Harper J, and Michael Begon, Essentials of Ecology, Blackwell Science
Trivedi R.K., Handbook of Environmental Laws, Rules Guidelines, Compliances and
Standards, Vol I and II, Enviro Media (R)
Trivedi R. K. and P.K. Goel, Introduction to air pollution, Techno-Science Publication
(TB)
Wanger K.D., 1998 Environnemental Management. W.B. Saunders Co. Philadelphia,
USA 499p

APPLIED PHYSICS LAB - I


Course Code:

BTCE 120

Credit Units: 01

List of Experiments:
1.

To determine the wavelength of sodium light by Newtons rings method.

2.

To determine the dispersive power of the material of prism with the help of a spectrometer.

3.

To determine the specific rotation of sugar by Bi-quartz or Laurent half shade polarimeter.

4.

To determine the speed of ultrasonic waves in liquid by diffraction method.

5.

To determine the width of a narrow slit using diffraction phenomena.

6.

To determine the temperature coefficient of platinum wire, using a platinum resistance thermometer and a
Callender & Griffths bridge.

7.

To determine the value of specific charge (ratio of e/m) of an electron by Thomson method.

8.

To determine the internal resistance of Leclanche cell with the help of Potentiometer.

9.

To determine the resistance per unit length of a Carey Fosters bridge wire and also to find out the specific
resistance of a given wire.

10.

To plot graph showing the variation of magnetic field with distance along the aixs of a circular coil
carrying current, and hence estimate the radius of the coil.

11.

To determine the value of acceleration due to gravity (g) in the laboratory using bar pendulum.

12.

To determine the moment of inertia of a flywheel about its own axis of rotation.

13.

To determine the density of material of the given wire with the help of sonometer.

Examination Scheme:
IA

EE

A
PR
LR
V
PR
V
5
10
10
5
35
35
Note: IA Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR Lab Record, V Viva.

ELEMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING LAB


Course Code:
1.

BTCE 121

Credit Units: 01

Welding
(a)

Arc Welding

(b)

Gas Welding

Butt Joint
Lap Joint
T Joint
Butt Joint
Lap Joint
Brazing of Broken pieces
Sand mould casting by single piece pattern&
Split pattern bracket with cores

2.

Foundry

3.

Sheet Metal

Dust Bin
Mug
Funnel
Cylindrical Mug with handle-Rectangular

4.

Fitting Shop

Male Female Joint


Rectangular piece
Filing the job

Examination Scheme:
IA
EE
A
PR
LR
V
PR
V
5
10
10
5
35
35
Note: IA Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR Lab Record, V Viva.

PROGRAMMING IN C LAB
Course Code:

BTCE 122

Credit Units: 01

Software Required: Turbo C


Course Contents:

C program involving problems like finding the nth value of cosine series, Fibonacci series. Etc.
C programs including user defined function calls
C programs involving pointers, and solving various problems with the help of those.
File handling

Examination Scheme:
IA

EE

A
PR
LR
V
PR
V
5
10
10
5
35
35
Note: IA Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR Lab Record, V Viva.

ELECTRICAL SCIENCE LAB


Course Code:

BTCE 123

Credit Units: 01

List of Experiments:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

To verify KVL & KCL in the given network.


To verify Superposition Theorem.
To verify Maximum Power Transfer Theorem.
To verify Reciprocity Theorem.
To determine and verify RTh, VTh, RN, IN in a given network.
To perform open circuit & short circuit test on a single-phase transformer.
To study transient response of a given RLC Circuit.
To perform regulation, ratio & polarity test on a single-phase transformer.
To measure power & power factor in a three phase circuit by two wattmeter method.
To measure power & power factor in a three phase load using three ammeter & three voltmeter method.

Examination Scheme:
IA

EE

A
PR
LR
V
PR
V
5
10
10
5
35
35
Note: IA Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR Lab Record, V Viva.

ENGINEERING GRAPHICS LAB


Course Code:

BTCE 124

Credit Units: 01

Course Objective:
This course will provide students concepts on the drawings of different curves like straight line, parabola, ellipse etc.
After completion of this course, students will be able to draw different figures manually and will be capable of using
various instruments involved in drawings.

Course Contents:
Module I: General
Importance, Significance and scope of engineering drawing, Lettering, Dimensioning, Scales, Sense of proportioning,
Different types of projections, Orthographic Projection, B.I.S. Specifications.
Module II: Projections of Point and Lines
Introduction of planes of projection, Reference and auxiliary planes, projections of points and Lines in different
quadrants, traces, inclinations, and true lengths of the lines, projections on Auxiliary planes, shortest distance,
intersecting and non-intersecting lines.
Module III: Planes other than the Reference Planes
Introduction of other planes (perpendicular and oblique), their traces, inclinations etc., Projections of points and lines
lying in the planes, conversion of oblique plane into auxiliary Plane and solution of related problems.
Module IV: Projections of Plane Figures
Different cases of plane figures (of different shapes) making different angles with one or both reference planes and
lines lying in the plane figures making different given angles (with one of both reference planes). Obtaining true
shape of the plane figure by projection.
Module V: Projection of Solids
Simple cases when solid is placed in different positions, Axis faces and lines lying in the faces of the solid making
given angles.
Module VI: Development of Surface
Development of simple objects with and without sectioning. Isometric Projection

Examination Scheme:
IA

EE

A
PR
LR
V
PR
V
5
10
10
5
35
35
Note: IA Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR Lab Record, V Viva.

Text & References:

M.B. Shah & B.C. Rana, Engineering Drawing, Pearson Education, 2007
PS Gill, Engineering Drawing, Kataria Publication
ND Bhatt, Engineering Drawing, Charotar publications
N Sidheshwar, Engineering Drawing, Tata McGraw Hill
CL tanta, Mechanical Drawing, Dhanpat Rai

ENGLISH
Course Objective:
The course is intended to give a foundation of English Language. The literary texts are indented to help students to
inculcate creative & aesthetic sensitivity and critical faculty through comprehension, appreciation and analysis of the
prescribed literary texts. It will also help them to respond form different perspectives.

Course Contents:
Module I: Vocabulary
Use of Dictionary
Use of Words: Diminutives, Homonyms & Homophones
Module II: Essentials of Grammar - I
Articles
Parts of Speech
Tenses
Module III: Essentials of Grammar - II
Sentence Structure
Subject -Verb agreement
Punctuation
Module IV: Communication
The process and importance
Principles & benefits of Effective Communication
Module V: Spoken English Communication
Speech Drills
Pronunciation and accent
Stress and Intonation
Module VI: Communication Skills - I
Developing listening skills
Developing speaking skills
Module VII: Communication Skills - II
Developing Reading Skills
Developing writing Skills
Module VIII: Written English communication
Progression of Thought/ideas
Structure of Paragraph
Structure of Essays
Module IX: Short Stories
Of Studies, by Francis Bacon
Dream Children, by Charles Lamb
The Necklace, by Guy de Maupassant
A Shadow, by R.K.Narayan
Glory at Twilight, Bhabani Bhattacharya
Module X: Poems
All the Worlds a Stage
To Autumn
O! Captain, My Captain.
Where the Mind is Without Fear
Psalm of Life

Shakespeare
Keats
Walt Whitman
Rabindranath Tagore
H.W. Longfellow

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

A
05

CT
15

Text & References:

Madhulika Jha, Echoes, Orient Long Man


Ramon & Prakash, Business Communication, Oxford.
Sydney Greenbaum Oxford English Grammar, Oxford.
Successful Communications, Malra Treece (Allyn and Bacon)
Effective Technical Communication, M. Ashraf Rizvi.

* 30 hrs Programme to be continued for Full year

HA
10

EE
70

BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCE - I
(UNDERSTANDING SELF FOR EFFECTIVENESS)
Course Code:
Course Objective:

BTCE 143

Credit Units: 01

This course aims at imparting:


Understanding self & process of self exploration
Learning strategies for development of a healthy self esteem
Importance of attitudes and its effective on personality
Building Emotional Competence

Course Contents:
Module I: Self: Core Competency
Understanding of Self
Components of Self Self identity
Self concept
Self confidence
Self image
Module II: Techniques of Self Awareness
Exploration through Johari Window
Mapping the key characteristics of self
Framing a charter for self
Stages self awareness, self acceptance and self realization
Module III: Self Esteem & Effectiveness
Meaning and Importance
Components of self esteem
High and low self esteem
Measuring your self esteem
Module IV: Building Positive Attitude
Meaning and nature of attitude
Components and Types of attitude
Importance and relevance of attitude
Module V: Building Emotional Competence
Emotional Intelligence Meaning, components, Importance and Relevance
Positive and Negative emotions
Healthy and Unhealthy expression of emotions
Module VI: End-of-Semester Appraisal
Viva based on personal journal
Assessment of Behavioural change as a result of training
Exit Level Rating by Self and Observer

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

SAP

20

05

Mid Term
Test (CT)
20

VIVA
30

Journal for
Success (JOS)
25

Text & References:

Organizational Behaviour, Davis, K.


Hoover, Judhith D. Effective Small Group and Team Communication, 2002,Harcourt College Publishers
Dick, Mc Cann & Margerison, Charles: Team Management, 1992 Edition, viva books
Bates, A. P. and Julian, J.: Sociology - Understanding Social Behaviour
Dressler, David and Cans, Donald: The Study of Human Interaction
Lapiere, Richard. T Social Change
Lindzey, G. and Borgatta, E: Sociometric Measurement in the Handbook of Social Psychology, Addison
Welsley, US.
Rose, G.: Oxford Textbook of Public Health, Vol.4, 1985.
LaFasto and Larson: When Teams Work Best, 2001, Response Books (Sage), New Delhi
J William Pfeiffer (ed.) Theories and Models in Applied Behavioural Science, Vol 2, Group (1996); Pfeiffer &
Company
Smither Robert D.; The Psychology of Work and Human Performance, 1994, Harper Collins College Publishers

FRENCH - I
Course Code:

BTCE 144

Credit Units: 02

Course Objective:
To familiarize the students with the French language
with the phonetic system
with the syntax
with the manners
with the cultural aspects

Course Contents:
Module A: pp. 01 to 37: Units 1, 2, Unit 3 Objectif 1, 2
Only grammar of Unit 3: objectif 3, 4 and 5
Contenu lexical: Unit 1 : Dcouvrir la langue franaise : (oral et crit)
1. se prsenter, prsenter quelquun, faire la connaissance des
autres, formules de politesse, rencontres
2. dire/interroger si on comprend
3. Nommer les choses
Unit 2: Faire connaissance
1. donner/demander des informations sur une personne, premiers
contacts, exprimer ses gots et ses prfrences
2. Parler de soi: parler du travail, de ses activits, de son pays, de sa ville.
Unit 3: Organiser son temps
1. dire la date et lheure
Contenu grammatical:

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

organisation gnrale de la grammaire


article indfini, dfini, contract
nom, adjectif, masculin, fminin, singulier et pluriel
ngation avec de , "moi aussi", "moi non plus"
interrogation : Inversion, est-ce que, qui, que, quoi, quest-ce
que, o, quand, comment, quel(s), quelle(s)
Interro-ngatif : rponses : oui, si, non
6. pronom tonique/disjoint- pour insister aprs une prposition
7. futur proche

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

CT1
20

C Project + Presentation
I Interaction/Conversation Practice

Text & References:

le livre suivre : Campus: Tome 1

CT2
20

C
20

I
20

V
15

A
5

GERMAN - I
Course Code:

BTCE 145

Credit Units: 02

Course Objective:
To enable the students to converse, read and write in the language with the help of the basic rules of grammar,
which will later help them to strengthen their language.
To give the students an insight into the culture, geography, political situation and economic opportunities
available in Germany

Course Contents:
Module I: Introduction
Self introduction: heissen, kommen, wohnwn, lernen, arbeiten, trinken, etc.
All personal pronouns in relation to the verbs taught so far.
Greetings: Guten Morgen!, Guten Tag!, Guten Abend!, Gute Nacht!, Danke sehr!, Danke!, Vielen Dank!, (es
tut mir Leid!),
Hallo, wie gehts?: Danke gut!, sehr gut!, prima!, ausgezeichnet!,
Es geht!, nicht so gut!, so la la!, miserabel!
Module II: Interviewspiel
To assimilate the vocabulary learnt so far and to apply the words and phrases in short dialogues in an interview
game for self introduction.
Module III: Phonetics
Sound system of the language with special stress on Dipthongs
Module IV: Countries, nationalities and their languages
To make the students acquainted with the most widely used country names, their nationalitie and the language
spoken in that country.
Module V: Articles
The definite and indefinite articles in masculine, feminine and neuter gender. All Vegetables, Fruits, Animals,
Furniture, Eatables, modes of Transport
Module VI: Professions
To acquaint the students with professions in both the genders with the help of the verb sein.
Module VII: Pronouns
Simple possessive pronouns, the use of my, your, etc.
The family members, family Tree with the help of the verb to have
Module VIII: Colours
All the color and color related vocabulary colored, colorful, colorless, pale, light, dark, etc.
Module IX: Numbers and calculations verb kosten
The counting, plural structures and simple calculation like addition, subtraction, multiplication and division to
test the knowledge of numbers.
Wie viel kostet das?
Module X: Revision list of Question pronouns
W Questions like who, what, where, when, which, how, how many, how much, etc.

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)
C Project + Presentation

CT1
20

CT2
C
20
20
I Interaction/Conversation Practice

Text & References:

Wolfgang Hieber, Lernziel Deutsch


Hans-Heinrich Wangler, Sprachkurs Deutsch
Schulz Griesbach, Deutsche Sprachlehre fr Auslnder
P.L Aneja, Deutsch Interessant- 1, 2 & 3
Rosa-Maria Dallapiazza et al, Tangram Aktuell A1/1,2
Braun, Nieder, Schme, Deutsch als Fremdsprache 1A, Grundkurs

I
20

V
15

A
5

SPANISH I
Course Code:

BTCE 146

Credit Units: 02

Course Objective:
To enable students acquire the relevance of the Spanish language in todays global context, how to greet each
other. How to present / introduce each other using basic verbs and vocabulary

Course Contents:
Module I
A brief history of Spain, Latin America, the language, the cultureand the relevance of Spanish language in
todays global context.
Introduction to alphabets
Module II
Introduction to Saludos (How to greet each other. How to present / introduce each other).
Goodbyes (despedidas)
The verb llamarse and practice of it.
Module III
Concept of Gender and Number
Months of the years, days of the week, seasons. Introduction to numbers 1-100, Colors, Revision of numbers
and introduction to ordinal numbers.
Module IV
Introduction to SER and ESTAR (both of which mean To Be).Revision of Saludos and Llamarse. Some
adjectives, nationalities, professions, physical/geographical location, the fact that spanish adjectives have to
agree with gender and number of their nouns. Exercises highlighting usage of Ser and Estar.
Module V
Time, demonstrative pronoun (Este/esta, Aquel/aquella etc)
Module VI
Introduction to some key AR /ER/IR ending regular verbs.

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

CT1
20

C Project + Presentation
I Interaction/Conversation Practice

Text & References:

Espaol, En Directo I A
Espaol Sin Fronteras

CT2
20

C
20

I
20

V
15

A
5

JAPANESE - I
Course Code:

BTCE 147

Credit Units: 02

Course Objective:
To enable the students to learn the basic rules of grammar and Japanese language to be used in daily life that
will later help them to strengthen their language.

Course Contents:
Module I: Salutations
Self introduction, Asking and answering to small general questions
Module II: Cardinal Numbers
Numerals, Expression of time and period, Days, months
Module III: Tenses
Present Tense, Future tense
Module IV: Prepositions
Particles, possession, forming questions
Module V: Demonstratives
Interrogatives, pronoun and adjectives
Module VI: Description
Common phrases, Adjectives to describe a person
Module VII: Schedule
Time Table, everyday routine etc.
Module VIII: Outings
Going to see a movie, party, friends house etc.

Learning Outcome
Students can speak the basic language describing above mentioned topics

Methods of Private study /Self help


Handouts, audio-aids, and self-do assignments and role-plays will support classroom teaching

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

CT1
20

C Project + Presentation
I Interaction/Conversation Practice

Text & References:


Text:
Teach yourself Japanese
References:
Shin Nihongo no kiso 1

CT2
20

C
20

I
20

V
15

A
5

CHINESE I
Course Code:

BTCE 148

Credit Units: 02

Course Objective:
There are many dialects spoken in China, but the language which will help you through wherever you go is
Mandarin, or Putonghua, as it is called in Chinese. The most widely spoken forms of Chinese are Mandarin,
Cantonese, Gan, Hakka, Min, Wu and Xiang. The course aims at familiarizing the student with the basic aspects
of speaking ability of Mandarin, the language of Mainland China. The course aims at training students in
practical skills and nurturing them to interact with a Chinese person.

Course Contents:
Module I
Show pictures, dialogue and retell.
Getting to know each other.
Practicing chart with Initials and Finals. (CHART The Chinese Phonetic Alphabet Called Hanyu Pinyin in
Mandarin Chinese.)
Practicing of Tones as it is a tonal language.
Changes in 3rd tone and Neutral Tone.
Module II
Greetings
Let me Introduce
The modal particle ne.
Use of Please qing sit, have tea .. etc.
A brief self introduction Ni hao ma? Zaijian!
Use of bu negative.
Module III
Attributives showing possession
How is your Health? Thank you
Where are you from?
A few Professions like Engineer, Businessman, Doctor, Teacher, Worker.
Are you busy with your work?
May I know your name?
Module IV
Use of How many People in your family?
Use of zhe and na.
Use of interrogative particle shenme, shui, ma and nar.
How to make interrogative sentences ending with ma.
Structural particle de.
Use of Nin when and where to use and with whom. Use of guixing.
Use of verb zuo and how to make sentences with it.
Module V
Family structure and Relations.
Use of you mei you.
Measure words
Days and Weekdays.
Numbers.
Maps, different languages and Countries.

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

CT1
20

CT2
20

C Project + Presentation
I Interaction/Conversation Practice

Text & References:

Elementary Chinese Reader Part I Lesson 1-10

C
20

I
20

V
15

A
5

APPLIED MATHEMATICS II
Course Code:

BTCE 201

Credit Units: 04

Course Objective:
The knowledge of Mathematics is necessary for a better understanding of almost all the Engineering and
Science subjects. Here our intention is to make the students acquainted with the concept of basic topics from
Mathematics, which they need to pursue their Engineering degree in different disciplines.

Course Contents:
Module I: Linear Algebra
Hermitian and Skew Hermitian Matrix, Unitary Matrix, Orthogonal Matrix, Elementary Row Transformation,
Reduction of a Matrix to Row Echelon Form, Rank of a Matrix, Consistency of Linear Simultaneous Equations,
Gauss Elimination Method, Gauss-Jordan Method, Eigen Values and Eigen Vectors of a Matrix, CaleyHamilton Theorem, Diagonalization of a Matrix, Vector Space, Linear Independence and Dependence of
Vectors, Linear Transformations.
Module II: Infinite Series
Definition of Sequence, Bounded Sequence, Limit of a Sequence, Series, Finite and Infinite Series,
Convergence and Divergence of Infinite series, Cauchys Principle of Convergence, Positive Term Infinite
Series, Comparison test, DAlemberts Ratio test. Raabes Test, Cauchys nth root Test. Logarithmic Test,
Alternating Series, Leibnitzs Test, Absolute and conditional convergence, Uniform Convergence, Power Series
and its Interval of Convergence.
Module III: Complex Analysis
De Moivres Theorem and Roots of Complex Numbers, Logarithmic Functions, Circular, Hyperbolic Functions
and their Inverses.
Functions of a Complex Variables, Limits, Continuity and Derivatives, Analytic Function, Cauchy-Riemann
Equations (without proof), Harmonic Function, Harmonic Conjugates, Conformal Mapping, Bilinear
Transformations, Complex Line Integral, Cauchy Integral Theorem, Cauchy Integral Formula, Derivative of
Analytic Function, Power Series, Taylor Series, Laurent Series, Zeroes and Singularities, Residues, Residue

Theorem, Evaluation of Real Integrals of the Form

F (cos , sin ) d

and

f ( x)
dx
F ( x) .

Module IV: Statistics and Probability


Moments, Skewness, Kurtosis, Random Variables and Probability Distribution, Mean and Variance of a
Probability Distribution, Binomial Distribution, Poisson Distribution and Normal Distribution.

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Text & References:

Engineering Mathematics by Erwin Kreyszig.


Engineering Mathematics by R.K. Jain and S.R.K. Iyengar.
Higher Engineering Mathematics by H.K. Dass.
Engineering Mathematics by B.S. Grewal.
Differential Calculus by Shanti Narain.
Integral Calculus by Shanti Narain.
Linear Algebra- Schaum Outline Series.

APPLIED PHYSICS - II - MODERN PHYSICS


Course Code:

BTCE 202

Credit Units: 03

Course Objective:
Aim of this course is to introduce the students to fundamentals of graduate level physics which form the basis of
all applied science and engineering.

Course Contents:
Module I: Special Theory of Relativity
Michelson-Morley experiment, Importance of negative result, Inertial & non-inertial frames of reference,
Einsteins postulates of Special theory of Relativity, Space-time coordinate system, Relativistic Space Time
transformation (Lorentz transformation equation), Transformation of velocity, Addition of velocities, Length
contraction and Time dilation, Mass-energy equivalence (Einsteins energy mass relation) & Derivation of
Variation of mass with velocity.
Module II: Wave Mechanics
Wave particle duality, De-Broglie matter waves, phase and group velocity, Heisenberg uncertainty principle,
wave function and its physical interpretation, Operators, expectation values. Time dependent & time
independent Schrdinger wave equation for free & bound states, square well potential (rigid wall), Step
potential.
Module III: Atomic Physics
Vector atom model, LS and j-j coupling, Zeceman effect (normal & anomalous), Paschen-Bach effect, X-ray
spectra and energy level diagram, Moseleys Law, Lasers Einstein coefficients, conditions for light
amplification, population inversion, optical pumping, three level and four level lasers, He-Ne and Ruby laser,
Properties and applications of lasers.
Module IV: Solid State Physics
Sommerfields free electron theory of metals, Fermi energy, Introduction to periodic potential & Kronig-Penny
model (Qualitative) Band Theory of Solids, Semi-conductors: Intrinsics and Extrinsic Semiconductors,
photoconductivity and photovotaics, Basic aspects of Superconductivity, Meissner effect.

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Text & References:

Concept of Modern Physics, A. Beiser


Applied Physics II, Agarawal & Goel
Solid State Physics, S. O. Pallai
Physics of Atom, Wehr & Richards

APPLIED CHEMISTRY
Course Code:
Course Objective:

BTCE 203

Credit Units: 03

Four basic sciences, Physics, Chemistry, Mathematics and Biology are the building blocks in engineering and
technology. Chemistry is essential to develop analytical capabilities of students, so that they can characterize,
transform and use materials in engineering and apply knowledge in their field. All engineering fields have
unique bonds with chemistry whether it is Aerospace, Mechanical, Environmental and other fields the makeup
of substances is always a key factor, which must be known. For electronics and computer science engineering,
apart from the material, computer modeling and simulation knowledge can be inherited from the molecule
designing. The upcoming field of technology like Nanotechnology and Biotechnology depends fully on the
knowledge of basic chemistry. With this versatile need in view, course has been designed in such a way so that
the student should get an overview of the whole subject.

Course Contents:
Module I: Water Technology
Introduction and specifications of water,
Hardness and its determination (EDTA method only),
Alkalinity,
Boiler feed water, boiler problems scale, sludge, priming & foaming: causes & prevention, Boiler problems
caustic embitterment & corrosion: causes & prevention,
Carbonate & phosphate conditioning, colloidal conditioning & calgon treatment
Water softening processes: Lime soda process, Ion exchange method,
Water for domestic use.
Module II: Fuels
Classification, calorific value of fuel, (gross and net),
Determination of calorific value of fuels, bomb calorimeter,
Solid fuels - Proximate and ultimate analysis,
Octane & Cetane No. and its significance.
Numericals on combustion
Module III: Instrumental Methods of analysis
Introduction; Principles of spectroscopy; Laws of absorbance
IR : Principle, Instrumentation, Application
UV : Principle, Instrumentation, Application
NMR : Principle, Instrumentation, Application
Module III: Lubricants
Introduction; Mechanism of Lubrication;
Types of Lubricants; Chemical structure related to Lubrication;
Properties of lubricants; Viscosity and Viscosity Index; Iodine Value; Aniline Point; Emulsion number; Flash
Point; Fire Point; Drop Point; Cloud Point; Pour Point.
Selection of Lubricants.
Module VI: Corrosion
Introduction, Mechanism of dry and wet corrosion,
Types of corrosion-Galvanic, Concentration cell, soil, pitting, intergranular, waterline. Passivity.
Factors influencing corrosion.
Corrosion control.

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Text & References:


Text:
Engineering Chemistry- Jain and Jain
Engineering Chemistry - Sunita Rattan
Engineering Chemistry - Shashi Chawla
References:
Engineering Chemistry Dara and Dara
Spectroscopy- Y.R Sharma
Corrosion Engineering Fontenna and Greene

OBJECT ORIENTED PROGRAMMING USING C++


Course Code:

BTCE 204

Credit Units: 03

Course Objective:
The objective of this module is to introduce object oriented programming. To explore and implement the various
features of OOP such as inheritance, polymorphism, Exceptional handling using programming language C++.
After completing this course student can easily identify the basic difference between the programming
approaches like procedural and object oriented.

Course Contents:
Module I: Introduction
Review of C, Difference between C and C++, Procedure Oriented and Object Oriented Approach. Basic
Concepts: Objects, classes, Principals like Abstraction, Encapsulation, Inheritance and Polymorphism. Dynamic
Binding, Message Passing. Characteristics of Object-Oriented Languages. Introduction to Object-Oriented
Modeling techniques (Object, Functional and Dynamic Modeling).
Module II: Classes and Objects
Abstract data types, Object & classes, attributes, methods, C++ class declaration, Local Class and Global Class,
State identity and behaviour of an object, Local Object and Global Object, Scope resolution operator, Friend
Functions, Inline functions, Constructors and destructors, instantiation of objects, Types of Constructors, Static
Class Data, Array of Objects, Constant member functions and Objects, Memory management Operators.
Module III: Inheritance
Inheritance, Types of Inheritance, access modes public, private & protected, Abstract Classes, Ambiguity
resolution using scope resolution operator and Virtual base class, Aggregation, composition vs classification
hirarchies, Overriding inheritance methods, Constructors in derived classes, Nesting of Classes.
Module IV: Polymorphism
Polymorphism, Type of Polymorphism Compile time and runtime, Function Overloading, Operator
Overloading (Unary and Binary) Polymorphism by parameter, Pointer to objects, this pointer, Virtual Functions,
pure virtual functions.
Module V: Strings, Files and Exception Handling
Manipulating strings, Streams and files handling, formatted and Unformatted Input output. Exception handling,
Generic Programming function template, class Template Standard Template Library: Standard Template
Library, Overview of Standard Template Library, Containers, Algorithms, Iterators, Other STL Elements, The
Container Classes, General Theory of Operation, Vectors.

