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TERRORISM

AND COUNTERTERRORISM: AN
INTRODUCTION
SELF-PACED C OURSE T HROUGH M ARCH 1 , 2 017

Course Syllabus
GeorgetownX

Self-Paced Course through March 1, 2017







GeorgetownX: Terrorism and Counterterrorism: An Introduction

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Core Faculty ............................................................................................................................................................ 2
Interviews ............................................................................................................................................................... 4
Faculty Support Team ............................................................................................................................................ 4
What is the course about? ..................................................................................................................................... 4
Key Questions .................................................................................................................................................... 5
What does the course include? .............................................................................................................................. 5
Course Section Outline ....................................................................................................................................... 5
What will I learn in the course? .............................................................................................................................. 7
What should we expect from each other? ............................................................................................................. 7
What you can Expect from Professor Byman and the course team .................................................................. 7
What you can expect from edX .......................................................................................................................... 7
What we expect from you .................................................................................................................................. 7
Appendix A: Detailed Course Section Outline ...................................................................................................... 10
1. What is Terrorism and Who are the Terrorists? + Strategies, Tactics, and Technology Use .................... 10
2. Al-Qaeda ................................................................................................................................................... 11
3. ...................................................................................................................................................................... 12
4. Intelligence and Counterterrorism Instruments ....................................................................................... 12
5. Counterterrorism and The Rule of Law (Learn More Section) .................................................................. 13

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TERRORISM A ND COUNTERTERRORISM
What is the danger of terrorism, and how can the world respond effectively?

NOTE: The course will be available through March 1, 2017. No certificates will be issued for work completed
after March 1, 2017.
CORE FACULTY

Daniel L. Byman

Dr. Byman is a Professor in the Security Studies Program of the Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown
University and the Research Director of the Brookings Institutions Center for Middle East Policy. Dr. Byman
served as a Professional Staff Member with the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks on the United States
(the 9/11 Commission) and the Joint 9/11 Inquiry Staff of the House and Senate Intelligence Committees. He
also worked as the Research Director of the Center for Middle East Public Policy at the RAND Corporation and
as a Middle East analyst for the U.S. intelligence community. Dr. Byman received his B.A. in religion from
Amherst College and his Ph.D. in political science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Follow him
@dbyman.

Jonathan Brown

Dr. Jonathan Brown is a Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Professor of Islamic Civilization in the Center for Muslim-
Christian Understanding at Georgetown University, a term member of the Council on Foreign Relations, Editor-
in-Chief of the Oxford Encyclopedia of Islamic Law, and publisher of several books and articles on the Hadith,
Islamic law, Sufism, Arabic lexical theory and Pre-Islamic poetry. Dr. Brown's current research interests include
the history of forgery and historical criticism in Islamic civilization, comparison with the Western tradition; and
modern conflicts between Late Sunni Traditionalism and Salafism in Islamic thought. Dr. Brown received his
B.A. in history from Georgetown University and his Ph.D. in near eastern languages and civilizations from the
University of Chicago.

John Esposito

Founding Director of the Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding, John Esposito
specializes in Islamic studies, religion, and international affairs as a Professor at Georgetown University.
Esposito's research is published in more than 45 books and monographs, including Unholy War: Terror in the
Name of Islam and The Future of Islam, translated into over 35 languages. Past President of the Middle East
Studies Association and the American Academy of Religion, a member of the E. C. European Network of
Experts on De-Radicalisation, the board of C-1 World Dialogue, an ambassador for the UN Alliance of
Civilizations, Esposito is Editor-in-Chief of Oxford Islamic Studies Online, The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Islamic
World and other Oxford reference works on the Islamic world and Islamic Studies.

