Anda di halaman 1dari 159

SURPASS hiT 7300

4.30
Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Issue: 2

Issue date: September 2010

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

The information in this document is subject to change without notice and describes only the
product defined in the introduction of this documentation. This documentation is intended for the
use of Nokia Siemens Networks customers only for the purposes of the agreement under which
the document is submitted, and no part of it may be used, reproduced, modified or transmitted
in any form or means without the prior written permission of Nokia Siemens Networks. The
documentation has been prepared to be used by professional and properly trained personnel,
and the customer assumes full responsibility when using it. Nokia Siemens Networks welcomes
customer comments as part of the process of continuous development and improvement of the
documentation.
The information or statements given in this documentation concerning the suitability, capacity,
or performance of the mentioned hardware or software products are given "as is" and all liability
arising in connection with such hardware or software products shall be defined conclusively and
finally in a separate agreement between Nokia Siemens Networks and the customer. However,
Nokia Siemens Networks has made all reasonable efforts to ensure that the instructions
contained in the document are adequate and free of material errors and omissions. Nokia
Siemens Networks will, if deemed necessary by Nokia Siemens Networks, explain issues which
may not be covered by the document.
Nokia Siemens Networks will correct errors in this documentation as soon as possible. IN NO
EVENT WILL NOKIA SIEMENS NETWORKS BE LIABLE FOR ERRORS IN THIS DOCUMENTATION OR FOR ANY DAMAGES, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO SPECIAL, DIRECT,
INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL OR ANY LOSSES, SUCH AS BUT NOT
LIMITED TO LOSS OF PROFIT, REVENUE, BUSINESS INTERRUPTION, BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITY OR DATA,THAT MAY ARISE FROM THE USE OF THIS DOCUMENT OR
THE INFORMATION IN IT.
This documentation and the product it describes are considered protected by copyrights and
other intellectual property rights according to the applicable laws.
The wave logo is a trademark of Nokia Siemens Networks Oy. Nokia is a registered trademark
of Nokia Corporation. Siemens is a registered trademark of Siemens AG.
Other product names mentioned in this document may be trademarks of their respective
owners, and they are mentioned for identification purposes only.
Copyright Nokia Siemens Networks 2010. All rights reserved.

Important Notice on Product Safety


Elevated voltages are inevitably present at specific points in this electrical equipment.
Some of the parts may also have elevated operating temperatures.
Non-observance of these conditions and the safety instructions can result in personal
injury or in property damage.
Therefore, only trained and qualified personnel may install and maintain the system.
The system complies with the standard EN 60950 / IEC 60950. All equipment connected
has to comply with the applicable safety standards.

The same text in German:


Wichtiger Hinweis zur Produktsicherheit
In elektrischen Anlagen stehen zwangslufig bestimmte Teile der Gerte unter Spannung. Einige Teile knnen auch eine hohe Betriebstemperatur aufweisen.
Eine Nichtbeachtung dieser Situation und der Warnungshinweise kann zu Krperverletzungen und Sachschden fhren.
Deshalb wird vorausgesetzt, dass nur geschultes und qualifiziertes Personal die
Anlagen installiert und wartet.
Das System entspricht den Anforderungen der EN 60950 / IEC 60950. Angeschlossene
Gerte mssen die zutreffenden Sicherheitsbestimmungen erfllen.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Table of Contents
This document has 159 pages.
1
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4

Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Intended audience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Structure of this document . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Symbols and conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
History of changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.
.
.
.
.

11
11
11
11
13

2
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5

Alarm lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Equipment alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Communication alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Processing error alarms. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Environmental alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Quality of service alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

14
14
16
18
18
18

3
3.1
3.1.1
3.1.2
3.1.3
3.1.4
3.1.5
3.1.6
3.1.7
3.1.8
3.1.9
3.1.9.1

Troubleshooting instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Equipment alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
ACTLP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
APRM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
CCFAIL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
CFF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
CMISM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
CMISS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
CMM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
CONCABF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
CP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
CP alarm raised by transponder, muxponder, or regenerator card (except
40G) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
CP alarm raised by 40G card. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
CP alarm raised by CFSU card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
CP alarm raised by MCP404 card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
CP alarm raised by any other card type. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
FAN_MAJOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
FAN_MAJOR raised by a shelf that can hold only a
single Fan Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
FAN_MAJOR raised by a shelf that can hold
multiple Fan Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
FAN_MINOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
FAN_MINOR raised by a shelf that can hold only a
single Fan Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
FAN_MINOR raised by a shelf that can hold
multiple Fan Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
FCTNS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
FF_MISS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
FilterExpired. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
FMISM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
ILANF. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
ISLP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

3.1.9.2
3.1.9.3
3.1.9.4
3.1.9.5
3.1.10
3.1.10.1
3.1.10.2
3.1.11
3.1.11.1
3.1.11.2
3.1.12
3.1.13
3.1.14
3.1.15
3.1.16
3.1.17

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

.......
.......
.......
.......
.......

......
......
......
......
......

.......
.......
.......
.......
.......

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

3.1.18
3.1.19
3.1.20
3.1.21
3.1.22
3.1.23
3.1.24
3.1.25
3.1.26
3.1.27
3.1.28
3.1.29
3.1.30
3.1.31
3.1.32
3.1.33
3.1.34
3.1.35
3.1.36
3.1.37
3.1.38
3.1.39
3.1.40
3.1.41
3.1.42
3.1.43
3.1.44
3.1.45
3.1.46
3.1.47
3.1.48
3.1.49
3.1.50
3.1.51
3.1.52
3.1.53
3.1.54
3.1.55
3.1.56
3.1.57
3.1.58
3.1.59
3.1.60
3.1.61
3.1.62
3.1.63
3.1.64

LowCFSUFlow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
LSBFAIL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
LSBMISM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
LSBWRONG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
MeasFail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
MMISM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
MMISS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
MNOTCT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
MP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
NLD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
OBFF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
OBRF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
OBTF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
OPRF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
OPTF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
OSCLOL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
OSCTD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
OSCTF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
OverPower1M . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
PD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
PF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
POOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
PS1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
PS2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
PS3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
PS4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Pu1TD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Pu2TD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Pu3TD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Pu4TD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Pu1TF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Pu2TF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Pu3TF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Pu4TF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
SBLOS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
SLH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
SLL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
SRMISS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
SWP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
TD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
TempM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
TempMIN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
TempP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
TempP1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
TempP2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
TF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
WRGSR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

3.2
3.2.1
3.2.2
3.2.3
3.2.4
3.2.5
3.2.6
3.2.7
3.2.8
3.2.9
3.2.10
3.2.11
3.2.12
3.2.13
3.2.14
3.2.15
3.2.16
3.2.17
3.2.18
3.2.19
3.2.20
3.2.21
3.2.22
3.2.23
3.2.24
3.2.25
3.2.26
3.2.27
3.2.28
3.2.29
3.2.30
3.2.31
3.2.32
3.2.33
3.2.34
3.2.35
3.2.36
3.2.37
3.2.38
3.2.39
3.2.40
3.2.41
3.2.42
3.2.43
3.2.44
3.2.45
3.2.46

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Communication alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
BDI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CHM. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CSF_LCS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CSF_LOS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DEG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DEG-O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DOPFail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DRM. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
EOCI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
EXC-O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
EXM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ITIM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LCK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LFD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LOCL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LOF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LOF-egress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LOFLOM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LOF-O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LOM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LOS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LOS-O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LOS-P . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LSM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LSS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LTC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MSIM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NFR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
OCI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
OOS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
OPR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PESF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PHF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PLF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PLM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SSF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SSF-egress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SSF-O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SSF-P . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SSF-prot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SYNCF. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SYNCF-egress. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TCLL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TIM. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TIM-egress. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TNEF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

66
66
67
67
68
69
69
70
70
71
71
72
72
72
73
74
74
76
77
77
78
78
80
80
81
82
83
83
84
84
85
85
86
87
88
89
89
90
90
90
91
91
92
92
93
94
94

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

3.2.47
3.2.48
3.2.49
3.3
3.3.1
3.3.2
3.3.3
3.3.4
3.3.5
3.3.6
3.3.7
3.3.8
3.3.9
3.3.10
3.3.11
3.4
3.4.1
3.5
3.5.1

UCI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
UPM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
VOATC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Processing error alarms . . . . .
APSM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CFFULL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DUPDHCP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LOTR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MIBF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MIBFULL_MAJOR . . . . . . . . .
MIBFULL_MINOR . . . . . . . . . .
NQO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RAMFULL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RQO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TL1NQO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Environmental alarms . . . . . . .
EXT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Quality of Service alarms . . . .
TCA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4
4.1
4.1.1
4.1.2
4.1.3
4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5
4.6
4.7
4.8
4.9
4.10
4.11
4.12
4.13
4.14
4.15
4.16
4.17

Card replacement instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105


How to replace the CCEP and CCMP card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
CP alarm or OBFF alarm scenario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
MIBF alarm scenario. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Loss of Communication scenario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
How to replace the Compact Flash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
How to replace the CCSP card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
How to replace the CFSU card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
How to replace the F02MR card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
How to Replace the F09MDRT card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
How to replace F06-type and F09-type cards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
How to replace the F08MR-1 card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
How to replace F40-1 and F40V-1 cards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
How to replace the F40MR-1 card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
How to replace the F80DCI-1 card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
How to replace the F80MDI-1 card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
How to replace the LIFB-1 card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
How to replace MCP-type cards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
How to replace an OPMDC card. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
How to replace the PL-1 card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
How to replace a transponder,muxponder,
and regenerator cards (all types) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
How to replace Filter cards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
How to replace the O08VA-1 card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
How to replace an Amplifier card (all types) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
How to replace the PRC-1 card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
How to replace the O02CSP-1 card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
How to replace the O03CP-1 card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124

4.18
4.19
4.20
4.21
4.22
4.23

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

4.24
4.25
4.26
4.27
4.27.1
4.27.2
4.28
4.28.1

How to replace the CDMM-1 card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


How to replace a DCM card or UDCM. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How to replace a UDCM Tray . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How to replace a failed shelf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Replacing a main shelf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Replacing an extension shelf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How to replace the air filter element . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
For shelves where the Air Filter is mounted
inside the Fan Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
For shelves where the Air Filter is mounted
outside the Fan Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

124
125
126
127
127
129
129

5
5.1
5.2
5.3

Fiber cleaning instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Method 1: Dry cleaning cassette . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Method 2: Blast of clean, compressed air . . . . . . . . .
Method 3: Westover Scientific CleanBlast system. . .

133
133
133
133

6
6.1
6.2

Warm Start and Cold Start. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134


Differences between Warm and Cold Start . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
Impact of Warm and Cold Start . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135

7
7.1
7.2
7.3
7.4

Card LED behavior . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


FAULT and OK LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LED behavior on Controller cards (CCEP, CCMP, CCSP) . . . . . . . . .
Port LED behavior on I22CE10G-1 cards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mux and Demux LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Hints for Recover Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140

Glossary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142

10

Abbreviations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152

4.28.2

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

......
......
......
......

.......
.......
.......
.......

130
131

137
137
138
139
139

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

List of Figures
Figure 1
Figure 2

How to remove / install the Compact Flash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111


SRS-1 shelf Fan Unit: air filter is inside the Fan Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

List of Tables
Table 1
Table 2
Table 3
Table 4
Table 5
Table 6
Table 7
Table 8
Table 9
Table 10
Table 11
Table 12
Table 13
Table 14
Table 15
Table 16

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

List of conventions used in this document . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11


History of changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
SURPASS hiT 7300 equipment alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
SURPASS hiT 7300 communication alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
SURPASS hiT 7300 processing error alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
SURPASS hiT 7300 environmental alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
SURPASS hiT 7300 quality of service alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
MCP card system compatibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Phased-out DCM cards and required replacements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Differences between Warm Start and Cold Start . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
Impact of Warm Start and Cold Start . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
FAULT and OK LED behavior . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
Controller card LED behavior during NE start-up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
Controller card LED behavior after NE start-up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
Port LED behavior on I22CE10-G-1 card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
Clear Recover Mode window - reasons and remedies . . . . . . . . . . . . 141

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

10

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Preface

1 Preface
This Troubleshooting Manual describes fault-clearing procedures to be performed in
response to alarm events that may occur in the SURPASS hiT 7300 system.

1.1

Intended audience
This document is intended for anyone tasked with clearing fault conditions to restore
normal system operation. Personnel performing these procedures must have general
experience with long-haul optical DWDM networks as well as specific experience with
Nokia Siemens Networks SURPASS hiT 7300 hardware components and network management software. Personnel must also comply with all relevant safety practices
whenever working with SURPASS hiT 7300 equipment.

1.2

Structure of this document


Alarm Lists
When a fault condition occurs, the relevant alarm notification will be generated and displayed on craft terminal screens. All SURPASS hiT 7300 alarms are listed in the Alarm
lists in chapter 2. The Alarm Lists are divided into separate tables that match the fault
categories as presented on craft terminal screens. These categories are as follows:

Equipment alarms
Communication alarms
Processing Error alarms
Environmental alarms
Quality of Service alarms

Troubleshooting Instructions
For each entry in the Alarm Lists, specific fault-clearing procedures are contained in the
Troubleshooting instructions in chapter 3. Click the desired alarm name in the Alarm List
to jump directly to the instructions for that alarm.
Described Features

g Some features described in this document may not be available. To identify the
features released for your project, please refer to the Release Notes delivered
together with the product.

1.3

Symbols and conventions


The following symbols and conventions are used in this document:
Representation
Bold

Meaning
Text in the Graphic User Interface (window and wizard titles, field
names, buttons, etc.) is represented in bold face.
Example: Click Shutdown and then click OK to turn off the computer.

Table 1

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

List of conventions used in this document

11

Preface

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Representation
Italic

Meaning
Field values, file names, file extensions, folder and directory
names are denoted by italic text.
Examples: Enter 192.168.0.1 in the IP address field. Click OK to
produce a .pdf file.
Command and screen output are denoted by courier font.

Courier

Example: ping -t 192.168.0.1


<Angle brackets> Place holders for distinct names or values are represented by
enclosing them in <angle brackets>. If a file name is involved, italic
text will also be used.
Example: The naming convention for the log files is
<NEname>.txt, where <NEname> is the name of the NE sending
the messages.
Keyboard button

Keyboard keys are represented with a surrounding box.


Example: Press Enter .

[Square brackets] Keyboard shortcuts are represented using square brackets.


Example: Press [CTRL+ALT+DEL] to open the Task Manager.
>

The > symbol is used as short form to define a path through individual elements of the Graphic User Interface, e.g., menus and
menu commands.
Example: On the Windows taskbar, select Start > Programs >
TNMS > Client menu command to start the TNMS Core/CDM
Client.

A tip provides additional information related to the topic described.

A note provides important information on a situation that can


cause property damage or data loss.
A note introduced in the text by the keyword NOTICE: describes a
hazard that may result in property damage but not in personal
injury.

A safety message provides information on a dangerous situation


that could cause bodily injury.
The different hazard levels are introduced in the text by the following keywords:
DANGER! - Indicates a hazardous situation which, if not avoided,
will result in death or serious (irreversible) personal injury.
WARNING! - Indicates a hazardous situation which, if not
avoided, could result in death or serious (irreversible) personal
injury.
CAUTION! - Indicates a hazardous situation which, if not avoided,
may result in minor or moderate (reversible) personal injury.

Table 1

12

List of conventions used in this document (Cont.)

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Preface

Screenshots of the Graphic User Interface are examples only to illustrate principles.
This especially applies to a software version number visible in a screenshot.

1.4

History of changes
Issue

Issue date

Remarks

June 2010

Initial version

September 2010

Maintenance version

Table 2

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

History of changes

13

Alarm lists

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

2 Alarm lists
SURPASS hiT 7300 alarms are divided into the following categories:

2.1

Equipment alarms: originate from specific hardware elements (e.g., traffic card,
controller card, shelf, etc).
Communication alarms: originate from termination points which represent a particular function of the network.
Processing Error alarms: originate from the NE software.
Environmental alarms: originate from telemetry sensors that monitor conditions/events external to the NE.
Quality of Service alarms: originate from termination points where performance
measurement and threshold supervision is enabled.