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Text & References:


Text:
A.R. Venugopal, Rajkumar, T. Ravishanker Mastering C++, TMH, 1997
R. Lafore, Object Oriented Programming using C++, BPB Publications, 2004.
Object Oriented Programming with C++ By E. Balagurusamy.
Schildt Herbert, C++: The Complete Reference, Wiley Dream Tech, 2005.
References:
Parasons, Object Oriented Programming with C++, BPB Publication, 1999.
Steven C. Lawlor, The Art of Programming Computer Science with C++, Vikas Publication, 2002.
Yashwant Kanethkar, Object Oriented Programming using C++, BPB, 2004

ENGINEERING MECHANICS
Course Code:

BTCE 205

Credit Units: 03

Course Objective:
Objective of this course is to provide fundamental knowledge of force system and its effect on the behaviour of
the bodies that may be in dynamic or in static state. It includes the equilibrium of different structures like beams,
frames, truss etc and the force transfer mechanism in the different components of a body under given loading
condition.

Course Contents:
Module I: Force system & Structure
Free body diagram, Equilibrium equations and applications. Plane truss, perfect and imperfect truss, assumption
in the truss analysis, analysis of perfect plane trusses by the method of joints, method of section.
Module II: Friction
Static and Kinetic friction, laws of dry friction, co-efficient of friction, angle of friction, angle of repose, cone of
friction, friction lock, efficiency of screw jack, transmission of power through belt
Module III: Distributed Force
Determination of center of gravity, center of mass and centroid by direct integration and by the method of
composite bodies, mass moment of inertia and area moment of inertia by direct integration and composite
bodies method, radius of gyration, parallel axis theorem, Pappus theorems and its application, polar moment of
inertia.
Module IV: Work -Energy
Work energy equation, conservation of energy, Virtual work, impulse, momentum conservation, impact of
bodies, co-efficient of restitution, loss of energy during impact, Dalembert principle

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Text & References:

S.S. Bhavikatti, Engineering Mechanics, New Age International Ltd


Timoshenko, Engineering Mechanics, McGraw Hill
R. S. Khurmi, Engineering Mechanics, S. Chand Publication
I. H. Shames & G. K. M. Rao, Engineering Mechanics, Pearson Education, 2006

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES-II
Course Code:

BTCE 206

Credit Units: 02

Course Objective:
The term environment is used to describe, in the aggregate, all the external forces, influences
and conditions, which affect the life, nature, behaviour and the growth, development and
maturity of living organisms. At present a great number of environment issues, have grown in
size and complexity day by day, threatening the survival of mankind on earth. A study of
environmental studies is quite essential in all types of environmental sciences, environmental
engineering and industrial management. The objective of environmental studies is to
enlighten the masses about the importance of the protection and conservation of our
environment and control of human activities which has an adverse effect on the environment.
Course Contents:

Module I: Environmental Pollution


Definition
Causes, effects and control measures of:
a. Air pollution
b. Water pollution
c. Soil pollution
d. Marine pollution
e. Noise pollution
f. Thermal pollution
g. Nuclear pollution
Solid waste management: Causes, effects and control measures of urban and
wastes.
Role of an individual in prevention of pollution.
Pollution case studies.
Disaster management: floods, earthquake, cyclone and landslides.

industrial

Module II: Social Issues and the Environment


From unsustainable to sustainable development
Urban problems and related to energy
Water conservation, rain water harvesting, watershed management
Resettlement and rehabilitation of people; its problems and concerns. Case studies.
Environmental ethics: Issues and possible solutions
Climate change, global warming, acid rain, ozone layer depletion, nuclear accidents and
holocaust. Case studies.
Wasteland reclamation
Consumerism and waste products
Environmental Protection Act
Air (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act
Water (Prevention and control of Pollution) Act
Wildlife Protection Act
Forest Conservation Act
Issues involved in enforcement of environmental legislation
Public awareness
Module III: Human Population and the Environment
Population growth, variation among nations
Population explosion Family Welfare Programmes

Environment and human health


Human Rights
Value Education
HIV / AIDS
Women and Child Welfare
Role of Information Technology in Environment and Human Health
Case Studies
Module IV: Field Work
Visit to a local area to document environmental assets-river / forest/ grassland/ hill/ mountain.
Visit to a local polluted site Urban / Rural / Industrial / Agricultural
Study of common plants, insects, birds
Study of simple ecosystems-pond, river, hill slopes, etc (Field work equal to 5 lecture hours)
Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

CT
15

HA
5

S/V/Q
5

A
5

EE
70

Text & References:

Agarwal, K.C. 2001 Environmental Biology, Nidi Publ. Ltd. Bikaner.


Bharucha Erach, The Biodiversity of India, Mapin Publishing Pvt. Ltd., Ahmedabad 380
013, India, Email:mapin@icenet.net (R)
Brunner R.C., 1989, Hazardous Waste Incineration, McGraw Hill Inc. 480p
Clark R.S., Marine Pollution, Clanderson Press Oxford (TB)
Cunningham, W.P. Cooper, T.H. Gorhani, E & Hepworth, M.T. 2001, Environmental
Encyclopedia, Jaico Publ. House, Mumbai, 1196p
De A.K., Environmental Chemistry, Wiley Eastern Ltd.
Down to Earth, Centre for Science and Environment (R)
Gleick, H.P. 1993. Water in Crisis, Pacific Institute for Studies in Dev., Environment &
Security. Stockholm Env. Institute Oxford Univ. Press. 473p
Hawkins R.E., Encyclopedia of Indian Natural History, Bombay Natural History Society,
Bombay (R)
Heywood, V.H & Waston, R.T. 1995. Global Biodiversity Assessment. Cambridge Univ.
Press 1140p.
Jadhav, H & Bhosale, V.M. 1995. Environmental Protection and Laws. Himalaya Pub.
House, Delhi 284 p.
Mckinney, M.L. & School, R.M. 1996. Environmental Science Systems & Solutions,
Web enhanced edition. 639p.
Mhaskar A.K., Matter Hazardous, Techno-Science Publication (TB)
Miller T.G. Jr. Environmental Science, Wadsworth Publishing Co. (TB)
Odum, E.P. 1971. Fundamentals of Ecology. W.B. Saunders Co. USA, 574p
Rao M N. & Datta, A.K. 1987. Waste Water treatment. Oxford & IBH Publ. Co. Pvt. Ltd.
345p.
Sharma B.K., 2001. Environmental Chemistry. Geol Publ. House, Meerut
Survey of the Environment, The Hindu (M)
Townsend C., Harper J, and Michael Begon, Essentials of Ecology, Blackwell Science
Trivedi R.K., Handbook of Environmental Laws, Rules Guidelines, Compliances and
Standards, Vol I and II, Enviro Media (R)
Trivedi R. K. and P.K. Goel, Introduction to air pollution, Techno-Science Publication
(TB)
Wanger K.D., 1998 Environnemental Management. W.B. Saunders Co. Philadelphia,
USA 499p

APPLIED PHYSICS LAB - II


Course Code:

BTCE 220

Credit Units: 01

Course Contents:
List of Experiments:
1.

To determine the wavelength of prominent lines of mercury spectrum using plane transmission grating.

2.

To determine the thickness of a given wire by Wedge method.

3.

To determine the wavelength of He-Ne laser light using single slit.

4.

To determine the frequency of an electrically maintained tunning fork by Meldes method.

5.

To study the variation of magnetic field along the axis of Helmholtz coil and to find out reduction factor.

6.

To draw the V I characteristics of a forward and reverse bias PN junction diode.

7.

To determine the frequency of AC mains using sonometer.

8.

To determine the energy band-gap of Germanium crystal using four probes method.

9.

To draw V I characteristics of a photocell and to verify the inverse square law of radiation.

10. To determine the acceleration due to gravity (g) using Keters reversible pendulum.
11. To study the characteristics of photo voltaic cell (solar cell).

Examination Scheme:
IA

EE

A
PR
LR
V
PR
V
5
10
10
5
35
35
Note: IA Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR Lab Record, V Viva.

APPLIED CHEMISTRY LAB


Course Code:

BTCE 221

Credit Units: 01

Course Contents:
LIST OF EXPERIMENTS
(Any 10 Experiments)
1.

To determine the ion exchange capacity of a given cation exchanger.

2.

To determine the temporary, permanent and total hardness of a sample of water by complexometric titration
method.

3.

To determine the type and extent of alkalinity of given water sample.

4.

To determine the number of water molecules of crystallization in Mohrs salt (ferrous ammonium sulphate)
provided standard potassium dichromate solution (0.1N) using diphenylamine as internal indicator.

5.

To determine the ferrous content in the supplied sample of iron ore by titrimetric analysis against standard
K2Cr2O7 solution using potassium ferricyanide [K3Fe (CN)6] as external indicator.

6.

(a) To determine the surface tension of a given liquid by drop number method.
(b) To determine the composition of a liquid mixture A and B (acetic acid and water) by surface tension
method.

7.

To prepare and describe a titration curve for phosphoric acid sodium hydroxide titration using pH-meter.

8.

(a) To find the cell constant of conductivity cell.


(b) Determine the strength of hydrochloric acid solution by titrating it against standard sodium hydroxide
solution conductometrically

9.

Determination of Dissolved oxygen in the given water sample.

10. To determine the total residual chlorine in water.


11. Determination of amount of oxalic acid and H2SO4 in 1 L of solution using N/10 NaOH and N/10 KMnO 4
solution.
12. Determination of viscosity of given oil by means of Redwood viscometer I.
13. To determine flash point and fire point of an oil by Pensky Martins Apparatus
14. To determine the Iodine value of the oil.

Examination Scheme:
IA

EE

A
PR
LR
V
PR
V
5
10
10
5
35
35
Note: IA Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR Lab Record, V Viva.

OBJECT ORIENTED PROGRAMMING USING C++ LAB


Course Code:

BTCE 222

Credit Units: 01

Software Required: Turbo C++


Course Contents:

Creation of objects in programs and solving problems through them.


Different use of private, public member variables and functions and friend functions.
Use of constructors and destructors.
Operator overloading
Use of inheritance in and accessing objects of different derived classes.
Polymorphism and virtual functions (using pointers).
File handling.

Examination Scheme:
IA
EE
A
PR
LR
V
PR
V
5
10
10
5
35
35
Note: IA Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR Lab Record, V Viva.

ENGINEERING MECHANICS LAB


Course Code:

BTCE 223

Credit Units: 01

Course Contents:
Engineering Mechanics:

To verify the law of Force Polygon


To verify the law of Moments using Parallel Force apparatus. (Simply supported type)
To determine the co-efficient of friction between wood and various surface (like
Leather, Wood, Aluminum) on an inclined plane.
To find the forces in the members of Jib Crane.
To determine the mechanical advantage, Velocity ratio and efficiency of a screw jack.
To determine the mechanical advantage, Velocity ratio and Mechanical efficiency of the
Wheel and Axle
To determine the MA, VR, of Worm Wheel (2-start)
Verification of force transmitted by members of given truss.
To verify the law of moments using Bell crank lever
To find CG and moment of Inertia of an irregular body using Computation method

Examination Scheme:
IA

EE

A
PR
LR
V
PR
V
5
10
10
5
35
35
Note: IA Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR Lab Record, V Viva.

ENGLISH
Course Code:

BTCE 240

Credit Units: 03

Course Objective:
The course is intended to give a foundation of English Language. The literary texts are indented to help students
to inculcate creative & aesthetic sensitivity and critical faculty through comprehension, appreciation and
analysis of the prescribed literary texts. It will also help them to respond form different perspectives.

Course Contents:
Module I: Vocabulary
Use of Dictionary
Use of Words: Diminutives, Homonyms & Homophones
Module II: Essentials of Grammar - I
Articles
Parts of Speech
Tenses
Module III: Essentials of Grammar - II
Sentence Structure
Subject -Verb agreement
Punctuation
Module IV: Communication
The process and importance
Principles & benefits of Effective Communication
Module V: Spoken English Communication
Speech Drills
Pronunciation and accent
Stress and Intonation
Module VI: Communication Skills-I
Developing listening skills
Developing speaking skills
Module VII: Communication Skills-II
Developing Reading Skills
Developing writing Skills
Module VIII: Written English communication
Progression of Thought/ideas
Structure of Paragraph
Structure of Essays
Module IV: Short Stories
Of Studies, by Francis Bacon
Dream Children, by Charles Lamb
The Necklace, by Guy de Maupassant
A Shadow, by R.K.Narayan
Glory at Twilight, Bhabani Bhattacharya
Module V: Poems
All the Worlds a Stage
To Autumn
O! Captain, My Captain.
Where the Mind is Without Fear
Psalm of Life

Shakespeare
Keats
Walt Whitman
Rabindranath Tagore
H.W. Longfellow

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

A
05

CT
15

HA
10

EE
70

Text & References:

Madhulika Jha, Echoes, Orient Long Man


Ramon & Prakash, Business Communication, Oxford.
Sydney Greenbaum Oxford English Grammar, Oxford.
Successful Communications, Malra Treece (Allyn and Bacon)
Effective Technical Communication, M. Ashraf Rizvi.

BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCE - II
(PROBLEM SOLVING AND CREATIVE THINKING)
Course Code:

BTCE 243

Credit Units: 01

Course Objective:
To enable the students:
Understand the process of problem solving and creative thinking.
Facilitation and enhancement of skills required for decision-making.

Course Contents:
Module I: Thinking as a tool for Problem Solving
What is thinking: The Mind/Brain/Behaviour
Critical Thinking and Learning:
- Making Predictions and Reasoning
- Memory and Critical Thinking
- Emotions and Critical Thinking
Thinking skills
Module II: Hindrances to Problem Solving Process
Perception
Expression
Emotion
Intellect
Work environment
Module III: Problem Solving
Recognizing and Defining a problem
Analyzing the problem (potential causes)
Developing possible alternatives
Evaluating Solutions
Resolution of problem
Implementation
Barriers to problem solving:
- Perception
- Expression
- Emotion
- Intellect
- Work environment
Module IV: Plan of Action
Construction of POA
Monitoring
Reviewing and analyzing the outcome
Module V: Creative Thinking
Definition and meaning of creativity
The nature of creative thinking
- Convergent and Divergent thinking
- Idea generation and evaluation (Brain Storming)
- Image generation and evaluation
- Debating
The six-phase model of Creative Thinking: ICEDIP model
Module VI: End-of-Semester Appraisal
Viva based on personal journal
Assessment of Behavioural change as a result of training
Exit Level Rating by Self and Observer

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

SAP

20

05

Mid Term
Test (CT)
20

VIVA
30

Journal for
Success (JOS)
25

Text & References:

Michael Steven: How to be a better problem solver, Kogan Page, New Delhi, 1999
Geoff Petty: How to be better at creativity; Kogan Page, New Delhi, 1999
Richard Y. Chang and P. Keith, Kelly: Wheeler Publishing, New Delhi, 1998.
Phil Lowe Koge Page: Creativity and Problem Solving, New Delhi, 1996
J William Pfeiffer (ed.) Theories and Models in Applied Behavioural Science, Vol 3, Management (1996);
Pfeiffer & Company
Bensley, Alan D.: Critical Thinking in Psychology A Unified Skills Approach, (1998), Brooks/Cole
Publishing Company.

FRENCH - II
Course Code:

BTCE 244

Credit Units: 02

Course Objective:
To enable the students to overcome the fear of speaking a foreign language and take position as a foreigner
speaking French.
To make them learn the basic rules of French Grammar.

Course Contents:
Module A: pp.38 47: Unit 3: Objectif 3, 4, 5. 6
Module B: pp. 47 to 75 Unit 4, 5
Contenu lexical:

Unit 3: Organiser son temps


1. donner/demander des informations sur un emploi du temps, un horaire
SNCF Imaginer un dialogue
2. rdiger un message/ une lettre pour
i) prendre un rendez-vous/ accepter et confirmer/ annuler
ii) inviter/accepter/refuser
3. Faire un programme dactivits
imaginer une conversation tlphonique/un dialogue
Propositions- interroger, rpondre
Unit 4: Dcouvrir son environnement
1. situer un lieu
2. sorienter, sinformer sur un itinraire.
3. Chercher, dcrire un logement
4. connatre les rythmes de la vie
Unit 5: sinformer
1. demander/donner des informations sur un emploi du temps pass.
2. donner une explication, exprimer le doute ou la certitude.
3. dcouvrir les relations entre les mots
4. savoir sinformer

Contenu grammatical:

1. Adjectifs dmonstratifs
2. Adjectifs possessifs/exprimer la possession laide de:
i. de ii. A+nom/pronom disjoint
3. Conjugaison pronominale ngative, interrogative construction l'infinitif
4. Impratif/exprimer lobligation/linterdiction laide de il
faut. / il ne faut pas
5. pass compos
6. Questions directes/indirectes

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

CT1
20

C Project + Presentation
I Interaction/Conversation Practice

Text & References:

le livre suivre: Campus: Tome 1

CT2
20

C
20

I
20

V
15

A
5

GERMAN II
Course Code:

BTCE 245

Credit Units: 02

Course Objective:
To enable the students to converse, read and write in the language with the help of the basic rules of grammar,
which will later help them to strengthen their language.
To give the students an insight into the culture, geography, political situation and economic opportunities
available in Germany
Introduction to Grammar to consolidate the language base learnt in Semester I

Course Contents:
Module I: Everything about Time and Time periods
Time and times of the day.
Weekdays, months, seasons.
Adverbs of time and time related prepositions
Module II: Irregular verbs
Introduction to irregular verbs like to be, and others, to learn the conjugations of the same, (fahren, essen,
lessen, schlafen, sprechen und hnliche).
Module III: Separable verbs
To comprehend the change in meaning that the verbs undergo when used as such
Treatment of such verbs with separable prefixes
Module IV: Reading and comprehension
Reading and deciphering railway schedules/school time table
Usage of separable verbs in the above context
Module V: Accusative case
Accusative case with the relevant articles
Introduction to 2 different kinds of sentences Nominative and Accusative
Module VI: Accusative personal pronouns
Nominative and accusative in comparison
Emphasizing on the universal applicability of the pronouns to both persons and objects
Module VII: Accusative prepositions
Accusative propositions with their use
Both theoretical and figurative use
Module VIII: Dialogues
Dialogue reading: In the market place
At the Hotel

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

CT1
20

CT2
20

C
20

C Project + Presentation
I Interaction/Conversation Practice

Text & References:

Wolfgang Hieber, Lernziel Deutsch


Hans-Heinrich Wangler, Sprachkurs Deutsch
Schulz Griesbach, Deutsche Sprachlehre fr Auslnder
P.L Aneja, Deutsch Interessant- 1, 2 & 3
Rosa-Maria Dallapiazza et al, Tangram Aktuell A1/1,2
Braun, Nieder, Schme, Deutsch als Fremdsprache 1A, Grundkurs

I
20

V
15

A
5

SPANISH II
Course Code:

BTCE 246

Credit Units: 02

Course Objective:
To enable students acquire more vocabulary, grammar, Verbal Phrases to understand simple texts and start
describing any person or object in Simple Present Tense.

Course Contents:
Module I
Revision of earlier modules.
Module II
Some more AR/ER/IR verbs. Introduction to root changing and irregular AR/ER/IR ending verbs
Module III
More verbal phrases (eg, Dios Mio, Que lastima etc), adverbs (bueno/malo, muy, mucho, bastante, poco).
Simple texts based on grammar and vocabulary done in earlier modules.
Module IV
Posessive pronouns
Module V
Writing/speaking essays like my friend, my house, my school/institution, myself.descriptions of people,
objects etc, computer/internet related vocabulary

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

CT1
20

C Project + Presentation
I Interaction/Conversation Practice

Text & References:

Espaol, En Directo I A
Espaol Sin Fronteras

CT2
20

C
20

I
20

V
15

A
5

JAPANESE - II
Course Code:

BTCE 247

Credit Units: 02

Course Objective:
To enable the students to converse in the language with the help of basic particles and be able to define the
situations and people using different adjectives.

Course Contents:
Module I: Verbs
Transitive verbs, intransitive verbs
Module II: More prepositions
More particles, articles and likes and dislikes.
Module III: Terms used for instructions
No parking, no smoking etc.
Module IV: Adverbs
Different adverbial expression.
Module V: Invitations and celebrations
Giving and receiving presents,
Inviting somebody for lunch, dinner, movie and how to accept and refuse in different ways
Module VI: Comprehensions
Short essay on Family, Friend etc.
Module VII: Conversations
Situational conversations like asking the way, At a post office, family
Module VIII: Illness
Going to the doctor, hospital etc.

Learning Outcome

Students can speak the language describing above-mentioned topics.

Methods of Private study /Self help

Handouts, audio-aids, and self-do assignments.


Use of library, visiting and watching movies in Japan and culture center every Friday at 6pm.

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

CT1
20

C Project + Presentation
I Interaction/Conversation Practice

Text & References:


Text:
Teach yourself Japanese
References:
Shin Nihongo no kiso 1

CT2
20

C
20

I
20

V
15

A
5

CHINESE II
Course Code:

BTCE 248

Credit Units: 02

Course Objective:
Chinese is a tonal language where each syllable in isolation has its definite tone (flat, falling, rising and
rising/falling), and same syllables with different tones mean different things. When you say, ma with a third
tone, it mean horse and ma with the first tone is Mother. The course aims at familiarizing the student with the
basic aspects of speaking ability of Mandarin, the language of Mainland China. The course aims at training
students in practical skills and nurturing them to interact with a Chinese person.

Course Contents:
Module I
Drills
Practice reading aloud
Observe Picture and answer the question.
Tone practice.
Practice using the language both by speaking and by taking notes.
Introduction of basic sentence patterns.
Measure words.
Glad to meet you.
Module II
Where do you live?
Learning different colors.
Tones of bu
Buying things and how muchit costs?
Dialogue on change of Money.
More sentence patterns on Days and Weekdays.
How to tell time. Saying the units of time in Chinese. Learning to say useful phrases like 8:00, 11:25, 10:30
P.M. everyday, afternoon, evening, night, morning 3:58, one hour, to begin, to end .. etc.
Morning, Afternoon, Evening, Night.
Module III
Use of words of location like-li, wais hang, xia
Furniture table, chair, bed, bookshelf,.. etc.
Description of room, house or hostel room.. eg what is placed where and how many things are there in it?
Review Lessons Preview Lessons.
Expression yao, xiang and yaoshi (if).
Days of week, months in a year etc.
I am learning Chinese. Is Chinese difficult?
Module IV
Counting from 1-1000
Use of chang-chang.
Making an Inquiry What time is it now? Where is the Post Office?
Days of the week. Months in a year.
Use of Preposition zai, gen.
Use of interrogative pronoun duoshao and ji.
Whose??? Sweater etc is it?
Different Games and going out for exercise in the morning.
Module V
The verb qu
Going to the library issuing a book from the library
Going to the cinema hall, buying tickets
Going to the post office, buying stamps
Going to the market to buy things.. etc
Going to the buy clothes . Etc.
Hobby. I also like swimming.
Comprehension and answer questions based on it.

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

CT1
20

CT2
20

C Project + Presentation
I Interaction/Conversation Practice

Text & References:

Elementary Chinese Reader Part I Lesson 11-20

C
20

I
20

V
15

A
5

APPLIED MATHEMATICS III


Course Code:

BTCE 301

Credit Units: 04

Course Objective:
The knowledge of Mathematics is necessary for a better understanding of almost all the Engineering and
Science subjects. Here our intention is to make the students acquainted with the concept of basic topics from
Mathematics, which they need to pursue their Engineering degree in different disciplines.

Course Contents:
Module I: Partial Differential Equations
Formation of PDE, Equations solvable by direct integration, Linear equations of the first order, Non-linear
equations of the first order, Charpits method, Homogeneous linear equations with constant coefficients, Non
homogeneous linear equations.
Module II: Fourier Series
Periodic Functions, Fourier Series, Functions having points of discontinuity, Even or Odd Functions, Change of
Interval, Half-range series, Parsevals Formula, Complex form of Fourier series, Practical Harmonic Analysis,
Fourier Transforms, Sine and Cosine Transforms.
Module III: Laplace Transformation
Definition, Transforms of elementary functions, Properties of Laplace transforms, Existence conditions,
Transforms of derivatives, Transforms of integrals, Evaluation of integrals by Laplace transform, Inverse
transforms, Other methods of finding inverse transforms, Convolution theorem, Application to differential
equations, Simultaneous linear equations with constant coefficients, Unit step functions, Periodic functions.
Module IV: Linear Programming
Formulation of the problem, Graphical method, Canonical and Standard forms of L.P.P. Simplex Method,
Artificial variable Techniques-M-method, Two phase method, Degeneracy, Dual simplex method.

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Text & References:


Text:
Differential Calculus by Shanti Narain
Integral Calculus by Shanti Narain
Higher Engineering Mathematics by B.S. Grewal
References:
Differential Equations by A.R. Forsyth
Higher Engineering Mathematics by H.K. Dass
Partial Differential Equations by I.N. Snedon

ENGINEERING GEOLOGY
Course Code:

BTCE 302

Credit Units: 03

Course Objective:
The student is given an introduction to basics of Geology genesis and characteristic of rocks: Geological
structure and other effects of civil engineering structures. Geology of India is introduced.

Course Contents:
Module I: Branches and scope of geology
Physical geology
Geological agents and their action, weathering, volcanism, earthquake and plate tectonics
Module II: Elements of crystallography and mineralogy
Petrology
Types of rocks, genesis and physical and chemical characters, Building stones
Module III: Structural geology
Types of structures and classification and their effect on civil engineering projects and Geological mapping
Hydrogeology
Groundwater and occurrence, investigations, quality, artificial recharge
Module IV: Geology in Civil Engineering
Tunnels, dams, reservoirs, bridges, Runways, Roads and Buildings.
Slope failures and landslides. Investigations, Remote sensing and GIS applications
Geology of India
Types, age and occurrence of rock formations and economic importance

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Text & References:

Parbin Singh, Engineering & General Geology, S.K. Kataria & Sons, New Delhi (2008)
Bangar, K.M., Principles of Engineering Geology, Standard Publishers Distributors, Delhi (2009)
Billings, Marland P., Structural Geology, 3rd ed., Prentice-Hall India, New Delhi.
Todd, D.K., Ground Water Hydrology, 2nd ed., Wiley India, New Delhi (2008)

MECHANICS OF SOLIDS
Course Code:

BTCE 303

Credit Units: 03

Course Objective:
The objective of this course is to make the students understand the concept of stress and strain in different types of
structure/machine under different loading conditions. The course also covers the simple and compound stresses due
to forces, stresses and deflection in beams due to bending, torsion in circular section, strain energy, different
theories of failure, stress in thin cylinder thick cylinder and spheres due to external and internal pressure.