Christine Fair

C. Christine Fair is a Georgetown Security Studies Program Assistant Professor, where she focuses on South
Asian political and military affairs. Fair previously worked at the RAND Corporation, United Nations Assistance
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Mission to Afghanistan in Kabul, and at USIPs Center for Conflict Analysis and Prevention. Fair has as
authored, co-authored and co-edited several books, is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, Women
in International Security, International Studies Association, American Political Science Association, and
American Institute of Pakistan Studies. She serves on the editorial board of numerous journals, and is a senior
fellow with the Combating Terrorism Center at West Point. Fair received her PhD and MA from the University
of Chicago. Her most recent book is Fighting to the End: The Pakistan Armys Way of War (Oxford University
Press, 2014). Many of her other publications can be found at christinefair.net

Bruce Hoffman

Bruce Hoffman is a Professor and Director of both the Center for Security Studies and the Security Studies
Program at Georgetown University. Professor Hoffman is currently a member of the National Security
Preparedness Group; a Global Scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars; a Senior
Fellow at the Combating Terrorism Center; a Visiting Professor at the International Institute for Counter-
Terrorism, Herzliya, Israel and at the Handa Centre for the Study of Terrorism and Political Violence at St
Andrews University, Scotland ; and serves in various editing capacities at The National Interest, Studies in
Conflict and Terrorism, and the Columbia University Press Series on Terrorism and Irregular Warfare. Hoffman
was awarded the United States Intelligence Community Seal Medallion in 1994 from the Director of Central
Intelligence. Follow him @hoffman_bruce.

Fathali M. Moghaddam

Fathali M. Moghaddam is Professor, Department of Psychology, Georgetown University, and Editor-in-Chief


of Peace and Conflict: Journal of Peace Psychology (American Psychological Association). Moghaddam was
born in Iran, educated from an early age in England, and worked for the United Nations and McGill University
before joining Georgetown University in 1990. He has published extensively on radicalization, intergroup
conflict, and the psychology of dictatorship and democracy. His most recent book is The Psychology of
Dictatorship (2013), which received Honorable Mention, 2013 Prose Awards for Professional and Scholarly
Excellence. Moghaddam has received a number of recognitions for his scholarly contributions, the most recent
being the Outstanding International Psychologist Award for 2012 from the American Psychological
Associations Division of International Psychology.

Paul R. Pillar

In 2005, Paul Pillar retired after a 28-year intelligence career in positions such as National Intelligence Officer
for the Near East and South Asia; Chief of Analytic Units at the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA); an original
member of the National Intelligence Councils Analytic Group; Executive Assistant to CIA's Deputy Director for
Intelligence; Executive Assistant to Director of Central Intelligence William Webster; and Head of Assessments
and Information Group and Deputy Chief of the DCI Counterterrorist Center. Pillar is a retired officer in the U.S.
Army Reserve and a former core faculty member at Georgetown University Security Studies Program. He
received his B.A. from Dartmouth College, his Ph.D. from Princeton University, and a B.Phil. from Oxford
University.

Benjamin Wittes

Benjamin Wittes is a senior fellow in Governance Studies at The Brookings Institution. He co-founded and is
the editor-in-chief of the Lawfare blog, which is devoted to sober and serious discussion of "Hard National
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Security Choices," and is a member of the Hoover Institution's Task Force on National Security and Law. He is
the author of Detention and Denial: The Case for Candor After Guantanamo, published in November 2011, co-
editor of Constitution 3.0: Freedom and Technological Change, published in December 2011, and editor
of Campaign 2012: Twelve Independent Ideas for Improving American Public Policy (Brookings Institution Press,
May 2012). He is also writing a book on data and technology proliferation and their implications for security.
He is the author of Law and the Long War: The Future of Justice in the Age of Terror, published in June 2008 by
The Penguin Press, and the editor of the 2009 Brookings book, Legislating the War on Terror: An Agenda for
Reform.

INTERVIEWS

Jacob Shapiro, Associate Professor, Princeton University and author of The Terrorists Dilemma:
Managing Violent Covert Organizations.