Equipment alarms
Table 3 lists SURPASS hiT 7300 equipment alarms. Click on the alarm name in the table
to jump directly to the troubleshooting procedure for that alarm.
Alarm Name
ACTLP

Active Loop (ACTLP)

APRM

Automatic Power Reduction Mode (APRM)

CCFAIL

Card Communication Failure (CCFAIL)

CFF

Compact Flash Failure (CFF)

CMISM

Card Mismatch (CMISM)

CMISS

Card Missing (CMISS)

CMM

Client Mode Mismatch (CMM)

CONCABF

Connection Cable Fail (CONCABF)

CP

Card Problem (CP)

FAN_MAJOR

Fan Major (FAN_MAJOR)

FAN_MINOR

Fan Minor (FAN_MINOR)

FCTNS

Function Not Supported (FCTNS)

FF_MISS

Fan Filter Missing (FF_MISS)

FilterExpired

Filter Life Time Expired (FilterExpired)

FMISM

Frequency Mismatch (Optical Interface) (FMISM)

ILANF

ILAN Fail (ILANF)

ISLP

Interstage Loss Problem (ISLP)

LowCFSUFlow

Low CFSU Flow (LowCFSUFlow)

LSBFAIL

Laser Safety Bus Failure (LSBFAIL)

LSBMISM

Slot LSB Mismatch (LSBMISM)

LSBWRONG

Wrong LSB Cabling (LSBWRONG)

Table 3

14

Alarm Message Text

SURPASS hiT 7300 equipment alarms

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Alarm lists

Alarm Name

Alarm Message Text

MeasFail

Measurement Failed (MeasFail)

MMISM

Module Type Mismatch (MMISM)

MMISS

Module Missing (MMISS)

MNOTCT

Module Not Certified (MNOTCT)

MP

Module Problem (MP)

NLD

No Light Detected (NLD)

OBFF

Onboard Flash Failure (OBFF)

OBRF

Optical Booster Stage Receive Failure (OBRF)

OBTF

Booster Stage Transmit Fail (OBTF)

OPRF

Optical Preamplifier Stage Receive Failure (OPRF)

OPTF

Preamplifier Stage Transmit Fail (OPTF)

OSCLOL

OSC Loss of Lock (OSCLOL)

OSCTD

OSC Laser Transmit Degrade (OSCTD)

OSCTF

OSC Laser Transmit Fail (OSCTF)

OverPower1M

Over Power 1M (OverPower1M)

PD

Pump Degrade (PD)

PF

Pump Fail (PF)

POOR

Power Out of Range (POOR)

PS1

Power Supply 1 Problem (PS1)

PS2

Power Supply 2 Problem (PS2)

PS3

Power Supply 3 Problem (PS3)

PS4

Power Supply 4 Problem (PS4)

Pu1TD

Transmit Degrade Pump 1 (Pu1TD)

Pu2TD

Transmit Degrade Pump 2 (Pu2TD)

Pu3TD

Transmit Degrade Pump 3 (Pu3TD)

Pu4TD

Transmit Degrade Pump 4 (Pu4TD)

Pu1TF

Transmit Fail Pump 1 (Pu1TF)

Pu2TF

Transmit Fail Pump 2 (Pu2TF)

Pu3TF

Transmit Fail Pump 3 (Pu3TF)

Pu4TF

Transmit Fail Pump 4 (Pu4TF)

SBLOS

Sub Band Loss of Signal (SBLOS)

SLH

Span Loss High (SLH)

SLL

Span Loss Low (SLL)

SRMISS

Shelf Missing (SRMISS)

Table 3

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

SURPASS hiT 7300 equipment alarms (Cont.)

15

Alarm lists

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Alarm Name
SWP

Switch Problem (SWP)

TD

Transmit Degrade (TD)

TempM

Temperature Problem (major) (TempM)

TempMIN

Temperature Problem (minor) (TempMIN)

TempP

Temperature Problem (TempP)

TempP1

Temperature Problem 1 (TempP1)

TempP2

Temperature Problem 2 (TempP2)

TF

Transmit Fail (TF)

WRGSR

Wrong Shelf Type (WRGSR)

Table 3

2.2

Alarm Message Text

SURPASS hiT 7300 equipment alarms (Cont.)

Communication alarms
Table 4 lists SURPASS hiT 7300 communication alarms. Click on the alarm name in the
table to jump directly to the troubleshooting procedure for that alarm.
Alarm Name
BDI

Backward Defect Indication (BDI)

CHM

Channel Mismatch (CHM)

CSF_LCS

GFP Client Signal Fail - Loss of Character Synchronization


(CSF_LCS)

CSF_LOS

GFP Client Signal Fail - Loss of Signal (CSF_LOS)

DEG

Degraded Signal (DEG)

DEG-O

Degraded Signal (OSC) (DEG-O)

DOPFail

Degree of Polarization Failure (DOPFail)

DRM

GFP Data Rate Mismatch (DRM)

EOCI

External Open Connection Indication (EOCI)

EXC-O

Excessive Bit Error Ratio (OSC) (EXC-O)

EXM

GFP Extension Header Mismatch (EXM)

ITIM

Internal Trace Identifier Mismatch (ITIM)

LCK

Locked Defect (LCK)

LFD

GFP Loss of Frame Delineation (LFD)

LOCL

Loss of Clock Lock (LOCL)

LOF

Loss of Frame (LOF)

LOF-egress

Loss of Frame (egress) (LOF-egress)

LOFLOM

Loss of Frame and Multiframe (LOFLOM)

Table 4

16

Alarm Message Text

SURPASS hiT 7300 communication alarms

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Alarm lists

Alarm Name

Alarm Message Text

LOF-O

Loss of Frame (OSC) (LOF-O)

LOM

Loss of Multiframe (LOM)

LOS

Loss of Signal (LOS)

LOS-O

Loss of Signal (OSC) (LOS-O)

LOS-P

Loss of Signal (payload) (LOS-P)

LSM

Link State Mismatch (LSM)

LSS

Loss of PRBS Lock (LSS)

LTC

Loss of Tandem Connection (LTC)

MSIM

Multiplex Structure Identifier Mismatch (MSIM)

NFR

GFP No Frames Received (NFR)

OCI

Open Connection Indication (OCI)

OOS

GFP Frames Out Of Sequence (OOS)

OPR

Optical Power Received Too Low (OPR)

PESF

Preemphasis Section Fail (PESF)

PHF

Power Too High Failure (PHF)

PLF

Power Too Low Failure (PLF)

PLM

Payload Mismatch (PLM)

SSF

Server Signal Fail (SSF)

SSF-egress

Server Signal Fail (egress) (SSF-egress)

SSF-O

Server Signal Fail (OSC) (SSF-O)

SSF-P

Server Signal Fail (payload) (SSF-P)

SSF-prot

Server Signal Fail (protection) (SSF-prot)

SYNCF

Synchronization Failure (SYNCF)

SYNCF-egress

Synchronization Failure (egress) (SYNCF-egress)

TCLL

TDC Control Loop Limit (TCLL)

TIM

Trace Identifier Mismatch (TIM)

TIM-egress

Trace Identifier Mismatch (egress) (TIM-egress)

TNEF

Target NE Failure (TNEF)

UCI

GFP Unexpected Channel ID (UCI)

UPM

GFP User Payload Mismatch (UPM)

VOATC

VOA Threshold Crossed (VOATC)

Table 4

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

SURPASS hiT 7300 communication alarms (Cont.)

17

Alarm lists

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

2.3

Processing error alarms


Table 5 lists SURPASS hiT 7300 processing error alarms. Click on the alarm name in
the table to jump directly to the troubleshooting procedure for that alarm.
Alarm Name
APSM

APS Mismatch (APSM)

CFFULL

Compact Flash Full (CFFULL)

DUPDHCP

Duplicated DHCP Server (DUPDHCP)

LOTR

Loss of Time Reference (LOTR)

MIBF

MIB Failure (MIBF)

MIBFULL_MAJOR

MIB Full Major (MIBFULL_MAJOR)

MIBFULL_MINOR

MIB Full Minor (MIBFULL_MINOR)

NQO

Notification Queue Overflow (NQO)

RAMFULL

RAM Full (RAMFULL)

RQO

Request Queue Overflow (RQO)

TL1NQO

TL1 Notification Queue Overflow (TL1NQO)

Table 5

2.4

Alarm Message Text

SURPASS hiT 7300 processing error alarms

Environmental alarms
Table 6 lists SURPASS hiT 7300 environmental alarms. Click on the alarm name in the
table to jump directly to the troubleshooting procedure for that alarm.
Alarm Name
EXT
Table 6

2.5

Alarm Message Text


External Alarm (via TIF Sensor) (EXT)

SURPASS hiT 7300 environmental alarms

Quality of service alarms


Table 7 lists SURPASS hiT 7300 quality of service alarms. Click on the alarm name in
the table to jump directly to the troubleshooting procedure for that alarm.
Alarm Name

18

Alarm Message Text

TCA

Threshold Crossing Alert (TCA)

Table 7

SURPASS hiT 7300 quality of service alarms

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Troubleshooting instructions

3 Troubleshooting instructions
This section provides alarm-clearing procedures for all alarms defined in the hiT 7300
system.

For many failure events, when the root cause is repaired, NEs that are downstream
of the original fault may continue to display alarms for a brief period. This happens
because downstream NEs require a short amount of time to pass through the recovered optical channels. When the traffic is completely restored end-to-end, all alarms
will be cleared.

Under certain error conditions related to a mismatch of the NEs APS software or
MIB contents, a hiT 7300 NE will automatically enter Recover Mode. When the NE
is in Recover Mode, the TL1 interface is not available, so only the Element Manager
management tool can be used to restore the NE to normal operation. This Troubleshooting Manual provides instructions in appropriate chapters to exit Recover Mode
and restore normal operation.

3.1
3.1.1

Equipment alarms
ACTLP

Alarm name

Active Loop (ACTLP)

Default severity

Warning

Alarm object

Transponder card Client interface

General information
and causes

There is an active loopback on a Transponder card Client


interface.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.1.2

Via the craft terminal, the user may set one or more Client interfaces on Transponder cards to loopback mode for test purposes. When this is done, a separate ACTLP
alarm will be raised for each loopback as a reminder that the loopback is active. If
loopback(s) are no longer desired, deactivate them via the craft terminal. When all
loopbacks are disabled, all ACTLP alarms will be cleared.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

APRM

Alarm name

Automatic Power Reduction Mode (APRM)

Default severity

Minor

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

19

Troubleshooting instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Alarm object

The APRM alarm can be raised by:

General information
and causes

LAL- type amplifier card used as a pre-amplifier.


LAV- type amplifier card used as a pre-amplifier.
PL-1 external pump card.

The APRM alarm will be raised when Automatic Power


Reduction Mode is active on the card raising the alarm.
APRM is a laser safety mode.

Troubleshooting instructions

When the APRM alarm is raised, optical power fluctuations in downstream preemphasis sections may occur (since APRM decreases the output power of the
amplifier for laser safety reasons). Similarly, fluctuations may also occur when the
APRM alarm is cleared.

Note that the APRM alarm may require several minutes to clear. The alarm will clear
when the amplifier card output power returns to its original value. For example, if the
steps below confirm that the alarm was caused by dirty, disconnected, or damaged
fiber, the APRM alarm may not clear immediately upon establishing a good fiber
connection. If the amplifier cards original output power was very high, it may require
several minutes for the card to reach this output power level again and clear the
ARPM alarm.
1

If any card has raised a CP alarm, troubleshoot and clear that alarm first.

If the APRM alarm persists, dispatch personnel to the site. Verify that the Laser
Safety Bus cabling in this Network Element (NE) is connected among all shelves as
directed in the Interconnection and Mechanical Assembly Manual (ICMA).

If the APRM alarm persists, the most probable cause is a fiber connection problem
in the demux path (disconnected/damaged fiber or dirty connectors). Verify that the
following fiber connections are made correctly and that the fiber is not bent or
kinked. Make corrections as necessary.

3.1.3

Fiber between the Out port of the amplifier card raising the APRM alarm and the
first Filter card in the demux direction.
Fiber between remaining Filter cards in the demux direction.

If the APRM alarm persists, optical connectors may be dirty. One-by-one, disconnect the fibers listed above in Step 3, clean the optical connectors, and re-connect.

If the APRM alarm persists, Warm Start the card raising the alarm. If the alarm persists, Cold Start the card.

If the alarm persists, replace the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, replace the Filter card connected to the amplifier.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

CCFAIL

Alarm name

20

Card Communication Failure (CCFAIL)

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Troubleshooting instructions

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

Card slot

General information
and causes

If a Controller card cannot communicate with one (or more) of


the cards that it manages, the CCFAIL alarm will be raised.
Since the type of card is therefore unknown to the Controller
because of the lack of communication, the CCFAIL alarm is
raised against the shelf slot(s) that cannot communicate.

Troubleshooting instructions
1

Which type of Controller card manages the slot(s) raising the CCFAIL alarm?
a) CCEP or CCMP NE Controller card: Cold Start this Controller card. If the alarm
persists, go to step 2.
b) CCSP Shelf Controller card: [If previously-working communication between
shelves has been interrupted, CCFAIL will be raised by all slots managed by the
CCSP card]. Warm Start the CCSP card. If the alarm persists, Cold Start the
CCSP card. If the alarm persists, dispatch personnel to the site. Check that the
inter-shelf LAN cable is properly connected. If the cable is properly connected,
but the alarm persists, replace the cable with a spare. If the alarm persists, go
to step 2.

3.1.4

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support. If only one
slot is raising the CCFAIL alarm, the card in that slot probably needs to be replaced.

CFF

Alarm name

Compact Flash Failure (CFF)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

CCEP and CCMP cards

General information
and causes

CCEP and CCMP cards contain a removable Compact Flash


memory module. The CFF alarm will be raised if the card
cannot write data to its Compact Flash.

Troubleshooting instructions

g NOTICE: Do NOT Cold Start a card that has an active CFF alarm!

3.1.5

Dispatch service personnel to the site of the card raising the alarm. Bring at least
one spare Compact Flash module. Replace the Compact Flash module on the card
raising the CFF alarm. To do so, follow the Compact Flash replacement instructions
in chapter 4.2.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

CMISM

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

21

Troubleshooting instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Alarm name

Card Mismatch (CMISM)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

Card slot

General information
and causes

The NE Configuration File (NCF) specifies the card type to be


installed in each slot. If a slot contains a card different from
that specified by the NCF, a CMISM alarm will be raised.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.1.6

Remove the incorrect card and install the exact card type specified in the NCF.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

CMISS

Alarm name

Card Missing (CMISS)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

Card slot

General information
and causes

The NE Configuration File (NCF) specifies the card type to be


installed in each slot. If no card is installed in a slot that is
supposed to contain a card, a CMISS alarm will be raised.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.1.7

Install the exact card type specified in the NCF.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

CMM

Alarm name

Client Mode Mismatch (CMM)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

Client port of I01T10G card and I04TQ10G card

General information
and causes

The CMM alarm will be raised if the card is not capable of


running the user-specified client mode. The cards client laser
will be switched off when a CMM alarm is active.

Troubleshooting instructions
1

What card type is raising the CMM alarm?

22

I01T10G card: go to step 2.


I04TQ10G card::go to step 3.

For the I01T10G card, the CMM alarm will be raised for either of the following
reasons:

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Troubleshooting instructions

If 11.09 10GbE LAN PHY [also known as OTU2 (overclocked, OTU2e)]


mapping is selected by the user for any sub-type of I01T10G card that does not
support it. Only the I01T10G-1 LHD (Long-haul, higher dispersion tolerance)
and I01T10G-1 LHDS (Long-haul, higher dispersion tolerance, submarine) subtypes supports this client mode. Selecting 11.09 10GbE LAN PHY mapping for
any I01T10G sub-type other than LHD or LHDS will raise the CMM alarm.
If superFEC is activated when 11.09 10GbE LAN PHY [OTU2 (overclocked
OTU2e)] or 10GbE LAN PHY (mapping via OPU2e) is selected for the client
port, the CMM alarm will be raised if the current optical module cannot support
the increased bit rate.

So, to clear the alarm, select another client mode that is supported by the sub-type
of I01T10G card actually installed, or change the line interface FEC to standard (but
this will reduce performance). Conversely, if 11.09 10GbE LAN PHY mapping is
absolutely required, the currently installed I01T10G sub-type must be replaced by
an I01T10G-1 LHD or I01T10G-1 LHDS sub-type.
3

For the I04TQ10G card, the CMM alarm will be raised if superFEC is activated on
the line side when 10G Fibre Channel client mode is specified. To clear the alarm,
ensure that client mode and FEC type are compatible as follows:

3.1.8

If client mode needs to be 10G Fibre Channel, then the line interface must be
set to Standard FEC.
If the line interface must be superFEC, then the client mode is not allowed to be
10G Fibre Channel.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

CONCABF

Alarm name

Connection Cable Fail (CONCABF)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

PL-1 card

General information
and causes

Each LALx amplifier card may have an optional PL-1 pump


card connected to it via fiber cable. This fiber includes a
small, low-voltage electrical cable that provides the capability
to detect if the connection is mated properly. If the cable is not
connected, the affected PL-1 card will raise a CONCABF
alarm. The PL-1 cards laser is shut off under these conditions.