Course Contents:
Module I: Simple stresses and strains
Concept of stress and strain; Hookes law, Youngs modulus, Poisson ratio, stress at a point, stress and strains in
bars subjected to axial loading. Modulus of elasticity, stress produced in compound bars subject to axial loading.
Temperature stress and strain calculations due to applications of axial loads and variation of temperature in single
and compound walls. Impact loading.
Module II: Compound stress and strains
The two dimensional system; stress at a point on a plane, principal stresses and principal planes; Mohrs circle of
stress. Graphical and Analytical methods for stresses on oblique section of body. Shear force and bending moment
diagrams for cantilever, simply supported and overhanging beams.
Module III
Theory of bending stresses in beams due to bending, assumptions in the simple bending theory, derivation of
formula: its application to beams of rectangular, circular and channel sections, composite / flitched beams, bending
and shear stresses in composite beams.
Module IV: Torsion
Derivation of torsion equation and its assumptions. Applications of the equation of the hollow and solid circular
shafts torsional rigidity, combined torsion and bending of circular shafts principal stress and maximum shear
stresses under combined loading of bending and torsion, analysis of close-coiled-helical springs.
Module V: Thin cylinders and spheres
Derivation of formulae and calculation of hoop stress, longitudinal stress in a cylinder and sphere subjected to
internal pressure.
Module VI: Columns and struts
Columns and failure of columns, Eulers formulas; Rankine-Gordons formula, Johnsons empirical formula for
axially loaded columns and their applications.
Module VII: Slope and deflection
Relationship between moment, slope and deflection, Mohrs theorem; Moment area method; method of integration;
Macaulays method: Use of all these methods to calculate slope and deflection for the following:
a) Cantilevers
b) Simply supported beams with or without overhang
c) Under concentrated loads, uniformly distributed loads or combination of concentrated and uniformly distributed
loads

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Text & References:


Text:
Jindal U.C., Strength of Materials, Galgotia Publication, New Delhi, 1998.
Ryder G.H., Strength of Materials, Macmillan, Delhi, 2003.
R.K. Bansal, Strength of Materials, Laxmi Publication, New Delhi, 2001.
References:
Sadhu Singh, Strength of Materials, Khanna Publishers, New Delhi, 2000.
Timoshenko S.P., Elements of Strength of Materials, East-West affiliated, New Delhi, 2000.
Hibbler R.C., Mechanics of Materials, Prentice Hall, New Delhi, 1994.
Popov Eger P., Engg. Mechanics of solids, Prentice Hall, New Delhi, 1998.
Fenner, Roger. T, Mechanics of Solids, U.K. B.C. Publication, New Delhi, 1990.

Srinath L.S. et.al., Strength of Materials, McMillan, New Delhi,2001

MECHANICS OF FLUIDS
Course Code:

BTCE 304

Credit Units: 04

Course Objective:
The objective of Fluid Mechanics subject is that students should understand the, properties of fluids, pressure
measurement devices, hydraulic forces on surfaces, bouncy and flotation in fluids, kinematics and static behavior
of fluids, dimension and model analysis, laminar and turbulent flow, flow through pipes and orifices, boundary
layer theory.

Course Contents:
Module I: Fluid Properties and Fluid Statics
Newtonian and Non-Newtonian Fluids; Viscosity; Incompressible and compressible fluids, compressibility. Forces
on plane surfaces, forces on curved surfaces, buoyant forces, and stability of floating bodies, metacentre and
metacentre height.
Module II: Kinematics of Fluid Motion
Steady and unsteady flow; uniform and non-uniform flow; Laminar and turbulent flow; streamline, path line and
streak line; continuity equation, irrotational and rotational flow, velocity potential and stream function, vortex flow,
free and forced vortex.
Module III: Dynamics of Fluid Flow
Eulers equation of motion and its integration to yield Bernoullis equation, its practical applications Pilot tube,
Venturi meter; steady flow momentum equation, force exerted on a pipe bend.
Module IV: Dimensional Analysis and Principles of Similarity
Buckingham -Theorem and its applications, Geometric, Kinematics and Dynamic similarity; Dimensionless
numbers-Reynolds, Froude, Euler, Mach, Weber Number and their significance.
Module V: Laminar and Turbulent Flow
Reynolds experiment, critical velocity, steady laminar flow through a circular tube, flow between parallel plates,
measurement of viscosity. Transition from laminar to turbulent flow, courses of turbulence, velocity distribution
law near a solid boundary, velocity distribution in rough pipes, Hazen Williamss formula.
Module VI: Analysis of Pipe Flow
Energy losses, minor losses in pipe lines, concept of equivalent length, flow between two reservoirs, and multiple
pipe systems in series and parallel, siphon.
Module VII: Flow Measurements
Measurement of flow using Venturi meter, orifice meter, Pitot tube, measurement of flow in open channels
rectangular, triangular, trapezoidal weir, Cipoeletti weir.

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Text & References:


Text:
R.K. Bansal, Fluid Mechanics & Hydraulic Machines, Laxmi Publications (P) Ltd., 2002.
Gupta, S. C., Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machines, Pearson Education, 2007
D.S. Kumar, Fluid Mechanics and Fluid Power Engineering, S.K. Kataria & Sons, 2000.
References:
F. M. White, Introduction to Fluid Mechanics, McGraw Hill
I.H. Shames, Mechanics of Fluids, Tata McGraw Hill
Douglas, J. F., Gasiorek, J.M. and Swaffield, J., Fluid Mechanics, Pearson Education, 4/e, 2006
V.L. Streeter and E.B. Wylie, Fluid Mechanics, Tata McGraw Hill Massey B S, Mechanics of Fluids, Van
Nostrand Reinhold Co

BUILDING TECHNOLOGY
Course Code:

BTCE 305

Credit Units: 03

Course Objective:
The course covers building materials and their testing, cement and its applications foundation and structural
members of building. Different areas and utilities of building like floors, doors etc.

Course Contents:
Module I
Building stones - Classification of rocks - Quarrying - Dressing - Properties and uses of common type of stones;
Timber - Defects - Seasoning - Decay - Preservation - Plywood, fibre board, particle board; Clay products - Bricks
- Manufacture - IS classifications - Properties and testing - Types of bricks - Tiles - Manufacture, properties and
uses - Types of tiles; Ceramic products - Lime - Classification - Manufacture, properties and uses.
Module II
Cement - Ingredients - Manufacture - Types of cement - Properties and testing - Uses; Mortar - Sand - Properties Types of mortar and uses; Concrete - Properties of fresh concrete and tests - Proportioning of concrete mixes Properties of hardened concrete and tests Recent developments in concrete; Iron and steel - Structural sections Properties and uses of structural steel - Recent developments; Miscellaneous materials - Glass - Plastics A.C.sheets Thermocole.
Module III
Foundation - Timbering of foundation trenches - Bearing capacity of soils - Improvement of bearing capacity Settlement of foundation - Description of spread, grillage, raft and pile foundations; Brick and stone masonry Bonds in brick work - Types of stone masonry -Cavity walls - Lintels and arches; concrete construction - Batching,
mixing, placing, compacting and curing of concrete - form work - Precast concrete - Prestressed concrete - Recent
developments in concreting; Partition walls - Types and features.
Module IV
Floors and flooring Different types and applications; Doors, windows and ventilators - Different types; Finishing
works; Building Failures - Concrete failure - Steel failure -Foundation failure - Other types of failures Causes and
Remedial measures Building repairs - Shoring - Underpinning Scaffolding; Tall buildings - Framed structures Steel and concrete frames Joints in steel and concrete frames - Introduction to prefabrication Slip form and lift
slab constructions; Fire proof construction - Fire load - Fire resisting properties of building materials Fire
extinguishing methods Fire proof construction methods.

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Text & References:

Punmia B. C, Ashok Kr. Jain, Arun Kr. Jain, Building Construction, Laxmi Publications, New Delhi.
(2008).
Shetty M. S, Concrete Technology, S. Chand & Co., New Delhi (2008).

SURVEYING
Course Code:

BTCE 306

Credit Units: 02

Course Objective:
Surveying is the basic element of mapping areas for civil engineering construction. Methods of surveying
including leveling, and leveling methods, contours, estimation of volumes etc are covered .

Course Contents:
Module I
Introduction - classification of surveys - plane surveying - geodetic surveying topographic surveying reconnaissance - principle of working from whole to part - provision of control -conventional signs - chain
survey - instruments - principles of chain survey - field book - plotting - tie line and check line - chaining and
ranging - obstacles - chaining on sloping ground - errors in chain survey - uses of cross staff and optical square
Module II
Compass survey - prismatic compass - surveyors compass - whole circle and reduced bearing- true and
magnetic bearing - dip and declination - local attraction - traversing - plotting - error of closure - graphical and
analytical adjustments - plane table survey - instruments and accessories - different methods - orientation advantages and disadvantages of plane tabling -two point problem - three point problem - errors in plane tabling
- minor instruments hand levels - clinometer - Ceylon ghat tracer - hypsometer - pantagraph -ediograph - box
sextant -telescopic alidade
Module III
Levelling - definition of level surfaces - mean sea level - reduced level - bench marks - levelling instruments temporary and permanent adjustments - fly leveling - booking - reduction of levels - corrections for refraction
and curvature - reciprocal leveling - longitudinal levelling and cross sectioning - contour survey - definition characteristics of contour - uses of contour - methods of contouring - direct and indirect interpolation plotting areas and volumes - trapezoidal rule - Simpsons rule - area from latitude and departure - uses of planimeter volumes - trapezoidal and prismoidal formula
Module IV
Theodolite surveying - study of theodolite - temporary and permanent adjustments -measurement of horizontal
angles - method of repetition and reiteration - measurement of vertical angles - theodolite traverse - calculation
of co ordinates - corrections - traverse table -omitted measurements - tacheometric surveying - stadia system fixed and movable hair methods - staff held vertical and normal - instrument constants - analytic lens
tangential system - direct reading tacheometer - subtense bar trigonometric leveling various methods
E.D.M total station.

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Text & References:

S.K Duggal, Surveying Vol 1 and II, 2nd ed., Tata - McGraw Hill, New Delhi (2004).
Arora K.R., Surveying Vol I &II, Standard Book House, New Delhi (2008)
Punmia, B.C., Ashok Kr. Jain, Arun Kr. Jain, Surveying Vol I & II, Laxmi Publications, New Delhi (2008).

MECHANICS OF SOLIDS AND FLUIDS LAB


Course Code:

Credit Units: 01

BTCE 320

Course Contents:
Experimental work will be based on the following papers:
Mechanics of Solids
Fluid Mechanics
MECHANICS OF SOLIDS LAB
List of Experiments

Universal Testing Machine


Tensile Test (MS)
Double Shear Test (MS)
Compression Test (CI)
Brinell Hardness No.
Izod Impact
Testing Machine
Rockwell Hardness Tester
Spring Stiffness (Spring Compression Testing machine)
Torsion testing machine

FLUID MECHANICS LAB


List of Experiments

Verification of Bernoullis Theorem


Experiment using Venturimeter
Determination of coefficient of Discharge Cd, Cc, C! Using
Circular/triangular/rectangular orifice
To find major head losses in a pipe line
To find minor head losses in a pipe line (sudden expansion/contraction/bend)

Examination Scheme:
IA

EE

A
PR
LR
V
PR
V
5
10
10
5
35
35
Note: IA Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR Lab Record, V Viva.

CIVIL ENGINEERING DRAWING LAB


Course Code:

BTCE 321

Credit Units: 01

Course Contents:
1.

Panelled doors, glazed windows and ventilators in wood.

2.

Steel and aluminium windows.

3.

Steel roof trusses.

4.

Reinforced concrete staircase.

5.

Residential buildings with flat and pitched roof RC and tiled.

6.

Public buildings like office, dispensary, post office, bank etc.

7.

Industrial buildings.

Examination Scheme:
IA

EE

A
PR
LR
V
PR
V
5
10
10
5
35
35
Note: IA Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR Lab Record, V Viva.

Text & References:

National Building Code of India


Local Building Bye-laws
Callender, John Hancock, Time Saver Standards for Architectural design Data, Tata McGraw Hill.
Chiara, Callender, John Hancock, Time Saver Standards for Building Type, McGraw Hill
Chiara, Joseph De, Time Saver Standards for Site Planning, McGraw Hill
Ching, Francis D K, Architectural Graphics. .John Wiley

SURVEYING PRACTICAL I
Course Code:

Credit Units: 01

BTCE 322

List of Exercices:
1.

Chain survey - Traversing and plotting of details.

2.

Compass survey - Traversing with compass and plotting.

3.

Plane table survey Method of Radiation and Intersection.

4.

Plane table survey - Solving three point problem.

5.

Plane table survey Solving two point problem

6.

Plane table survey - Traverse.

7.

Levelling Fly leveling Plane of collimation method.

8.

Levelling Fly leveling Rise and Fall method.

9.

Levelling Longitudinal and cross sectioning.

10.

Levelling Contour surveying.

11.

Theodolite surveying Measurement of horizontal angle by method of repetition and reiteration.

Examination Scheme:
IA

EE

A
PR
LR
V
PR
V
5
10
10
5
35
35
Note: IA Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR Lab Record, V Viva

COMMUNICATION SKILLS - I
Course Code:

BTCE 341

Credit Units: 01

Course Objective:
To form written communication strategies necessary in the workplace

Course Contents:
Module I: Introduction to Writing Skills
Effective Writing Skills
Avoiding Common Errors
Paragraph Writing
Note Taking
Writing Assignments
Module II: Letter Writing
Types
Formats
Module III
Memo
Agenda and Minutes
Notice and Circulars
Module IV: Report Writing
Purpose and Scope of a Report
Fundamental Principles of Report Writing
Project Report Writing
Summer Internship Reports

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

CT1
20

CT2
20

CAF
25

V
10

CAF Communication Assessment File


GD Group Discussion
GP Group Presentation

Text & References:

Business Communication, Raman Prakash, Oxford


Creative English for Communication, Krishnaswamy N, Macmillan
Textbook of Business Communication, Ramaswami S, Macmillan
Working in English, Jones, Cambridge
A Writer's Workbook Fourth edition, Smoke, Cambridge
Effective Writing, Withrow, Cambridge
Writing Skills, Coe/Rycroft/Ernest, Cambridge
Welcome!, Jones, Cambridge

GD
10

GP
10

A
5

BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCE - III


(INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION)
Course Code:

BTCE 343

Credit Units: 01

Course Objective:
This course provides practical guidance on
Enhancing personal effectiveness and performance through effective interpersonal communication
Enhancing their conflict management and negotiation skills

Course Contents:
Module I: Interpersonal Communication: An Introduction
Importance of Interpersonal Communication
Types Self and Other Oriented
Rapport Building NLP, Communication Mode
Steps to improve Interpersonal Communication
Module II: Behavioural Communication
Meaning and Nature of behavioural communication
Persuasion, Influence, Listening and Questioning
Guidelines for developing Human Communication skills
Relevance of Behavioural Communication for personal and professional development
Module III: Interpersonal Styles
Transactional Analysis
Life Position/Script Analysis
Games Analysis
Interact ional and Transactional Styles
Module IV: Conflict Management
Meaning and nature of conflicts
Styles and techniques of conflict management
Conflict management and interpersonal communication
Module V: Negotiation Skills
Meaning and Negotiation approaches (Traditional and Contemporary)
Process and strategies of negotiations
Negotiation and interpersonal communication
Module VI: End-of-Semester Appraisal
Viva based on personal journal
Assessment of Behavioural change as a result of training
Exit Level Rating by Self and Observer

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

SAP

20

05

Mid Term
Test (CT)
20

VIVA
30

Journal for
Success (JOS)
25

Text & References:

Vangelist L. Anita, Mark N. Knapp, Inter Personal Communication and Human Relationships: Third
Edition, Allyn and Bacon.
Julia T. Wood. Interpersonal Communication everyday encounter
Simons, Christine, Naylor, Belinda: Effective Communication for Managers, 1997 1 st Edition Cassel
Goddard, Ken: Informative Writing, 1995 1st Edition, Cassell
Harvard Business School, Effective Communication: United States of America
Foster John, Effective Writing Skills: Volume-7, First Edition 2000, Institute of Public Relations (IPR)
Beebe, Beebe and Redmond; Interpersonal Communication, 1996; Allyn and Bacon Publishers

FRENCH - III
Course Code:

BTCE 344

Credit Units: 02

Course Objective:
To provide the students with the know-how
To master the current social communication skills in oral and in written.
To enrich the formulations, the linguistic tools and vary the sentence construction without repetition.

Course Contents:
Module B: pp. 76 88 Unit 6
Module C: pp. 89 to103 Unit 7
Contenu lexical:

Unit 6: se faire plaisir


1. acheter: exprimer ses choix, dcrire un objet (forme, dimension, poids et
matires) payer
2. parler de la nourriture, deux faons dexprimer la quantit, commander
un repas au restaurant
3. parler des diffrentes occasions de faire la fte
Unit 7: Cultiver ses relations
1. matriser les actes de la communication sociale courante
(Salutations, prsentations, invitations, remerciements)
2. annoncer un vnement, exprimer un souhait, remercier,
sexcuser par crit.
3. caractriser une personne (aspect physique et caractre)

Contenu grammatical:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

accord des adjectifs qualificatifs


articles partitifs
Ngations avec de, nerien/personne/plus
Questions avec combien, quel
expressions de la quantit
neplus/toujours - encore
pronoms complments directs et indirects
accord du participe pass (auxiliaire avoir ) avec
lobjet direct
9. Impratif avec un pronom complment direct ou indirect
10. construction avec que - Je crois que/ Je pense que/ Je
sais que

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

CT1
20

C Project + Presentation
I Interaction/Conversation Practice

Text & References:

le livre suivre: Campus: Tome 1

CT2
20

C
20

I
20

V
15

A
5

GERMAN - III
Course Code:

BTCE 345

Credit Units: 02

Course Objective:
To enable the students to converse, read and write in the language with the help of the basic rules of grammar,
which will later help them to strengthen their language.
To give the students an insight into the culture, geography, political situation and economic opportunities
available in Germany

Course Contents:
Module I: Modal verbs
Modal verbs with conjugations and usage
Imparting the finer nuances of the language
Module II: Information about Germany (ongoing)
Information about Germany in the form of presentations or Referat neighbors, states and capitals, important
cities and towns and characteristic features of the same, and also a few other topics related to Germany.
Module III: Dative case
Dative case, comparison with accusative case
Dative case with the relevant articles
Introduction to 3 different kinds of sentences nominative, accusative and dative
Module IV: Dative personal pronouns
Nominative, accusative and dative pronouns in comparison
Module V: Dative prepositions
Dative preposition with their usage both theoretical and figurative use
Module VI: Dialogues
In the Restaurant,
At the Tourist Information Office,
A telephone conversation
Module VII: Directions
Names of the directions
Asking and telling the directions with the help of a roadmap
Module VIII: Conjunctions
To assimilate the knowledge of the conjunctions learnt indirectly so far

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

CT1
20

CT2
20

C
20

C Project + Presentation
I Interaction/Conversation Practice

Text & References:

Wolfgang Hieber, Lernziel Deutsch


Hans-Heinrich Wangler, Sprachkurs Deutsch
Schulz Griesbach, Deutsche Sprachlehre fr Auslnder
P.L Aneja, Deutsch Interessant- 1, 2 & 3
Rosa-Maria Dallapiazza et al, Tangram Aktuell A1/1,2
Braun, Nieder, Schme, Deutsch als Fremdsprache 1A, Grundkurs

I
20

V
15

A
5

SPANISH III
Course Code:

BTCE 346

Credit Units: 02

Course Objective:
To enable students acquire knowledge of the Set/definite expressions (idiomatic expressions) in Spanish
language and to handle some Spanish situations with ease.

Course Contents:
Module I
Revision of earlier semester modules
Set expressions (idiomatic expressions) with the verb Tener, Poner, Ir.
Weather
Module II
Introduction to Gustarand all its forms. Revision of Gustar and usage of it
Module III
Translation of Spanish-English; English-Spanish. Practice sentences.
How to ask for directions (using estar)
Introduction to IR + A + INFINITIVE FORM OF A VERB
Module IV
Simple conversation with help of texts and vocabulary
En el restaurante
En el instituto
En el aeropuerto
Module V
Reflexives

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

CT1
20

CT2
20

C Project + Presentation
I Interaction/Conversation Practice

Text & References:

Espaol, En Directo I A
Espaol Sin Fronteras -Nivel Elemental

C
20

I
20

V
15

A
5

JAPANESE - III
Course Code:

BTCE 347

Credit Units: 02

Course Objective:
To enable the students to converse in the language with the help of basic verbs and to express themselves
effectively and narrate their everyday short encounters. Students are also given projects on Japan and Japanese
culture to widen their horizon further.
Note: The Japanese script is introduced in this semester.

Course Contents:
Module I: Verbs
Different forms of verbs: present continuos verbs etc
Module II
More Adverbs and adverbial expressions
Module III: Counters
Learning to count different shaped objects,
Module IV: Tenses
Past tense, Past continuous tense.
Module V: Comparison
Comparative and Superlative degree
Module VI: Wishes and desires
Expressing desire to buy, hold, possess. Usage in negative sentences as well.
Comparative degree, Superlative degree.
Module VII: Appointment
Over phone, formal and informal etc.

Learning Outcome

Students can speak the language and can describe themselves and situations effectively
They also gain great knowledge in terms of Japanese lifestyle and culture, which help them at the time of
placements.

Methods of Private study /Self help

Handouts, audio-aids, and self-do assignments.


Use of library, visiting and watching movies in Japan and culture center every Friday at 6pm.

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

CT1
20

C Project + Presentation
I Interaction/Conversation Practice

Text & References:


Text:
Teach yourself Japanese
References:
Shin Nihongo no kiso 1

CT2
20

C
20

I
20

V
15

A
5

CHINESE III
Course Code:
Course Objective:

BTCE 348

Credit Units: 02

Foreign words are usually imported by translating the concept into Chinese, the emphasis is on the meaning
rather than the sound. But the system runs into a problem because the underlying name of personal name is
often obscure so they are almost always transcribed according to their pronciation alone. The course aims at
familiarizing the student with the basic aspects of speaking ability of Mandarin, the language of Mainland
China. The course aims at training students in practical skills and nurturing them to interact with a Chinese
person.

Course Contents:
Module I
Drills
Dialogue practice
Observe picture and answer the question.
Introduction of written characters.
Practice reading aloud
Practice using the language both by speaking and by taking notes.
Character writing and stroke order
Module II
Measure words
Position words e.g. inside, outside, middle, in front, behind, top, bottom, side, left, right, straight.
Directional words beibian, xibian, nanbian, dongbian, zhongjian.
Our school and its different building locations.
What game do you like?
Difference between hii and neng, keyi.
Module III
Changing affirmative sentences to negative ones and vice versa
Human body parts.
Not feeling well words e.g.; fever, cold, stomach ache, head ache.
Use of the modal particle le
Making a telephone call
Use of jiu and cal (Grammar portion)
Automobiles e.g. Bus, train, boat, car, bike etc.
Traveling, by train, by airplane, by bus, on the bike, by boat.. etc.
Module IV
The ordinal number di
Mei the demonstrative pronoun e.g. mei tian, mei nian etc.
use of to enter to exit
Structural particle de (Compliment of degree).
Going to the Park.
Description about class schedule during a week in school.
Grammar use of li and cong.
Comprehension reading followed by questions.
Module V
Persuasion-Please dont smoke.
Please speak slowly
Praise This pictorial is very beautiful
Opposites e.g. Clean-Dirty, Little-More, Old-New, Young-Old, Easy-Difficult, Boy-Girl, Black-White, BigSmall, Slow-Fast etc.
Talking about studies and classmates
Use of it doesnt matter
Enquiring about a student, description about study method.
Grammar: Negation of a sentence with a verbal predicate.

Examination Scheme:
Components
CT1
CT2
C
I
20
20
20
20
Weightage (%)
C Project + Presentation,
I Interaction/Conversation Practice

Text & References:

Elementary Chinese Reader Part I, Part-2 Lesson 21-30

V
15

A
5

TERM PAPER
Course Code:

BTCE 330

Credit Units: 02

A term (or research) paper is primarily a record of intelligent reading in several sources on a particular subject.
The students will choose the topic at the beginning of the session in consultation with the faculty assigned. The
progress of the paper will be monitored regularly by the faculty. At the end of the semester the detailed paper
on the topic will be submitted to the faculty assigned. The evaluation will be done by Board of examiners
comprising of the faculties.
GUIDELINES FOR TERM PAPER
The procedure for writing a term paper may consist of the following steps:
1. Choosing a subject
2. Finding sources of materials
3. Collecting the notes
4. Outlining the paper
5. Writing the first draft
6. Editing & preparing the final paper
1. Choosing a Subject
The subject chosen should not be too general.
2.

Finding Sources of materials


a) The material sources should be not more than 10 years old unless the nature of the paper is such that it
involves examining older writings from a historical point of view.
b) Begin by making a list of subject-headings under which you might expect the subject to be listed.
c) The sources could be books and magazine articles, news stories, periodicals, scientific journals etc.

3. Collecting the notes


Skim through sources, locating the useful material, then make good notes of it, including quotes and information
for footnotes.
a) Get facts, not just opinions. Compare the facts with author's conclusion.
b) In research studies, notice the methods and procedures, results & conclusions.
c) Check cross references.
4.

Outlining the paper


a) Review notes to find main sub-divisions of the subject.
b) Sort the collected material again under each main division to find sub-sections for outline so that it
begins to look more coherent and takes on a definite structure. If it does not, try going back and sorting
again for main divisions, to see if another general pattern is possible.

5. Writing the first draft


Write the paper around the outline, being sure that you indicate in the first part of the paper what its purpose is.
You may follow the following:
a) statement of purpose
b) main body of the paper
c) statement of summary and conclusion
Avoid short, bumpy sentences and long straggling sentences with more than one main idea.
6.