Juan Zarate, Senior Adviser, Center for Strategic and International Studies, and former first Secretary of
Treasury for Terrorism Financing and Financial Crimes
Major David Blair, USAF, MQ-1 Predator Pilot, United States Air Force
Mark Mazzetti, New York Times Reporter and author of The Way of the Knife: The CIA, a Secret Army, and
a War at the Ends of the Earth.

Peter Neumann, Professor, Kings College London, and Director, International Centre for the Study of

Radicalisation
Rita Katz, Co-founder, SITE Intelligence Group

FACULTY SUPPORT TEAM

Natalia Pea, Teaching Assistant

Natalia Pea is an M.A. candidate in the Security Studies Program at Georgetown University, where she
focuses on terrorism and sub-state violence. Prior to studying at Georgetown, Natalia has previously worked in
the Massachusetts House of Representatives and the Plymouth County District Attorney's Office. Her research
interests include regional security in the Middle East, Islam, and the evolution and use of radical ideology. She
graduated from Boston College with a double major in Political Science and Islamic Civilization and Societies.

WHAT IS THE COURSE ABOUT?
Terrorism has gone from a persistent yet marginal security concern to one of the most important security
problems of our day: indeed, there are few countries that do not suffer from some form of terrorism. Though
many terrorist attempts fail, some groups wage lengthy and bloody campaigns and, in exceptional cases, kill
hundreds or even thousands in pursuit of their ends.
Course topics include the nuances involved in defining terrorism, the nature of Al-Qaeda, Hamas, and other
important groups, the effectiveness of different counterterrorism tools like detention and military force,
linkages (or the lack thereof) between terrorism and world religions like Islam, terrorist recruiting, the rule of
law, the political context in South Asia and the Middle East, and terrorist use of technology.
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KEY QUESTIONS

What is terrorism, and what are the components of different definitions?

What are common causes of terrorism?

What are common strategies and tactics of terrorism? How do terrorist groups respond to
technological change?

What are common weaknesses of terrorist groups? Why do these occur?

What is the nature of Al-Qaeda, and why has it proven such a difficult adversary?

What is the role of intelligence in counterterrorism?

What are the strengths and weaknesses of different counterterrorism instruments?

How can you fight terrorism in accord with the rule of law?

Under what conditions does terrorism "work?

How serious a problem is terrorism? In what ways does it manifest?


WHAT DOES THE COURSE INCLUDE?
Each section of the course listed in the Course Section Outline below begins with an Introduction subsection
and ends with a Conclusion & Looking Ahead subsection. In between these subsections, the topics are
organized sequentially. Most of the subsections are required when working towards a certificate of
completion, but there are also optional segments for those interested in learning more.
These topics (listed in the Course Section Outline below) include lectures highlighting key concepts that are
summarized under the Definition of Terms menu item, knowledge checks, polls, a case study simulation, and
discussion activities.

The Introduction includes a weekly guide that lists the key questions to be addressed in that course
section. It also lists the readings, which may be links to external website or PDF files. The weekly guide
is then followed by the faculty members introduction of the section's topic under study.
The Conclusion & Looking Ahead provides you with a listing of the key learning outcomes related to
that particular section of the course. It features the faculty members summary of key points and
considerations in relation to the topics addressed.

The overall course content outline follows. For a complete listing of the sections, including list of key questions
and readings, see Appendix A.
COURSE SECTION OUTLINE
1. What is Terrorism and Who Are The Terrorists? + Strategies, Tactics, and Technology Use
This section of the course explores the definitional debate surrounding terrorism, conditions that make
individuals more susceptible to radicalization and eventual recruitment by terrorist groups, and terrorist
psychology. We will also explore the various strategies and common tactics employed by most terrorist
organizations as well as terrorist use of technology. There will also be an optional subsection interview
with director of the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, Peter Neumann. This section will

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also feature Professor Bymans interview with terrorism scholar Jacob Shapiro, which is optional for class
participants.
2. Al-Qaeda
This section of the course explores the most important modern terrorist group -- Al-Qaeda and its
historical evolution, goals, strengths and weaknesses. It also details how Al-Qaeda fits in with the broader
jihadist movement and the Islamic State. There will also be an optional subsection lecture featuring SITE
Intelligence Group co-founder Rita Katz.