Troubleshooting instructions
1

Contact your next level of technical support before proceeding since the following
action is traffic-affecting. Warm Start the PL-1 card raising the alarm. If the alarm
persists after Warm Start recovery time (approx 3 minutes), dispatch personnel to
the site to check the cable.

Ensure that the fiber from the associated LALx amplifier card is connected properly
to the PL-1 card raising the alarm. If not, clean all optical connectors and make the
correct fiber connections. This should clear the CONCABF alarm. Note that it is nec-

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

23

Troubleshooting instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

essary to withdraw the PL-1 card a short distance from the shelf in order to access
its internal connector.
3

3.1.9

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support before proceeding since the following action is traffic-affecting. Replace the faulty PL-1 card
with a spare.

CP

Alarm name

Card Problem (CP)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

Card (active type cards only; the CP alarm is not raised by


Filter or DCM cards).

General information
and causes

The CP alarm is raised due to a fault condition on the indicated card.

Troubleshooting instructions
1

What type of card is raising the CP alarm?

3.1.9.1

Transponder, Muxponder, and Regenerator card (except 40G cards): go to


chapter 3.1.9.1.
40G card: go to chapter 3.1.9.2.
CFSU card: go to chapter 3.1.9.3.
MCP404 card: go to chapter 3.1.9.4.
Any other card type: go to chapter 3.1.9.5.

CP alarm raised by transponder, muxponder, or regenerator card


(except 40G)
Are MMISS alarm(s) also raised by the same card?

3.1.9.2

No: go to chapter 3.1.9.5.


Yes: there is a problem with the insertion of pluggable modules. Go to the troubleshooting instructions for the MMISS alarm.

CP alarm raised by 40G card


The following description is valid for I01T40G-1, I01R40G-1, and I04T40G-1 cards.
Perform the following steps:

24

Try to clear the alarm remotely first. Warm Start the card raising the CP alarm and
see if the alarm clears. If the alarm persists, continue to step 2.

If one (or more) of these card types has raised a CP alarm, it does not necessarily
mean there is a defect on the card. If the cards allowable temperature range has
been significantly exceeded, the card will be automatically taken out of operation (all
traffic interfaces are switched off) as a safety precaution to prevent damage to the
card. The CP alarm will be raised to alert the user to this condition. If the remote
Warm Start did not clear the alarm, dispatch personnel to the site. For the shelf that

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Troubleshooting instructions

contains the card(s) raising the CP alarm, withdraw the Fan Unit from the shelf and
check the type listed on the label.

3.1.9.3

If the Fan Unit is the older CFS-1 type, replace it with a CFS-2 Fan Unit: Nokia
Siemens Networks part number S42024-L5423-C200-x (where x is 3 or
higher). The CFS-1 Fan Unit cannot be used in any shelf that contains 40G
cards. Only the CFS-2 Fan Unit (Rev 3 or higher) may be used with 40G
cards.
If the Fan Unit is the CFS-2 type, verify that it is correctly installed and working.
If a FAN_MAJOR or FAN_MINOR alarm is also active, follow the troubleshooting procedures for those alarms, including replacement of the Fan Unit with a
spare if necessary.

Once a correctly-functioning CFS-2 Fan Unit is installed in the shelf, wait 15 minutes
for the fan to cool the shelf and cards to the proper temperature. Then, Cold Start
the 40G card(s) raising the CP alarm (or withdraw the card from the shelf and then
re-seat it). This is the only way to clear this type of CP alarm and restore the card to
operation.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

CP alarm raised by CFSU card


The CFSU card is designed to be operated at altitudes from 0 m to 2000 m above sea
level. If the CFSU is installed at altitudes lower than 500 m below sea level or higher
than 8000 m above sea level, the card will raise a CP alarm. The CFSU card will also
raise a CP alarm if the ambient temperature is lower than -10 degrees Celsius or higher
than +73 degrees Celsius. All these conditions are far outside the allowable hiT 7300
operating ranges. Under such conditions, the card will raise a CP alarm that cannot be
cleared (except by moving the CFSU to a lower altitude location or correcting the
ambient temperature).
Conversely, if the CFSU is installed at a location that does meet the official Nokia
Siemens Networks specifications for operating environment, then the CP alarm has
been caused by a fault on the card itself. Go to chapter 3.1.9.5.

3.1.9.4

CP alarm raised by MCP404 card


If the CP alarm is raised by an MCP404 card, there is a possibility that the wrong card
type was installed. These cards are available in two types; MCP404-1 and MCP404-2.
An MCP404 card may raise a CP alarm if it receives configuration instructions from the
Network Configuration File (NCF) that are not supported by that type of MCP404. In this
case, the CP alarm does not indicate a defective card; it simply indicates that the wrong
MCP404 type is installed. Therefore, check the part number of the installed card. If it
does not agree with the part number specified in the TransNet report, remove the incorrect card and install the correct type. If the CP alarm persists, go to chapter 3.1.9.5.

3.1.9.5

CP alarm raised by any other card type


1

Execute a Warm Start of the card raising the CP alarm. Sometimes, this allows a
faulty card to recover. However, the recovery may only be temporary. If the alarm
persists, continue to step 2.

Is traffic affected by the failed condition?

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

25

Troubleshooting instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

a) Yes: execute a Cold Start of the card. If the alarm persists, immediately dispatch
personnel to the site and replace the card with a spare. See Card Replacement
instructions in chapter 4.1.
b) No: do NOT execute a Cold Start (since traffic is OK). However, replacement of
the faulty card should be scheduled for the next scheduled maintenance
window. See Card Replacement instructions in chapter 4.1.

3.1.10

FAN_MAJOR

Alarm name

Fan Major (FAN_MAJOR)

Default severity

Critical

Alarm object

Shelf

General information
and causes

A shelf will raise the FAN_MAJOR alarm as follows:

Shelf types that can hold only a single Fan Unit (CFS1 or CFS-2 type Fan Units): the FAN_MAJOR alarm will
be raised if two or more individual fans inside the Fan Unit
are faulty. Note: all working fans in the Fan Unit will go to
high speed when a FAN_MAJOR alarm is active. In addition, the FAN_MAJOR alarm is raised if the Fan Units
presence is not detected by the shelf. Either the Fan Unit
has been unplugged from the shelf, or there is some
problem with its connector plug.
Shelf types that can hold multiple Fan Units (CFS-3
type Fan Units): the FAN_MAJOR alarm will be raised if
two or more Fan Units have completely failed. Note: all
working Fan Units in the shelf will go to high speed when
a FAN_MAJOR alarm is active. In addition, the
FAN_MAJOR alarm is raised if the two or more Fan Units
are detected to be missing from the shelf. Either the Fan
Units have been unplugged from the shelf, or there is
some problem with their connector plugs.

Troubleshooting instructions
1

What type of shelf is raising the alarm?

3.1.10.1

A shelf that can hold only one Fan Unit: go to chapter 3.1.10.1.
A shelf that can hold multiple Fan Units: go to chapter 3.1.10.2.

FAN_MAJOR raised by a shelf that can hold only a


single Fan Unit
Troubleshooting instructions

26

Immediately dispatch personnel to the site. Take a spare Fan Unit and a spare Air
Filter.

Once on site, check the shelf raising the alarm.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Troubleshooting instructions

If there is no Fan Unit in the shelf, install the replacement (with its new Air Filter).
The FAN_MAJOR alarm should clear when a fully-working Fan Unit is installed.
Go to step 3.
If the Fan Unit is present in the shelf, it may not be fully engaged with its shelf
connector plug. Withdraw the Fan Unit from the shelf, then immediately re-insert
it. If this Fan Unit is functioning correctly, the FAN_MAJOR alarm will clear. If the
FAN_MAJOR alarm persists, it means two or more individual fans in the Fan
Unit are faulty. Withdraw the Fan Unit and replace it with the spare (with its new
Air Filter). The FAN_MAJOR alarm will clear when a fully-working Fan Unit is
correctly installed in the shelf. Go to step 3.

g NOTICE: Do NOT remove the Fan Unit unless the replacement unit is readily at
hand. When a shelfs Fan Unit is removed, there is no cooling airflow. Therefore,
the replacement unit must be inserted as quickly as possible after removing the
old unit.
3

If a new Fan Unit was installed, it is assumed that it contained a new Air Filter. Therefore, the filter maintenance timer must be reset. There are two ways to do this:

3.1.10.2

If the shelf contains the optional CFSU card, there is a button on the cards
front panel named Restart Timer. Press this button (a small tool is required)
and hold the button for 5 seconds. This will restart the filter replacement timer.
In addition, the new filters Insertion Date (visible on the Element Manager
Shelf-Config window) will be set to the current date and time.
If the shelf does not contain a CFSU card, restart the timer via Element
Manager. In the Shelf Equipment window, right-click on the Shelf bar and
select Configuration. On the resulting window, click the Fan Filter Configuration button, enter the current date and time in the fields provided, and then click
the Apply button.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

FAN_MAJOR raised by a shelf that can hold


multiple Fan Units
Troubleshooting instructions
1

Immediately dispatch personnel to the site. Take at least two spare CFS-3 Fan
Units.

Once on site, remove the plate that covers the shelfs Fan Unit area.

g NOTICE: In these shelf types, the Air Filter and the Fan Units are separate
assemblies. Whenever one or more Fan Units are removed from the shelf, do
not remove the Air Filter. If the Air Filter is removed from the shelf when one or
more Fan Units are also removed, cooling airflow will not be sufficient and
damage to the cards will occur.

If Fan Units are missing from the shelf, install the spares. The FAN_MAJOR
alarm should clear when fully-working Fan Units are installed.
If all Fan Units are present in the shelf, they may not be fully engaged with their
connector plugs. One by one, withdraw each Fan Unit from the shelf, then immediately re-insert it. If all Fan Units are functioning correctly, the FAN_MAJOR
alarm will clear. If the FAN_MAJOR alarm persists, it means two or more Fan
Units are faulty. The faulty units can be usually be quickly identified since their

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

27

Troubleshooting instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

red LED should be on. Remove each failed Fan Unit from the shelf and replace
them with the spares. The FAN_MAJOR alarm will clear when fully-working Fan
Units are correctly installed in the shelf.
3

Re-install the cover plate over the fan area of the shelf.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

Operating note: CFS-3 fans are displayed in Element Managers Equipment


Inventory list. But this inventory data can be updated on the GUI only if all Fan
Units are inserted in the shelf. If one or more Fan Units are removed from the
shelf, old inventory data will continue to be displayed. Once all Fans are
inserted, inventory status will be updated.

3.1.11

FAN_MINOR

Alarm name

Fan Minor (FAN_MINOR)

Default severity

Critical

Alarm object

Shelf

General information
and causes

A shelf will raise the FAN_MINOR alarm as follows:

Shelf types that can hold only a single Fan Unit (CFS1 or CFS-2 type Fan Units): the FAN_MINOR alarm will
be raised if one individual fan inside the Fan Unit is faulty.
Note: all working fans in the Fan Unit will go to high speed
when a FAN_MINOR alarm is active.
Shelf types that can hold multiple Fan Units (CFS-3
type Fan Units): the FAN_MINOR alarm will be raised if
one Fan Unit has completely failed. In addition, the
FAN_MINOR alarm is raised if one Fan Unit is detected
to be missing from the shelf. Either the Fan Unit has been
unplugged from the shelf, or there is some problem with
its connector plugs.

Troubleshooting instructions
1

What type of shelf is raising the alarm

3.1.11.1

A shelf that can hold only one Fan Unit: go to chapter 3.1.11.1.
A shelf that can hold multiple Fan Units: go to chapter 3.1.11.2.

FAN_MINOR raised by a shelf that can hold only a


single Fan Unit
Troubleshooting instructions
1

Which alarm(s) are raised?

28

FAN_MAJOR and FAN_MINOR: If both alarms are raised simultaneously, go


to the troubleshooting instructions for the FAN_MAJOR alarm.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Troubleshooting instructions

FAN_MINOR only: one fan pack in the Fan Unit is faulty. Replace the Fan Unit
with a spare as soon as possible before a more serious FAN_MAJOR alarm has
a chance to occur. It is recommended to replace the Fan Unit within 24 hours of
a FAN_MINOR alarm. In addition to the spare Fan Unit, take a spare air filter to
the site. It is a good idea to also replace the air filter at this time.

g NOTICE: Do NOT remove the Fan Unit unless the replacement unit is readily at
hand. When a shelfs Fan Unit is removed, there is no cooling airflow. Therefore,
the replacement unit must be inserted as quickly as possible after removing the
old unit.
2

If a new Fan Unit was installed, it is assumed that it contained a new Air Filter. Therefore, the filter maintenance timer must be reset. There are two ways to do this:

3.1.11.2

If the shelf contains the optional CFSU card, there is a button on the cards
front panel named Restart Timer. Press this button (a small tool is required)
and hold the button for 5 seconds. This will restart the filter replacement timer.
In addition, the new filters Insertion Date (visible on the Element Manager
Shelf-Config window) will be set to the current date and time.
If the shelf does not contain a CFSU card, restart the timer via Element
Manager. In the Shelf Equipment window, right-click on the Shelf bar and
select Configuration. On the resulting window, click the Fan Filter Configuration button, enter the current date and time in the fields provided, and then click
the Apply button.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

FAN_MINOR raised by a shelf that can hold


multiple Fan Units
Troubleshooting instructions
1

Dispatch personnel to the site within 24 hours of the FAN_MINOR alarm being
raised. Take at least one spare CFS-3 Fan Unit.

Once on site, remove the plate that covers the shelfs Fan Unit area.

g NOTICE: In these shelf types, the Air Filter and the Fan Units are separate
assemblies. Whenever one or more Fan Units are removed from the shelf, do
not remove the Air Filter. If the Air Filter is removed from the shelf when one or
more Fan Units are also removed, cooling airflow will not be sufficient and
damage to the cards will occur.

If a Fan Unit is missing from the shelf, install the spare. The FAN_MINOR alarm
should clear when all Fan Units are installed in the shelf and fully working.
If all Fan Units are present in the shelf, they may not be fully engaged with their
connector plugs. One by one, withdraw each Fan Unit from the shelf, then immediately re-insert it. If all Fan Units are functioning correctly, the FAN_MINOR
alarm will clear. If the FAN_MINOR alarm persists, it means one Fan Unit is
faulty. The faulty unit can be usually be quickly identified since its red LED
should be on. Remove the failed Fan Unit from the shelf and replace it with the
spare. The FAN_MINOR alarm will clear when fully-working Fan Units are correctly installed in the shelf.

Re-install the cover plate over the fan area of the shelf.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

29

Troubleshooting instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

Operating note: CFS-3 fans are displayed in Element Managers Equipment


Inventory list. But this inventory data can be updated on the GUI only if all Fan
Units are inserted in the shelf. If one or more Fan Units are removed from the
shelf, old inventory data will continue to be displayed. Once all Fans are
inserted, inventory status will be updated.

3.1.12

FCTNS

Alarm name

Function Not Supported (FCTNS)

Default severity

Minor

Alarm object

The FCTNS alarm can be raised by the following:

General information
and causes

I04T2G5-1 card
I05AD10G-1 card
MCP404-1 card and MCP404-2 card

The FCTNS alarm will be raised by a card that does not


support one or more functions due to a hardware limitation or
a netlist that has not yet been upgraded.

Troubleshooting instructions
1

Which type of card is raising the FCTNS alarm?

I04T2G5-1 card: go to step 2.


I05AD10G-1 card: go to step 3.
MCP-404-1 or MCP-404-2 card: go to step 4.

I04T2G5-1 card: there is only one I04T2G5-1 function that can be activated to
cause an FCTNS alarm: GCC0. Beginning with Release 4.2, GCC0 is supported
with a netlist variant. I04T2G5-1 cards already running in the system with an older
netlist cannot support GCC0 unless the new netlist is downloaded to the card.
Therefore, if an FCTNS alarm is raised by an I04T2G5-1 card, it means that the
GCC0 feature has been activated on a card that cannot support it with its current
netlist. To clear the alarm, do either of the following:

deactivate GCC0 on the card raising the alarm.


Or, Cold Start the card to download the new netlist. This is traffic-affecting!

I05AD10G-1 card: Cold Start the card to clear the FCTNS alarm. This is trafficaffecting!