Editing & Preparing the final Paper


a) Before writing a term paper, you should ensure you have a question which you attempt to answer in
your paper. This question should be kept in mind throughout the paper. Include only information/
details/ analyses of relevance to the question at hand. Sometimes, the relevance of a particular section
may be clear to you but not to your readers. To avoid this, ensure you briefly explain the relevance of
every section.
b) Read the paper to ensure that the language is not awkward, and that it "flows" properly.
c) Check for proper spelling, phrasing and sentence construction.
d) Check for proper form on footnotes, quotes, and punctuation.
e) Check to see that quotations serve one of the following purposes:
(i)
Show evidence of what an author has said.
(ii) Avoid misrepresentation through restatement.
(iii) Save unnecessary writing when ideas have been well expressed by the original author.
f) Check for proper form on tables and graphs. Be certain that any table or graph is self-explanatory.
Term papers should be composed of the following sections:
1) Title page

2) Table of contents
3) Introduction
4) Review
5) Discussion & Conclusion
6) References
7) Appendix
Generally, the introduction, discussion, conclusion and bibliography part should account for a third of the paper
and the review part should be two thirds of the paper.
Discussion
The discussion section either follows the results or may alternatively be integrated in the results section. The
section should consist of a discussion of the results of the study focusing on the question posed in the research
paper.
Conclusion
The conclusion is often thought of as the easiest part of the paper but should by no means be disregarded. There
are a number of key components which should not be omitted. These include:
a) summary of question posed
b) summary of findings
c) summary of main limitations of the study at hand
d) details of possibilities for related future research
Reference
From the very beginning of a research project, you should be careful to note all details of articles gathered.
The bibliography should contain ALL references included in the paper. References not included in the text in
any form should NOT be included in the bibliography.
The key to a good bibliography is consistency. Choose a particular convention and stick to this.
Conventions
Monographs
Crystal, D. (2001), Language and the internet. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Edited volumes
Gass, S./Neu, J. (eds.) (1996), Speech acts across cultures. Challenges to communication in a second language.
Berlin/ NY: Mouton de Gruyter.
[(eds.) is used when there is more than one editor; and (ed.) where there is only one editor. In German the
abbreviation used is (Hrsg.) for Herausgeber].
Edited articles
Schmidt, R./Shimura, A./Wang, Z./Jeong, H. (1996), Suggestions to buy: Television commercials from the U.S.,
Japan, China, and Korea. In: Gass, S./Neu, J. (eds.) (1996), Speech acts across cultures. Challenges to
communication in a second language. Berlin/ NY: Mouton de Gruyter: 285-316.
Journal articles
McQuarrie, E.F./Mick, D.G. (1992), on resonance: A critical pluralistic inquiry into advertising rhetoric. Journal
of consumer research 19, 180-197.
Electronic book
Chandler, D. (1994), Semiotics for beginners [HTML document]. Retrieved [5.10.'01] from the World Wide
Web, http://www.aber.ac.uk/media/Documents/S4B/.
Electronic journal articles
Watts, S. (2000) Teaching talk: Should students learn 'real German'? [HTML document]. German as a Foreign
Language Journal [online] 1. Retrieved [12.09.'00] from the World Wide Web, http://www.gfl-journal.com/.
Other websites
Verterhus, S.A. (n.y.), Anglicisms in German car advertising. The problem of gender assignment [HTML
document]. Retrieved [13.10.'01] from the World Wide Web, http://olaf.hiof.no/~sverrev/eng.html.
Unpublished papers
Takahashi, S./DuFon, M.A. (1989), Cross-linguistic influence in indirectness: The case of English directives
performed by native Japanese speakers. Unpublished paper, Department of English as a Second Language,
University of Hawai'i at Manoa, Honolulu.

Unpublished theses/ dissertations


Mhl, S. (1996), Alltagssituationen im interkulturellen Vergleich: Realisierung von Kritik und Ablehnung im
Deutschen und Englischen. Unpublished MA thesis, University of Hamburg.
Walsh, R. (1995), Language development and the year abroad: A study of oral grammatical accuracy amongst
adult learners of German as a foreign language. Unpublished PhD dissertation, University College Dublin.
Appendix
The appendix should be used for data collected (e.g. questionnaires, transcripts, ...) and for tables and graphs not
included in the main text due to their subsidiary nature or to space constraints in the main text.

Assessment Scheme:
Continuous Evaluation:
(Based on abstract writing, interim draft, general approach,
research orientation, readings undertaken etc.)

40%

Final Evaluation:
(Based on the organization of the paper, objectives/
problem profile/ issue outlining, comprehensiveness of the
research, flow of the idea/ ideas, relevance of material used/
presented, outcomes vs. objectives, presentation/ viva etc.)

60%

NUMERICAL ANALYSIS AND PROGRAMMING


Course Code:

BTCE 401

Credit Units: 03

Course Objective:
This course deals with the techniques of numerical analysis, which gives the solution to applied problem when
ordinary analytical method fails. Emphasis is given on computer programming also so that the given techniques
can be used in design of engineering and scientific problems.

Course Contents:
Module I
Solution of Algebraic and Transcendental Equation
Error in a series approximation, Bisection Method, Iteration method, Method of false position, Newton-Raphson
method
Solutions of Simultaneous equation
Gauss elimination method, Jacobi iteration method, Gauss Seidal method
Module II: Interpolation
Finite Differences, Difference tables
Polynomial Interpolation: Newtons forward and backward formula
Central Difference Formulae: Gauss forward and backward formula.
Interpolation with unequal intervals: Lagranges Interpolation, Newton Divided difference formula
Module III: Numerical Integration and Differentiation
Introduction, Numerical differentiation Numerical Integration: Trapezoidal rule, Simpsons 1/3 and 3/8 rules.
Module IV: Solution of differential Equations
Eulers Method, Runga-Kutta Methods.
Module V: Statistical Computation
Frequency chart, Curve fitting by method of least squares, fitting of straight lines, polynomials, exponential
curves etc, Data fitting with Cubic splines.

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Text & References:


Text:
Rajaraman V, Computer Oriented Numerical Methods, Pearson Education
Gerald & Whealey, Applied Numerical Analyses, AW
Jain, Iyengar and Jain, Numerical Methods for Scientific and Engineering Computations, New Age Int.
Grewal B S, Numerical methods in Engineering and Science, Khanna Publishers, Delhi
References:
T Veerarajan, T Ramachandran, Theory and Problems in Numerical Methods, TMH
Pradip Niyogi, Numerical Analysis and Algorithms, TMH
Francis Scheld, Numerical Analysis, TMH
Sastry S. S, Introductory Methods of Numerical Analysis, Pearson Education.
Gupta C.B., Vijay Gupta, Introduction to Statistical Methods, Vikas Publishing.
Goyal, M, Computer Based Numerical and Statistical Techniques, Firewall Media, New Delhi.

STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS - I
Course Code:

BTCE 402

Credit Units: 04

Course Objective:
Structural Analysis, being the critical part in designing building and other structures, is important. Elastic
theorems fixed and continuous beams, circular beams over simple support and theory of columns are covered in
this course.

Course Contents:
Module I: Deflection of beams
Differential equation of the elastic curve - slope and deflection of beams by method of successive integration Macaulays method - Moment area method - Conjugate beam method - Deflection due to shear.
Module II: Elastic theorems and energy principles
Strain energy and complementary energy - review of strain energy due to axial load - bending, shear and torsion
- principle of superposition - principle of virtual work - Castiglianos theorem for deflection - theorem of
complementary energy - Bettis theorem - Maxwells law of reciprocal deflections - principle of least work application of method of virtual work (unit load method) and strain energy method for determination of
deflections of statically determinate beams - pin-joined trusses and rigid frames - temperature effects.
Module III: Fixed and continuous beams
Statically indeterminate structures - degree of static and kinematic indeterminacies brief introduction to force
and displacement methods - fixed and continuous beams - force method - analysis by consistent deformation
method - application of moment area and conjugate beam methods for fixed beams - theorem of three moments
for continuous beams - shear force and bending moment diagrams - deflection and support settlement.
Module IV: Beams curved in plan
Analysis of cantilever beam curved in plan - analysis of circular beams over simple supports
Theory of columns
Axial loading of short strut - long columns - Eulers Formula - Rankine Formula Secant Formula - eccentric
loading - direct and bending stresses Buckling Load as an eigen value problem.

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Texts & References:

R. Vaidyanathan, P. Perumal, Comprehensive Structural Analysis Vol. I & II, Laxmi Publications, New
Delhi
Reddy C.S., Basic Structural Analysis, 2nd ed., Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi (2004).

HYDRO SYSTEMS
Course Code:

BTCE 403

Credit Units: 03

Course Objective:
Water flowing in various conditions like open channels weirs, canals systems are covered in this syllabus.

Course Contents:
Module I
Open channel flow in rigid boundary channels- Comparison with pipe flow, Classification of flow, uniform flow
Equations for uniform flow such as Chezys and Mannings formula, Most efficient channel section
Circular. Rectangular, and Trapezoidal channel sections, Velocity distribution in open channels, Conveyance,
Normal depth, Hydraulic exponent for uniform flow, Determination of normal depth and velocity, Specific
energy and Specific force diagrams, Critical flow, Hydraulic exponent for critical flow, Channel transitions,
Venturi, Standing wave and Parshall flumes.
Module II
Non-uniform flow, Basic assumptions, Gradually Varied Flow, Dynamic equation for gradually varied flow,
Different forms of the dynamic equation, Flow profiles in prismatic channels, Computation of the length of the
backwater curve - Graphical Integration and Direct Step Methods. Rapidly Varied Flow- Hydraulic Jump,
Hydraulic jump equations for a rectangular channel, Practical applications, Energy loss and efficiency of a
jump, Stilling Basins, Selection of Stilling Basins, Rapidly varied unsteady flow Surges.
Module III
Distribution works - Classification of canals, Canal alignment, Considerations for fixing longitudinal slope,
Typical canal cross sections in embankment and filling, Cross sections of irrigation canals as per BIS codes,
Maintenance of canals, Canals in alluvial soils Regime Theory - Kennedys and Laceys Theories, Silting in
canals, Scour and protection against scour. Canal lining - losses in irrigation canals, Advantages and
disadvantages of lining, Types of lining. Water logging- Causes & preventive measures. Drainage Open and
Closed Drains.
Module IV
Components of a distribution system (no detailed design) - Head and Cross Regulator, Canal Falls, Canal
Outlets, Cross Drainage Works, Canal Escapes- Surplussing arrangements in minor irrigation tanks.

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Texts & References:

K. Subramanya, Flow in Open Channels, 3rd ed., Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi (2008).
P. N. Modi, Irrigation, Water Resources &Water Power Engineering, 2nd ed., Standard Book House, New
Delhi (2009)
Srivastava, Flow through Open Channels, Oxford University Press, New Delhi (2008).
Todd, D.K., Ground Water Hydrology, 2nd ed., Wiley India, New Delhi (2008)

GEOINFORMATICS
Course Code:

BTCE 404

Credit Units: 03

Course Objective:
Geoinformatics is an important data system for all civil engineering activities including construction of
structures, dams, water systems etc. Correct and reliable information and geographical data are a requirement
today. The course thus addresses this issue.

Course Contents:
Module I
Triangulation - principle - reconnaissance - selection of site for base line - selection of stations - orders of
triangulation - triangulation figures - scaffolds and signals - marking of stations - intervisibility and heights of
stations - satellite stations - base line measurement - equipment and corrections - adjustment of observations.
Module II
Survey adjustments and theory of errors introduction laws of accidental errors probability curve principle
of least squares laws of weights probable error normal equation most probable value method of
correlates angle adjustment station adjustment figure adjustment adjustment of triangles adjustment of
a geodetic quadrilateral.
Module III
Curves - types of curves - elements of a curve - simple curves - different methods of setting out introduction to
compound curves - reverse curves, transition curves, vertical curves -hydrographic survey - scope - shoreline
survey - river survey - soundings sounding equipment - methods - ranges - locating sounding - plotting - three
point problem.
Module IV
Photogrammetry terrestrial and aerial photogrammetry heights and distances from Photographs flight
planning elements of stereoscopy photo mosaic photo interpretation applications of photogrammetry.
GNSS GPS differential GPS.

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Texts & References:

S.K Duggal, Sruveying Vol. I and II, 2nd ed., Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi (2004).
Arora K.R., Surveying Vol. I & II, Standard Book House, New Delhi (2008)
Punmia B.C., Ashok Kr. Jain, Arun Kr. Jain, Surveying Vol. I &II, Laxmi Pub, New Delhi (2004)

FUNCTIONAL DESIGN OF BUILDING


Course Code:

BTCE 405

Credit Units: 03

Course Objective:
Modern buildings are not mere load bearing structures. They have to be provided with all facilities and
amenities for the purposes for which they are meant, be it office space, residential building, warehouses or large
shopping malls. Consideration of comfort and functional requirements are significant and energy efficiency is
now a critical factors. The course exposes the students these aspects of modern building design and
construction.

Course Contents:
Module I: Building Physics
Climate: Global climatic factors Elements of climate Data and measurement of elements of climate
Graphical representation methods - Site climate - Classification of climates.
Thermal comfort: Thermal balance of human body - Subjective variables - Thermal comfort indices and uses Comfort zone.
Thermo-physical properties of building materials: Thermal quantities and their units - Periodic heat flow and
its characteristics - Heat flow calculations.
Sun's movement and building: Solar temperature concept - Solar gain factor Apparent movement of sun Solar charts and its use - Sun control devices External shading devices, Internal blinds and curtains and
Special glasses
Heat flow and thermal insulation
Heat flow through buildings - Thermal gradient; Insulating materials - Properties Thermal insulation of roofs,
Exposed walls and Openings
Module II: Building services
Vertical transportation: Stairs - Types and design considerations; Elevators - Types and design considerations;
Escalators - features, operation & arrangement; Ramps.
Ventilation and air conditioning: Ventilation requirements - Natural and mechanical ventilation; Air
conditioning - Heat exchange of building - Calculation of air conditioning load - Summer and winter air
conditioning - Parts and operation of a/c plant - Systems of air conditioning.
Plumbing services: Typical details of water supply and sewage disposal arrangements for buildings - Standard
requirements.
Module III: Lighting
Photometric quantities - Day lighting - Day light factor and components - Artificial lighting - Lamps and
luminaries - Polar distribution curves - Design of artificial lighting Lumen method - Point by point method Glare - Illumination requirements for various buildings -Measurement of illumination.
Acoustics
Properties of sound - Frequency - Pitch - Intensity - Power- Pressure - Loudness Decibel scale; Room
acoustics - Reverberation - Sabine's formula - Acoustical defects Sound absorbing materials and constructions;
Requirements for good acoustics - General principles of acoustic design; Sound insulation -Transmission loss
Methods of sound insulation construction of walls, floors and roofs .
Module IV: Environment
Introduction to environment site and built up space relationships Design as a human activity principles of
architectural design.
Functional planning Introduction to anthropometrics and ergonomics Occupancy classification of buildings
Essentials of National Building Code Essentials of Building and development rules.

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Texts & References:

Punmia B.C., Ashok Kr. Jain, Arun Kr. Jain, Building Construction, Laxmi Publications, New Delhi
(2008).
Duggal, S. K, Building Materials, 2nd ed., New Age (New Delhi) 2008.
K. S. Jagadish, B. V. Venkatarama Reddy, K. S. Nanjunda Rao, Alternative Building Materials and
Technologies, New Age, New Delhi (2008)

TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING - I
Course Code:

BTCE 406

Credit Units: 03

Course Objective:
Modern road design and construction are covered in the syllabus.

Course Contents:
Module I: Highway Classification, Alignment and Geometrical Design
Introduction Highway development in India - Classification of roads - Typical cross sections of roads in urban
and rural area - Requirements and factors controlling alignment of roads - Engineering surveys for highway
location - Pavement surface characteristics - Camber and width requirements Sight distances - stopping and
overtaking sight distances, overtaking zone requirements - Design of horizontal alignment - speed, radius, super
elevation, methods of providing super elevation, extra widening of pavements, transition curves - Design of
vertical alignment - gradient, grade compensation, summit curves and valley curves - worked out problems on
all the above topics.
Module II: Traffic engineering
Introduction - Road user, vehicle and traffic characteristics - Speed and volume studies - Simple worked out
problems - Principles of design of at-grade intersections -Simple layouts - Objectives, classification and uses of
traffic signs and markings - Design of isolated signals by Websters method.
Module III: Pavement Materials and Design
Desirable properties and testing of highway materials: road aggregates, bituminous materials and subgrade soil Factors influencing the design of pavements - CBR method and IRC guidelines of flexible pavements design Design of rigid pavements using IRC charts - worked out problems.
Module IV: Pavement Construction and Maintenance
Historical development of road construction -Construction of earth roads, WBM roads, stabilized roads,
bituminous pavements, cement concrete roads and joints in cement concrete roads - Types and causes of failures
in flexible & rigid pavements.

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Text & References:

Papacostas, C.S., Transportation Engineering and Planning, 3 rd ed., Pearson Education, New Delhi (2008)
O Flaherty Coleman. A., Transport Planning and Traffic Engineering, Elsevier, New Delhi (2008).
Slinn, Mike, Traffic Engineering Design (Principles and Practice), Elsevier, New Delhi (2008), OFlaherty,
Coleman A., Highways (The Location, Design, Construction and Maintenance of Pavement) 4th ed,
Elsevier, New Delhi (2008).

NUMERICAL ANALYSIS LAB - I


Course Code:

BTCE 420

Credit Units: 01

Course Contents:
Assignments will be provided for the following:

Analysis of various numerical and statistical techniques

Examination Scheme:
IA
EE
A
PR
LR
V
PR
V
5
10
10
5
35
35
Note: IA Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR Lab Record, V Viva.

MATERIAL TESTING LAB - I


Course Code:

BTCE 421

Credit Units: 01

Course Contents:
List of Exercises:
1.

Tests on aggregate for concrete


(a) Grain size distribution (b) Specific gravity (c) Density (d) Voids (e) Bulking (f) Aggregate crushing
value (g) Aggregate impact value.

2.

Tests on cement
(a) Fineness (b) Normal consistency (c) Setting time (d) Compressive strength

3.

Test on Timber beam Bending test

4.

Tests on tiles Dimension, Transverse Strength, Water Absorption and Crazing

5.

Tests on bricks Crushing strength, water absorption and efflorescence

6.

Tests on metals Hardness test and impact test

Examination Scheme:
IA
EE
A
PR
LR
V
PR
V
5
10
10
5
35
35
Note: IA Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR Lab Record, V Viva.

SURVEYING PRACTICAL - II
Course Code:

BTCE 422

Credit Units: 01

Course Contents:
List of Exercises:
1.

Determination of tacheometric constants.

2.

Heights and distances by stadia tacheometry.

3.

Heights and distances by tangential tacheometry.

4.

Heights and distances by solution of triangles.

5.

Setting out of simple curves linear methods.

6.

Setting out of simple curves angular method.

7.

Setting out of transition curve.

8.

Permanent adjustments of theodolite.

9.

Heights and distances by using subtense bar.

10. Study of modern instruments Automatic levels and Total station.

Examination Scheme:
IA

EE

A
PR
LR
V
PR
V
5
10
10
5
35
35
Note: IA Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR Lab Record, V Viva.

COMMUNICATION SKILLS - II
Course Code:

BTCE 441

Credit Units: 01

Course Objective:
To teach the participants strategies for improving academic reading and writing.
Emphasis is placed on increasing fluency, deepening vocabulary, and refining academic language proficiency.

Course Contents:
Module I: Social Communication Skills
Small Talk
Conversational English
Appropriateness
Building rapport
Module II: Context Based Speaking
In general situations
In specific professional situations
Discussion and associated vocabulary
Simulations/Role Play
Module III: Professional Skills
Presentations
Negotiations
Meetings
Telephony Skills

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

CT1
20

CT2
20

CAF
25

V
10

CAF Communication Assessment File


GD Group Discussion
GP Group Presentation

Text & References:

Essential Telephoning in English, Garside/Garside, Cambridge


Working in English, Jones, Cambridge
Business Communication, Raman Prakash, Oxford
Speaking Personally, Porter-Ladousse, Cambridge
Speaking Effectively, Jermy Comfort, et.al, Cambridge
Business Communication, Raman Prakash, Oxford

GD
10

GP
10

A
5

BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCE - IV
(RELATIONSHIP MANAGEMENT)
Course Code:

BTCE 443

Credit Units: 01

Course Objective:
To understand the basis of interpersonal relationship
To understand various communication style
To learn the strategies for effective interpersonal relationship

Course Contents:
Module I: Understanding Relationships
Importance of relationships
Role and relationships
Maintaining healthy relationships
Module II: Bridging Individual Differences
Understanding individual differences
Bridging differences in Interpersonal Relationship TA
Communication Styles
Module III: Interpersonal Relationship Development
Importance of Interpersonal Relationships
Interpersonal Relationships Skills
Types of Interpersonal Relationships
Module IV: Theories of Interpersonal Relationships
Theories: Social Exchange, Uncertainty Reduction Theory
Factors Affecting Interpersonal Relationships
Improving Interpersonal Relationships
Module V: Impression Management
Meaning & Components of Impression Management
Impression Management Techniques (Influencing Skills)
Impression Management Training-Self help and Formal approaches
Module VI: End-of-Semester Appraisal
Viva based on personal journal
Assessment of Behavioural change as a result of training
Exit Level Rating by Self and Observer

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

SAP

20

05

Mid Term
Test (CT)
20

VIVA
30

Journal for
Success (JOS)
25

Text & References:

Vangelist L. Anita, Mark N. Knapp, Inter Personal Communication and Human Relationships: Third
Edition, Allyn and Bacon
Julia T. Wood. Interpersonal Communication everyday encounter
Simons, Christine, Naylor, Belinda: Effective Communication for Managers, 1997 1 st Edition Cassell
Goddard, Ken: Informative Writing, 1995 1 st Edition, Cassell
Harvard Business School, Effective Communication: United States of America
Foster John, Effective Writing Skills: Volume-7, First Edition 2000, Institute of Public Relations (IPR)
Beebe, Beebe and Redmond; Interpersonal Communication, 1996; Allyn and Bacon Publishers.

FRENCH - IV
Course Code:

BTCE 444

Credit Units: 02

Course Objective:
To enable students:
To develop strategies of comprehension of texts of different origin
To present facts, projects, plans with precision

Course Contents:
Module C: pp. 104 139: Units 8, 9
Contenu lexical:

Unit 8: Dcouvrir le pass


1. parler du pass, des habitudes et des changements.
2. parler de la famille, raconter une suite
dvnements/prciser leur date et leur dure.
3. connatre quelques moments de lhistoire
Unit 9: Entreprendre
1. faire un projet de la ralisation: (exprimer un besoin,
prciser les tapes dune ralisation)
2. parler dune entreprise
3. parler du futur

Contenu grammatical:

1. Imparfait
2. Pronom en
3. Futur
4. Discours rapport au prsent
5. Pass rcent
6. Prsent progressif

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

CT1
20

C Project + Presentation
I Interaction/Conversation Practice

Text & References:

le livre suivre: Campus: Tome 1

CT2
20

C
20

I
20

V
15

A
5

GERMAN - IV
Course Code:

BTCE 445

Credit Units: 02

Course Objective:
To enable the students to converse, read and write in the language with the help of the basic rules of grammar,
which will later help them to strengthen their language.
To give the students an insight into the culture, geography, political situation and economic opportunities
available in Germany.
Introduction to Advanced Grammar Language and Professional Jargon

Course Contents:
Module I: Present perfect tense
Present perfect tense, usage and applicability
Usage of this tense to indicate near past
Universal applicability of this tense in German
Module II: Letter writing
To acquaint the students with the form of writing informal letters.
Module III: Interchanging prepositions
Usage of prepositions with both accusative and dative cases
Usage of verbs fixed with prepositions
Emphasizing on the action and position factor
Module IV: Past tense
Introduction to simple past tense
Learning the verb forms in past tense
Making a list of all verbs in the past tense and the participle forms
Module V: Reading a Fairy Tale
Comprehension and narration
Rotkppchen
Froschprinzessin
Die Fremdsprache
Module VI: Genitive case
Genitive case Explain the concept of possession in genitive
Mentioning the structure of weak nouns
Module VII: Genitive prepositions
Discuss the genitive propositions and their usage: (whrend, wegen, statt, trotz)
Module VIII: Picture Description
Firstly recognize the persons or things in the picture and identify the situation depicted in the picture;
Secondly answer questions of general meaning in context to the picture and also talk about the personal
experiences which come to your mind upon seeing the picture.

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

CT1
20

CT2
20

C
20

C Project + Presentation
I Interaction/Conversation Practice

Text & References:

Wolfgang Hieber, Lernziel Deutsch


Hans-Heinrich Wangler, Sprachkurs Deutsch
Schulz Griesbach, Deutsche Sprachlehre fr Auslnder
P.L Aneja, Deutsch Interessant- 1, 2 & 3
Rosa-Maria Dallapiazza et al, Tangram Aktuell A1/1,2
Braun, Nieder, Schme, Deutsch als Fremdsprache 1A, Grundkurs

I
20

V
15

A
5

SPANISH - IV
Course Code:

BTCE 446

Credit Units: 02

Course Objective:
To enable students acquire working knowledge of the language; to give them vocabulary, grammar, voice
modulations/intonations to handle everyday Spanish situations with ease.

Course Contents:
Module I
Revision of earlier semester modules
Introduction to Present Continuous Tense (Gerunds)
Module II
Translation with Present Continuous Tense
Introduction to Gustar, Parecer, Apetecer, doler
Module III
Imperatives (positive and negative commands of regular verbs)
Module IV
Commercial/business vocabulary
Module V
Simple conversation with help of texts and vocabulary
En la recepcion del hotel
En el restaurante
En la agencia de viajes
En la tienda/supermercado

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

CT1
20

CT2
20

C Project + Presentation
I Interaction/Conversation Practice

Text & References:

Espaol Sin Fronteras (Nivel Elemental)

C
20

I
20

V
15

A
5

JAPANESE - IV
Course Code:

BTCE 447

Credit Units: 02

Course Objective:
To enable the students to comfortably interact using basic Japanese.
Note: Teaching is done in roman as well as Japanese script, students will be taught katankana (another form of
script) in this semester i.e. to be able to write all the foreign words in Japanese.

Course Contents:
Module I
Comparison using adjectives, making requests
Module II
Seeking permission
Module III
Practice of conversations on:
Visiting people, Party, Meetings, after work, at a ticket vending machine etc
Module IV
Essays, writing formal letters

Learning Outcome

Students can speak the language describing above-mentioned topics.

Methods of Private study /Self help

Handouts, audio-aids, and self-do assignments, role-plays.


Students are also encouraged to attend Japanese film festival and other such fairs and workshops organized
in the capital from time to time.

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

CT1
20

C Project + Presentation
I Interaction/Conversation Practice

Text & References:


Text:
Teach yourself Japanese
References:
Shin Nihongo no kiso 1

CT2
20

C
20

I
20

V
15

A
5

CHINESE IV
Course Code:

BTCE 448

Credit Units: 02

Course Objective:
How many characters are there? The early Qing dynasty dictionary included nearly 50,000 characters the vast
majority of which were rare accumulated characters over the centuries. An educate person in China can
probably recognize around 6000 characters. The course aims at familiarizing the student with the basic aspects
of speaking ability of Mandarin, the language of Mainland China. The course aims at training students in
practical skills and nurturing them to interact with a Chinese person.