3. Intelligence and Counterterrorism Instruments
This section of the course explores the role of intelligence in counterterrorism operations and considers
several important post-9/11 controversies such as surveillance and torture. We will also explore various
counterterrorism instruments, such as diplomacy, financial pressure, and targeted killings, and their
associated advantages and limitations. This section will also feature an optional subsection on renditions
and interviews with New York Times reporter Mark Mazzetti, MQ-1 Predator Pilot Major David Blair, USAF
and former Assistant Secretary of Treasury for Terrorism Financing and Financial Crimes Juan Zarate.

4. LEARN MORE: Counterterrorism and the Rule of Law (Optional)
This section of the course explores the implications of U.S. domestic and international law for
counterterrorism.



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WHAT WILL I LEARN IN THE COURSE?
The course is designed to help you achieve the following learning goals and objectives.
Recall the working definitions of terrorism and recognize their analytic limits;
Identify a range of causes of terrorism and, as importantly, understand what commonly cited issues are
not usually causes;
Understand the strategies and tactics of terrorist groups;
Identify important terrorist groups in the Middle East with an understanding of their strengths,
weaknesses, and overall effectiveness;
Understand how counterterrorism is constrained in a democratic society and several important legal
debates related to counterterrorism.

WHAT SHOULD WE EXPECT FROM EACH OTHER?
WHAT YOU CAN EXPECT FROM PROFESSOR BYMAN AND THE COURSE TEAM
Teaching Assistants will regularly participate in discussion boards to provide content clarification, guidance,
and support.
We will also be providing occasional current events news briefs, in addition to posting relevant news stories
surrounding terrorism and counterterrorism on our social media outlets Facebook and Twitter.
WHAT YOU CAN EXPECT FROM EDX
In the event of a technical problem, you should click
the Help tab located on the left border of the screen
(Figure 1). This Help tab opens an instruction box
that directs you to student Frequently Asked
Questions (FAQs) for general edX questions. You can
also:
Report a problem
Make a suggestion
Ask a question
You may post technical problems to the Technical
thread of the discussion board. Finally, you may also
contact technical@edx.org directly to report bugs.

Figure 1: Screenshot with Help tab

WHAT WE EXPECT FROM YOU


Students should spend around eight to ten (8-10) hours per section to review assigned readings, watch
lectures, work through knowledge checks and other activities, including the discussion threads, polling
questions, and keeping informed of current events surround terrorism and counterterrorism.
In each course section we have included activities to support you in reaching the specified learning objectives
for that section. The graded activities are categorized as knowledge checks; these are the activities that are
counted toward achieving the certificate for the course. They include:

Multiple answer questions;


Multiple choice questions;
Peer instruction questions;
True/False questions; and
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Self-assessment open response questions.
To receive a course certificate, you must complete/submit all graded assignments by March 1, 2017 (by
23:59 UTC) and receive a score of 75 percent or higher.
To supplement the graded knowledge check activities listed above, we have also included other components
to enable learners to explore the subject matter more deeply. These include:

Gauge your knowledge questions;


Recap challenge questions;
Discussion questions; and
Polling questions

All activities included in the course are designed to help you gauge your learning as a result of your interaction
with the course content both from the video lectures and readings. Instructions on how to complete the
activities are included within each course section.
TIMELINE
As part of this self-paced course, you are invited to complete the course on your own timeline and at your own
pace. Our only due date is March 1, 2017, which marks the last day this course is available as a live course.
Until then, you may submit assignments and participate in knowledge checks at your own pace. Take a look at
our suggested path below for engaging with the course on a section-by-section basis.