Explanation: if a client mode change makes it necessary to download a different


"partial netlist" to the card, the card software will check if the currently running
"master netlist" is the compatible version. If yes, then the partial netlist will be
automatically downloaded and used. If not, changing the partial netlist will be
blocked, and the FCTNS alarm will be raised. The only way to recover is to Cold
Start the card, which will trigger download of a new master netlist and unblock
the download of the partial netlist.

30

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Troubleshooting instructions

MCP404-1 and MCP404-2 cards: MCP cards must be deployed only as specified
in the following table. If an FCTNS alarm is raised, it means that the card has been
installed in a system that is incompatible. Therefore, be sure to install these card
types (MCP404-1, MCP404-2, and MCP4-1) according to the table below. Be aware
of this requirement if you are replacing a failed MCP card - be sure the replacement card is an acceptable type for your system. When the correct card type is
installed, the FCTNS alarm will clear.
MCP Card System Compatibility
Bit Rate

Channel Count (Spacing)

Card Type

40G DPSK

All Others

40 ch (100 GHz)

80 ch (50 GHz)

MCP404-1

OK

OK

OK

No!

MCP404-2

No!

OK

OK

No!

MCP4-1

OK

OK

OK

OK

Table 8

MCP card system compatibility


5

3.1.13

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

FF_MISS

Alarm name

Fan Filter Missing (FF_MISS)

Default severity

Minor

Alarm object

Shelf (SRS-2 type only)

General information
and causes

An SRS-2 shelf will raise the FF_MISS alarm if the Air Filter
is removed from the shelf. Note that all four fan units must be
inserted in the shelf in order for the shelf to be able to detect
a missing filter and raise the FF_MISS alarm.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.1.14

Inert the Air Filter into its slot underneath the fans. Make sure it is fully seated.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

FilterExpired

Alarm name

Filter Life Time Expired (FilterExpired)

Default severity

Warning

Alarm object

Shelf

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

31

Troubleshooting instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

General information
and causes

As a back-up to detection of a clogged air filter by CFSU card


airflow measurement, the user can also configure a simple
timer. When the timer expires, a FilterExpired alarm will be
raised to remind the user to replace the shelf air filter. This
timer is implemented by the Controller card (CCEP, CCMP,
and CCSP).
The timer parameters are set on the Shelf-Configuration
window. Available choices (based on site environmental conditions) are 6, 8, 10, or 12 months. Refer to the NE Commissioning Manuals for details that will assist in choosing the
time period appropriate for your NE site conditions.

Troubleshooting instructions
1

It is possible that the FilterExpired alarm has been raised unintentionally by the user.
This can happen when a new value for the air Filter Insertion Date (on the Shelf Configuration window) is set manually by the user. If the Insertion Date is accidentally set to a value that is later than the NE Time, then the Filter Expired alarm will
be raised immediately. The root cause is that a typo was made when setting the
Insertion Date, or the NE Time itself is incorrect. So, if a FilterExpired alarm occurs
immediately after manually setting the air filter Insertion Date, verify that the NE
Time is correct and the Insertion Date is set correctly. Instructions for setting both
these parameters can be found in the hiT 7300 NE Commissioning Manual. When
these parameters are set correctly, the FilterExpired alarm will clear. If the FilterExpired alarm was not caused by this manual setting, continue to step 2.

Dispatch personnel to the site. Be sure to take a spare air filter. Replace the air filter
in the shelf raising the alarm according to the instructions in chapter 4.28. As
explained in chapter 4.28, note that a key part of the procedure is to restart the timer
after replacing the filter. There are two ways to do this:

3.1.15

32

If the shelf contains the optional CFSU card, there is a button on the cards
front panel named Restart Timer. Press this button (a small tool is required)
and hold the button for 5 seconds. This will restart the filter replacement timer.
In addition, the new filters Insertion Date (visible on the Element Manager
Shelf-Config window) will be set to the current date and time.
If the shelf does not contain a CFSU card, restart the timer via Element
Manager. In the Shelf Equipment window, right-click on the Shelf bar and
select Configuration. On the resulting window, click the Fan Filter Configuration button, enter the current date and time in the fields provided, and then click
the Apply button.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

FMISM

Alarm name

Frequency Mismatch (Optical Interface) (FMISM)

Default severity

Major

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Troubleshooting instructions

Alarm object

Transponder card Client port (if configured as WDM client)


and Transponder card Line port.

General information
and causes

The FMISM alarm will be raised in there is an anomaly with


the transponder cards transmit frequency on the indicated
port.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.1.16

Verify that the card raising the alarm is installed in the correct slot, and correct if necessary. Card positions not in agreement with the NE Configuration File (NCF) or
manual configuration (for SON), can cause the FMISM alarm.

If the FMISM alarm persists, verify that the proper type of pluggable module is
installed in the port raising the FMISM alarm. If the wrong type of pluggable module
is installed, remove it and install the correct type.

If the FMISM alarm persists, Warm Start the card raising the alarm.

If the FMISM alarm persists, Cold Start the card raising the alarm.

If the FMISM alarm persists, replace the card raising the alarm with a spare.
Transfer all pluggable modules from the old card to the new card.

If the FMISM alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

ILANF

Alarm name

ILAN Fail (ILANF)

Default severity

Minor

Alarm object

ILAN1 and ILAN2 ports on CCxP card

General information
and causes

The hiT 7300 NE Commissioning procedures recommend


that ILAN ports and the ILANF alarm be configured as
follows:

When an ILAN port is used (i.e., a cable is connected to


it):
The port itself should be enabled.
The ILANF alarm should be enabled.
When an ILAN port is unused (i.e., no cable is connected to it):
The port itself should remain enabled.
But, the ILANF alarm should be suppressed.

Suppressing or enabling the ILANF alarm is done on the


Element Manager Alarm Notification Suppression window.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

33

Troubleshooting instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Troubleshooting instructions
1

If the ILANF alarm is raised, it can be caused by either of the following:

3.1.17

The cable connected to an ILAN port has been disconnected. If this is the case,
re-install the cable and the ILANF will clear. If the alarm persists, replace the
cable with a spare.
An unused ILAN port does not have the alarm suppressed. If this is the case,
suppress this ports ILANF alarm via the Alarm Notification Suppression
window.

If the alarm persists, Cold Start the CCxP card raising the alarm. If the alarm persists, replace the CCxP card and re-connect all ILAN cables.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

ISLP

Alarm name

Interstage Loss Problem (ISLP)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

Amplifier card interstage input port. (All amplifier card types


execpt LASBC-1 feature interstage access).

General information
and causes

The ISLP alarm will be raised if the indicated amplifier card


detects that the insertion loss through its external "interstage"
device(s) is too high.

Troubleshooting instructions

34

First, try to clear the alarm remotely. Warm Start the card raising the alarm. If the
alarm persists, dispatch personnel to the site.

If any of the amplifier cards interstage fibers are pinched or kinked (which will cause
increased attenuation), correct the condition. If the alarm persists, continue to the
next step.

Verify that all interstage devices (DCM and/or attenuator patchcord) connected to
the amplifier card raising the alarm are the exact types required at this location. If
any interstage device is an incorrect type, replace it with the correct type.

If the alarm persists, disconnect all interstage fibers, clean all connectors, and reconnect. If the alarm persists, replace the fibers one-by-one with spares until the
alarm clears. Be sure to replace any attenuator patchcord with one of an equivalent
rating.

If the alarm persists, try another Warm Start of the amplifier card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, replace the DCM with a spare of the identical type.

If the alarm persists, Cold Start the amplifier card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, replace the amplifier card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

3.1.18

Troubleshooting instructions

LowCFSUFlow

Alarm name

Low CFSU Flow (LowCFSUFlow)

Default severity

Minor

Alarm object

CFSU card

General information
and causes

The CFSU card has determined that the airflow through the
shelfs air filter is too low. This indicates that the filter is
clogged and needs to be replaced.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.1.19

Dispatch personnel to the site raising the alarm. Be sure to take a spare air filter.

Once on site, identify the shelf raising the alarm. Replace its air filter by following the
instructions in chapter 4.28. Verify that the LowCFSUFlow alarm clears and that the
yellow Replace Filter LED on the front panel of the CFSU card turns off.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

LSBFAIL

Alarm name

Laser Safety Bus Failure (LSBFAIL)

Default severity

Critical

Alarm object

Shelf

General information
and causes

The LSBFAIL alarm will be raised if the indicated shelf


detects a failure of the Laser Safety Bus (also known as the
APSD bus).

Troubleshooting instructions

3.1.20

Verify that the APSD IN/APSD OUT cable connections are correctly made to the
shelf indicating the LSBFAIL alarm as directed in the hiT 7300 Installation Manual
(ITMN). Correct any cabling errors.

If the alarm persists, replace the APSD IN and APSD OUT cables connected to the
shelf raising the alarm. If there was a bad cable, this should clear the alarm.

If the alarm persists, Cold Start the Controller card in the shelf raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

LSBMISM

Alarm name

Slot LSB Mismatch (LSBMISM)

Default severity

Major

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

35

Troubleshooting instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Alarm object

The LSBMISM alarm can be raised by the following card


types:

General information
and causes

LAL-type Amplifier cards (LALIC-1, LALPC-1, LALBC-1,


and LALBCH-1)
LAV-type Amplifier cards (LAVIC-1, LAVBC-1, and
LAVBCH-1)
LIFB-1 card
PRC-1 Raman Pump card
PL-1 Pump card
F40-1/S and F40-1/O cards (only when the card is used
in demux mode)
F40V-1/S and F40V-1/O cards (only when the card is
used in demux mode)
F02MR-1 card
F08MR-1 card
F16SB-1 card
F80MDI-1 and F80DCI-1 cards
F06DR80-1 and F09DR80-1 cards
F09MDRT-1/S and F09MDRT-1/O cards

A card will raise the LSBMISM alarm if it receives a laser


safety bus (LSB) address that is not permitted for its card type
or slot position in the shelf.

Troubleshooting instructions

Warm Start the Controller card in the shelf raising the LSBMISM alarm. If the alarm
persists after Warm Start recovery, Cold Start the Controller card.

If the alarm persists, follow the instructions in the Danger note below and
contact your next higher level of technical support for instructions to clear this alarm.
The LSBMISM alarm could be caused by a corrupt NCF (Network Configuration
File).

DANGER! if your system contains PL-1 Pump cards, shut down the system immediately
if an LSBMISM alarm is still active! If the system is allowed to remain in operation with
PL-1 Pump cards, laser safety requirements are not met, which causes a risk of human
injury.
If your system does not contain PL-1 Pump cards, it is permitted for the system to remain
in operation with an LSBMISM alarm raised - but do not install any PL-1 cards until the
alarm is cleared. It is unsafe to operate the system with PL-1 card(s) when an
LSBMISM alarm is raised!

3.1.21

36

LSBWRONG

Alarm name

Wrong LSB Cabling (LSBWRONG)

Default severity

Critical

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Troubleshooting instructions

Alarm object

Shelf

General information
and causes

The LSBWRONG alarm will be raised if the indicated shelf


detects a non-allowed laser safety bus (LSB) address on one
of the member cards of the LSB ring. This is most often
caused by connecting the APSD IN/APSD OUT cables incorrectly (i.e., not connected in agreement with the TransNet
Cabling Plan Report).

Troubleshooting instructions

Check that the APSD IN/APSD OUT cables are correctly connected to form the laser
safety bus ring as directed in the TransNet Cabling Plan Report. Always use the
TransNet Cabling Plan Report that matches the currently active APS software of the
network element (example: for APS = R4.10.00, use the Cabling Plan Report from
TransNet V6.0x). If the cables are not connected properly, immediately make the
required corrections.

If the alarm persists, Cold Start the Controller card in the shelf raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, follow the instructions in the Danger note below and
contact your next higher level of technical support for instructions to clear this alarm.
In addition to incorrect cable connections, the LSBWRONG alarm could be caused
by a corrupt NCF (Network Configuration File).

DANGER! if your system contains PL-1 Pump cards, shut down the system immediately
if an LSBWRONG alarm is still active! If the system is allowed to remain in operation with
PL-1 Pump cards, laser safety requirements are not met, which causes a risk of human
injury.
If your system does not contain PL-1 Pump cards, it is permitted for the system to remain
in operation with an LSBWRONG alarm raised - but do not install any PL-1 cards until
the alarm is cleared. It is unsafe to operate the system with PL-1 card(s) when a
LSBWRONG alarm is raised!

3.1.22

MeasFail

Alarm name

Measurement Failed (MeasFail)

Default severity

Minor

Alarm object

CFSU card

General information
and causes

The MeasFail alarm indicates that the shelf's CFSU (Flow


Sensor Unit) failed to successfully complete an airflow measurement. The CFSU card automatically makes periodic
airflow measurements to determine if the air filter is clogged.
The interval between measurements is user-configurable via
the Element Manager Shelf - Config window. A failed measurement indicates a problem with the CFSU card or possibly
the Fan Unit.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

37

Troubleshooting instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Troubleshooting instructions
1

The CFSU is designed to function only at altitudes between 0 to 2000 m above sea
level. CFSU behavior is as follows:

If the equipment has been installed at an altitude from 2000 m to 4000 m, a


MeasFail alarm will be raised the very first time the CFSU performs an airflow
measurement. In this case, CFSU measurements will be ignored and the
CFSUs air filter Maintenance interval is automatically set to 12 months. A FilterExpired alarm will therefore be raised at 12-month intervals as a reminder to
replace the air filter. Therefore, at these altitudes, the CFSU card provides the
timer function only. It provides no capability to detect a clogged filter via airflow
measurements. Note that as long as the CFSU is used at such altitudes, the
MeasFail alarm will remain raised and cannot be cleared.
If the equipment has been installed at an altitude higher than 4000 m, the CFSU
is being used beyond its design parameters. Again, the MeasFail alarm will be
raised the very first time the CFSU performs a measurement. Since such usage
is not supported, remove the CFSU card from the shelf. It cannot be used at
such altitudes.
If the equipment has been installed at its approved design altitude of 0 m to 2000
m, continue to step 2.

Before dispatching personnel to the site, try to clear the MeasFail alarm remotely by
issuing a manual measurement command to the CFSU card raising the alarm. To
do so, open the CFSU Card - Config window and click the Check Air Flow button.
The read-only Measurement State field on this window will change to Measurement
in progress. It requires 3 to 5 minutes for a measurement to be completed.

Monitor the Measurement State field on the CFSU Card - Config window and look
for one of the following messages:

If the Measurement State field displays Last measurement cycle finished, the
measurement was successful and the MeasFail alarm will be cleared.
If the Measurement State field displays Last status rejected, or Last measurement cycle failed, dispatch personnel to the site with a replacement CFSU card,
a replacement Fan Unit, and replacement Air Filter. Go to step 4.

Once on-site, check the following in the shelf that contains the CFSU raising the
alarm:

Make sure the CFSU card is correctly installed. Equipping rules are: CFSU can
be installed only in Slot 1. Slot 2 is not allowed to be empty. If Slot 2 does not
contain a traffic-carrying card, then this slot must be equipped with a special
type of Filler Panel (NSN part number C50117-A29-B214). Other types of Filler
Panels cannot be used in this situation. One such Filler Panel is shipped with
each CFSU card.
Make sure all Fan Unit(s) are correctly installed in the shelf. If one or more Fan
Units are missing or not fully plugged-in, install the correct Fan Unit in the shelf
(also make sure the air filter element is installed properly).

Older shelf types contain only a single Fan Unit that also contains the Air
Filter. Newer shelf types contain multiple Fan Units and a separate Air Filter.
5

38

Repeat step 2 (manual measurement) to see if the MeasFail alarm clears. If the
alarm persists, continue to step 6.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Troubleshooting instructions

Note that during an airflow measurement, the fans will temporarily change
speeds. This is normal behavior and does not indicate any problem with the Fan
Unit(s).
6

If the alarm persists, a properly-installed, but defective Fan Unit may be causing the
MeasFail alarm. Replace any defective Fan Unit with a spare and repeat step 2. If
the alarm persists, continue to step 7.

g NOTICE: For shelves that contain only a single Fan Unit, do NOT remove it
unless the replacement is readily at hand. Since there is only one Fan Unit in
these shelf types, there is no forced-airflow cooling when the Fan Unit is
removed. Therefore, install the new Fan Unit as quickly as possible to minimize
the time the shelf is without a Fan Unit.

3.1.23

If the MeasFail alarm persists, replace the CFSU card with a spare. For instructions,
see chapter 4.4. Then, repeat step 2 to verify that the MeasFail alarm has cleared.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

MMISM

Alarm name

Module Type Mismatch (MMISM)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

Transponder Line Port and Transponder Client Port

General information
and causes

The MMISM alarm be raised if the pluggable module actually


installed in a transponder Line or Client port does not match
that ports user-configured Required WDM Grid Type value
(on the ports Traffic Configuration window).
For fixed-mounted, non-tunable MSA modules, if the
"Required WDM Grid Type" is set to CWDM, but the MSA
module has a frequency other than a CWDM wavelength, the
MMISM alarm will be raised. Behavior note: in this case,
invalid values will be shown for "Maximum Wavelength" and
"Minimum Wavelength" on this cards 'Line Traffic Configuration' window.