Course Contents:
Module I
Dialogue Practice
Observe picture and answer the question
Pronunciation and intonation
Character writing and stroke order.
Electronic items
Module II
Traveling The Scenery is very beautiful
Weather and climate
Grammar question with bu shi . Ma?
The construction yao le (Used to indicate that an action is going to take place)
Time words yiqian, yiwai (Before and after).
The adverb geng.
Module III
Going to a friend house for a visit meeting his family and talking about their customs.
Fallen sick and going to the Doctor, the doctor examines, takes temperature and writes prescription.
Aspect particle guo shows that an action has happened some time in the past.
Progressive aspect of an actin zhengzai Also the use if zhe with it.
To welcome someone and to see off someone . I cant go the airport to see you off etc.
Module IV
Shipment. Is this the place to checking luggage?
Basic dialogue on Where do u work?
Basic dialogue on This is my address
Basic dialogue on I understand Chinese
Basic dialogue on What job do u do?
Basic dialogue on What time is it now?
Module V
Basic dialogue on What day (date) is it today?
Basic dialogue on What is the weather like here.
Basic dialogue on Do u like Chinese food?
Basic dialogue on I am planning to go to China.

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

CT1
20

CT2
20

C Project + Presentation
I Interaction/Conversation Practice

Text & References:

Elementary Chinese Reader, Part-2 Lesson 31-38

C
20

I
20

V
15

A
5

STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS - II
Course Code:

BTCE 501

Credit Units: 03

Course Objective:
The course builds upon the earlier course of Structural Analysis I and deals with more advanced methods.

Course Contents:
Module I: Force method of analysis of indeterminate structures Analysis of rigid frames of different
geometry by consistent deformation method settlement effects - analysis of pin-jointed trusses by consistent
deformation method - externally and internally redundant trusses - effects of settlement and prestrains.
Module II: Displacement method of analysis of indeterminate structures Slope deflection method - analysis
of continuous beams - beams with overhang - analysis of rigid frames - frames with sloping legs - gabled frames
- frames without sway and with sway - settlement effects - moment distribution method as successive
approximation of slope deflection equations - analysis of beams and frames - non-sway and sway analyses Kanis method as iterative method of analysis of frames (outline only)
Module III: Moving Loads & Influence Lines
Introduction to moving loads - concept of influence lines - influence lines for reaction, shear force and bending
moment in simply supported beams - influence lines for forces in trusses analysis for different types of
moving loads - single concentrated load - several concentrated loads - uniformly distributed load shorter and
longer than the span.
Module IV: Cables, suspension bridges and arches
Analysis of forces in cables - suspension bridges with three-hinged and two-hinged stiffening girders - theory of
arches - Eddys theorem - analysis of three-hinged and two-hinged arches - settlement and temperature effects.

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Text & References:

Wang C.K., Statically Indeterminate Structures, McGraw Hill, New York, 1983.
Wilbur J.B. & Norris C.H., Elementary Structural Analysis, McGraw Hill, 1960.
Wang C.K., Intermediate Structural Analysis, McGraw Hill, 1983.
Timoshenko S.P. & Young D.H., Theory of Structures, McGraw Hill, 1965.
Kinney S.J., Indeterminate Structural Analysis, Oxford & IBH, 1985.
Matheson J.A.L., Hyperstatic Structures, John Wiley and Sons, 1996.
Reddy C.S., Basic Structural Analysis, Tata McGraw Hill
Negi L.S. & Jangid R.S, Structural Analysis, Tata McGraw Hill
Rajasekaran S. & Sankarasubramanian G., Computational Structural Mechanics, PHI

PRINCIPLES OF STRUCTURAL DESIGN


Course Code:

BTCE 502

Credit Units: 04

Course Objective:
Based on the course Structural Analysis the student should be able to start design of structures using various
types of materials.

Course Contents:
Module I: Design Philosophy
Introduction Structures and structural systemsInternal forces in different types of structural systems such as
Trusses, Cables, Arches, Beams and Slabs, Frames. stability criteria design considerations loading
standards working stress method (WSM) ultimate load method probabilistic analysis and design
uncertainties in design classical reliability models reliability analysis and design levels of reliability
methods limit state method(LSM) limit states multiple safety factor formats load and resistance factor
design format partial safety factor format.
Module II: Reinforced Concrete
Introduction materials mix design by IS method basic properties of concrete and reinforcement basic
design concepts of working stress method (WSM) analysis of sections by WSM flexure, shear, torsion and
bond singly reinforced, doubly reinforced and flanged sections deflection criteria.
Module III: Steel
Steel - introduction to connections - analysis and design of riveted, bolted and welded joints for direct force and
moment - struts and ties made of single and double angles.
A design project involving the design and detailing of a typical connection is envisaged at this stage.
Module IV: Timber
Classification and allowable stresses - design of beams for flexure, shear & bearing deflection criteria - design
of solid and built-up columns-flitched beam formwork design.
A design project involving the design and specification of the formwork for a typical concrete structure is
envisaged at this stage.

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Text & References:

Pillai S.U. & Menon D, Reinforced Concrete Design Tata McGraw Hill, 2003.
Varghese P.C., Limit State Design of Reinforced Concrete, Prentice Hall of India, 2003.
Mallick S.K. & Gupta A.K., Reinforced Concrete, Oxford & IBH, 1982.
Jain A.K., Reinforced Concrete - Limit State Design, Standard Book House, 1998.
Shetty M.S., Concrete Technology, S. Chand, 1988.
Punmia B.C., Reinforced Concrete Structures Vol. I, Standard Book House, 2005
Jain & Jaikrishna, Plain & Reinforced Concrete Vol. I, Nemchand, 2000.
Sinha S.N., Reinforced Concrete Design, Tata McGraw Hill, 2005.
Ram Chandra, Design of Steel Structures Vol. I, Standard Book House, 2005.
Negi L.S., Design of Steel Structures Vol. I, Tata McGraw Hill, 2005.
BIS Codes (IS 875, IS 10262, SP 23, IS 456, IS 800, SP 6, IS 883, IS 2750).

GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING - I
Course Code:

BTCE 503

Credit Units: 03

Course Objective:
Soil mechanics and related topics are important areas in Civil Engineering and the first part of Geotechnical
Engineering deals with soils and their characteristics.

Course contents:
Module I: Nature of soil and functional relationships
Soil type -Concepts of single grained, honey combed and flocculent structure and their effects on the basic soil
properties - 3 phase system - void ratio - specific gravity - dry density - porosity - water content - saturated unit
weight - submerged unit weight - degree of saturation. Laboratory and field identification of soils:
Determination of water content by oven drying -Specific gravity using pycnometer and specific gravity bottle Grain size analysis by sieve analysis, hydrometer analysis and pipette analysis - Atterberg limits and indices
Visual identification by simple field tests - Field density by core cutter, sand replacement and wax coating
methods. Classification of soils: Necessity -Principles of classification - I.S. classification Plasticity charts Group index.
Module II: Soil Water, Permeability and Stress Distribution
Soil water: Types - Effective stress - Total stress - Pore pressure - Pressure diagrams. Permeability: Definition Darcys law - Factors affecting permeability Laboratory determination - Stratified soils: average permeability.
Stress distribution: Boussinesqs equations for vertical pressure due to point loads- Assumptions and limitations
- pressure bulb Influence diagram - Vertical pressure due to uniformly distributed loads, line loads and strip
loads - Newmark charts and their use - Westergaards solution.
Module III: Consolidation and Compation
Consolidation: Definition - Concepts of coefficient of compressibility - Coefficient of volume change and
compression index - e-log p curves - Terzaghis theory of one dimensional consolidation Determination of
coefficient of consolidation- pre-consolidation pressure difference between consolidation and compaction.
Compaction: Definition and objectives of compaction - Proctor test and modified proctor test - Concept of OMC
and maximum dry density - Zero air voids line -Factors influencing compaction.- Effect of compaction on soil
properties - Field compaction methods - Proctor needle for field control.
Module IV: Shear Strength and Stability of Slopes
Shear Strength: Definition - Mohrs strength and stress circles - origin of planes - Mohrs envelope - MohrCoulomb strength theory -Direct, triaxial and UCC tests - Drainage conditions - Measurement of pore pressure Vane shear tests -Total and effective stress -strength parameters Stress path, Liquefaction of sand - Choice of
test conditions for field problems. Stability of slopes: Slope failure, base failure and toe failure - Swedish circle
method - =0 analysis and c=0 analysis - Friction circle method - Taylors stability number -Stability charts Sliding block analysis.

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Text & References:

Terzaghi K. & Peck R.B., Soil Mechanics in Engineering Practice, John Wiley Sons, 1967.
Alam Singh, Soil Engineering-Theory and Practice, Asia Pub, 1967.
Punmia B.C., Soil Mechanics and Foundations, Saurabh,1992.
Murthy V.N.S., Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering, Dhanpat Rai, 1984
Khan I.H., Text Book of Geotechnical Engineering, Prentice Hall of India

TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING - II
Course Code:

BTCE 504

Credit Units: 04

Course Objective:
This course deals with the design concept of railways, airport and tunnel.

Course Contents:
Module I: Components & Geometric Design of Railways
Introduction. Typical cross-sections. Various gauges. Coning of wheels and tilting of rails. Functions and
requirements of component parts of a railway track. Creep of rails. Geometrical design of railway track.
Horizontal curves, radius, superelevation, cant deficiency, transition curves, safe speed on curves, different
types of gradients, grade compensation. Worked out problems.
Module II: Railway Operation and Control
Points and crossings and their design. Track junctions and simple track layouts. Details of different types of
stations and yards. Signaling and interlocking. Control of train movements. Absolute block . Automatic block
system and CTC system. Railway Construction and Maintenance: Construction of railway track: earthwork,
plate laying and packing. Maintenance of track-alignment, gauge, renewal of component parts and drainage,
modern methods of track maintenance.
Module III: Tunneling
Tunnel alignment and grade. Size and shape of a tunnel. Methods of tunneling in hard rocks. Full face method,
heading and bench method, drift method. Methods of tunneling in soft soils. Compressed air and shield
tunneling Shafts in tunnels. Ventilation of tunnel and various methods. Lining of tunnels. Drainage and lighting
of . Micro Tunneling. Trenchless technology.
Module IV: Airport planning and Design
Introduction. Aircraft characteristics and their influence on planning of airports. Airport obstructions and
zoning. Component parts of airport and site selection. Runway design. Orientation, basic runway length,
corrections and geometric. Design of taxiways and aprons - Terminal area planning. Facilities in terminal area
and their planning concepts, aircraft parking configurations. Airport drainage system.
Surface and subsurface drainage systems and their design.

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Text & References:

Antia K.F, Railway Track, New Book Company Pvt. Ltd, 1960.
Agarwal M.M., Railway Engineering, Prabha and Co
Khanna S.K & Arora M.G., Airport Planning and Design, Nemchand & Bros.
Horonjeff R., Planning and Design of Airports, Mc Graw Hill
Mundrey J.S, Railway Track Engineering, TMGS, 1988.

HYDRAULIC MACHINES
(Ref. Fluid Power Systems of B.Tech MAE)
Course Code:

BTCE 505

Credit Units: 03

Course Objective:
Fluid power systems cover generation, transmission, and control applications of power by using pressurized
fluids. This course imparts the knowledge of different fluid power systems which are used in industries and
hydropower plants.

Course Contents:
Module I: Introduction
Eulers equations for turbo machines; impulse and reaction forces due to fluid systems on stationery and moving
system of vanes; jet propulsion.
Module II: Water Turbines
Classification: Pelton, Francis, Propeller and Kaplan turbines; velocity triangles; efficiency; draft tubes,
governing.
Module III: Pumps
Centrifugal pumps, velocity triangles, efficiency, turbine pumps, axial and mixed flow pumps.
Module IV: Performance of Fluid Machines
Similarity laws applied to rotodynamic machines; specific speed, unit quantities; characteristic curves; use of
models; cavitations and attendant problems in turbo machines; selection of turbines hydroelectric plants.
Module V: Hydraulic Power Transmission
Transmission of hydraulic power through pipe lines; water hammer; precautions against water hammer in
turbine and pump installations: hydraulic ram.
Module VI: Power Hydraulics
Positive pumps: gear, vane, screw, pump, variable delivery valves: flow control, pressure control, direction
control, solenoid operated valve, hydraulic circuits, fluid coupling and torque converter.
Pneumatic Power: Basic principles, comparison of pneumatic and hydraulic Systems.

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Text & References:


Text:
Gupta, S. C., Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machines, Pearson Education, 2007
R.K. Bansal, Fluid Mechanics & Hydraulic Machines, Laxmi Publications (P) Ltd., 2002.
References:
Dr. D.S. Kumar, Fluid Mechanics & Fluid Power Engineering, S.K. Kataria & Sons,2001
D.R. Malhotra & N.K. Malhotra, The Fluid Mech. & Hydraulics, Satya Prakashan, 2001
V.P. Gupta, Alam Singh, Manish Gupta, Fluid Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics & Hydraulics, CBS
Publishers; 1999

MATERIAL TESTING LAB II


Course Code:

BTCE 520

Credit Units: 01

List of Exercises
1.

Tension test on MS rod.

2.

Shear Test on MS rod.

3.

Torsion test on MS Specimen.

4.

Bending test on steel beams.

5.

Spring test open and close coil springs.

6.

Workability tests slump, compaction, V-bee, flow and preparation of cubes.

7.

Compression test on cubes and cylinders determination of modulus of elasticity.

8.

Split test on concrete cylinders and flexure test on concrete.

9.

Study of extensometers and strain gauges.

10. Bending test on reinforced concrete beams under reinforced and over reinforced.
11. Demonstration of Non- Destructive Testing Equipment.

Examination Scheme:
IA

EE

A
PR
LR
V
PR
V
5
10
10
5
35
35
Note: IA Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR Lab Record, V Viva.

HYDRAULIC MACHINES LAB


Course Code:

BTCE 521

Credit Units: 01

Name of Experiments
1.

To conduct a test on Centrifugal Pump and plot its characteristics.

2.

To Plot the characteristics of Pelton turbine.

3.

To conducts an experiment on Francis turbine.

4.

To study the effect of a draft tube on reaction turbines.

5.

To find the friction factor for flow through pipes.

6.

To study the hydraulic controls rig.

7.

To conduct an experiment for verifying model laws.

8.

To study the cavitations phenomenon in turbines.

9.

Study of hydraulic couplings and torque converters.

Examination Scheme:
IA

EE

A
PR
LR
V
PR
V
5
10
10
5
35
35
Note: IA Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR Lab Record, V Viva.

COMMUNICATION SKILLS - III


Course Code:

BTCE 541

Credit Units: 01

Course Objective:
To equip the participant with linguistic skills required in the field of science and technology while guiding them
to excel in their academic field.

Course Contents:
Module I
Reading Comprehension
Summarising
Paraphrasing
Module II
Essay Writing
Dialogue Report
Module III
Writing Emails
Brochure
Leaflets
Module IV: Introduction to Phonetics
Vowels
Consonants
Accent and Rhythm
Accent Neutralization
Spoken English and Listening Practice

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

CT1
20

CT2
20

CAF
25

V
10

CAF Communication Assessment File


GD Group Discussion
GP Group Presentation

Text & References:

Effective English for Engineering Students, B Cauveri, Macmillan India


Creative English for Communication, Krishnaswamy N, Macmillan
A Textbook of English Phonetics, Balasubramanian T, Macmillan

GD
10

GP
10

A
5

BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCE - V
(GROUP DYNAMICS AND TEAM BUILDING)
Course Code:
Course Objective:

BTCE 543

Credit Units: 01

To inculcate in the students an elementary level of understanding of group/team functions.


To develop team spirit and to know the importance of working in teams.

Course Contents:
Module I: Group formation
Definition and Characteristics
Importance of groups
Classification of groups
Stages of group formation
Benefits of group formation
Module II: Group Functions
External Conditions affecting group functioning: Authority, Structure, Org. Resources, Organizational policies
etc.
Internal conditions affecting group functioning: Roles, Norms, Conformity, Status, Cohesiveness, Size, Inter
group conflict.
Group Cohesiveness and Group Conflict
Adjustment in Groups
Module III: Teams
Meaning and nature of teams
External and internal factors effecting team
Building Effective Teams
Consensus Building
Collaboration
Module IV: Leadership
Meaning, Nature and Functions
Self leadership
Leadership styles in organization
Leadership in Teams
Module V: Power to empower: Individual and Teams
Meaning and Nature
Types of power
Relevance in organization and Society
Module VI: End-of-Semester Appraisal
Viva based on personal journal
Assessment of Behavioural change as a result of training
Exit Level Rating by Self and Observer

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

SAP
20

A
05

Mid Term Test (CT)


20

VIVA
30

Journal for Success (JOS)


25

Text & References:

Organizational Behaviour, Davis, K.


Hoover, Judhith D. Effective Small Group and Team Communication, 2002, Harcourt College Publishers.
Dick, Mc Cann & Margerison, Charles: Team Management, 1992 Edition, viva books.
Bates, A. P. and Julian, J.: Sociology - Understanding Social Behaviour.
Dressers, David and Cans, Donald: The Study of Human Interaction.
Lapiere, Richard. T Social Change.
Lindzey, G. and Borgatta, E: Sociometric Measurement in the Handbook of Social Psychology, Addison
Welsley, US.
Rose, G.: Oxford Textbook of Public Health, Vol.4, 1985.
LaFasto and Larson: When Teams Work Best, 2001, Response Books (Sage), New Delhi
J William Pfeiffer (ed.) Theories and Models in Applied Behavioural Science, Vol 2, Group (1996); Pfeiffer
& Company.
Smither Robert D.; The Psychology of Work and Human Performance, 1994, Harper Collins College
Publishers.

FRENCH - V
Course Code:

BTCE 544

Credit Units: 02

Course Objective:
To furnish some basic knowledge of French culture and civilization for understanding an authentic document and
information relating to political and administrative life

Course Contents:
Module D: pp. 131 156 Units 10, 11
Contenu lexical:

Unit 10: Prendre des dcisions


1. Faire des comparaisons
2. dcrire un lieu, le temps, les gens, l'ambiance
3. rdiger une carte postale
Unit 11: faire face aux problmes
1. Exposer un problme.
2. parler de la sant, de la maladie
3. interdire/demander/donner une autorisation
4. connatre la vie politique franaise

Contenu grammatical:
1.
2.
3.
4.

comparatif - comparer des qualits/ quantits/actions


supposition: Si + prsent, futur
adverbe - caractriser une action
pronom "Y"

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

CT1
20

C Project + Presentation
I Interaction/Conversation Practice

Text & References:

le livre suivre: Campus: Tome 1

CT2
20

C
20

I
20

V
15

A
5

GERMAN - V
Course Code:

BTCE 545

Credit Units: 02

Course Objective:
To enable the students to converse, read and write in the language with the help of the basic rules of grammar,
which will later help them to strengthen their language.
To give the students an insight into the culture, geography, political situation and economic opportunities
available in Germany
Introduction to Advanced Grammar and Business Language and Professional Jargon.

Course Contents:
Module I: Genitive case
Genitive case Explain the concept of possession in genitive
Mentioning the structure of weak nouns
Module II: Genitive prepositions
Discuss the genitive propositions and their usage: (whrend, wegen, statt, trotz)
Module III: Reflexive verbs
Verbs with accusative case
Verbs with dative case
Difference in usage in the two cases
Module IV: Verbs with fixed prepositions
Verbs with accusative case
Verbs with dative case
Difference in the usage of the two cases
Module V: Texts
A poem Maxi
A text Rocko
Module VI: Picture Description
Firstly recognize the persons or things in the picture and identify the situation depicted in the picture;
Secondly answer questions of general meaning in context to the picture and also talk about the personal
experiences which come to your mind upon seeing the picture.

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

CT1
20

CT2
20

C
20

C Project + Presentation
I Interaction/Conversation Practice

Text & References:

Wolfgang Hieber, Lernziel Deutsch


Hans-Heinrich Wangler, Sprachkurs Deutsch
Schulz Griesbach, Deutsche Sprachlehre fr Auslnder
P.L Aneja, Deutsch Interessant - 1, 2 & 3
Rosa-Maria Dallapiazza et al, Tangram Aktuell A1/1,2
Braun, Nieder, Schme, Deutsch als Fremdsprache 1A, Grundkurs

I
20

V
15

A
5

SPANISH - V
Course Code:

BTCE 546

Credit Units: 02

Course Objective:
To enable students acquire working knowledge of the language; to give them vocabulary, grammar, voice
modulations/intonations to handle everyday Spanish situations with ease.

Course Contents:
Module I
Revision of earlier semester modules
Module II
Future Tense
Module III
Presentations in English on
Spanish speaking countries
Culture
Sports
Food
People
Politics
Society
Geography
Module IV
Situations:
En el hospital
En la comisaria
En la estacion de autobus/tren
En el banco/cambio
Module V
General revision of Spanish language learnt so far.

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

CT1
20

C Project + Presentation
I Interaction/Conversation Practice

Text & References:

Espaol Sin Fronteras, Greenfield

CT2
20

C
20

I
20

V
15

A
5

JAPANESE - V
Course Code:

BTCE 547

Credit Units: 02

Course Objective:
To enable the students to converse, read and write language comfortably and be able to converse using different
patterns and forms taught through out. Students are taught and trained enough to get placed themselves in
Japanese companies.
Note: Teaching is done in roman as well as Japanese script.

Course Contents:
Module I
Dictionary form of the verbs, Joining of verbs
Negative form of verbs
Potential form
Module II
Joining of many actions together
Usage of dictionary form of the verbs in sentences
Introducing colloquial language.
Module III
Direct form of the speech, quotations,
Expressing thoughts
Actions and reasoning
Module IV
Conclusion
Receiving and giving things, favour etc.
Different forms like tara form.
Module V
Revision of the whole syllabus

Learning Outcome

Students can speak and use different patterns, ways to describe a particular situation and can converse
comfortably in mentioned situations through out.
Students can appear in the interviews for placements in Japanese companies.

Methods of Private study /Self help

Teaching will be supported by handouts, audio-aids, and self-do assignments and role plays.
Use of library, visiting and watching movies in Japan and culture center every Friday at 6pm.

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

CT1
20

C Project + Presentation
I Interaction/Conversation Practice

Text & References:


Text:
Teach yourself Japanese
References:
Shin Nihongo no kiso 1

CT2
20

C
20

I
20

V
15

A
5

CHINESE V
Course Code:

BTCE 548

Credit Units: 02

Course Objective:
What English words come from Chinese? Some of the more common English words with Chinese roots
areginseng, silk, dim sum, fengshui, typhoon, yin and yang, Tal chi, kung-fu. The course aims at familiarizing
the student with the basic aspects of speaking ability of Mandarin, the language of Mainland China. The course
aims at training students in practical skills and nurturing them to interact with a Chinese person.

Course Contents:
Module I
Drills
Dialogue practice
Observe picture and answer the question.
Pronunciation and intonation.
Character writing and stroke order
Module II
Intonation
Chinese foods and tastes tofu, chowmian, noodle, Beijing duck, rice, sweet, sour.etc. Learning to say
phrases like Chinese food, Western food, delicious, hot and spicy, sour, salty, tasteless, tender, nutritious, god
for health, fish, shrimps, vegetables, cholesterol is not high, pizza, milk, vitamins, to be able to cook, to be used
to, cook well, once a week, once a month, once a year, twice a week
Repetition of the grammar and verbs taught in the previous module and making dialogues usingit.
Compliment of degree de.
Module III
Grammar the complex sentence suiran danshi.
Comparison It is colder today than it was yesterday..etc.
The Expression chule.yiwai. (Besides)
Names of different animals.
Talking about Great Wall of China
Short stories
Module IV
Use of huozhe and haishi
Is he/she married?
Going for a film with a friend.
Having a meal at the restaurant and ordering a meal.
Module V
Shopping Talking abut a thing you have bought, how much money you spent on it? How many kinds were
there? What did you think of others?
Talking about a day in your life using compliment of degree de. When you get up? When do you go for class?
Do you sleep early or late? How is Chinese? Do you enjoy your life in the hostel?
Making up a dialogue by asking question on the year, month, day and the days of the week and answer them.

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

CT1
20

CT2
20

C Project + Presentation
I Interaction/Conversation Practice

Text & References:

Elementary Chinese Reader Part-II Lesson 39-46

C
20

I
20

V
15

A
5

INDUSTRIAL PRACTICAL TRAINING - I


Course Code:

BTCE 550

Credit Units: 03

Methodology:
Practical training is based on the theoretical subjects studied by students. It can be arranged within the college or
in any related industrial unit. The students are to learn various industrial, technical and administrative processes
followed in the industry. In case of on-campus training the students will be given specific task of
fabrication/assembly/testing/analysis. On completion of the practical training the students are to present a report
covering various aspects learnt by them and give a presentation on same.

Examination Scheme:
Feedback from industry/work place
Training Report
Viva
Presentation
Total

20
40
15
25
100

ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINERING - I
Course Code:

BTCE 601

Credit Units: 03

Course Objective:
Based on course Environmental studies, the water resources and their management for environmental suitability
are studied in this course.

Course Contents:
Module I: Scope of Environmental Engineering
Water Supply Engineering. Quantity of water. Types of water demand. Fluctuation in demand. Factors affecting
consumption. Forecasting population. Design period.
Module II: Sources of water
Surface water sources. Intakes. Ground water Sources. Estimation of yield from various ground water sources.
Quality of water. Drinking water standards Water quality parameters- effects on human health- Methods of
Physical, Chemical and Bacteriological analysis of water.
Module III: Treatment of water
Process details and design considerations. Aeration. Coagulation. Flocculation. Sedimentation. Filtration.
Disinfection. Miscellaneous and advanced treatments. Iron and manganese removal. Fluoridation and
defluoridation. Water Softening. Arsenic removal. Desalination. Membrane filtration.
Module IV: Water supply schemes
Gravitational, pumping and combined schemes. Pumps. Pumping stations. Transmission of water. Materials of
water supply pipes. Design of gravity and pumping main. Distribution systems. Different layout of pipe
networks.House connection from mains. Different valves, meters and hydrants. Storage reservoirs. Balancing
reservoir. Detection and prevention of leaks in the distribution systems. Maintenance of distribution systems.

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Text & References:

Garg S. K, Environmental Engineering, Vol. I, Khanna Publications, 2001, New Delhi.