Each secbon begins on


your bmeline
Review the secson
guide
Watch the course
video introducson

Study the course


content

Take Part in the


Acbvibes

Read the assigned


readings for the
week

Complete the
knowledge checks

Watch the video


lectures
Use the Student
Lecture Notes area
to highlight key
points

Parscipate in the
discussions and
polls
Parscipate in gauge
your knowledge
quessons

Figure 2: Suggested engagement



NETIQUETTE GUIDELINES
Please be respectful
To promote the best educational experience possible, we ask each student to respect the opinions and
thoughts of other students and be courteous in the way that you choose to express yourself. Terrorism and
Counterterrorism topics elicit and should elicit -- passionate and controversial debates. However, informed
debate should never give way to insult, rudeness, or anything that might detract from the learning process.
GUIX-501-03x students should be respectful and considerate of all opinions.
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In order for us to have meaningful discussions, we must learn to understand what others are saying and be
open-minded about others opinions. If you want to persuade someone to see things differently, it is much
more effective to do so in a polite, non-threatening way rather than to do so antagonistically. Everyone has
insights to offer based on his/her experiences, and we can all learn from each other. Civility is essential: Our
teaching assistants can, and will, remove students from the class who detract from the learning process with
insulting comments on the course-wise discussion boards.
Look before you write
Prior to posting a question or comment on the discussion board, the Georgetown course team asks that you
look to see if any of your classmates have the same question. Upvote questions that are similar to your own or
that are also of interest to you, instead of starting a new thread. This will greatly help our Georgetown TAs
best monitor the discussions and bring important questions to Professor Bymans attention.
Use the discussion board for course-related posts only
Although we encourage students to get to know each other, please use the discussion board as a for course
content conversations only.
Properly and promptly notify us of technical issues
Although we do not predict technical issues, they can and may happen. To make sure these receive prompt
attention, post details about any technical issues directly on the Technical discussion thread or email
technical@edx.org directly.
ACADEMIC INTEGRITY
Observe edX and GeorgetownXs honor policies
Although collaboration and conversation will certainly contribute to your learning in the course, we ask
students to refrain from collaborating with or consulting one another on any graded material for the course.
Violations of the honor policy undermine the purpose of education and the academic integrity of the course.
We expect that all work submitted will be a reflection of ones own original work and thoughts.
GeorgetownX faculty and staff expect all members of the community to strive for excellence in scholarship and
character.

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APPENDIX A: DETAILED COURSE SECTION OUTLINE
1. WHAT IS TERRORISM AND WHO ARE THE TERRORISTS? + STRATEGIES, TACTICS, AND
TECHNOLOGY USE

This section of the course explores the definitional debate surrounding terrorism, conditions that make
individuals more susceptible to radicalization and eventual recruitment by terrorist groups, and terrorist
psychology. We will also explore the various strategies and common tactics employed by most terrorist
organizations as well as terrorist use of technology. There will also be an optional subsection interview
with director of the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, Peter Neumann. This section will
also feature Professor Bymans interview with terrorism scholar Jacob Shapiro, which is optional for class
participants.
KEY QUESTIONS:

Why is terrorism so difficult to define?


How have definitions of terrorism changed over time?
What are the common, core elements of terrorism as a means to build a definition?
What are the differences and similarities between terrorism and guerrilla warfare?
What are the core definitional requirements of terrorism?
Why do people become terrorists?
What is the process that results in an individuals radicalization and then recruitment?
How do terrorists justify the violence they commit?
Why is it so difficult, if not impossible, to develop a common set of reasons for why someone becomes
a terrorist?
What are the different strategies that terrorist groups use to advance their objectives?
What are the strengths and weaknesses of the various strategies?
Why does terrorism essentially functions in a technological vacuum compared with modern warfare?
What are the reasons for terrorists operational conservatism?
How do ease and low cost affect terrorist planning and operations?
Why do terrorists avoid sophisticated technologies when they innovate?
What role does publicity play in fostering terrorist innovation?
Why are terrorists rarely attracted to more sophisticated technologies and Weapons of Mass
Destruction (WMD)?