Troubleshooting instructions
1

Follow the instructions in a) or b) as appropriate:


a) For a port equipped with a pluggable module: locate the port on the transponder card raising the MMISM alarm. Verify that pluggable module type
actually installed matches the user-configured Required WDM Grid Type
value. If there is a mismatch, install the correct module, or change the configuration setting to match the module actually installed.
b) For a card equipped with a fixed-mounted, non-tunable MSA module: the
MMISM alarm has been raised because the "Required WDM Grid Type" is configured to CWDM, but the MSA module has a frequency other than a CWDM
wavelength. So, change the Required WDM Grid Type to match the MSA
module. Alternately, if a CWDM wavelength is truly needed for this line port, the

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

39

Troubleshooting instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

entire transponder card must be replaced with one that does have a CWDM
MSA module.
2

3.1.24

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

MMISS

Alarm name

Module Missing (MMISS)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

Transponder Pluggable Port

General information
and causes

The MMISS alarm will be raised if any required SFP or XFP


module is not installed on the indicated transponder port.

Troubleshooting instructions
1

Locate the port on the transponder card raising the MMISS alarm and verify that it
is equipped with a pluggable module appropriate for the card type. Refer to the
Product Description document (PD) for listings of SFPs and XFPs that are compatible with each type of hiT 7300 transponder card.

If the pluggable module is present but simply loose, insert it fully into the cards connector and the alarm should clear. However, if the required module is missing
entirely, determine the exact Nokia Siemens Networks part number of the module
that is required for this port and install it. Connect fibers to the pluggable module.

g Behavior note: It is mechanically possible to install some SFPs upside down. In


some cases, this will cause a short circuit and raise the MMISS alarm (typically,
the alarm will be raised simultaneously on all the cards ports). In addition, this
situation will also raise a CP alarm. If investigation shows that an SFP is installed
upside down, do the following:

3.1.25

40

Remove the incorrectly-installed SFP and re-insert it in the correct orientation.


Warm Start the transponder card. This will clear the CP and MMISS alarms.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

MNOTCT

Alarm name

Module Not Certified (MNOTCT)

Default severity

Minor

Alarm object

Transponder Pluggable Port

General information
and causes

The MNOTCT alarm will be raised if a non-Nokia Siemens


Networks SFP or XFP module is installed in the indicated
transponder port. Refer to the Product Description document
(PD) for listings of SFPs and XFPs that are compatible with
each type of hiT 7300 transponder card.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Troubleshooting instructions

Troubleshooting instructions

The following procedure is traffic-affecting!

3.1.26

Locate the port on the transponder card raising the MNOTCT alarm. Carefully disconnect fibers from the pluggable module. Remove the non-approved module from
this port.

Determine the exact Nokia Siemens Networks part number of the module that is
required for this port and install it. Re-connect fibers.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

MP

Alarm name

Module Problem (MP)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

Transponder pluggable port

General information
and causes

The MP alarm indicates a failure of the indicated ports SFP


or XFP module.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.1.27

Before dispatching personnel to the site, remotely Warm Start the card raising the
alarm. Sometimes, this will clear an MP alarm.

If the alarm persists after the card recovers from the Warm Start, dispatch personnel
to the site. Be sure to take a spare SFP or XFP pluggable module of the exact type
that matches the failed one. Also take a spare transponder card of the exact type
involved.

Once on-site, replace the faulty SFP or XFP module with the spare. The MP alarm
will clear as soon as the faulty module is removed from the card.

If the MP alarm persists after replacing the SFP or XFP module, then replace the
entire card according to the instructions in chapter 4.17.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

NLD

Alarm name

No Light Detected (NLD)

Default severity

Minor

Alarm object

MCP card input port.

General information
and causes

The NLD alarm will be raised if no light is detected at the currently-selected input port of the MCP card.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

41

Troubleshooting instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Troubleshooting instructions

3.1.28

First, try to clear the alarm remotely. Warm Start the card raising the alarm. If the
alarm persists, dispatch personnel to the site.

Missing or loose fiber connections between the amplifier cards MonSo port and the
MCP cards input ports can cause the NLD alarm. Verify that all fiber patchcords are
properly installed. If any patchcord is missing, bent/pinched, or improperly connected, the NLD alarm should clear when the correct connection is established.

If the alarm persists, disconnect the fiber patchcord from the relevant input port of
the MCP card and the MonSo port of the corresponding amplifier card. Clean all
optical connectors and re-connect. If the NLD alarm persists after cleaning, replace
the fiber patchcord with a cleaned, inspected spare.

If the alarm persists, there may be no light coming from the amplifier cards MonSo
port. Disconnect the fiber from the amplifier cards MonSo port and measure the
output power. If no light is exiting the MonSo port, contact your next higher level of
technical support before proceeding. Replace the amplifier card with a spare.

If no other cause can be found, try another Warm Start of the affected MCP card. If
the alarm persists after recovery time (approx 3 minutes), Cold Start the MCP card.
If the alarm persists after recovery time (approx 3 minutes), the MCP card is defective. Replace the MCP card with a spare.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

OBFF

Alarm name

Onboard Flash Failure (OBFF)

Default severity

Warning

Alarm object

CCEP and CCMP cards.

General information
and causes

The CCEP and CCMP cards both contain an onboard flash


memory. A copy of the MIB contents is periodically written to
the onboard flash. When the onboard flash reaches the end
of its lifetime, no further backup copies can be written to it.
Therefore, the OBFF alarm serves as a warning that the
onboard flash has reached the end of its lifetime. The entire
card (CCEP or CCMP) card must then be replaced.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.1.29

Replace the card raising the OBFF alarm with a spare as soon as practical. For
instructions, go to Chapter 4.1.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

OBRF

Alarm name

42

Optical Booster Stage Receive Failure (OBRF)

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Troubleshooting instructions

Default severity

Critical

Alarm object

Amplifier card interstage input port. (All types of amplifier


cards except LASBC-1 feature interstage access).

General information
and causes

If an amplifier card detects a loss of signal condition at the


input to its booster stage, the OBRF alarm will be raised.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.1.30

If an LOS alarm is raised anywhere in the network, troubleshoot and clear that alarm
first.

If the alarm persists, Warm Start the amplifier card raising the alarm.

If the OBRF alarm persists, dispatch personnel to the site. Check the interstage fiber
connections of the card raising the alarm. If any of these fibers are pinched or kinked
(which will cause increased attenuation), correct the condition. If the alarm persists,
continue to step 3.

If the alarm persists, disconnect all interstage fibers, clean all connectors, and reconnect. If the alarm persists, replace the fibers one-by-one with spares until the
alarm clears. Be sure to replace any attenuation patchcord with one of an equivalent
rating.

If the alarm persists, Cold Start the amplifier card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, replace the amplifier card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

OBTF

Alarm name

Booster Stage Transmit Fail (OBTF)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

Amplifier cards (all types).

General information
and causes

The OBTF alarm is raised if the gain of the amplifier cards


booster stage is too low, or if there is a back reflection condition at the cards transmit port.

Troubleshooting instructions
1

If other alarms are raised on the same amplifier card, troubleshoot and clear them
first.

If the OBTF alarm persists, disconnect the fiber from the amplifier cards output connector. Clean the fiber end and connector. Re-attach the fiber.

If the alarm persists, disconnect the fiber from the amplifier cards output connector
and replace it with a cleaned, inspected spare.

If the alarm persists, Warm Start the amplifier card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, Cold Start the amplifier card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, replace the amplifier card raising the alarm.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

43

Troubleshooting instructions

3.1.31

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

OPRF

Alarm name

Optical Preamplifier Stage Receive Failure (OPRF)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

LAxB and LIFB amplifier cards.

General information
and causes

This alarm is raised if there is a loss of signal detected at the


input of Amplifier Stage I of the card raising the alarm.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.1.32

44

Troubleshoot and clear any upstream alarms first. If the OPRF alarm persists, Warm
Start the card raising the alarm. If the alarm persists, dispatch personnel to the site.

An OPRF alarm is typically caused by a fiber break or other fiber problem immediately prior to the amplifier card raising the alarm. So, verify that the input fiber to the
card is properly installed. If the cable was missing, bent/pinched, or improperly connected, correct the problem. The OPRF alarm should clear when the correct connection is established.

If the alarm persists, disconnect the fiber at the In connector of the affected amplifier
card. Clean all optical connectors and re-connect. If OPRF alarm persists, replace
the fiber cable with a cleaned, inspected spare.

If the alarm persists, try another Warm Start of the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, Cold Start the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, replace the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

OPTF

Alarm name

Preamplifier Stage Transmit Fail (OPTF)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

Amplifier card interstage output port. (All types of amplifier


cards except LASBC-1 feature interstage access)..

General information
and causes

The OPTF alarm is raised if the amplifier cards pre-amplifier


stage cannot achieve the required power gain, or if there is a
back reflection condition at the cards interstage output
(transmit) port.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Troubleshooting instructions

Troubleshooting instructions

3.1.33

If other alarms are raised on the same amplifier card, troubleshoot and clear them
first.

If the OPTF alarm persists, Warm Start the amplifier card raising the alarm.

If the OPTF alarm persists, dispatch personnel to the site. Disconnect the fiber from
the amplifier cards To ISD output connector. Clean the fiber end and connector.
Re-attach the fiber.

If the alarm persists, Cold Start the amplifier card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, replace the amplifier card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

OSCLOL

Alarm name

OSC Loss of Lock (OSCLOL)

Default severity

Minor

Alarm object

In-line and Pre-amplifier cards

General information
and causes

The OSCLOL alarm is raised if the indicated amplifier card


detects a clocking problem on the incoming Optical Supervisory Channel.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.1.34

Troubleshoot and clear upstream alarms first.

If the OSCLOL alarm persists, Warm Start the amplifier card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, Cold Start the amplifier card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, dispatch personnel to the site and replace the amplifier card
raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

OSCTD

Alarm name

OSC Laser Transmit Degrade (OSCTD)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

Booster and In-line amplifier cards (i.e., those amplifier types


that transmit the Optical Supervisory Channel).

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

45

Troubleshooting instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

General information
and causes

The OSCTD alarm is raised if the indicated amplifier card


detects a fault with its Optical Supervisory Channel transmit
laser for more than 900 consecutive seconds. The alarm is
based on laser modulation current, bias current, and monitor
current. The exact alarm trigger threshold of each parameter
varies slightly according to the specific type of amplifier card.

Troubleshooting instructions
1

Warm Start the amplifier card raising the alarm. If the alarm persists, continue to
step 2. Note that this alarm has a clear time of 900 seconds (15 minutes), so it will
be necessary to wait at least that long after the Warm Start to verify if the alarm
clears.

Since Cold Starting an amplifier card is traffic-affecting, do not Cold Start the
card raising the OSCTD alarm. This alarm indicates that only the Optical Supervisory Channel is experiencing problems - the payload is still OK. So, a Cold
Start would unnecessarily drop good payload traffic.

3.1.35

If the alarm persists, replace the amplifier card raising the alarm during the next
scheduled network maintenance period.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

OSCTF

Alarm name

OSC Laser Transmit Fail (OSCTF)

Default severity

Critical

Alarm object

Booster and In-line amplifier cards (i.e., those amplifier types


that transmit the Optical Supervisory Channel).

General information
and causes

The OSCTF alarm is raised if the indicated amplifier card


cannot transmit the Optical Supervisory Channel.

Troubleshooting instructions
1

Warm Start the amplifier card raising the alarm.

Since Cold Starting an amplifier card is traffic-affecting, do not Cold Start the
card raising the OSCTF alarm. This alarm indicates that only the Optical Supervisory Channel is experiencing problems - the payload is still OK. So, a Cold
Start would unnecessarily drop good payload traffic.

3.1.36

46

If the alarm persists, replace the amplifier card raising the alarm during the next
scheduled network maintenance period.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

OverPower1M

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Troubleshooting instructions

Alarm name

Over Power 1M (OverPower1M)

Default severity

Minor

Alarm object

The OverPower1M alarm can be raised by an LALx amplifier


card used as a pre-amplifier.

General information
and causes

Filter cards receiving the optical signal from the pre-amplifier


card contain over power monitors. If these monitors detect
optical power higher than the 1M laser safety level, the preamplifier card will enter Automatic Power Reduction Mode
(APRM) and raise the OverPower1M alarm. This alarm signifies that the pre-amplifier card has reduced its output power
and is latched in APRM.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.1.37

If any card has raised a CP alarm, troubleshoot and clear that alarm first.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support. Changes to
the Network Configuration File (NCF) may be necessary.

Only after the OverPower1M alarm has been cleared is it permitted to release the
latched APRM. To do so, open the pre-amplifier cards Card-Config window and
click the Disable APRM button.

PD

Alarm name

Pump Degrade (PD)

Default severity

Minor

Alarm object

40G transponder cards

General information
and causes

40G transponder cards contain a pre-amplifier module. The


PD alarm indicates a degraded condition with the pump laser
portion of the amplifier module. The pump laser is not shut
down as a result of this alarm. Among the conditions that can
trigger the PD alarm are:

Pump laser current has exceeded its maximum value.


An anomaly is detected between the Pump laser current
and the amplifier output power.

Troubleshooting instructions
1

Try to clear the alarm remotely first. Warm Start the card raising the alarm. If the
alarm persists, continue to step 2.

Has the card been in service a long time?

Yes: the alarm indicates that the laser is nearing its End of Life. Replace the card
at the earliest opportunity.
No: troubleshoot any upstream alarms first. Verify that the cards output power
settings are correct. If the alarm persists, continue to step 3.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

47

Troubleshooting instructions

3.1.38

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Dispatch personnel to the site. Disconnect fiber at this cards input. Clean fiber ends
and connectors. Re-connect fiber.

If the alarm persists, try another Warm Start the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, Cold Start the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, replace the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

PF

Alarm name

Pump Failure (PF)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

40G transponder cards

General information
and causes

40G transponder cards contain a pre-amplifier module. The


PF alarm indicates a failed condition with the pre-amplifiers
pump laser. The pump laser is shut down as a result of this
alarm. Among the conditions that can trigger the PF alarm
are:

Pump laser current is far above its maximum upper limit.


Pump laser temperature is too high or too low.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.1.39

Try to clear the alarm remotely first. Cold Start the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, dispatch personnel to the site and replace the card raising the
alarm.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

POOR

Alarm name

Power Out of Range (POOR)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

The POOR alarm can be raised by:

48

LAMIC-1, LAMPC-1, and LASBC-1 cards


O02CSP-1 Protection Switch card

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Troubleshooting instructions

General information
and causes

The POOR alarm can be caused by: .

If raised by an amplifier card: Release 4.2 of hiT 7300


(which supports 80-channel operation) re-uses amplifier
card hardware from earlier releases which was designed
for a maximum channel count of 40. The fixed range of
power measurement circuitry at various stages of the
amplifier cards is not sufficient for 80 channels. A POOR
alarm signifies that the monitor circuitry is near its upper
or lower limit and that the card may shift its measurement
range. If the card is in running state, this range shift will
cause a traffic hit of approximately 1 second.
If raised by O02CSP-1 card: there is an incorrect equipment configuration resulting in a laser safety hazard as
explained below.

Troubleshooting instructions
1

What card is raising the POOR alarm?

3.1.40

Amplifier card: The POOR alarm may be temporary (caused by power fluctuations or temporary changes in span attenuation). In these cases, the POOR
alarm will clear itself. However, if the POOR alarm persists, do not perform a
channel upgrade or downgrade when a POOR alarm is active until a
network maintenance window is available, because there will be a 1second traffic hit when the card shifts its measurement range. After the
range shift occurs, the POOR alarm will clear itself.
O02CSP-1 card: if the POOR alarm is raised by an O02CSP-1 card, it means
that the optical power of the client input port(s) of the Protection Group exceeds
10 dBm (which can occur for certain equipment combinations when OTS protection mode is being used), and the Protection Group was not configured correctly.
As described in the Operating Manual (OMN), Protection Groups must always
be created before performing link start-up. If this was not done, the O02CSP-1
card will raise the POOR alarm after the link is running.
To clear the POOR alarm, immediately create the required Protection Group.
The Protection Group Layer must be OTS. After creating the Protection
Group, the POOR alarm will clear. Since it indicates a laser safety hazard,
it is not permitted for the user to mask the POOR alarm.