Birdie G.S & Birdie J.S, Water Supply and Sanitary Engineering, Dhanpat Rai & Sons, 1998, New Delhi.
Duggal, K.N., Elements of Environmental Engineering, S Chand & Co. Ltd., 2000, New Delhi.
Mark J. Hammer & Mark J. Hammer Jr., Water and Waste Water Technology, Prentice Hall of India Pvt.
Ltd., 1998, New Delhi.
Fair, Geyer & Okun, Water & Waste Water Engineering, John Wiley, 1966, New York.
Ernest W. Steel & Terence J. Mc Ghee, Water Supply & Sewage, McGraw Hill, 1990, New York.
Relevant BIS Codes.

STRUCTURAL CONCRETE DESIGN


Course Code:

BTCE 602

Credit Units: 03

Course Objective:
This course deals with the design concept of designing concrete structure. As a prerequisite the students should
have knowledge of principal of structural design.

Course Contents:
Module I: Introduction to limit state method of design
Review of partial safety factors. Limit state of collapse. Limit state of serviceability.
Limit State of Collapse: Flexure. Limit state of collapse for flexure as per IS. Assumptions. Moment capacity
of rectangular and flanged sections. Singly and doubly reinforced sections. Design tables and charts. Critical
sections for bending in important structural elements such as slabs, beams, retaining
wall, footings, staircase etc. Design project for the design and detailing of a floor slab system and staircase of
aresidence (load bearing masonry walls).
Module II: Shear and Torsion
Limit State of Collapse: Shear. Nominal shear stress. Design shear strength of concrete. Design of shear
reinforcement. Use of SP16 for shear design. Critical sections for shear in important structural elements such as
slabs, beams, retaining walls, footings etc. Design project for the design and detailing the beams of a framed
system.
Limit State of Collapse: Torsion. General. Critical section.Shear and torsion. Equivalent . Reinforcement for
torsion. Equivalent longitudinal moment. Design project for the design and detailing of a water tank with curved
beams.
Module III: Compression
Limit State of Collapse: Compression. Analysis and design of columns of rectangular and circular cross
sections. Axially loaded columns Columns with uniaxial and biaxial eccentricity using SP 16 design charts.
Short and slender columns. Design project for the design and detailing the columns of a framed system and
isolated and combined footings.
Module IV: Limit State of Serviceability
Deflection. Short term deflection. Long term deflection. Cracking. Control of cracking. Estimation of width of
cracks.

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Text & References:

Pillai S.U. & Menon D., Reinforced Concrete Design Tata McGraw Hill, 2003
Varghese P.C., Limit State Design of Reinforced Concrete, Prentice Hall of India, 2003
Mallick S.K. & Gupta A.K., Reinforced Concrete, Oxford & IBH, 1982
Jain A.K., Reinforced Concrete - Limit State Design, Standard Book House, 1998
Punmia B.C., Reinforced Concrete Structures Vol. I, Standard Book House,2005
Jain & Jaikrishna, Plain & Reinforced Concrete Vol. I, Nemchand, 2000
Sinha S.N., Reinforced Concrete Design, Tata McGraw Hill, 2005
BIS codes ( IS 456, SP 16, SP 24, SP 34)

GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING - II
Course Code:

BTCE 603

Credit Units: 04

Course Objective:
Advanced topics of soil mechanics and the design of foundations are covered in this course.

Course Contents:
Module I: Earth pressure
Earth pressure at rest. Active and passive earth pressure for cohesionless and cohesive soils. Coulombs and
Rankines theories. Point of application of earth pressure for cases of with and without surcharge in cohesionless
and cohesive soils. Culmanns and Rebhans graphical construction for active earth pressure. Friction circle
method for active earth pressure. Site investigation and soil exploration: Objectives. Planning.
Reconnaissance. Depth of exploration. Methods of subsurface exploration. Test pits. Auger borings. Wash
boring. Rotary drilling. Percussion drilling. Core drilling. Sampling. Types of soil samples. Splitspoon sampler.
Thin walled sampler. Piston sampler. Denison sampler. Hand cut samples. Location of water table. S.P.T. Field
vane shear test. Introduction to geophysical methods. Boring log. Soil profile.
Module II: Bearing capacity
Ultimate and allowable bearing capacity. Terzaghis equation for bearing capacity for continuous circular and
square footings. Types of shear failures. Bearing capacity factors and charts. Effect of water table on bearing
capacity. Meyerhoffs bearing capacity heory. Skemptons formulae. Bearing capacity from field tests. Bearing
capacity from building codes. Net bearing pressure. Methods of improvement of soil bearing capacity: vibro
flotation and sand drains.
Settlement analysis: Distribution of contact pressure. Immediate and consolidation settlement. Estimation of
initial and final settlement under building loads. Limitations in settlement computation. Causes of . Permissible,
total and differential settlements. Cracks and effects of settlement.
Module III: Foundations
General considerations: Functions of foundations. Requisites of satisfactory foundations. Different types of
foundations. Definition of shallow and deep foundation. Selection of type of foundation. Advantages and
limitations of various types of foundations. Design considerations . Footings subjected to eccentric loading.
Conventional procedure for proportioning footings for equal settlements.
Open excavation: Open foundation excavations with unsupported slopes. Supports for shallow and deep
excavations. Stress distribution in sheeting and bracing of shallow and deep excavations. Stability of bottom of
excavations. Raft foundations: Bearing capacity equations. Design considerations. Conventional design
procedure for rigid mat. Uplift pressures. Methods of resisting uplift. Floating foundations.
Module IV: Pile foundations
Uses of piles. Classification of piles based on purpose and material. Determination of type and length of piles.
Determination of bearing capacity of axially loaded. Single vertical pile. Static and dynamic formulae.
Determination of bearing capacity by penetration tests and pile load tests (IS methods). Negative skin friction.
Group action and pile spacing. Analysis of pile groups. Load distribution by Culmanns method. Caissons and
piers: Open (well) caissons. Box (floating) caissons. Pneumatic caissons. Construction details and design
considerations of well foundations. Drilled piers and their
construction details.

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Text & References:

Joseph E. & Bowles, Foundation Analysis & Design, McGraw Hill


Leonards G.A., Foundation Engineering, McGraw Hill
Teng W.C., Foundation Design, PHI, 1984
Tomlinson M.J., Foundation Design & Construction, Pitman, 1963.
Terzaghi & Peck, Soil Mechanics in Engineering Practice, Asia Publishing
Arora K.R., Soil Mechanics & Foundation Engg., Standard Publications, 1987.
Murthy V.N.S., Soil Mechanics & Foundations.
Punmia B.C., Soil Mechanics & Foundations, Laxmi, 1988.

COMPUTER APPLICATION IN CIVIL ENGINEERING


Course Code:

BTCE 604

Credit Units: 03

Course Objective:
Application of the course on Numerical Analysis & Programming and use of linear and non-linear programming
are given in this course.

Course Contents:
Module I: Overview of Numerical Methods
Application of Numerical Methods in Civil Engineering: importance of numerical methods in civil engineering sources of errors in numerical methods number representations - fixed and floating point numbers - significant
digits - round off errors - development of computer algorithms - pseudo code. Solution of Algebraic and
Transcendental Equations in One Variable: bisection method - method of false position Newton - Raphson
method - successive approximation method - development of computer algorithms for the above methods
System of Linear Algebraic Equations: solution of linear algebraic equations using Gauss elimination method
and LU decomposition method - solution by iterative method - conditions of convergence- conditioned system
of equations. Applications in Civil Engineering Problems
Module II: Application of Eigenvalue Problems and Interpolations to Civil Engineering
Eigen Value Problems: determination of eigen values and eigen vectors by Power method and Jacobis method.
Interpolation: Newtons formulae - Gauss formulae - Lagrangian interpolation Cubic spline interpolation.
Applications in Civil Engineering Problems
Module III: Numerical differentiation and integration
Numerical differentiation using Newtons formula - maximum and minimum values of tabulated functions numerical integration -trapezoidal formula - Simpsons formulae and Gauss quadrature - development of
computer algorithms for numerical integration. Numerical solution of ordinary differential equations.
Applications in Civil Engineering Problems
Module IV: Linear and Non-Linear Programming Problems
Statement of an optimisation problem - linear and nonlinear programming problems - standard form of linear
programming problems - applications of linear programming in civil engineering. Introduction to nonlinear
programming problems: outline of: Difficulties in nonlinear programming problems unconstrained
optimization problems - unimodal function - search methods - one dimensional minimization methods Fibonacci and golden section methods - examples of one dimensional minimization. Problems in civil
engineering.

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Text & References:

Sastry S.S., Introductory Methods of Numerical Analysis, Prentice Hall of India, 1979.
Scarborough J.B., Numerical Mathematical Analysis, Oxford & IBH
Chapra, S.C., and Canale, R.P., Numerical Methods for Engineers, McGraw Hill, Inc.
Rao S.S., Engineering Optimization - Theory & Applications, New Age International Publishers, 1988.

CONCRETE TECHNOLOGY

Course Code:

BTCE 605

Credit Units: 03

Course Objective:
Types of concrete and their manufacture and applications are covered in this course.

Course Contents:
Module I: Materials
Materials: cement - different types - chemical composition and physical properties - tests on cement - I.S.
specifications - aggregates - classification - mechanical properties and tests as per I.S. - alkali aggregate reaction
- grading requirements - heavy weight - light weight - normal weight - aggregate - sampling of aggregate - water
- quality of water - permissible impurities as per I.S - admixtures - accelerators - retarders - water reducing
agents super plasticizers- use of silica fumes.
Module II: Manufacture
Manufacture of concrete - measurement of materials - storage and handling - batching plant and equipment mixing - types of mixers - transportation of concrete - pumping of concrete - placing of concrete - under water
concreting - compaction of concrete - curing of concrete - ready mixed concrete - mix design - nominal mixes design mixes - factors influencing mix design - A.C.I method - I.S method - design for high strength mixes.
Module III: Properties of Concrete
Properties of concrete - fresh concrete - workability - factors affecting workability - tests for workability segregation and bleeding - hardened concrete - factors affecting strength of concrete - strength of concrete in
compression, tension and flexure - stress- strain characteristics and elastic properties - shrinkage and creep durability of concrete - permeability - chemical attack - sulphate attack - resistance to abrasion and cavitaion resistance to freezing and thawing - resistance to fire - marine atmosphere - quality control - frequency of
sampling - test specimens - statistical analysis of test results - standard deviation - acceptance criteria
Module IV: Special Concretes
Special concrete - light weight concrete - high density concrete - vacuum concrete - shotcrete - Fibre reinforced
concrete-polymer concrete - ferrocement - high performance concrete - self compacting concrete - types of
failure - diagnosis of distress in concrete - crack control - leak proofing - guniting and jacketing techniques.

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Text & References:

Neville A.M., Properties of Concrete, Pitman


Shetty M.S., Concrete Technology, S I Chand & Company, 1993.
Gambhir M.L., Concrete Technology, Tata McGraw Hill, 1995.
Orchard D.F., Concrete Technology Vol. I & II, 1968.
Krishna Raju N., Design of Concrete Mixes, CBS publishers, 1988.
Raina V.K., Concrete for Construction-Facts & Practices, Tata McGraw Hill publishing co. 1988.
John. H. Bungey, The Testing of Concrete in Structures, Urrey University of Press Hall
Akroyd T.N.W., Concrete: Properties & Manufacture, Pergamon Press, 1962.
Murdock L.J., Concrete: Materials & Practice, Edward Arnold, 1968.

BUILDING DESIGN AND DRAWING


Course Code:

BTCE 606

Credit Units: 04

Course Objective:
The objective of the course is to develop the capability for carrying out independent design. Information in the
form of sketch and images to be illustrated as a part of discussion.

Course Contents:
PART A: PLANNING
Module I: Function, Structure and Appearance
Evolution of architectural styles. Roman, Greek, Medieval and Modern architecture. Examples.
Module II: Creative principles
Design methods. Pragmatic, iconic, canonic and rational design methods. Elements of composition. Point, line,
texture and colour etc. Organisation of elements. Proportion, scale, rhythm balance and unity. Architectural
examples. Design procedure, brief analysis, synthesis and communication.
Module III: Functional factors
Lighting, ventilation, thermal and acoustics factors and their effects on architectural form.
Module IV: Spaces
Space planning of buildings such as residential, public and commercial. Design process. Activity areas and
linkages. Proximity matrix. Adjacency diagram. Form development with respect to site conditions and
functional requirements. Preparation of drawings. Elementary perspective and rendering.
PART B: DRAWING
Planning, designing from given requirements of areas and specifications and preparation of sketch design and
working drawings for:
1. Residential building- flat and pitched roof, economic domestic units, cottages, bungalows and building
flats.
2. Public building small public utility shelters, dispensaries, banks, schools, offices, libraries, hostels,
restaurants, commercial complexes, factories etc.
3. Preparation of site plans and service plans as per Building Rules
4. Septic Tank and Soak Pit detailed drawings.
5. Plumbing, water supply and drainage for buildings.

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Text & References:

SP 7:2005,National Building Code of India


Local Building Bye-laws
Callender, John Hancock, Time Saver Standards for Architectural Design Data, McGraw Hill
Chiara, Callender, John Hancock, Time Saver Standards for Building Type, McGraw Hill
Chiara, Joseph De, Time Saver Standards for Site Planning, McGraw Hill
Scott, Robert Gillan, Design Fundamentals, Mc-Graw Hill.
Tessie Agan M.S., The House, Its Plan & Use, Oxford & IBH Publishing Co.
IS 5533: 1969, Recommendation for Dimensions of Spaces for Human Activities. B.I.S
IS 4963: 1987, Recommendation for Buildings and facilities for the Physically Handicapped. B.I.S
Shaw and Kale, Building Drawing, Tata Mc Graw Hill Publishers
Balagopal T S Prabhu, Building Drawing and Detailing, Spades Publishers

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS LAB


Course Code:

BTCE 620

Credit Units: 01

Course Objective:
To familiarize and give hands on training to students in the following areas of Civil Engineering Application
software.

Course Contents:
1.

Drafting and documentation.

2.

Surveying terrain mapping, computation of areas & volumes.

3.

Structural Analysis and Design.

4.

Water resources

5.

Geotechnical Engineering

6.

Road/Railway system

7.

Environmental Engineering

8.

Estimation and costing

9.

Project management

Examination Scheme:
IA
EE
A
PR
LR
V
PR
V
5
10
10
5
35
35
Note: IA Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR Lab Record, V Viva.

GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING LAB


Course Code:

BTCE 621

Credit Units: 01

Course Contents:
1.

Specific gravity of coarse and fine grained soils.

2.

Grain size analysis (a) Sieve analysis (b) Pipette analysis

3.

Atterbergs limits and indices

4.

Determination of field density (a) sand replacement method (b) core cutter method

5.

Determination of coefficient of permeability by


(a) Constant head method (b) Variable head method

6.

Consolidation test

7.

Compaction test (a) IS light compaction test (b) IS heavy compaction test

8.

California Bearing Ratio test

9.

Direct shear test

10. Triaxial shear test


11. Unconfined compressive strength test
12. Laboratory vane shear test

Examination Scheme:
IA
EE
A
PR
LR
V
PR
V
5
10
10
5
35
35
Note: IA Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR Lab Record, V Viva.

COMMUNICATION SKILLS - IV
Course Code:

BTCE 641

Credit Units: 01

Course Objective:
To enhance the skills needed to work in an English-speaking global business environment.

Course Contents:
Module I: Business/Technical Language Development
Advanced Grammar: Syntax, Tenses, Voices
Advanced Vocabulary skills: Jargons, Terminology, Colloquialism
Individualised pronunciation practice
Module II: Social Communication
Building relationships through Communication
Communication, Culture and Context
Entertainment and Communication
Informal business/ Technical Communication
Module III: Business Communication
Reading Business/ Technical press
Listening to Business/ Technical reports (TV, radio)
Researching for Business /Technology
Module IV: Presentations
Planning and getting started
Design and layout of presentation
Information Packaging
Making the Presentation

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

CT1
20

CT2
20

CAF
25

V
10

CAF Communication Assessment File


GD Group Discussion
GP Group Presentation

Text & References:

Business Vocabulary in Use: Advanced Mascull, Cambridge


Business Communication, Raman Prakash, Oxford
Business Communications, Rodgers, Cambridge
Working in English, Jones, Cambridge
New International Business English, Jones/Alexander, Cambridge

GD
10

GP
10

A
5

BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCE - VI
(STRESS AND COPING STRATEGIES)
Course Code:

BTCE 643

Credit Units: 01

Course Objective:
To develop an understanding the concept of stress its causes, symptoms and consequences.
To develop an understanding the consequences of the stress on ones wellness, health, and work performance.

Course Contents:
Module I: Stress
Meaning & Nature
Characteristics
Types of stress
Module II: Stages and Models of Stress
Stages of stress
The physiology of stress
Stimulus-oriented approach.
Response-oriented approach.
The transactional and interact ional model.
Pressure environment fit model of stress.
Module III: Causes and symptoms of stress
Personal
Organizational
Environmental
Module IV: Consequences of stress
Effect on behaviour and personality
Effect of stress on performance
Individual and Organizational consequences with special focus on health
Module V: Strategies for stress management
Importance of stress management
Healthy and Unhealthy strategies
Peer group and social support
Happiness and well-being
Module VI: End-of-Semester Appraisal
Viva based on personal journal
Assessment of Behavioural change as a result of training
Exit Level Rating by Self and Observer

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

SAP

20

05

Mid Term
Test (CT)
20

VIVA
30

Text & References:

Blonna, Richard; Coping with Stress in a Changing World: Second edition


Pestonjee, D.M, Pareek, Udai, Agarwal Rita; Studies in Stress And its Management
Pestonjee, D.M.; Stress and Coping: The Indian Experience
Clegg, Brian; Instant Stress Management Bring calm to your life now

Journal for
Success (JOS)
25

FRENCH - VI
Course Code:

BTCE 644

Credit Units: 02

Course Objective:
To strengthen the language of the students both in oral and written so that they can:
i) express their sentiments, emotions and opinions, reacting to information, situations;
ii) narrate incidents, events;
iii) perform certain simple communicative tasks.

Course Contents:
Module D: pp. 157 168 Unit 12
Unit 12: s'vader
1. prsenter, caractriser, dfinir
2. parler de livres, de lectures
3. prparer et organiser un voyage
4. exprimer des sentiments et des opinions
5. tlphoner
6. faire une rservation
Contenu grammatical:
1.

proposition relative avec pronom relatif "qui", "que", "o" - pour


caractriser
2. faire + verbe

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

CT1
20

C Project + Presentation
I Interaction/Conversation Practice

Text & References:

le livre suivre: Campus: Tome 1

CT2
20

C
20

I
20

V
15

A
5

GERMAN - VI
Course Code:

BTCE 645

Credit Units: 02

Course Objective:
To enable the students to converse, read and write in the language with the help of the basic rules of grammar,
which will later help them to strengthen their language.
To give the students an insight into the culture, geography, political situation and economic opportunities
available in Germany
Introduction to Advanced Grammar and Business Language and Professional Jargon

Course Contents:
Module I: Adjective endings
Adjective endings in all the four cases discussed so far
Definite and indefinite articles
Cases without article
Module II: Comparative adverbs
Comparative adverbs as and like
Module III: Compound words
To learn the structure of compound words and the correct article which they take
Exploring the possibility of compound words in German
Module IV: Infinitive sentence
Special usage of to sentences called zu+ infinitive sentences
Module V: Texts
A Dialogue: Ein schwieriger Gast
A text: Abgeschlossene Vergangenheit
Module VI: Comprehension texts
Reading and comprehending various texts to consolidate the usage of the constructions learnt so far in this
semester.
Module VII: Picture Description
Firstly recognize the persons or things in the picture and identify the situation depicted in the picture;
Secondly answer questions of general meaning in context to the picture and also talk about the personal
experiences which come to your mind upon seeing the picture.

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

CT1
20

CT2
20

C
20

C Project + Presentation
I Interaction/Conversation Practice

Text & References:

Wolfgang Hieber, Lernziel Deutsch


Hans-Heinrich Wangler, Sprachkurs Deutsch
Schulz Griesbach, Deutsche Sprachlehre fr Auslnder
P.L Aneja, Deutsch Interessant- 1, 2 & 3
Rosa-Maria Dallapiazza et al, Tangram Aktuell A1/1,2
Braun, Nieder, Schme, Deutsch als Fremdsprache 1A, Grundkurs

I
20

V
15

A
5

SPANISH VI
Course Code:

BTCE 646

Credit Units: 02

Course Objective:
To enable students acquire working knowledge of the language; to give them vocabulary, grammar, voice
modulations/intonations to handle everyday Spanish situations in Present as well as in Present Perfect Tense
with ease.

Course Contents:
Module I
Revision of the earlier modules
Module II
Present Perfect Tense
Module III
Commands of irregular verbs
Module IV
Expressions with Tener que and Hay que
Module V
En la embajada
Emergency situations like fire, illness, accident, theft

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

CT1
20

C Project + Presentation
I Interaction/Conversation Practice

Text & References:

Espaol, En Directo I A
Espaol Sin Fronteras

CT2
20

C
20

I
20

V
15

A
5

JAPANESE - VI
Course Code:

BTCE 647

Credit Units: 02

Course Objective:
To enable the students to converse in the language with the help of verbs and the usage of different sentence
patterns, which help them to strengthen the language.
Students are taught and trained enough to get placed in Japanese companies.
Note: The teaching is done in roman as well as Japanese script. 10 more kanjis are introduced in this semester.

Course Contents:
Module I: Polite form of verbs
Expressing feelings with the polite forms of verb.
Module II: Potential form
Ability of doing or not doing something
Module III: Conjunctions
Joining two sentences with the help of shi and mo
Module IV: Intransitive Verbs
Sentence patterns of indirect speech
Module V: Feelings and expressions
Regret, existence etc.

Learning Outcome

Students can speak the language with the use of different forms of verb.

Methods of Private study/ Self help

Hand-outs, audio -aids, assignments and role-plays will support classroom teaching.
Students are encouraged to watch Japanese movies at Japan Cultural and information center.

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

CT1
20

CT2
20

C
20

C Project + Presentation
I Interaction/Conversation Practice

Text & References:

Shin Nihon-go no Kiso Lesson No. 26 to 30.


All vocabulary and topics taught are from the above-mentioned book.

I
20

V
15

A
5

CHINESE VI
Course Code:

BTCE 648

Credit Units: 02

Course Objective:
Chinese emperor Qin Shi Huang Ti who built the great wall of China also built a network of 270 palaces,
linked by tunnels, and was so afraid of assassination that he slept in a different palace each night. The course
aims at familiarizing the student with the basic aspects of speaking ability of Mandarin, the language of
Mainland China. The course aims at training students in practical skills and nurturing them to interact with a
Chinese person.

Course Contents:
Module I
Drills
Dialogue practice
Observe picture and answer the question.
Pronunciation and intonation.
Character writing and stroke order.
Module II
Going out to see a science exhibition
Going to the theatre.
Train or Plane is behind schedule.
Indian Economy-Chinese Economy
Talking about different Seasons of the Year and Weather conditions. Learning to say phrases like-spring,
summer, fall, winter, fairly hot, very cold, very humid, very stuffy, neither hot nor cold, most comfortable,
pleasant . etc.
Module III
Temperature how to say What is the temperature in May here?
How is the weather in summer in your area?
Around 30 degrees
Heating, air-conditioning
Is winter is Shanghai very cold?
Talking about birthdays and where you were born?
The verb shuo (speak) saying useful phrases like speak very well, do not speak very well, if speak slowly then
understand if speak fast then dont understand, difficult to speak, difficult to write, speak too fast, speak too
slow, listen and can understand, listen and cannot understand etc.
Tell the following in Chinese My name is . I was born in (year). My birthday is Today is
(date and day of the week). I go to work (school) everyday. I usually leave home at. (Oclock). In the evening, I
usually . (do what)? At week end, I . On Sundays I usually It is today.. It will
soon be my younger sisters birthday. She was born in .. (year). She lives in . (where). She is working
(or studying) where She lives in .. (where.)

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

CT1
20

CT2
20

C Project + Presentation
I Interaction/Conversation Practice

Text & References:

Elementary Chinese Reader Part-2, 3; Lesson 47-54

C
20

I
20

V
15

A
5

STRUCTURAL STEEL DESIGN


Course Code:

BTCE 701

Credit Units: 04

Course Objective:
This course deals with design of various steel structures. The prerequisite of this course is that the students
should have good understanding of principles of structural design.

Course Contents:
Module I: Design of steel girders
Analysis and design of laterally restrained unrestrained simple and compound beams open web girders
castellated beamsdeflection criteria - check for shear.
Module II: Design of compression members
Axially and eccentrically loaded compression members - built up columns - lacings and battens - design of
column bases.
A project involving the design and detailing of a Mill bent is envisaged at this stage.
Module III: Roof truss
Introduction to steel roof systems - design of roof trusses design of roofing elements and purlin wind
bracings.
A project involving the design and detailing of a roof truss is envisaged at this stage.
Module IV: Plastic Analysis
Plastic theory: introduction - plastic hinge concept - plastic modulus - shape factor - redistribution of moments collapse mechanism - plastic analysis of beams and portal frames by equilibrium and mechanism methods

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Text & References:

Ramchandra, Design of Steel Structures Vol I and II, Standard book house, 1991
P. Dayaratnam, Design of Steel Structures, (Wheeler), 1998
M. Raghupathi, Design of Steel Structures, Tata McGraw Hill, 1985
Lin & Breslar, Design of Steel Structures, John Wiley & Sons, 1963
BIS codes (IS 800, SP: 6 Part 1 to 6).

ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING - II
Course Code:

BTCE 702

Credit Units: 03

Course Objective:
This course deals with advanced environmental engineering concepts. It explains the design of various
plumbing, treatment plant and solid waste management.