REQUIRED READINGS:
(All Readings are available in the course itself as part of the Weekly Guide within the Introduction subsection or under
Readings in the main top menu of the course.)

Bruce Hoffman, Inside Terrorism (New York: Columbia University Press, 2nd edition, 2006), pp. 1-42 ,
229-256, and 267-281..

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John Parachini, "Putting WMD Terrorism into Perspective, Washington Quarterly, Vol. 26, Iss. 4, pp.
37-50.
OPTIONAL READINGS:
(All Readings are available in the course itself as part of the Weekly Guide within the Introduction subsection or under
Readings in the main top menu of the course.)

Leonard Weinberg, et al., The Challenges of Conceptualizing Terrorism, Terrorism and Political
Violence, vol. 16, no. 4 (2004), pp. 777-794.
The United States Department of State, Country Reports on Terrorism (Washington, D.C., 2013). p. xvi
only [including the footnote].
Central Intelligence Agency, Terrorist CBRN: Materials and Effects, June 2008.

2. AL-QAEDA

This section of the course explores the most important modern terrorist group Al-Qaeda and its
historical evolution, goals, strengths, and weaknesses as well as the broader jihadist movement. There will
also be an optional subsection lecture featuring SITE Intelligence Group co-founder Rita Katz.
KEY QUESTIONS:
How has Al-Qaeda evolved over time?
Why did Al-Qaeda conduct the 9/11 attacks and how did it adjust to setbacks it suffered in the attacks
aftermath?
What are Al-Qaedas key organizational goals?
What are some of the key traits and characteristics of senior Al-Qaeda leaders and their supporters?
Why do groups affiliate with Al-Qaeda and what are common limits to cooperation between affiliates
and the core organization?
How did the Islamic State emerge?
How is the Islamic State different from Al-Qaeda?
REQUIRED READINGS:
(All Readings are available in the course itself as part of the Weekly Guide within the Introduction subsection or under
Readings in the main top menu of the course.)

Daniel Byman, Al Qaeda, the Islamic State, and the Global Jihadist Movement (United Kingdom: Oxford
University Press, 2015), selected pages: pp.13-14, 25-27, 47-50, 57-59, 82-83, 109-110, 157-162.
National Commission on Terrorist Attacks upon the United States (the 9/11 Commission), The 9/11
Commission Report (Norton: 2004), "The Foundation of New Terrorism," pp. 47-70.
National Commission on Terrorist Attacks upon the United States (the 9/11 Commission), "Al Qaeda
Aims at the American Homeland," pp. 145-173.
Lawrence Wright, The Man Behind Bin Laden, The New Yorker (September 16, 2002).
Bruce Hoffman and Fernando Reinares, "Conclusions," The Evolving Global Terrorism Threat. Cases
from 9/11 to Osama bin Laden's Death (Columbia University Press: New York, 2014).
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"ISIS vs. Al Qaeda: Jihadisms Global Civil War, The National Interest, Iss. 136, pp. 10-18 (March/April
2015).
OPTIONAL READINGS:
(All Readings are available in the course itself as part of the Weekly Guide within the Introduction subsection or under
Readings in the main top menu of the course.)

Daniel Byman Breaking the Bonds between Al Qaeda and Its Affiliate Organizations, (Brookings
2012).
Peter Bergen and Paul Cruickshank, The Unraveling: Al-Qaedas Revolt against Bin Ladin, The New
Republic, June 2008.
3.