If the POOR alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

PS1

Alarm name

Power Supply 1 Problem (PS1)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

Shelf

General information
and causes

The PS1 alarm will be raised if the shelf detects a failure of its
UBAT1 power feed.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

49

Troubleshooting instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Troubleshooting instructions
1

Check the rack-mounted Power Distribution Panel that serves this shelf. ANSI
systems are equipped with fuses. ETSI systems are equipped with circuit breakers.
If a fuse is blown or missing, insert a new fuse of the proper rating. If a circuit breaker
is off, set it to on. If the alarm persists, continue to step 2.

Ensure that all power cables from the rack Power Distribution Panel to the shelf are
connected properly. If the alarm persists, continue to step 3.

Verify that all cables and fuses from the Facility Battery Distribution Bay to the rack
Power Distribution Panel are OK. If the alarm persists, continue to step 4.

Disconnect the UBAT1/3 cable at the shelf and measure the voltage being delivered
to the shelf via this cable. Requirements:

ANSI: -40.5 Vdc to -57.5 Vdc


ETSI: -40.5 Vdc to -75 Vdc

If the voltage is out of range, measure the voltage at other points to determine where
the problem originates (Power Distribution Panel, Battery Bay, etc).
5

3.1.41

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

PS2

Alarm name

Power Supply 2 Problem (PS2)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

Shelf

General information
and causes

The PS2 alarm will be raised if the shelf detects a failure of its
UBAT2 power feed.

Troubleshooting instructions
1

Check the rack-mounted Power Distribution Panel that serves this shelf. ANSI
systems are equipped with fuses. ETSI systems are equipped with circuit breakers.
If a fuse is blown or missing, insert a new fuse of the proper rating. If a circuit breaker
is off, set it to on. If the alarm persists, continue to step 2.

Ensure that all power cables from the rack Power Distribution Panel to the shelf are
connected properly. If the alarm persists, continue to step 3.

Verify that all cables and fuses from the Facility Battery Distribution Bay to the rack
Power Distribution Panel are OK. If the alarm persists, continue to step 4.

Disconnect the UBAT2/4 cable at the shelf and measure the voltage being delivered
to the shelf via this cable. Requirements:

ANSI: -40.5 Vdc to -57.5 Vdc


ETSI: -40.5 Vdc to -75 Vdc

If the voltage is out of range, measure the voltage at other points to determine where
the problem originates (Power Distribution Panel, Battery Bay, etc).
5

50

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

3.1.42

Troubleshooting instructions

PS3

Alarm name

Power Supply 3 Problem (PS3)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

Shelf

General information
and causes

The PS3 alarm will be raised if the shelf detects a failure of its
UBAT3 power feed.

Troubleshooting instructions
1

Check the rack-mounted Power Distribution Panel that serves this shelf. ANSI
systems are equipped with fuses. ETSI systems are equipped with circuit breakers.
If a fuse is blown or missing, insert a new fuse of the proper rating. If a circuit breaker
is off, set it to on. If the alarm persists, continue to step 2.

Ensure that all power cables from the rack Power Distribution Panel to the shelf are
connected properly. If the alarm persists, continue to step 3.

Verify that all cables and fuses from the Facility Battery Distribution Bay to the rack
Power Distribution Panel are OK. If the alarm persists, continue to step 4.

Disconnect the UBAT1/3 cable at the shelf and measure the voltage being delivered
to the shelf via this cable. Requirements:

ANSI: -40.5 Vdc to -57.5 Vdc


ETSI: -40.5 Vdc to -75 Vdc

If the voltage is out of range, measure the voltage at other points to determine where
the problem originates (Power Distribution Panel, Battery Bay, etc).
5

3.1.43

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

PS4

Alarm name

Power Supply 4 Problem (PS4)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

Shelf

General information
and causes

The PS4 alarm will be raised if the shelf detects a failure of its
UBAT4 power feed.

Troubleshooting instructions
1

Check the rack-mounted Power Distribution Panel that serves this shelf. ANSI
systems are equipped with fuses. ETSI systems are equipped with circuit breakers.
If a fuse is blown or missing, insert a new fuse of the proper rating. If a circuit breaker
is off, set it to on. If the alarm persists, continue to step 2.

Ensure that all power cables from the rack Power Distribution Panel to the shelf are
connected properly. If the alarm persists, continue to step 3.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

51

Troubleshooting instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Verify that all cables and fuses from the Facility Battery Distribution Bay to the rack
Power Distribution Panel are OK. If the alarm persists, continue to step 4.

Disconnect the UBAT2/4 cable at the shelf and measure the voltage being delivered
to the shelf via this cable. Requirements:

ANSI: -40.5 Vdc to -57.5 Vdc


ETSI: -40.5 Vdc to -75 Vdc

If the voltage is out of range, measure the voltage at other points to determine where
the problem originates (Power Distribution Panel, Battery Bay, etc).
5

3.1.44

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

Pu1TD

Alarm name

Transmit Degrade Pump 1 (Pu1TD)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

All sub-types of LAL, LAM, and LAS amplifier cards, PRC-1


card, and PL-1 card.

General information
and causes

The Pu1TD alarm indicates a degraded condition with the


indicated cards Pump Laser 1. The pump laser is not shut
down as a result of this alarm. Among the conditions that can
trigger the Pu1TD alarm are:

Pump 1 laser current has exceeded its maximum value.


An anomaly is detected between the Pump 1 laser
current and the cards output power.

Troubleshooting instructions
1

If the card has been in service a long time, this alarm indicates that the laser is
nearing its End of Life. Replace the card at the earliest opportunity. If this alarm is
raised after the card has been in service only a short time, check and correct the following:

the cards output power settings.


troubleshoot any upstream alarms.

If the alarm persists, Warm Start the card raising the alarm.

If the Pu1TD alarm persists, dispatch personnel to the site. Disconnect fiber at this
cards input. Clean fiber ends and connectors. Re-connect fiber.

If the alarm persists, try another Warm Start of the card raising the alarm. If the alarm
persists, Cold Start the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, replace the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

g Note: Alarm integration (raise/clear) times: the raise time for the Pu1TD alarm
is 120 seconds for the PL-1 card and 900 seconds for all other cards. The clear
time for the Pu1TD alarm is 60 seconds for the PL-1 card and 900 seconds for
all other cards. Take these times into consideration when troubleshooting. For

52

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Troubleshooting instructions

example, if this alarm occurs on a PRC-1 card, it will be necessary to wait 900
seconds (15 minutes) after each troubleshooting step to verify that the alarm has
cleared.

3.1.45

Pu2TD

Alarm name

Transmit Degrade Pump 2 (Pu2TD)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

All sub-types of LAL and LAV amplifier cards, and PRC-1


card

General information
and causes

The Pu2TD alarm indicates a degraded condition with the


indicated cards Pump Laser 2. The pump laser is not shut
down as a result of this alarm. Among the conditions that can
trigger the Pu2TD alarm are:

Pump 2 laser current has exceeded its maximum value.


An anomaly is detected between the Pump 2 laser
current and the cards output power.

Troubleshooting instructions
1

If the card has been in service a long time, this alarm indicates that the laser is
nearing its End of Life. Replace the card at the earliest opportunity. If this alarm is
raised after the card has been in service only a short time, check and correct the following:

the cards output power settings.


troubleshoot any upstream alarms.

If the alarm persists, Warm Start the card raising the alarm.

If the Pu2TD alarm persists, dispatch personnel to the site. Disconnect fiber at this
cards input. Clean fiber ends and connectors. Re-connect fiber.

If the alarm persists, try another Warm Start of the card raising the alarm. If the alarm
persists, Cold Start the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, replace the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

g Note: Alarm integration (raise/clear) times: the raise time for the Pu2TD alarm
is 900 seconds. The clear time for the Pu2TD alarm is also 900 seconds. Take
these times into consideration when troubleshooting, i.e., it will be necessary to
wait 900 seconds (15 minutes) after each troubleshooting step to verify that the
alarm has cleared.

3.1.46

Pu3TD

Alarm name

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Transmit Degrade Pump 3 (Pu3TD)

53

Troubleshooting instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

PRC-1 card

General information
and causes

The Pu3TD alarm will be raised if the indicated card detects


that its Pump 3 laser current has exceeded 120% of its BOL
(Beginning of Life) value for 900 consecutive seconds.

Troubleshooting instructions
1

If the card has been in service a long time, this alarm indicates that the laser is
nearing its End of Life. Replace the card at the earliest opportunity. If this alarm is
raised after the card has been in service only a short time, check and correct the following:

the cards output power settings.


troubleshoot any upstream alarms.

If the alarm persists, Warm Start the card raising the alarm.

If the Pu3TD alarm persists, dispatch personnel to the site. Disconnect fiber at this
cards input. Clean fiber ends and connectors. Re-connect fiber.

If the alarm persists, try another Warm Start of the card raising the alarm. If the alarm
persists, Cold Start the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, replace the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

g Note: Alarm integration (raise/clear) times: the raise time for the Pu3TD alarm
is 900 seconds. The clear time for the Pu3TD alarm is also 900 seconds. Take
these times into consideration when troubleshooting, i.e., it will be necessary to
wait 900 seconds (15 minutes) after each troubleshooting step to verify that the
alarm has cleared.

3.1.47

Pu4TD

Alarm name

Transmit Degrade Pump 4 (Pu4TD)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

PRC-1 card

General information
and causes

The Pu4TD alarm will be raised if the indicated card detects


that its Pump 4 laser current has exceeded 120% of its BOL
(Beginning of Life) value for 900 consecutive seconds.

Troubleshooting instructions
1

If the card has been in service a long time, this alarm indicates that the laser is
nearing its End of Life. Replace the card at the earliest opportunity. If this alarm is
raised after the card has been in service only a short time, check and correct the following:

54

the cards output power settings.


troubleshoot any upstream alarms.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Troubleshooting instructions

If the alarm persists, Warm Start the card raising the alarm.

If the Pu4TD alarm persists, dispatch personnel to the site. Disconnect fiber at this
cards input. Clean fiber ends and connectors. Re-connect fiber.

If the alarm persists, try another Warm Start of the card raising the alarm. If the alarm
persists, Cold Start the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, replace the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

g Note: Alarm integration (raise/clear) times: the raise time for the Pu4TD alarm
is 900 seconds. The clear time for the Pu4TD alarm is also 900 seconds. Take
these times into consideration when troubleshooting, i.e., it will be necessary to
wait 900 seconds (15 minutes) after each troubleshooting step to verify that the
alarm has cleared.

3.1.48

Pu1TF

Alarm name

Transmit Fail Pump 1 (Pu1TF)

Default severity

Critical

Alarm object

All sub-types of LAL, LAM, and LAS amplifier cards, PRC-1


card, and PL-1 card.

General information
and causes

The Pu1TF alarm indicates a failed condition with the indicated cards Pump Laser 1. The pump laser is shut down as
a result of this alarm. Among the conditions that can trigger
the Pu1TF alarm are:

Pump 1 laser current is far above its maximum upper


limit.
Pump 1 laser temperature is too high or too low. A corresponding temperature alarm will also be raised (TempP1
for amplifier cards and TempP for PRC-1 and PL-1
cards).

Troubleshooting instructions

3.1.49

Cold Start the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, dispatch personnel to the site and replace the card raising the
alarm.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

Pu2TF

Alarm name

Transmit Fail Pump 2 (Pu2TF)

Default severity

Critical

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

55

Troubleshooting instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Alarm object

All sub-types of LAL and LAV amplifier cards, and PRC-1


card

General information
and causes

The Pu2TF alarm indicates a failed condition with the indicated cards Pump Laser 2. The pump laser is shut down as
a result of this alarm. Among the conditions that can trigger
the Pu2TF alarm are:

Pump 2 laser current is far above its maximum upper


limit.
Pump 2 laser temperature is too high or too low. A corresponding temperature alarm will also be raised (TempP2
for amplifier cards and TempP for PRC-1 cards).

Troubleshooting instructions

3.1.50

Cold Start the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, dispatch personnel to the site and replace the card raising the
alarm.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

Pu3TF

Alarm name

Transmit Fail Pump 3 (Pu3TF)

Default severity

Critical

Alarm object

PRC-1 card

General information
and causes

The Pu3TF alarm indicates a failed condition with the indicated cards Pump Laser 3. The pump laser is shut down as
a result of this alarm. Among the conditions that can trigger
the Pu3TF alarm are:

Pump 3 laser current is far above its maximum upper


limit.
Pump 3 laser temperature is too high or too low. The card
will also raise a TempP alarm in this case.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.1.51

Cold start the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, dispatch personnel to the site and replace the card raising the
alarm.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

Pu4TF

Alarm name

56

Transmit Fail Pump 4 (Pu4TF)

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Troubleshooting instructions

Default severity

Critical

Alarm object

PRC-1 card

General information
and causes

The Pu4TF alarm indicates a failed condition with the indicated cards Pump Laser 4. The pump laser is shut down as
a result of this alarm. Among the conditions that can trigger
the Pu4TF alarm are:

Pump 4 laser current is far above its maximum upper


limit.
Pump 4 laser temperature is too high or too low. The card
will also raise a TempP alarm in this case.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.1.52

Cold Start the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, dispatch personnel to the site and replace the card raising the
alarm.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

SBLOS

Alarm name

Sub Band Loss of Signal (SBLOS)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

The SBLOS alarm can be raised by the following:

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

F40V card COM port


F40MR card:
Line input port (RX-IN)
Express input port (EXP-IN)
F02MR card:
Line input port (RX-IN)
Add path input port (TX-IN2)
Express path input port (TX-IN1)
F08MR card RX-IN port
F06DR80 card RX-IN port
F09DR80 card RX-IN port
F09MR80 card:
Add path input ports (IN1 and IN2)
Express path input ports (IN3 to IN9)
F09MDRT card:
R-COM port
C9 port
LAxD card Line In port

57

Troubleshooting instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

General information
and causes

The SBLOS alarm is raised if the indicated card detects the


loss of all the input channels that it is supposed to be receiving at one of its input ports (as listed above for each card
type).

Troubleshooting instructions
1

Before dispatching personnel to the site, try to clear the alarm remotely by Warm
Starting the card raising the alarm. If the alarm persists after the card recovers from
the Warm Start, Cold Start the card. If the alarm persists after the card recovers from
the Cold Start, continue to step 2.

Dispatch personnel to the site. Take a spare card of the same type raising the
SBLOS alarm. Once on-site, inspect the fiber connection at the input ports listed
above (ports will have different names, depending on card type).

3.1.53

If the fiber is missing, bent/pinched, or improperly connected, correct the


problem. The SBLOS alarm should clear when the correct connection is established.
If the SBLOS alarm persists, disconnect both ends of the fiber. Clean all optical
connectors and re-connect. If the alarm persists, replace the fiber cable with a
cleaned, inspected spare.

If the alarm persists, replace the card raising the alarm with a spare.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

SLH

Alarm name

Span Loss High (SLH)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

Line In port of amplifier cards

General information
and causes

The total attenuation of the fiber span leading up to each inline amplifier and pre-amplifier is automatically calculated by
the system on a periodic basis. The SLH alarm signifies that
the span attenuation is too high. If a spans attenuation
increases above its defined End of Life (EOL)* value by 3 dB
or more (6 dB or more if PRC-1 Raman card is active), the
SLH alarm will be raised.
*The EOL attenuation value for each span is defined in the
NE Configuration File.

Troubleshooting instructions
1

Warm start the amplifier card raising the alarm. This may clear the alarm if there was
a defect on the amplifier card. If the alarm persists, continue to step 2.

Something caused the span attenuation to rise. Check the following:

58

Check for damaged or kinked fiber at the input of the amplifier card raising the
alarm or at the output of this spans upstream amplifier card. Such fiber

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

3.1.54

Troubleshooting instructions

problems should be suspected if personnel recently performed any work at


either site. Dirty connectors could also be the problem, but if the system has
already been operating successfully long-term, fibers that have remained connected to the amplifiers are unlikely to be the cause.
If obvious fiber problems can be ruled out, call your next higher level of technical
support. It may be necessary to schedule an OTDR (Optical Time Domain
Reflectometer) reading of the outside fiber plant at the next maintenance
window to determine the location of the problem.