Course Contents:
Module I
Sanitary plumbing sanitary fixtures systems of piping house drainage connection of house drains and
street sewers. Systems of sewerage Dry weather flow and wet weather flow sewers and sewer appurtenances
sewage pumping maintenance of sewers.
Module II
Waste water- Characteristics sampling population equivalent preliminary treatment of waste water
screens grit chamber detritus tank Sedimentation tank.
Biological treatment (process details and design considerations) - Aerobic- Activated Sludge Process- Trickling
Filter- Oxidation Ponds
Module III
Anaerobic treatment- Anaerobic digesters- Septic Tanks- Soak pits
Waste water disposal disposal into stream fundamentals of stream sanitation- disposal by irrigation sludge
treatment and disposal
Module IV
Solid waste management: Generation- on site handling and storage- transfer and transportprocessing- resource
recovery- treatment and disposal.
Air pollution and control sources pollutants and their health effects particulate and gaseous pollution control
devices (fundamentals)-Settling chambers- Electrostatic precipitators- Cyclones- Wet Collectors-Gas absorption
by tray and packed towers

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Text & References:

Birdie G. S and Birdie J.S, Water Supply and Sanitary Engineering, Dhanpat Rai and Sons (1998), New
Delhi
Duggal K.N., Elements of Environmental Engineering, S. Chand and Co. Ltd. (2000), New Delhi
Garg S.K, Environmental Engineering Vol. II Khanna Publications (2001) New Delhi
Ehlers VM & Steel EW, Municipal & Rural Sanitation, 6th Edn.(1965)McGraw Hill.
Sawyer and McCarte, Chemistry for Environmental Engineering, Tata McGraw-Hill, (2003) New Delhi,.
Fair, Geyer & Okun, Water and Waste water Engineering, John Wiley & sons, Inc (1966)
Metcalf & Eddy, Waste Water Engineering Treatment, Disposal & Reuse, Tata McGraw Hill (1979)

WATER RESOURCES ENGINEERING


Course Code:

BTCE 703

Credit Units: 03

Course Objective:
This course deals with various concepts of water resources engineering. The course introduces the concept of
hydrology, ground water and then deals with irrigation engineering. It also deals with design of dam.

Course Contents:
Module I: Hydrology
Hydrologic cycle- Precipitation, rainfall variations, measurement, presentation of RF data, Mean precipitation,
Abstractions from precipitation- Runoff-Long term runoff, empirical formulae, short term runoff- hydrograph
analysis. Flood-Rational and Empirical methods for prediction - Design floods. Ground water- Aquifer typesflow of ground water Well hydraulics-Types of wells-Other sources of ground water.
Module II: Irrigation
Necessity of irrigation and type of irrigation systems.-Total planning concept-Water requirements of cropsCommand area-duty-delta. Consumptive use of water Irrigation efficiency-Irrigation requirement of cropsReservoir planning-Site investigation-Zones of storage-Reservoir yield-Reservoir losses and Control-Life of
reservoir
Module III
Diversion head works-Location Essential components of Weir and Barrage-Weirs on permeable foundationsBlighs and khoslas seepage theories - Design procedure.
Dams - Types of dams and their selection-Gravity dam-Analysis and design.
Spillways-Different types and suitability.
Module IV
Regulation and control of canal system-Purpose, Types of canal regulation works and their functional aspects.
Irrigation Outlets-Requirements, types, non-modular, semi-module and rigid module, selection criterion. River
Training - Objective and need, classification of rivers, and river training works, meandering, stages, methods of
river training, bank protection, Methods for measurement of discharge.

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Text & References:

Irrigation Engg. and Hydraulic Structures by S.K. Garg, Khanna Publishers.


Irrigation, Water Resources, and Water power Engineering By Dr P.N.Modi, Standard Book House 1990
Engineering Hydrology by K. Subramanya, TMH.
Irrigation Water Power and Water Resource Engg. by K.R. Arrora.
Water Resources Engg. By Larry W. Mays, John Wiley India
Water resources Engg. By Wurbs and James, John wiley India
Water Resources Engg. By R. K. Linsley, McGraw Hill
Irrigation and water Resources Engg. By G L Asawa, New age International Publishers
Irrigation Theory and practices by A.M. Michel.
Irrigation and water Power engineering by B.C. Punmia, Laxmi Publications.

ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING LAB


Course Code:

BTCE 720

Credit Units: 01

Course Contents:
1.

Determination of solids (total, dissolved, organic, inorganic and settleable) in water

2.

Determination of turbidity and the optimum coagulant dose

3.

Determination of alkalinity and pH of water

4.

Determination of hardness and chlorides in water

5.

Determination of iron and manganese in water

6.

Determination of sulphates and sulphides in water

7.

Determination of D.O and B.O.D of waste water

8.

Determination of available chlorine in bleaching powder and the chlorine dose required to treat the given
water sample

9.

Determination of coliforms in water

10. Demonstration of Instrumental methods of pollutant analysis

Examination Scheme:
IA
EE
A
PR
LR
V
PR
V
5
10
10
5
35
35
Note: IA Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR Lab Record, V Viva.

Text & References:

Standard method for the examination of water and waste water, 2005, APHA, AWWA, WPCF Publication

STRUCTURAL DETAILING LAB


Course Code:

BTCE 721

Credit Units: 01

Course Contents:
Preparation of working drawings for the following using any drafting software:
RC Beams- Simply supported, Continuous, Cantilever
T beam / L-beam floor
Slabs Simply supported, Continuous, One way and two way slabs.
Columns Tied Columns and Spirally reinforced columns.
Isolated footings for RC Columns.
Combined rectangular and trapezoidal footings.

Examination Scheme:
IA

EE

A
PR
LR
V
PR
V
5
10
10
5
35
35
Note: IA Internal Assessment, EE- External Exam, PR- Performance, LR Lab Record, V Viva.

COMMUNICATION SKILLS - V
Course Code:

BTCE 741

Credit Units: 01

Course Objective:
To facilitate the learner with Academic Language Proficiency and make them effective users of functional
language to excel in their profession.

Course Contents:
Module I
Introduction to Public Speaking
Business Conversation
Effective Public Speaking
Art of Persuasion
Module II: Speaking for Employment
Types of Interview
Styles of Interview
Facing Interviews-Fundamentals and Practice Session
Conducting Interviews- Fundamentals and Practice Session
Question Answer on Various Dimensions
Module III
Resume Writing
Covering Letters
Interview Follow Up Letters
Module IV: Basic Telephony Skills
Guidelines for Making a Call
Guidelines for Answering a Call
Module V: Work Place Speaking
Negotiations
Participation in Meetings
Keynote Speeches

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

CT1
20

CT2
20

CAF
25

V
10

CAF Communication Assessment File


GD Group Discussion
GP Group Presentation

Text & References:


Jermy Comfort, Speaking Effectively, et.al, Cambridge
Krishnaswamy, N, Creative English for Communication, Macmillan
Raman Prakash, Business Communication, Oxford.
Taylor, Conversation in Practice,

GD
10

GP
10

A
5

BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCE - VII


(INDIVIDUAL, SOCIETY AND NATION)
Course Code:

BTCE 743

Credit Units: 01

Course Objective:
This course aims at enabling students towards:
Understand the importance of individual differences
Better understanding of self in relation to society and nation
Facilitation for a meaningful existence and adjustment in society
Inculcating patriotism and national pride

Course Contents:
Module I: Individual differences & Personality
Personality: Definition& Relevance
Importance of nature & nurture in Personality Development
Importance and Recognition of Individual differences in Personality
Accepting and Managing Individual differences (adjustment mechanisms)
Intuition, Judgment, Perception & Sensation (MBTI)
BIG5 Factors
Module II: Managing Diversity
Defining Diversity
Affirmation Action and Managing Diversity
Increasing Diversity in Work Force
Barriers and Challenges in Managing Diversity
Module III: Socialization
Nature of Socialization
Social Interaction
Interaction of Socialization Process
Contributions to Society and Nation
Module IV: Patriotism and National Pride
Sense of pride and patriotism
Importance of discipline and hard work
Integrity and accountability
Module V: Human Rights, Values and Ethics
Meaning and Importance of human rights
Human rights awareness
Values and Ethics- Learning based on project work on Scriptures like- Ramayana, Mahabharata, Gita etc.
Module VI: End-of-Semester Appraisal
Viva based on personal journal
Assessment of Behavioural change as a result of training
Exit Level Rating by Self and Observer

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

SAP

20

05

Mid Term
Test (CT)
20

VIVA
30

Journal for
Success (JOS)
25

Text & References:

Davis, K. Organizational Behaviour,


Bates, A. P. and Julian, J.: Sociology - Understanding Social Behaviour
Dressler, David and Cans, Donald: The Study of Human Interaction
Lapiere, Richard. T Social Change
Lindzey, G. and Borgatta, E: Sociometric Measurement in the Handbook of Social Psychology, Addison
Welsley, US.
Rose, G.: Oxford Textbook of Public Health, Vol.4, 1985.
Robbins O.B.Stephen;. Organizational Behaviour

FRENCH - VII
Course Code:

BTCE 744

Credit Units: 02

Course Objective:
Revise the portion covered in the first volume, give proper orientation in communication and culture.

Course Contents:
Module A: Units 1 3: pp. 06 - 46
Contenu lexical:

Unit 1: Rdiger et prsenter son curriculum vitae


Exprimer une opinion
Caractriser, mettre en valeur
Parler des rencontres, des lieux, des gens
Unit 2: Imaginer - Faire des projets
Proposer - conseiller
Parler des qualits et des dfauts
Faire une demande crite
Raconter une anecdote
Amliorer son image
Unit 3: Exprimer la volont et lobligation
Formuler des souhaits
Exprimer un manque/un besoin
Parler de lenvironnement, des animaux, des catastrophes
naturelles

Contenu grammatical:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.

Le pass: pass compos/imparfait


Pronoms complments directs/indirects, y/en (ides/choses)
Propositons relatives introduites par qui, que, o
Comparatif et superlatif
Le conditionnel prsent
Situer dans le temps
Fminin des adjectifs
La prise de paroles: expressions
Le subjonctif: volont, obligation

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

CT1
20

C Project + Presentation
I Interaction/Conversation Practice

Text & References:

le livre suivre: Campus: Tome 2

CT2
20

C
20

I
20

V
15

A
5

GERMAN - VII
Course Code:

BTCE 745

Credit Units: 02

Course Objective:
To enable the students to converse, read and write in the language with the help of the basic rules of grammar,
which will later help them to strengthen their language.
To give the students an insight into the culture, geography, political situation and economic opportunities
available in Germany
Introduction to Advanced Grammar and Business Language and Professional Jargon

Course Contents:
Module I: Dass- Stze
Explain the use of the conjunction -that, where verb comes at the end of the sentence
Module II: Indirekte Fragestze
To explain the usage of the Question Pronoun as the Relative Pronoun in a Relative Sentence, where again the
verb falls in the last place in that sentence.
Module III: Wenn- Stze
Equivalent to the conditional If- sentence in English. Explain that the verb comes at the end of the sentence.
Module IV: Weil- Stze
Explain the use of the conjunction because- and also tell that the verb falls in the last place in the sentence.
Module V: Comprehension texts
Reading and comprehending various texts to consolidate the usage of the constructions learnt so far in this
semester.
Module VI: Picture Description
Firstly recognize the persons or things in the picture and identify the situation depicted in the picture;
Secondly answer questions of general meaning in context to the picture and also talk about the personal
experiences which come to your mind upon seeing the picture.

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

CT1
20

CT2
20

C
20

C Project + Presentation
I Interaction/Conversation Practice

Text & References:

Wolfgang Hieber, Lernziel Deutsch


Hans-Heinrich Wangler, Sprachkurs Deutsch
Schulz Griesbach, Deutsche Sprachlehre fr Auslnder
P.L Aneja, Deutsch Interessant - 1, 2 & 3
Rosa-Maria Dallapiazza et al, Tangram Aktuell A1/1,2
Braun, Nieder, Schme, Deutsch als Fremdsprache 1A, Grundkurs

I
20

V
15

A
5

SPANISH - VII
Course Code:

BTCE 746

Credit Units: 02

Course Objective:
To enable students acquire working knowledge of the language; to give them vocabulary, grammar, expressions
used on telephonic conversation and other situations to handle everyday Spanish situations with ease.

Course Contents:
Module I
Revision of earlier semester modules
Module II
Zodiac signs. More adjectivesto describe situations, state of minds, surroundings, people and places.
Module III
Various expressions used on telephonic conversation (formal and informal)
Module IV
Being able to read newspaper headlines and extracts (Material to be provided by teacher)
Module V
Negative commands (AR ending verbs)
Module VI
Revision of earlier sessions and introduction to negative ER ending commands, introduction to negative IR
ending verbs

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

CT1
20

CT2
20

C Project + Presentation
I Interaction/Conversation Practice

Text & References:

Espaol En Directo I A, 1B
Espaol Sin Fronteras
Material provided by the teacher from various sources

C
20

I
20

V
15

A
5

JAPANESE - VII
Course Code:

BTCE 747

Credit Units: 02

Course Objective:
To enable the students to converse in the language with the help of different speech, possibilities, probabilities
etc.
Note: The teaching is done in roman as well as Japanese script. 10 more kanjis (Japanese characters) are taught
in this semester.

Course Contents:
Module I: Thought
Expressing ones thought and intentions on different situations.
Module II: Advice
Giving advice, probability, possibility and suggestions.
Module III: Informal Speech
Addressing friends and close people using informal ways.
Module IV: Simultaneous Verbs
Describing two situations simultaneously.
Module V: Possibility
Explaining the probability and possibility of any situation.

Learning Outcome
Students can interact in a formal as well as informal way on above-mentioned topics.

Methods of Private study/ Self help


Hand-outs, audio-aids, assignments and role-plays will support classroom teaching.

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

CT1
20

CT2
20

C
20

I
20

C Project + Presentation
I Interaction/Conversation Practice

Text & References:

Shin Nihon-go no Kiso Lesson No.-31 to 35.


All vocabulary and topics taught to the students are from the above mentioned book.

V
15

A
5

CHINESE VII
Course Code:

BTCE 748

Credit Units: 02

Course Objective:
The story of Cinderella first appears in a Chinese book written between 850 and 860 A.D. The course aims at
familiarizing the student with the basic aspects of speaking ability of Mandarin, the language of Mainland
China. The course aims at training students in practical skills and nurturing them to interact with a Chinese
person.

Course Contents:
Module I
Drills
Dialogue practice
Observe picture and answer the question.
About china part I Lesson 1, 2.
Module II
Pronunciation and intonation
Character Writing and stroke order.
Module III
Ask someone what he/she usually does on weekends?
Visiting people, Party, Meeting, After work.etc.
Module IV
Conversation practice
Translation from English to Chinese and vise-versa.
Short fables.
Module V
A brief summary of grammar.
The optative verb yuanyi.
The pronoun ziji.

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

CT1
20

C Project + Presentation
I Interaction/Conversation Practice

Text & References:

Kan tu shuo hua Part-I Lesson 1-7

CT2
20

C
20

I
20

V
15

A
5

PROJECT
Course Code:

BTCE 760

Credit Units: 02

Methodology
The topic for the project work can be a design/experimental/field surveying/ analytical/simulation project in any
topic of Civil Engineering arena. The work can be done individually or by a group of students under the
guidance of a faculty of the Department. On completion of the project, the students are to present a report
covering various aspects learnt by them and give a presentation on same.

Examination Scheme:
Literature study/ Fabrication/ Experimentation
Written Report
Viva
Presentation
Total

40
20
15
25
100

INDUSTRIAL TRAINING
Course Code:

BTCE 750

Credit Units: 06

Methodology:
Practical training is based on the theoretical subjects studied by students. An industry visit will be planned for
each student and on-site practical training will be imparted with the help of the industry guide. The students are
to learn various industrial, technical and administrative processes followed in the industry. On completion of
the practical training the students are to present a report covering various aspects learnt by them and give a
presentation on same.

Examination Scheme:
Feedback from industry/work place
Training Report
Viva
Presentation
Total

20
40
15
25
100

PRESTRESSED CONCRETE
Course Code:

BTCE 704

Credit Units: 04

Course Objective:
This course deals with advanced concept of structural concrete design.
Course Contents:
Module I: Materials for prestressed concrete and prestressing systems
High strength concrete and high tensile steel tensioning devices pretensioning systems post tensioning
systems.
Module II: Analysis of prestress and bending stresses
Analysis of prestress resultant stresses at a sector pressure line or thrust line and internal resisting couple
concept of load balancing losses of prestress deflection of beams.
Module III: Strength of prestressed concrete sections in flexure, shear and torsion
Types of flexural failure strain compatibility method IS code procedure design for limit state of shear and
torsion.
Module IV: Design of prestressed concrete beams and slabs
Transfer of prestress in pre tensioned and post tensioned members design of anchorage zone reinforcement
design of simple beams cable profiles design of slabs.
A design project for the design and detailing of a large span beam is envisaged at this stage.

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Text & References:


N. Krishna Raju, Prestressed concrete, Tata McGraw Hill, 2000
T.Y. Lin, Ned H. Burns, Design of Prestressed Concrete Structures, John Wiley & Sons, 2004.
P. Dayaratnam, Prestressed Concrete, Oxford & IBH,1982
R. Rajagopalan, Prestressed Concrete, Narosa publishers, 2004.
BIS codes ( IS 1343 )

REMOTE SENSING AND GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS


Course Code:

BTCE 705

Credit Units: 04

Course Objective:
This course deals with remote sensing and geographic information systems.

Course Contents:
Module I
Concepts and foundations of remote sensing- electromagnetic spectrum, energy sources and radiation principles,
energy interactions in the atmosphere and with earth surface features, data acquisition and interpretation,
reference data, ideal remote sensing systems, characteristics of real remote sensing systems. Classification of
maps, map scale, spatial reference system, map projections, grid systems, linkage of GIS to remote sensing.
Radar principle- Factors affecting microwave measurements, radar wavebands, SLAR systems, interaction
between microwaves and earths surface. Elements of photographic systems - film exposure, film density and
characteristic curves, spectral sensitivity of black and white films, colour film and colour infrared film, filters,
aerial cameras, film resolution, electronic and multi band imaging, aerial videography. Basic principles of
photogrammetry geometrical characteristics of aerial photographs, photographic scale, ground coverage, area
measurement, relief displacement of vertical features, image parallax, ground control, mapping.
Module II
Remote sensing platforms and sensors - Satellite system parameters, sensor parameters, imaging sensor systems,
earth resources and meteorological satellites with microwave sensors, scanners, radiometers. The Indian Remote
Sensing Program. Data types and format, scale and legend.
Visual Image Interpretation - types of pictorial data products, fundamentals of visual image interpretation,
equipment, image interpretation strategy, process of image interpretation, key elements of visual image
interpretation, false colour composites, application in natural resources management. Digital Image Processing Basic character of a digital image, image rectification & restoration, preprocessing, registration, enhancement,
contrast, spatial feature and multi image manipulation, spatial filtering, image transformations, image
classification, performance analysis, data merging and GIS integration.
Module III
GIS overview what is GIS, components, definitions & terminology, uses, GIS queries & architecture,
theoretical models & framework, GIS technology trends, data sources, collection, and entry, data formats &
standards, types of analysis, spatial data modeling, GIS data management, database models, storage of data,
object based GIS models, data input & editing, data quality issues. Data analysis & modeling Integration of
remote sensing & GIS.
Module IV
Application of Remote Sensing& GIS in natural resources management with specific reference to impact of
mining activities on environment, biodiversity, coastal zone protection, flood management, forest protection,
monitoring urban growth, managing watersheds & water resources, hydrologic modeling, preventing natural
disasters etc.

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Text & References:

Thomas. M. Lillesand and Ralph. W. Kiefer, Remote Sensing and Image Interpretation:, John Wiley and
Sons, Inc., 2002
M. Anji Reddy, Text Book of Remote Sensing and Geographical Information Systems:, B.S. Publications,
2001
Ian Heywood, Sarah Cornelius, and Steve Carver, An Introduction to Geographical Information Systems,
Pearson Education Asia, 2001
George. B. Korte, The GIS Book:, Onward Press, Thomson Learning, 2001
D. P. Rao, Association of Exploration Geophysicists, 1995, Remote Sensing for Earth Resources.
L.R.A. Narayan, Remote Sensing and its Application, Universities Press, 1999.
P.A. Borrough, Rachel A. MsDonnel., Principles of Geographic Information System. Oxford University
Press, 1998.
E.T. Engman., R.J. Gurney, Remote Sensing in Hydrology, Chapman & hall, 1991.

ADVANCED STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS


Course Code:

BTCE 706

Credit Units: 04

Course Objective:
This course deals with advanced concept of structural concrete design.

Course Contents:
Module I: Approximate methods of analysis of multistorey frames
Analysis for vertical load - substitute frames - loading condition for maximum positive and negative bending
moment in beams and maximum bending moment in column - analysis for lateral load - portal method cantilever method and factor method
Matrix analysis of structures
Static and kinematic indeterminacy - force and displacement methods of analysis - definition of flexibility and
stiffness influence coefficients - development of flexibility matrices by physical approach
Module II
Flexibility method: flexibility matrices for truss and frame elements - load transformation matrix development of total flexibility matrix of the structure - analysis of simple structures - plane truss and plane
frame - nodal loads and element loads - lack of fit and temperature effects
Stiffness method: development of stiffness matrices by physical approach - stiffness matrices for truss and
frame elements - displacement transformation matrix - development of total stiffness matrix - analysis of simple
structures - plane truss and plane frame - nodal loads and element loads - lack of fit and temperature effects
Module III: Direct stiffness method
Introduction - element stiffness matrix - rotation transformation matrix - transformation of displacement and
load vectors and stiffness matrix - equivalent nodal forces and load vectors - assembly of stiffness matrix and
load vector - determination of nodal displacements and element forces - analysis of plane truss - plane frame
(with numerical examples) - analysis of grid - space-truss and space-frame (without numerical examples)
Module IV
Computer Implementation
A project on development of an analysis program using some of the above method is envisaged at this stage
Introduction to Analysis Packages
The numerical examples solved using the analysis program developed in the above to be verified using common
commercial packages.

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Text & References:

Wang C.K., Matrix Methods of Structural Analysis, International Textbook Company, 1970.
Przemeineicki J.S., Theory of Matrix Structural Analysis, McGraw Hill, New York, 1985.

HYDROLOGY AND FLOOD CONTROL


Course Code:

BTCE 707

Credit Units: 04

Course Objective:
This course deals with advanced concept of hydrology.

Course Contents:
Module I
Introduction hydrologic cycle, water budget equations, world water balance, application in engineering.
Precipitation: Forms of precipitation, measurement, depth-area-duration & intensity- duration- frequency
relationships, probable maximum precipitation.
Module II
Abstraction from Precipitation: Evaporation process, measurement and estimation; Evapotranspirationmeasurement and estimation; Initial Losses- Interception & Depression storage; Infiltration- process, capacities,
indices, measurement & estimation
Module III: Runoff and Hydrographs
Hydrograph, runoff characteristics of stream, Yield, Rainfall-runoff correlations, flow duration curve, mass
curve, droughts and floods. Factors affecting flood hydrographs, unit hydrograph and its analysis, s-curve
hydrograph, synthetic and instantaneous unit hydrographs.
Module IV: Flood
Rational method, empirical formulae, unit hydrograph method, flood frequency studies, statistical analysis,
regional flood frequency analysis, design storm & design flood, risk/reliability and safety factor; Flood Routing:
Basic equation, hydrologic storage routing & attenuation, hydrologic channel routing, flood forecasting &
control, hydraulic method of flood routing.

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance
Text & References:
Hydrology for Engineers by Linsley R. K., Kohler M. A. and Paulhus J. L. H.
Engineering Hydrology by K. Subramanya
Hydrology: Principles. Analysis. Design by Raghunath H. M.
Handbook of Applied Hydrology by Chow V. T.
Irrigation: Theory & Practice by Michael A. M.

ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION CONTROL ENGINEERING


Course Code:

BTCE 708

Credit Units: 04

Course Objective:
This course deals with advanced concept of environmental pollution and its control.

Course Contents:
Module I
Environmental pollution - interrelationship between various forms of pollution - surface water pollution surveys
- integrated river basin water management - restoration of water bodies - water quality changes by domestic use
- radioactive materials - thermal pollution and underground disposal - types of water pollutants and their effects
- instrumentation for water quality and treatment
Module II
Air pollution control strategy air pollution control technology methodological factors affecting air pollution
air pollution surveys instrumentation for air quality measurement air quality standards
Module III
Land pollution land pollution surveys - ecological aspects of vegetation control
Noise pollution - effects of noise - sources noise control techniques - instruments for noise measurement
Light and glare pollution outside lighting and glare sources - corrective procedures
Module IV
Water pollution laws and regulations
Air pollution control Act of India
Land pollution laws and regulations
The Environment (Protection) act, 1986

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Text & References:


Rao C.S., Environmental Pollution Control Engineering, New Age International (P) Ltd, 1993.
Goel P.K., Water Pollution Causes, Effects & Control, New Age International (P) Ltd.
Birdie G.S. & Birdie J.S., Water Supply & Sanitary Engineering, Dhanapat Raj & Sons, 1997.
Liptak Bela G., Environmental Engineers Hand Book Vols I, II & III

COMPUTER AIDED ANALYSIS AND DESIGN IN


CIVIL ENGINEERING
Course Code:

BTCE 709

Credit Units: 04

Course Objective:
The main objective of this programme is to train the student in the use of computers and creating a computer
code as well as using commercially available software for the design of Civil Engineering structures.

Course Contents:
Module I: Introduction
Fundamentals of CAD - Hardware and software requirements -Design process Applications and benefits.
Module II: Computer Graphics
Graphic primitives - Transformations -Wire frame modeling and solid modeling Graphic standards Drafting
packages
Module III: Structural Analysis
Fundamentals of finite element analysis - Principles of structural analysis -Analysis packages and applications.
Module IV: Design & Optimisation
Principles of design of steel and RC Structures -Applications to simple design problems Optimisation
techniques - Algorithms - Linear Programming Simplex method
Module V: Expert Systems
Introduction to artificial intelligence - Knowledge based expert systems -Rules and decision tables Inference
mechanisms - Simple applications.

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Text & References:


Groover M.P. and Zimmers E.W. Jr., CAD/CAM, Computer Aided Design and
Manufacturing, Prentice Hall of India Ltd, New Delhi, 1993.
Krishnamoorthy C.S. Rajeev S., Computer Aided Design, Narosa Publishing House, New Delhi, 1993
Harrison H.B., Structural Analysis and Design, Part I and II Pergamon Press, Oxford, 1990.
Rao S.S., Optimisation Theory and Applications, Wiley Eastern Limited, New Delhi, 1977.
Richard Forsyth (Ed), Expert System Principles and Case Studies, Chapman and Hall, London, 1989.

CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT AND QUANTITY SURVEYING


Course Code:

BTCE 801

Credit Units: 03

Course Objective:
The main objective of this course is to train the student construction management and quantity surveying

Course Contents:
Module I
Construction Management Network techniques introduction Bar charts use of CPM and PERT for
planning time estimates critical path updating crashing resource smoothing resource leveling
computer applications
Construction planning: Preparation of job layout labour schedule material schedule equipment schedule
Module II:
Project Implementation Tender earnest money deposit security deposit contract contract documents
measurements completion certificate inspection and quality control standardization organisations at
national and international level (BIS & ISO) role of certification
Module III
Quantity surveying - preparation of detailed estimates for: buildings - reinforced concrete structures - sanitary
and water supply works
Module IV
Preparation of specification for common materials of construction and items of work as per IS - analysis of rates
and preparation of abstract of estimate
Introduction to valuation of real properties: Depreciation Sinking fund methods of valuation

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Text & References:

Vazirani V.N. & Chandola S.P., Heavy Construction, 1978.