4. INTELLIGENCE AND COUNTERTERRORISM INSTRUMENTS



In this section of the course, we are exploring the role of intelligence in counterterrorism operations. We
are also exploring various counterterrorism instruments, such as diplomacy, financial pressure, and
targeted killings, and their associated advantages and limits. This section will also feature Professor Fair's
optional subsection interview with New York Times reporter Mark Mazzetti on U.S. targeted killings as a
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counterterrorism instrument, as well as an optional subsection on renditions and interviews with MQ-1
Predator Pilot Major David Blair, USAF, and former Assistant Secretary of Treasury for Terrorism Financing
and Financial Crimes, Juan Zarate.
KEY QUESTIONS:

What are the purposes that intelligence serves in counterterrorism?


What are the limits of intelligence in counterterrorism?
What are the standards of success and failure regarding counterterrorist intelligence?
What governmental organizations contribute to counterterrorist intelligence, especially in the United
States, and how have they changed?
What are the various instruments used in counterterrorism?
What are the principal ways in which each instrument is used?
What are the contributions and advantages of each instrument?
What are the limitations and disadvantages of each instrument?
How are these counterterrorism instruments used together in a complementary way?
What are the limits of alternative counterterrorism instruments to drone strikes?

REQUIRED READINGS:
(All Readings are available in the course itself as part of the Weekly Guide within the Introduction subsection or under
Readings in the main top menu of the course.)

Audrey Kurth Cronin, "Why Drones Fail, Foreign Affairs (July/August 2013).
Daniel Byman, "Why Drones Work, Foreign Affairs (July/August 2013).
Daniel Byman, "The Intelligence War on Terrorism," Intelligence and National Security (2013).
Paul R. Pillar, "Counterterrorist Instruments," in Terrorism and U.S. Foreign Policy (Washington, D.C.:
Brookings, 2003), Chapter 4.
Richard A. Posner, "Principles of Intelligence," Preventing Surprise Attacks (Rowman & Littlefield,
2005), Chapter 4.

OPTIONAL READINGS:
(All Readings are available in the course itself as part of the Weekly Guide within the Introduction subsection or under
Readings in the main top menu of the course.)

Gabriella Blum and Philip B. Heymann, "Interrogation," in Laws, Outlaws, and Terrorists
(Massachusetts: MIT Press, 2010), Chapter 6.

5. COUNTERTERRORISM AND THE RULE OF LAW (LEARN MORE SECTION)

This section of the course explores the implications of U.S. domestic and international law for
counterterrorism.
KEY QUESTIONS:
What are the laws of war and how do they related to counterterrorism?
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What is the impact of criminal law on counterterrorism?
What legal authorities govern which government agencies?
How do the roles of various government agencies differ?
How does the law affect targeted killings?
How does the law affect interrogations?
How does the law affect the use of force?
REQUIRED Readings:
(All Readings are available in the course itself as part of the Weekly Guide within the Introduction subsection or under
Readings in the main top menu of the course.)

Daniel O'Donnell, "International Treaties Against Terrorism and the Use of Terrorism During Armed
Conflict and by Armed Forces," International Review of Red Cross, Vol. 88, No. 864, December 2006.
United Nations Security Council, Resolution 1373, September 28, 2001.
U.S. Constitution.
U.S. Supreme Court, Youngstown Sheet & Tube Co. v. Sawyer, 343 U.S. 579 (1952) (The Steel Seizure
Case), with particular attention on Justice Jackson's tripartite framework and Chief Justice Vinson's
dissent.
OPTIONAL READINGS:
(All Readings are available in the course itself as part of the Weekly Guide within the Introduction subsection or under
Readings in the main top menu of the course.)

U.S. Supreme Court, United States v. Curtis-Wright Export Corp, 299 U.S. 304 (1936).
U.S. Supreme Court, New York Times Co. v. United States, 403 U.S. 713 (1971).
U.S. Supreme Court, Katz v. United States, 389 U.S. 347 (1967).
U.S. Supreme Court, U.S. v. U.S. District Court, 407 U.S. 297 (1972).

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