If the alarm persists, Cold Start of the amplifier card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, replace the amplifier card raising the alarm with a spare.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

SLL

Alarm name

Span Loss Low (SLL)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

Line In port of amplifier cards

General information
and causes

The total attenuation of the fiber span leading up to each inline amplifier and pre-amplifier is automatically calculated by
the system on a periodic basis. The SLL alarm signifies that
the attenuation is too low. The SLL alarm will be raised under
the following conditions:
For spans without Raman Pump cards:

If the End of Life (EOL)* span attenuation is defined to be


any value less than 12 dB, then the SLL alarm will be
raised if the spans attenuation decreases to 2 dB or less.
If the EOL span attenuation is defined to be greater or
equal to 12 dB, but less than 18 dB, then the SLL alarm
will be raised if the spans attenuation decreases below
its EOL value by 6 dB or more.
If the EOL span attenuation is defined to be greater or
equal to 18 dB, then the SLL alarm will be raised if the
spans attenuation decreases below its EOL value by 10
dB or more.

For spans with Raman Pump cards:

The SLL alarm will be raised if the spans attenuation


decreases below its EOL value by 15 dB or more.

*The EOL attenuation value for each span is defined in the


NE Configuration File.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

59

Troubleshooting instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Troubleshooting instructions

3.1.55

Via the craft terminal, check the reported attenuation for the span leading up to the
amplifier card raising the SLL alarm. If the span loss is too low, padding attenuation
must be added.

If no other cause can be found, the amplifier card may have a defect. Warm Start
the amplifier card raising the alarm. This may clear the alarm.

If the alarm persists, Cold Start the amplifier card raising the alarm. If the alarm persists, replace this amplifier card with a spare.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

SRMISS

Alarm name

Shelf Missing (SRMISS)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

Shelf

General information
and causes

The SRMISS alarm will be raised if:

a shelf specified by the NE Configuration File (NCF) or


manual configuration (for SON), is not installed.
the "missing" shelf is actually installed, but the NE Controller card cannot communicate with it.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.1.56

60

If a shelf specified by the NE Configuration File is not installed, install it according to


the instructions in the Installation and Test Manual (ITMN).

If the "missing" shelf is actually correctly installed, verify that its Shelf ID is set as
specified in the Commissioning Report. If the "missing" shelf is equipped with a
CCSP (Shelf Controller card) verify that the inter-shelf LAN cable is properly connected to this shelf. This will allow the NE Controller card (CCEP or CCMP) to communicate with the CCSP-equipped shelf and clear the SRMISS alarm.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

SWP

Alarm name

Switch Problem (SWP)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

MCP card

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

General information
and causes

Troubleshooting instructions

The MCP card contains an on-board Optical Spectrum


Analyzer (OSA). So, in order to monitor four input ports, the
card must switch to each port in sequence. The SWP alarm
indicates a problem with this switch. The operational state of
the MCP card is disabled when the SWP alarm is active.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.1.57

Warm Start the card raising the SWP alarm. Sometimes, this allows a failed card to
recover. Note however, that the recovery is often only temporary. If the Warm Start
does not clear the alarm, Cold Start the card. If the Cold Start does not clear the
alarm, immediately replace the failed card with a spare.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

TD

Alarm name

Transmit Degrade (TD)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

Transponder Line port, Transponder Client port

General information
and causes

The TD alarm will be raised if the laser current on the indicated port has risen above its BOL (Beginning of Life) value.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.1.58

The TD alarm serves as advance notice that a TF alarm may subsequently occur.
Immediate replacement of a component is not necessary, but the transmit conditions
should be monitored. Replacement of the relevant pluggable module (or possibly the
entire card) should probably be scheduled for the next convenient maintenance
period.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

TempM

Alarm name

Temperature Problem (major) (TempM)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

The TempM alarm can be raised by:

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

F40-1/S and F40-1/O cards


F40V-1/S and F40V-1/O cards
F40MR-1 card
F08MR-1 card

61

Troubleshooting instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

General information
and causes

The TempM alarm will be raised if a temperature anomaly


exists on the indicated card (temperature too high or too low).
The operational state of the card is disabled when this alarm
is active.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.1.59

If the shelf containing the affected card has raised a FAN_MAJOR or FAN_MINOR
alarm, troubleshoot that alarm first.

If the alarm persists, Warm Start the card raising the alarm.

If the TempM alarm persists, dispatch personnel to the site. Check the ambient temperature around the shelf. It must be within the operating limits quoted in the official
SURPASS hiT 7300 product specifications. Verify that the air filter is not clogged.

If the alarm persists, Cold Start the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, replace the card raising the alarm with a spare.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

TempMIN

Alarm name

Temperature Problem (minor) (TempMIN)

Default severity

Minor

Alarm object

The TempMIN alarm can be raised by:

General information
and causes

LALx, LASx, and LAMx cards


F40MR-1 card
F40V-1/S and F40V-1/O cards
F08MR-1 card
OPMDC card

The TempMIN alarm will be raised if a temperature anomaly


exists on the indicated card (temperature too high or too low).
The operational state of the card remains enabled when this
alarm is active.

Troubleshooting instructions

62

If the shelf containing the affected card has raised a FAN_MAJOR or FAN_MINOR
alarm, troubleshoot that alarm first.

If the alarm persists, Warm Start the card raising the alarm.

If the TempMIN alarm persists, dispatch personnel to the site. Check the ambient
temperature around the shelf. It must be within the operating limits quoted in the
official SURPASS hiT 7300 product specifications. Verify that the air filter is not
clogged.

If the alarm persists, Cold Start the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, replace the card raising the alarm.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

3.1.60

Troubleshooting instructions

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

TempP

Alarm name

Temperature Problem (TempP)

Default severity

Critical

Alarm object

PRC-1 card and PL-1 card

General information
and causes

The TempP alarm will be raised if a temperature anomaly is


detcted on the indicated card. The cards laser will be
switched off as a result of the TempP alarm.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.1.61

If the shelf containing the affected card has raised a FAN_MAJOR or FAN_MINOR
alarm, troubleshoot that alarm first.

If the TempP alarm persists, check the ambient temperature around the shelf. It
must be within the operating limits quoted in the official SURPASS hiT 7300 product
specifications. Verify that the air filter in the Fan Unit is not clogged.

If the alarm persists, Warm Start the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, Cold Start the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, replace the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

TempP1

Alarm name

Temperature Problem 1 (TempP1)

Default severity

Critical

Alarm object

The TempP1 alarm can be raised by all sub-types of LAL,


LAV, LAM, and LAS amplifier cards.

General information
and causes

The TempP1 alarm will be raised if the temperature of Pump


1 on the indicated card is too high. Note: this alarm causes
the card to shut down its Pump1 amplifier stage.

Troubleshooting instructions
1

If the shelf containing the affected card has raised a FAN_MAJOR, or FAN_MINOR
alarm, troubleshoot that alarm first.

If the alarm persists, Warm Start the card raising the alarm.

If the TempP1 alarm persists, dispatch personnel to the site. Check the ambient
temperature around the shelf. It must be within the operating limits quoted in the
official SURPASS hiT 7300 product specifications. Verify that the shelfs air filter is
not clogged.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

63

Troubleshooting instructions

3.1.62

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

If the alarm persists, Cold Start the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, replace the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

TempP2

Alarm name

Temperature Problem 2 (TempP2)

Default severity

Critical

Alarm object

All sub-types of LAL and LAV amplifier cards.

General information
and causes

The TempP2 alarm will be raised if the temperature of Pump


2 on the indicated card is too high. Note: this alarm causes
the card to shut down its Pump2 amplifier stage.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.1.63

If the shelf containing the affected card has raised a FAN_MAJOR or FAN_MINOR
alarm, troubleshoot that alarm first.

If the alarm persists, Warm Start the card raising the alarm.

If the TempP2 alarm persists, dispatch personnel to the site. Check the ambient
temperature around the shelf. It must be within the operating limits quoted in the
official SURPASS hiT 7300 product specifications. Verify that the shelfs air filter is
not clogged.

If the alarm persists, Cold Start the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, replace the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

TF

Alarm name

Transmit Fail (TF)

Default severity

Critical

Alarm object

Transponder Line port, Transponder Client port

General information
and causes

A TF alarm will be raised if an internal fault on the card


causes either of the following anomalies:

64

the indicated ports transmit laser is off when it should be


on.
the indicated port emits optical power at a higher level
than the maximum output specification for that optical
interface type.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Troubleshooting instructions

Troubleshooting instructions
1

Try to clear the alarm remotely first. Warm Start the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, note the following behavior:

For the port raising the alarm, replace the pluggable module with a spare of the
same type.

If the alarm persists, Cold Start the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, replace the card with a spare. Transfer all pluggable modules
from the failed card to the new card.

WARNING!
For SON, SONF, and ONN network elements, Transponders that have an active
Transmit Fail alarm must be replaced without further delay, since laser safety is compromised in this condition.

3.1.64

Client Mode is set by the user on Transponder Card - Configuration windows.


If a pluggable module that does not support the selected Client Mode is inserted
in a port, a TF alarm will sometimes be raised because the port is emitting optical
power that is too high. [The mismatch can be confirmed by opening this cards
Card Label window. On the Port labels tab, check the read-only field named
Module application code. If module mismatch is displayed for any port, there
is a module mismatch condition on that port]. Resolve the mismatch condition to
clear the TF alarm. Exchange the pluggable module with a type that matches the
Client Mode setting, or change the Client Mode setting to match the pluggable
module.
Once this situation has been fixed (or ruled out), proceed to step 3 if the alarm
persists.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

WRGSR

Alarm name

Wrong shelf type (WRGSR)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

Shelf

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

65

Troubleshooting instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

General information
and causes

If an incorrect shelf type is added to an NE, it will be detected


during startup and the WRGSR alarm will be raised to
indicate the mismatch.
An NE must always contain only the shelf type(s) allowed
for the NE type, as specified in the Installation Manual
(ITMN). In nearly all cases, an NE must contain only one
shelf type - either standard hiT 7300 shelves or Flatpack
shelves. It is not permitted to mix shelf types in the same
NE except in the following case. Standard shelves and
Flatpack shelves can be used together in SON NEs that
use MPBC equipment for long single-span applications.
However, in this case, the Flatpack shelf is permitted to
contain only DCM cards (plus the Controller card).
Since the shelf mismatch condition is detected at shelf
startup, the WRGSR alarm would typically be seen only
during the NE commissioning phase or if service staff has just
added new equipment to the NE.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.2
3.2.1

Remove the incorrect shelf and install a shelf that is compatible with the NE type.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

Communication alarms
BDI

Alarm name

Backward Defect Indication (BDI)

Default severity

Minor

Alarm object

The BDI alarm can be raised by the following objects:

General information
and causes

Transponder Line ports (OTUk Sink)


Transponder Line ports (ODUk Sink)
Transponder Client ports (OTUk Sink)
Transponder Client ports (ODUk Sink)
Transponder TCM Layers (ODUk Sink)

BDI signals are maintenance signals placed on the line. BDI


is a signal sent in the opposite direction to the direction that
is experiencing a fiber cut or other problem.

Troubleshooting instructions
1

66

Since BDI is a maintenance signal that signifies downstream alarms, troubleshoot


and fix all alarms (especially LOS, LOF, or TIM) which have occurred downstream

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Troubleshooting instructions

of the card raising the BDI alarm. Clearing all downstream alarms should clear the
BDI alarm.
2

3.2.2

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

CHM

Alarm name

Channel Mismatch (CHM)

Default severity

Minor

Alarm object

Link Control: Optical Channel Layer.

General information
and causes

The CHM alarm indicates that there is a mismatch in a


channel status detected by the MCP card and the Optical
Supervisory Channel. Either the channel is provisioned as
used, but is not actually present, or the channel is provisioned
as unused, but is detected as being present.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.2.3

Ensure that all channels are provisioned correctly (used or unused). Make changes
as necessary to reflect the actual deployment.

If the alarm persists, re-attempt the action (Manual Power Adjust or Enhanced Preemphasis - Manual) that triggered the CHM alarm. A second attempt will most likely
work correctly and clear the alarm.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

CSF_LCS

Alarm name

GFP Client Signal Fail - Loss of Character Synchronization


(CSF_LCS)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

I05AD10G-1 card Line port GFP(P)_TT_Sk:

General information
and causes

The CSF_LCS alarm indicates an error situation in the client


egress direction, which is originally detected at the far end.
The loss of character synchronization is detected at the client
ingress direction at the far end and should also be indicated
there. So most troubleshooting actions should concentrate
on the far end.

Troubleshooting instructions
1

If an CSF_LCS alarm occurs, system self-recovery to proper character synchronization is often achieved very quickly. If self-recovery occurs, no further action is necessary. Otherwise, continue to step 2.

It is possible that the far-end client (non-Nokia Siemens) equipment is faulty and is
not supplying a properly-framed signal. Troubleshoot the client equipment for

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

67

Troubleshooting instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

problems according to the equipment manufacturer's instructions. If the alarm persists, continue to step 3.

3.2.4

Warm Start the far-end transponder card. If the alarm persists, Cold Start the card.
If the alarm persists, Warm Start the corresponding near-end card. If the alarm persists, Cold Start the near-end card. If the alarm persists, dispatch personnel to the
far-end site.

Once on site, disconnect the fiber at the Client In connector of the affected transponder card. Clean all optical connectors and re-connect. If the CSF_LCS alarm persists, replace the fiber cable with a cleaned, inspected spare.

If the alarm persists, try another Warm Start the card raising the alarm. If the alarm
persists, Cold Start the card. If the alarm persists, the card is defective. Replace the
affected card with a spare.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

CSF_LOS

Alarm name

GFP Client Signal Fail - Loss of Signal (CSF_LOS)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

I05AD10G-1 Line port GFP(P)_TT_Sk

General information
and causes

The CSF_LOS alarm indicates an error situation in the client


egress direction, which is originally detected at the far end.
The loss of signal is detected at the client ingress direction at
the far end and should also be indicated there. This alarm
indicates that the incoming client signal has been lost. This
alarm is basically equivalent to an EOCI (External Open Connection Indication). So most troubleshooting actions should
concentrate on the far end.

Troubleshooting instructions

68

Try to clear the alarm remotely first by Warm Starting the card raising the alarm. If
the CSF_LOS alarm persists, Warm Start the corresponding card at the far end. If
the alarm persists, continue to step 2.

The card at the far-end is likely raising a Client In LOS alarm. So, troubleshoot and
clear that alarm according to the Client In LOS instructions. Once the Client In LOS
alarm at the far-end is cleared, the CSF_LOS alarm at the near end should also
clear.

If the CSF_LOS alarm persists, Warm Start the near-end and far-end cards again.

If the alarm persists, Cold Start the card raising the CSF_LOS alarm.

If the alarm persists, replace the card raising the CSF_LOS alarm.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

3.2.5

Troubleshooting instructions

DEG

Alarm name

Degraded Signal (DEG)

Default severity

Minor

Alarm object

The DEG alarm can be raised by the following objects:

General information
and causes

Transponder Line ports (OTUk Sink)


Transponder Line ports (ODUk Sink)
Transponder Client ports (OTUk Sink)
Transponder Client ports (ODUk Sink)
Transponder TCM Layers (ODUk Sink)

The DEG alarm is raised if the Bit Error Rate (after Forward
Error Correction) of the received optical signal is worse than
a user-specified threshold.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.2.6

Verify that the user-specified value for BER Degraded Threshold on the affected
card is set properly. Correct as necessary.

If the alarm does not clear, troubleshoot via the same instructions for the LOS alarm.

If the DEG alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

DEG-O

Alarm name

Degraded Signal (OSC) (DEG-O)

Default severity

Minor

Alarm object

The DEG-O alarm can be raised by the following objects:

General information
and causes

In-line amplifier and Pre-amplifier OTS Sink

An amplifier card will raise the DEG-O alarm if the Bit Error
rate (BER) of the incoming Optical Supervisory Channel is 1
x 10E-6 or worse.

Troubleshooting instructions
1

First, troubleshoot and fix any upstream alarms. Problems with an upstream amplifier that interfere with proper transmission of the Optical Supervisory Channel can
cause an DEG-O alarm. Check especially for an OSCTD or CP alarm raised by an
upstream amplifier.

If the DEG-O alarm persists, Warm Start the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, Cold Start the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, replace the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

69

Troubleshooting instructions

3.2.7

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

DOPFail

Alarm name

Degree of Polarization Failure (DOPFail)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

OPMDC-1 card

General information
and causes

The DOPFail alarm will be raised if the measured Degree of


Polarization is lower than the user-designated threshold.

Troubleshooting instructions
1

Open the Traffic Configuration - Source window for the OPMDC card raising the
alarm. Check the value displayed in the DOP Threshold field. Is the value as specified by TransNet?

3.2.8

No: correct the value, then click Apply. Go to step 2.


Yes: Warm Start the card raising the alarm. Go to step 2.