Jha J. & Sinha S.K., Construction & Foundation Engineering, Khanna Publications
Verma L.C., Standardisation - A New Discipline
Rangwala, Valuation of Real Properties, Charotar, 1978.
Peurifoy R.L., & Ledbetter W.B., Construction Planning Equipment & Methods,
McGraw Hill, 1956.
Dutta B.N., Estimation & Costing in Civil Engg, UBSPD, 1992.
Chakrabarthi, Estimation, Costing, Specification in Civil Engg,
Shah N.A., Quantity Surveying & Specification in Civil Engg.,
I.S 1200 (1968), Methods of Measurement of Building & Civil Engg. Works
Mahajan S.P., Civil Estimating & Costing, Sathyaprakasham, 1988.

ENGINEERING ECONOMICS AND MANAGEMENT


Course Code:

BTCE 802

Credit Units: 03

Course Objective:
The main objective of this course is to train the student construction management and quantity surveying

Course Contents:
Module I: Organisations and their Economic Environment
Definition of Economics and Managerial Economics Nature and Scope Definition and
Concept of Good, Want, Value, Wealth, Utility Utility and Demand Law of Diminishing
Marginal Utility Assumptions and Importance. Demand and Supply Law of Demand and
Law of Supply. Market price and natural price. Standard market forms- Monopoly, Perfect
competition. Organisational forms- Proprietorship, partnership, Joint Stock Company Cooperative
organisation.
Module II: Macroeconomics
Money- nature and functions Inflation and Deflation Kinds of Banking - commercial
banks Central banking Credit instrument - Monetary Policy International trade
Balance of trade and Balance of Payments taxation Direct and Indirect taxes Impact and
Incidence of tax- Concept of National Income Features with reference to developing
countries.
Module III: Introduction to Management
Management Theory- Characteristics of management Systems Approach to management Concepts of goal,
objective, strategies, programmes. Decision making under certainty, uncertainty and risk Introduction to
functional areas of management Operations management, Human resources management, marketing
management.
Module IV: Financial and Inventory Management
Need for Financial Management Types of financing Short term and long term Borrowing Equity financing
Analysis of Financial Statement balance sheet Profit and Loss account Fund flow statement Ratio
Analysis . Investment and Financial decision Financial control and Job control.
Functions and objectives of Inventory management Decision models Economic Order Quantity (EOQ)
model sensitivity analysis of EOQ model, Economic production lot size model inventory model with
planned shortages Periodic order quantity single period Inventory models Simulation model for inventory
analysis.

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Text & References:

Konni, Donnel C.O. and Weighnrich. H., Management, Eight Edition, McGraw Hill International Book
Company, 1997.
Philip Kotler, Marketing Management, Prentice-Hall of India, Edition 1998.
G.W. Plossl, Production and inventory control by, Prentice Hall.
Paul A Samuelson and William D Nardhaus, Economics, McGraw Hill International Edition.
Barthwal R R, Industrial Economics An Introductory Text Book, New Age International Pvt Ltd, 2000.
Aninnya Sen, Microeconomics Theory and Applications, OUP.
Sharma J.L., Construction management and accounts, Sathya Prakashan, New Delhi, 1994.
Srinath,L.S. An Introduction to Project Management, Tata McGraw Hill publications, 1995.

PROJECT
Course Code:

BTCE 860

Credit Units: 15

Methodology
Topics of project are to be based on the latest trends, verifying engineering concepts /principals and should
involve elementary research work. The projects may involve design, fabrications, testing, computer modeling,
and analysis of any engineering problem. On completion of the project, the students are to present a report
covering various aspects learnt by them and give a presentation on same.

Examination Scheme:
Literature study/ Fabrication/ Experimentation
Written Report
Viva
Presentation
Total

40
20
15
25
100

COMMUNICATION SKILLS - VI
Course Code:

BTCE 841

Credit Units: 01

Course Objective:
The modules are designed to enhance the communicative competence of the learners to equip them with
efficient interpersonal communication.

Course Contents:
Module I: Dynamics of Group Discussion
Introduction,
Methodology
Role Functions
Mannerism
Guidelines
Module II: Communication through Electronic Channels
Introduction
Technology based Communication Tools
Video Conferencing
Web Conferencing
Selection of the Effective Tool
E-mails, Fax etc.
Module III: Effective Public Speaking
Types
Essentials
Success in Public Speaking
Dos and Donts

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

CT1
20

CT2
20

CAF
25

V
10

CAF Communication Assessment File


GD Group Discussion
GP Group Presentation

Text & References:

Jermy Comfort, Speaking Effectively, et.al, Cambridge


Krishnaswamy, N, Creative English for Communication, Macmillan
Raman Prakash, Business Communication, Oxford.
Taylor, Conversation in Practice,

GD
10

GP
10

A
5

BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCE - VIII


(PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL EXCELLENCE)
Course Code:

BTCE 843

Credit Units: 01

Course Objective:
Importance of Personal and Professional excellence
Inculcating the components of excellence

Course Contents:
Module I: Components of Excellence
Personal Excellence:
Identifying long-term choices and goals
Uncovering the talent, strength & style
Analyzing choke points in your personal processes by analysis in area of placements, events, seminars,
conference, extracurricular activities, projects etc.
Module II: Managing Personal Effectiveness
Setting goals to maintain focus
Dimensions of personal effectiveness ( self disclosure, openness to feedback and perceptiveness)
Integration of personal and organizational vision for effectiveness
A healthy balance of work and play
Managing Stress creatively and productively
Module III: Personal Success Strategy
Time management
Handling criticism and interruptions
Dealing with difficult people
Mapping and evaluating the situations
Identifying long-term goals
Module IV: Positive Personal Growth
Understanding & Developing positive emotions
Positive approach towards future
Resilience during loss and challenge
Module V: Professional Success
Building independence & interdependence
Reducing resistance to change
Continued reflection (Placements, events, seminars, conferences, projects extracurricular Activities etc.)
Module VI: End-of-Semester Appraisal
Viva based on personal journal
Assessment of Behavioural change as a result of training
Exit Level Rating by Self and Observer

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

SAP

20

05

Mid Term
Test (CT)
20

VIVA
30

Journal for
Success (JOS)
25

FRENCH - VIII
Course Code:

BTCE 844

Credit Units: 02

Course Objective:
Provide students with the necessary linguistic tools
to face up to different situations of communication
to enhance their capacity in oral/written comprehension/expression

Course Contents:
Module B: Units 4, 5, 6: PP. 48 - 86
Contenu lexical:

Unit 4:

1. Prsenter une information/les circonstances dun vnement


2. Exprimer la possibilit/la probabilit
3. Exprimer une quantit indfinie
4. Comprendre et raconter un fait div

Unit 5:

1. Parler dune passion, dune aventure


2. Choisir/crer
3. Exprimer la surpirse/des sentiments

Unit 6:

1. Exprimer la cause et la consquence


2. Exprimer la crainte et rassurer
3. Faire une dmonstration

Contenu grammatical:
la construction passive
la forme impersonnelle
linterrogation
les adjectifs et les pronoms indfinis
les pronoms interrogatifs et dmonstratifs
la construction avec deux pronoms
le subjonctif dans lexpression des sentiments, de la crainte, du but
constructions permettant lexpression de la cause et de la consquence
lenchanement des ides: succession et opposition

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

CT1
20

C Project + Presentation
I Interaction/Conversation Practice

Text & References:

le livre suivre: Campus: Tome 2

CT2
20

C
20

I
20

V
15

A
5

GERMAN - VIII
Course Code:

BTCE 845

Credit Units: 02

Course Objective:
To enable the students to converse, read and write in the language with the help of the basic rules of grammar,
which will later help them to strengthen their language.
To give the students an insight into the culture, geography, political situation and economic opportunities
available in Germany
Introduction to Advanced Grammar and Business Language and Professional Jargon

Course Contents:
Module I: Reading and comprehension
Reading texts and comprehending them
Module II: Information about German History
Acquiring information about German History through appropriate texts and stories
Module III: Bio data/Curriculam vitae
Writing a bio-data in the proper format with all essential components
Module IV: Informal letters
Reading and writing informal letters
Module V: Business etiquette
Business etiquette in Germany and types of companies
Module VI: Interview skills
To learn to face interviews
Read a text Interviewspiel
Module VII: Picture Description
Firstly recognize the persons or things in the picture and identify the situation depicted in the picture;
Secondly answer questions of general meaning in context to the picture and also talk about the personal
experiences which come to your mind upon seeing the picture.

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

CT1
20

CT2
20

C
20

C Project + Presentation
I Interaction/Conversation Practice

Text & References:

Wolfgang Hieber, Lernziel Deutsch


Hans-Heinrich Wangler, Sprachkurs Deutsch
Schulz Griesbach, Deutsche Sprachlehre fr Auslnder
P.L Aneja, Deutsch Interessant - 1, 2 & 3
Rosa-Maria Dallapiazza et al, Tangram Aktuell A1/1,2
Braun, Nieder, Schme, Deutsch als Fremdsprache 1A, Grundkurs

I
20

V
15

A
5

SPANISH VIII
Course Code:

BTCE 846

Credit Units: 02

Course Objective:
To enable students to deal with Spanish situations putting things in perspective, using Past Tense. Enabling
them to comprehend and form slightly complex sentences. Give students vocabulary of various situations.

Course Contents:
Module I
Situational exercises/Picture Description:
At the cine
At the Chemists/Hospital
Module II
At a corporate clients informal/formal meeting/gathering
Looking for accommodation
Module III
Past Tense (Indefinido) of regular verbs
Past Tense (Indefinido) of irregular verbs
Exercises related to the above
Module IV
Past Tense (Imperfecto)

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

CT1
20

CT2
20

C Project + Presentation
I Interaction/Conversation Practice

Text & References:

Espaol En Directo I A, 1B
Espaol Sin Fronteras
Material provided by the teacher from various sources

C
20

I
20

V
15

A
5

JAPANESE - VIII
Course Code:

BTCE 847

Credit Units: 02

Course Objective:
To enable the students to converse in the language with the help of different forms as volitional forms, active
and passive voice and decision making etc.
Note: The course and teaching in Roman as well as Japanese script. Also introducing next 10 to 20 kanjis.

Course Contents:
Module I: Volitional forms
Explaining the situation when one is thinking of doing something.
Module II: Active and Passive voice
Direct and indirect ways of speech.
Module III: Plain Forms
Sentence patterns using plain forms of verb.
Module IV: Causes and effects
Explaining causes and effects with different forms of verb.
Module V: Decision making
Expressing different occupations and how to make decision.

Learning Outcome

Students can speak the language and will be able to express their views and opinions comfortably.

Methods of Private study/ Self help

Hand-outs, audio-aids, assignments and role-plays will support classroom teaching.

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

CT1
20

CT2
20

C
20

I
20

C Project + Presentation
I Interaction/Conversation Practice

Text & References:


Shin Nihon-go no Kiso Lesson No.-36 to 40.
All vocabulary and topics taught to the students are from the above mentioned book.

V
15

A
5

CHINESE VIII
Course Code:

BTCE 848

Credit Units: 02

Course Objective:
Paper was first invented n China in 105 AD. It was a closely guarded secret and didnt reach Europe until the 8 th
Century. The course aims at familiarizing the student with the basic aspects of speaking ability of Mandarin, the
language of Mainland China. The course aims at training students in practical skills and nurturing them to
interact with a Chinese person.

Course Contents:
Module I
Drills
Dialogue practice
Observe picture and answer the question.
The aspect particle le and the modal particle le.
Module II
Optative verbs
Texts based on different topics
Enriching vocabulary by dealing with various daily scenarios and situations.
Module III
Sentences with subject predicate construction as its predicate
Pronunciation and intonation
Character writing and stroke order
Module IV
About china Part I Lesson 2,3
Chinese to English and English to Chinese translations from the news paper.
Module V
Questions with an interrogative pronoun
Essays, writing formal letters.
Conversation practice.

Examination Scheme:
Components
Weightage (%)

CT1
20

C Project + Presentation
I Interaction/Conversation Practice

Text & References:

Kan tu shuo hua Part-I Lesson 8-13

CT2
20

C
20

I
20

V
15

A
5

FINITE ELEMENT METHOD


Course Code:

BTCE 803

Credit Units: 04

Course Objective:
At the end of this course the student shall have a basic knowledge of finite element method and shall be able to
analyse linear elastic structures, that he has studied about in core courses, using finite element method.

Course Contents:
Module I: Boundary value problems and the need for numerical discretisation
Introduction, examples of continuum problems, history of finite element method.
Weighted residual methods
Approximation by trial functions, weighted residual forms, piecewise trial functions, weak formulation,
Galerkin method, examples of one-, two- and three-dimensional problems.
Module II: Higher order finite element approximation
Degree of polynomial in trial functions and rate of convergence, the patch test, shape functions for C0 and C1
continuity, one-, two- and three-dimensional shape functions.
Isoparametric formulation
The concept of mapping, isoparametric formulation, numerical integration, mapping and its use in mesh
generation.
Module III: Variational methods
Variational principles, establishment of natural variational principles, approximate solution of differential
equations by Rayleigh-Ritz method, the use of Lagrange multipliers, general variational principles, penalty
functions, least-square method.
Partial discretisation and time-dependent problems
Partial discretisation applied to boundary value problems, time-dependent problems via partial discretisation,
analytical solution procedures, finite element solution procedures in time domain.
Module IV: Generalised finite elements and error estimates
The generalised finite element method, the discretisation error in a numerical solution, measure of discretisation
error, estimate of discretisation error.
Coordinate Transformation: Transformation of vectors and tensors, transformation of stiffness matrices,
degree of freedom within elements, condensation, condensation and recovery algorithm, substructuring,
structural symmetry.

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Text & References:

Zienkiewicz, O.C., and Morgan, K., Finite Element Approximation, John Wiley & Sons, 1983.
Reddy, J.N., An Introduction to the Finite Element Method, McGraw Hill, 2006.
Huebner, K.H., Thornton, E.A., and Byrom, T.G., The Finite Element Method for Engineers, John Wiley &
Sons, 1995.
Hutton, D.V., Fundamentals of Finite Element Analysis, McGraw Hill, 1991.
Kikuchi, N., Finite Element Methods in Mechanics, Cambridge University Press, 1986.
Cook, R.D., Malkus, D.S., Plesha, M.E., and Witt, R.J., Concepts and Applications of Finite Element
Analysis, John Wiley & Sons, 2003.
Zienkiewicz, O.C., and Taylor, R.L., The Finite Element Method, Vols I to III, McGraw Hill, 1999.

TRAFFIC ENGINEERING AND MANAGEMENT


Course Code:

BTCE 804

Credit Units: 04

Course Objective:
The students acquire comprehensive knowledge of traffic surveys and studies such as Volume Count, Speed
and delay, Origin and destination, Parking, Pedestrian and Accident surveys. They achieve knowledge
on design of at grade and grade separated intersections. They also become familiar with various traffic
control and trafficmanagement measures.

Course Contents:
Module I: Introduction
Significance and scope, Characteristics of Vehicles and Road Users, Skid Resistance and Braking Efficiency
(Problems), Components of Traffic Engineering- Road, Traffic and Land Use Characteristics
Module II: Traffic Surveys and Analysis
Surveys and Analysis - Volume, Capacity, Speed and Delays, Origin and Destination, Parking, Pedestrian
Studies, Accident Studies and Safety Level of Services- Basic principles of Traffic Flow.
Module III: Traffic Control
Traffic signs, Road markings, Design of Traffic signals and Signal co-ordination (Problems), Traffic control
aids and Street furniture, Street Lighting, Computer applications in Signal design
Module IV: Geometric Design of Intersections
Conflicts at Intersections, Classification of At Grade Intersections, - Channallised Intersections - Principles of
Intersection Design, Elements of Intersection Design, Rotary design, Grade Separation and interchanges Design principles.
Module V: Traffic Management
Traffic Management- Transportation System Management (TSM) - Travel Demand Management (TDM),
Traffic Forecasting techniques, Restrictions on turning movements, Oneway Streets, Traffic Segregation, Traffic
Calming, Tidal flow operations, Exclusive Bus Lanes, Introduction to Intelligent Transportation System (ITS).

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Text & References:

Kadiyali L R, Traffic Engineering and Transport Planning, Khanna Technical Publications, Delhi, 2000.
Khanna K and Justo C E G, Highway Engineering, Khanna Publishers, Roorkee, 2001.
Indian Roads Congress (IRC) specifications: Guidelines and special publications on Traffic Planning and
Management
Guidelines of Ministry of Road Transport and Highways, Government of India.
Subhash C. Saxena, A Course in Traffic Planning and Design, Dhanpat Rai Publications, New Delhi, 1989.
Transportation Engineering An Introduction, C.Jotin Khisty, B.Kent Lall, Prentice Hall of India Pvt Ltd,
2006.

COMPUTER APPLICATION IN HYDRO ENGINEERING


Course Code:

BTCE 805

Credit Units: 04

Course Objective:
This course deals with computer application in hydroengineering.

Course Contents:
Module I
Review of Basic Hydraulic Principles General flow characteristics, Energy and momentum principles and
Equations, Pressure and free surface flows, HGL and TEL, Major and minor losses, Computer applications to
simple flow problems, Introduction to SAP.
Storm Sewer Design and Gravity Piping Systems Review of basic hydrologic principles, Gradually varied
flow, Mixed flow profiles, Storm Sewer Applications.
Module II
Drainage Inlet Design, Culvert Hydraulics and Design.
Pressure Piping Systems & Water Quality Analysis Analysis and design of water distribution systems
Introduction to Some Packages such as Flow Master, Storm CAD, Culvert Master, Water CAD, and Sewer
CAD and EPANET.
Module III
Flow Routing - Hydrologic and hydraulic methods of routing, Sanitary sewer design including extended period
simulation and routing.
Watershed modeling Basic principles Introduction to SWMM
Module IV
Water quality modeling in streams- Basic models, Introduction to software packages.
Ground water quality modeling
Introduction to remote sensing and GIS applications and web based applications

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Text & References:

Michael. M. Meadows & Thomas M Walski, Computer Applications in Hydraulic Engineering, Haestad
Press, 2001.
QIP short term course notes advanced IT applications in Civil Engineering: IIT, Kharagpur, 2001.
L.W. Mays, Water Resources Engineering, John Wiley and Sons, 2001.
S.C. Chapra, Surface Water Quality Modeling, McGraw Hill, Inc., 1997.

WATER RESOURCES SYSTEM PLANNING AND DESIGN


Course Code:

BTCE 806

Credit Units: 04

Course Objective:
This course deals with design and planning of water resources system.

Course Contents:
Module I
Introduction: Water systems engineering scope and approach.
Issues and the systems planning approach- water system dynamics- water resource development alternatives
Water systems planning objectives- Constraints and Criteria Economic and Econometric principles
Module II
Hydrologic input analysis, Demand analysis, System elements & Subsystem planning - Stochastic planning and
management - Design and management issues.
Module III
Optimization methods and their application in W.R. systems. Linear programming and Dynamic programming
models. Problem formulation for W.R systems Multi objective planning Large scale system analysis- Case
studies.
Module IV
Ground water system planning Conjunctive surface and G.W development- Hierarchical approach- Water
quality management planning- Regional planning- Policy issues.

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Text & References:

M. C. Chathurvedi, W.R. Systems Planning & Management, Tata McGarw Hill Publications, New Delhi
Louks D P etal W.R System Planning & Analysis, Prentice Hall - 1981.
Maass. A. etal Design Water Resources Systems Mc. Millan. 1968
Goodman. A.S. Principles of Water Resources planning, Prentice Hall, 1984

ADVANCED CONCRETE DESIGN


Course Code:

BTCE 807

Credit Units: 04

Course Objective:
This course deals with advanced design of concrete structures.

Course Contents:
Module I
Large span concrete roofs
Introduction classification- behaviour of flat slabs - direct design and equivalent frame method- codal
provisions - waffle slabs.
Shells and Folded plates
Forms of shells and folded plates- structural behaviour of cylindrical shell and folded plate- method of analysismembrane analysis beam arch approximation- codal provisions- design of simply supported circular
cylindrical long shells and folded plates.
A design project involving the complete design of one of the above is envisaged at this stage
Module II
Deep beams
Analysis of deep beams- design as per BIS - design using strut and tie method.
Chimneys
Analysis of stresses in concrete chimneys - uncracked and cracked sections- codal provisions- design of
chimney.
A project involving the design of a deep beam and concrete chimney is envisaged at this stage.
Module III: Water tanks
Introduction- rectangular and circular with flat bottom- spherical and conical tank roofs- staging- design as per
BIS.
A project involving the design and detailing of a water tank is envisaged at this stage.
Module IV: Bridges
General IRC Bridge code loading standardsimpact effect wind load longitudinal forces centrifugal
forces force due to water currents buoyancy effect temperature effects secondary stresses erection
seismic force
Design of slab culvert R.C box culverts T-beam bridges Concept on design of continuous bridges, balanced
cantilever bridges, arch bridges and rigid frame bridges.
A project involving the design and detailing of a slab culvert/ T-beam bridge is envisaged at this stage.

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Text & References:

Purushothaman. P, Reinforced Concrete Structural Elements-, Tata McGraw Hill, 1986


G.S. Ramaswamy, Design and Construction of Concrete Shell Roofs-CBS publishers, 1986
Ashok K Jain, Reinforced Concrete Nem Chand Bros. Roorkee, 1998
Jain & Jaikrishna, Plain and Reinforced Concrete Vol I & II, Nem Chand Bros., Roorkee, 2000.
Taylor C Pere, Reinforced Concrete Chimneys, Concrete publications, 1960
Design of deep girders, Concrete Association of India, 1960
Mallick & Gupta, Reinforced Concrete, - Oxford & IBH, 1982
BIS codes (IS 456, IS 2210, IS 4998, IS 3370, SP 16, SP 24, SP 34).
IRC Codes (IRC 5, IRC 6, IRC 21)

ADVANCED STEEL DESIGN


Course Code:

BTCE 808

Credit Units: 04

Course Objective:
This course deals with advanced design of steel structures.

Course Contents:
Module I: Plate girder bridges
Plate girders loads equivalent uniformly distributed loads Indian railway code of practice design of plate
girder bridges bearings.
A design project involving the design of a plate girder is envisaged at this stage
Module II
Bunkers, Silos
Introduction Janssens theory Airys theory design criteria.
Transmission Towers
Introductionloads on towers analysisdesign of members and foundation.
A design project involving the design of any of the above structures is envisaged at this stage
Module III
Gantry Girder
Design of gantry girder gantry to column connection.
Water Tanks
Design of rectangular, pressed steel tanks design of suspended bottom tanks cylindrical tank with
hemispherical bottom design of staging.
A design project involving the design and detailing of a gantry girder and water tank is envisaged at this stage
Module IV
Light gauge members Light gauge sections design considerations allowable stresses buckling, design of
compression members, tension members and laterally supported beams connections.
A design project involving the design of a light gauge structure is envisaged at this stage

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Text & References:

Ramchandra, Design of Steel Structures Vol I and II, Standard book house, 1991
P. Dayaratnam, Design of Steel Structures, (Wheeler),1998
M. Raghupathi, Design of Steel Structures, Tata McGraw Hill, 1985
Lin & Breslar, Design of Steel Structures, John Wiley & Sons, 1963
BIS codes ( IS 800, SP 6, IS 804, IS 805,IS 6533, IS 9178, IS 801, IS 811 )

ARCHITECTURE AND TOWN PLANNING


Course Code:

BTCE 809

Credit Units: 04

Course Objective:
To provide the basic knowledge on the principles of design of buildings relating to the environment and climate.

Course Contents:
Module I: Architectural Design
Architectural Design an analysis integration of function and aesthetics Introduction to basic elements and
principles of design.
Module II: Site Planning
Surveys Site analysis Development Control Layout regulations- Layout design concepts.
Module III: Building Types
Residential, institutional, commercial and Industrial Application of anthropometry and space standards-Inter
relationships of functions Safety standards Building rules and regulations Integration of building services
Interior design
Module IV: Climate and Environmental Responsive Design
Man and environment interaction- Factors that determine climate Characteristics of climate types Design for
various climate types Passive and active energy controls Green building concept
Module V: Town Planning
Planning Definition, concepts and processes- Urban planning standards and zoning regulations- Urban
renewal Conservation Principles of Landscape design

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Text & References:

Francis D.K. Ching, Architecture: Form, Space and Order, VNR, N.Y., 1999.
Givoni B., Man Climate and Architecture, Applied Science, Barking ESSEX, 1982
Edward D.Mills, Planning and Architects Handbook, Butterworth London, 1995.
Gallian B.Arthur and Simon Eisner, The Urban Pattern City Planning and Design, Affiliated Press Pvt.
Ltd., New Delhi, 1995.
Margaret Robert, An Introduction to Town Planning Techniques, Hutchinso London, 1990.

INDUSTRIAL WASTE ENGINEERING


Course Code:

BTCE 810

Credit Units: 04

Course Objective:
To provide the basic knowledge on the principles of design of buildings relating to the environment and climate.

Course Contents:
Module I
Nature and characteristics of Industrial wastes- prevention versus control of industrial pollution- Linkage
between technology and pollution prevention- tools for clean processes- reuse, recycle, recovery, source
reduction, raw material substitution, toxic use reduction and process modification- separation technologies as
tools for waste minimization- Flow sheet analysis- Energy and resource audits-waste audits
Module II
Preliminary treatment of industrial waste water volume reduction strength reduction neutralization
equalization and proportioning
Treatment of industrial waste- suitability of different techniques- disposal of industrial waste
Module III
Effluent generation from textile industry paper industry dairy fertilizer thermal power plants - effluent
characteristics- treatment
Module IV
Environmental impact of textile industry paper industry - dairy - fertilizer thermal power plant
Study of damages caused by industrial pollution in India and Kerala (typical problems).

Examination Scheme:
Components
A
CT
S/V/Q
HA
EE
5
10
8
7
70
Weightage (%)
CT: Class Test, HA: Home Assignment, S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz, EE: End Semester Examination; Att:
Attendance

Text & References:

Nemerow, N, Theory and Practices of Industrial Waste Treatment, Addison Wiley (1963)
Agardy, Franklin J. Strategies of Industrial and Hazardous Waste Management, John Wiley & Sons (1998)
Nemerow Nelson Leonard Industrial Waste Treatment: Contemporary Practice and Vision for the Future,
Butterworth-Heinemann (2006)
Larry W Canter, Environmental Impact Assessment, McGraw Hill, Inc., (1996)