If the alarm persists, the card is defective. Replace the OPMDC card with a spare.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

DRM

Alarm name

GFP Data Rate Mismatch (DRM)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

I05AD10G-1 card ODU2P/GFP_A_Sink

General information
and causes

A CDR (Channel Data Rate) field is inserted by the


ODU2P/GFP_A_Source function. This field reports the data
rate of the client signal configured for the respective channel.
The CDR is extracted from the header of the incoming signal
and compared with the expected data rate of the same
channel in the ODU2P/GFP_A_Sink function. If the received
and expected data rates do not match, the DRM alarm will be
raised (individually per GFP-T channel). In addition to raising
the alarm, the following will occur:

70

If the received CDR value is higher than the expected


value, all frames of that channel are discarded in order
not to affect the remaining traffic.
If the received CDR value is lower than the configured
value, no frames are discarded.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Troubleshooting instructions

Troubleshooting instructions

3.2.9

Troubleshoot and clear any upstream alarms first. If the DRM alarm persists,
continue to step 2.

Verify that the client mode is set properly for all channels raising the DRM alarm. In
addition, verify that the Tx line interface of the card at the head end is connected to
the line properly.

Then, if necessary to restore traffic, Warm Start the card raising the DRM alarm. If
the Warm Start does not restore traffic, Cold Start the card.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

EOCI

Alarm name

External Open Connection Indication (EOCI)

Default severity

Minor

Alarm object

The EOCI alarm can be raised by the following objects:

General information
and causes

Transponder SDH/SONET Client ports (ODUk Sink)


Transponder Ethernet Client ports (10GE Sink)
Transponder Ethernet Client ports (ODU1/ETC3 Sink)
Transponder Fibre Channel Client ports (ODU1P/FC-2
Sink)

EOCI (External Open Connection Indication) is a special


maintenance signal which indicates an upstream fault (i.e.,
LOS) in the physical layer (ETYm, OSn, or FC-0-n) at the
head end.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.2.10

EOCI indicates an open connection at the signal source end. There will be a Client
LOS alarm at the source end. Troubleshoot and clear the Client LOS alarm to clear
the EOCI alarm.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

EXC-O

Alarm name

Excessive Bit Error Ratio (OSC) (EXC-O)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

The EXC-O alarm can be raised on the following objects:

General information
and causes

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

In-line Amplifier and Pre-amplifier OTS Sink

An amplifier card will raise the EXC-O alarm if the Bit Error
rate (BER) of the incoming Optical Supervisory Channel is 1
x 10E-3 or worse.

71

Troubleshooting instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Troubleshooting instructions

3.2.11

Troubleshoot an EXC-O alarm via the same instructions for a DEG-O alarm.

If the EXC-O alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

EXM

Alarm name

GFP Extension Header Mismatch (EXM)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

The EXM alarm can be raised by the following objects:

General information
and causes

Transponder/Muxponder SDH/SONET Client port.


Transponder/Muxponder Ethernet Client port.
Transponder/Muxponder Fibre Channel Client port.

The EXM alarm is raised due to a mismatch between the


received and expected values for the Generic Framing Procedure (GFP) payload Extension Header Identifier (EXI) field.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.2.12

Troubleshoot the EXM alarm with the same instructions for the LFD alarm.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

ITIM

Alarm name

Internal Trace Identifier Mismatch (ITIM)

Default severity

Minor

Alarm object

Amplifier card OTS Layer Sink

General information
and causes

To verify correct cabling between line amplifier cards,


Transnet creates an expected and a transmitted 2-byte
number for every line amplifier card. Each transmitted
number is unique. Booster amplifiers send these trace bytes
via the OSC to the next far end NE. The far-end preamplifier
reads the trace bytes. If the expected bytes do not match
those actually received, the ITIM alarm will be raised.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.2.13

72

Correct the cabling error.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

LCK

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Troubleshooting instructions

Alarm name

Locked Defect (LCK)

Default severity

Minor

Alarm object

The LCK alarm can be raised by the following objects:

General information
and causes

Transponder/Muxponder Line ports in the sink direction


(ODUk Sink)
Transponder/Muxponder Client ports in the sink direction
(ODUk Sink)
Transponder/Muxponder TCM layers on line ports in the
sink direction (ODUkT Sink)
Transponder TCM layers Client ports in the sink direction
(ODUkT Sink)

LCK is a special ODUk maintenance signal specified in ITU


G.709. LCK is typically invoked to lock the signal from user
access while, for example, performing set-up tests. The
ODUk, ODUk-TCM and OPUk overhead bytes and the whole
payload are overwritten with the LCK pattern (binary
01010101). The LCK signal is therefore always traffic-affecting.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.2.14

There is no spontaneous fault that causes the LCK signal. Insertion of LCK is generated via user command. To remove the LCK signal, the parameter must set to
unlocked in the upstream transponder card.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

LFD

Alarm name

GFP Loss of Frame Delineation (LFD)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

The LFD alarm can be raised by the following objects:

General information
and causes

Transponder/Muxponder SDH/SONET Client port


Transponder/Muxponder Ethernet Client port
Transponder/Muxponder Fibre Channel port

The Generic Framing Procedure (GFP) frame alignment is


not detected by the card raising the LFD alarm.

Troubleshooting instructions
1

Troubleshoot and clear any other raised alarms first (especially any LOS or LOF
alarms).

If the LFD alarm persists, the problem is with the upstream transponder. Verify that
it is configured for GbE or Fibre Channel traffic, as appropriate. Correct as necessary.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

73

Troubleshooting instructions

3.2.15

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

If the alarm persists, Warm Start the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, Warm Start the upstream transponder card.

If the alarm persists, Cold Start the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, Cold Start the upstream transponder card.

If the alarm persists, replace the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

LOCL

Alarm name

Loss of Clock Lock (LOCL)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

Transponder and Muxponder card client interface in the


receive direction.

General information
and causes

The LOCL alarm is raised if the cards phase-locked loop


(PLL) loses lock for 100 msec or more.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.2.16

Often the LOCL condition is only temporary. Wait a short time and see if the alarm
clears by itself.

If the alarm persists, Warm Start the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, Cold Start the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, dispatch personnel to the site and replace the card raising the
alarm.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

LOF

Alarm name

Loss of Frame (LOF)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

The LOF alarm can be raised by the following objects:

74

Transponder Line port (OCh/OTUk Sink)


Transponder SDH/SONET Client port (ODUk/RSj Sink)
Transponder SDH/SONET Client port (OS16/OS64 Sink)
Transponder Client port (OChr/OTUk Sink)

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Troubleshooting instructions

General information
and causes

An LOF alarm is raised if a Loss of Frame condition is


detected in the incoming signal. Typical causes of an LOF
alarm are as follows:

low signal-to-noise-ratio (low input signal optical power;


high noise in the line, or damaged/dirty optical components).
severely distorted signal (input signal with high impairments such as dispersion, or non-linear effects).
Wrong signal format (mapping of an input signal that is
not accepted by Nokia Siemens Networks transponder
cards).
In rare cases, the LOF alarm indicates a receiver permanently damaged by an overpower condition. See step 1
below.

Troubleshooting instructions
1

In rare cases, the LOF alarm indicates a receiver permanently damaged by an overpower condition, caused by using the card in an incorrectly configured system. This
can occur only with high-sensitivity (APD) receivers like those used in Metro transponders.
An overpower condition should never occur in a properly configured system or in a
system that already successfully carried traffic. But, check the following:
For the card raising the LOF alarm, open its Traffic Config window (Line or Client
as applicable) for the interface raising the LOF alarm. Check the value displayed for
Optical Input Power. If the displayed value is unreasonably high and/or the displayed
value does not vary even when the input power is changed, then it is likely that the
receiver has been damaged. Do all the above conditions apply?

No: go to step 2.
Yes: A damaged receiver is a fatal error. The entire card must be replaced with
a spare (or if the interface raising the alarm contains an SFP or XFP module,
only the module needs to be replaced). But first, whatever system problem is
causing the optical input overpower must be fixed to prevent the replacement card/module from immediately suffering the same damage!

If an LOF alarm occurs, system self-recovery to proper signal framing is often


achieved very quickly. If self-recovery occurs, no further action is necessary. If the
alarm persists, continue to step 3.

Which interface is raising the LOF alarm?

Transponder Line port: Warm Start the corresponding upstream Transponder. If


the alarm persists, Cold Start the upstream card. If the alarm persists, go to step
4.
Transponder Client port (Client to Line direction): It is possible that the client
(non-Nokia Siemens Networks) equipment is faulty and is not supplying a
properly-framed SONET/SDH signal. Troubleshoot the client equipment for
problems according to the equipment manufacturer's instructions. If the alarm
persists, go to step 4.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

75

Troubleshooting instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Note that an LOF alarm on the OTU layer will occur if it is attempted to
combine standard FEC (e.g., any standard OTU2 client) with enhanced FEC
(i.e., an I01T10G line). Connecting such interfaces is not supported.

Note that an LOF alarm at Client In for XFP interfaces suppresses a TF


alarm.

3.2.17

If the alarm persists, Warm Start the card raising the LOF alarm.

If the alarm persists, Cold Start the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, dispatch service personnel to the site of the card raising the
alarm. If the Line port raised the LOF alarm, disconnect the Line In fiber from the
affected Transponder and clean the connectors. If the Client In port raised the LOF
alarm, disconnect the Client In fiber from the affected Transponder and clean the
connectors. Re-connect the fiber.

If the alarm persists, replace the pluggable modules (SFP or XFP) on the port raising
alarm (line port or client port).

If the alarm persists, replace the card raising the alarm. Transfer all pluggable
modules to the new card.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

LOF-egress

Alarm name

Loss of Frame (egress) (LOF-egress)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

The LOF-egress alarm can be raised by the following objects:

General information
and causes

Transponder Client Out port [incoming (ingress) signal


from the Line mapped to the outgoing (egress) signal
exiting the SDH/SONET Client Out port].

An LOF-egress alarm is generated from a LOF defect


detected by the mapping of ingress line port signal to the
egress direction of a SDH/SONET Client Out port.

Troubleshooting instructions

76

If an LOF-egress alarm occurs, system self-recovery to proper signal framing is


often achieved very quickly. If self-recovery occurs, no further action is necessary.
If the alarm persists, continue to step 2.

If the alarm persists, troubleshoot and clear any alarms raised by the corresponding
upstream Transponder card (especially Client In LOS or LOF).

It is possible that the client (non-Nokia Siemens Networks) equipment is faulty and
is not supplying a properly-framed SONET/SDH signal. Troubleshoot the client
equipment for problems according to the equipment manufacturer's instructions. If
the alarm persists, go to step 4.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

3.2.18

Troubleshooting instructions

If the LOF-egress alarm persists, Warm Start the card raising the alarm. If the alarm
persists, Cold Start the card raising the alarm. If the alarm persists, replace the card
with a spare.

If the LOF-egress alarm persists, replace the upstream Transponder card with a
spare.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

LOFLOM

Alarm name

Loss of Frame and Multiframe (LOFLOM)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

The LOM alarm can be raised by the following objects:

General information
and causes

Muxponder Line port (ODU Sink)

An LOFLOM alarm is raised if a Loss of Frame and a Loss of


Multiframe condition are both detected in the incoming signal.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.2.19

If an LOFLOM alarm occurs, system self-recovery to proper signal framing is often


achieved very quickly. If self-recovery occurs, no further action is necessary. If the
alarm persists, continue to step 2.

Troubleshoot and clear any alarm raised by the corresponding upstream Transponder first (especially Client In LOS or LOF).

If the alarm persists, warm start the card raising the alarm. If the alarm persists, cold
start the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, dispatch service personnel to the site of the card raising the
alarm. Disconnect the fiber at the In connector of the affected Transponder card.
Clean all optical connectors and re-connect. If the LOFLOM alarm persists, replace
the fiber cable.

If the alarm persists, replace the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

LOF-O

Alarm name

Loss of Frame (OSC) (LOF-O)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

The LOF-O alarm can be raised by the following objects:

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

In-line Amplifier and Pre-amplifier OTS Sink


Pre-amplifier OMS Sink

77

Troubleshooting instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

General information
and causes

An amplifier card will raise the LOF-O alarm if it can no longer


detect the proper frame structure of the incoming Optical
Supervisory Channel.

Troubleshooting instructions
1

3.2.20

Troubleshoot the LOF-O alarm via the same instructions for the DEG-O alarm.

LOM

Alarm name

Loss of Multiframe (LOM)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

The LOM alarm can be raised by the following objects:

General information
and causes

Transponder Line port (OCh/OTUk Sink)


Transponder Client port (OCh/OTUk Sink)

An LOM alarm is raised if a Loss of Multiframe condition is


detected in the incoming signal. Also, if an FEC-enabled
signal is expected, but an FEC-disabled signal is actually
received, the LOM alarm will be raised.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.2.21

78

If an LOM alarm occurs, system self-recovery to proper signal framing is often


achieved very quickly. If self-recovery occurs, no further action is necessary. If the
alarm persists, continue to step 2.

Since LOM on the OTU layer may occur if an FEC-enabled signal is expected, but
an FEC-disabled signal is actually received, ensure consistent configuration of FEC
between OTUk interfaces. If the alarm persists, continue to step 3.

Troubleshoot and clear any alarm raised by the corresponding upstream Transponder first (especially Client In LOS or LOF).

If the alarm persists, warm start the card raising the alarm. If the alarm persists, cold
start the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, dispatch service personnel to the site of the card raising the
alarm. Disconnect the fiber at the In connector of the affected Transponder card.
Clean all optical connectors and re-connect. If LOM alarm persists, replace the fiber
cable.

If the alarm persists, replace the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

LOS

Alarm name

Loss of Signal (LOS)

Default severity

Major

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Troubleshooting instructions

Alarm object

The LOS alarm can be raised by the following objects:

General information
and causes

Transponder Client In port.


Amplifier Line In port (OTS Sink).

An LOS alarm will be raised if the incoming signal power at


the indicated interface falls below the LOS threshold. For
Transponders, LOS detection of the Client In signal is a builtin feature of the SFP/XFP modules. For Amplifier cards, LOS
is raised if there is both of the following conditions exist simultaneously: loss of payload (LOS-P) and loss of Optical Supervisory Channel (LOS-O).

Troubleshooting instructions
1

Troubleshoot and clear any upstream alarms first. If the alarm persists, continue to
step 2.

Note that an LOS alarm at Client In for XFP interfaces suppresses a TF alarm.
Note the following behavior when protection-switch cards (O02CSP-1 or
O03CP-1) are used. If the protection-switch card has a loss-of-signal condition
at a Client In port (the input to its working/protection splitter), obviously no signal
will be output on the working or protection output ports. But, there is no downstream LOS alarm suppression in this case. An LOS alarm will be raised by the
working and protection traffic cards connected to the protection switch card. So,
if a card raising an LOS alarm is connected to an O02CSP-1 or O03CP-1 card,
the problem could be with the fiber connected to the card raising the alarm, or
the problem could be further upstream at the Client In port of the protectionswitch card.
2

Which interface is raising the LOS alarm?

Transponder Client In interface: go to step 3.


Amplifier Line In interface: use the troubleshooting instructions for the LOS-P
alarm.

There may be missing or loose connections at the Client input to the affected card.
Verify that the Client input fiber is properly installed. If the cable was missing,
bent/pinched, or improperly connected, correct the problem. The LOS alarm should
clear when the correct connection is established

If the alarm persists, disconnect the fiber at the Client In port of the affected card.
Clean all optical connectors. Measure the optical power of the signal being carried
by this fiber. Is the measured power higher or lower than the Client In LOS threshold?

Lower than the threshold: assuming upstream conditions are OK, the fiber connected to the Transponder card is likely bad. Replace the fiber. Measure the
power before connecting the fiber to the Client In port. If the power is higher than
the LOS threshold, connect the fiber to the Client In port. The LOS alarm should
clear within 15 seconds.
Higher than the threshold: Re-connect the fiber to the card raising the Client In
LOS alarm. The LOS alarm should clear within 15 seconds. If it does not clear,
go to step 5.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

79

Troubleshooting instructions

3.2.22

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

If the alarm persists, Warm Start the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, Cold Start the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, replace the card raising the alarm. See Transponder replacement instructions in chapter 4.17.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

LOS-O

Alarm name

Loss of Signal (OSC) (LOS-OSC)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

The LOS-O alarm can be raised by the following objects:

General information
and causes

In-line Amplifier and Pre-amplifier OTS Sink

A card will raise the LOS-O alarm if it can no longer detect the
incoming Optical Supervisory Channel. Note: when the OSC
is lost, the link control mechanism goes to a "best effort" state
in order to maintain service. Consequently, an LOS-O condition must be fixed as soon as possible.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.2.23

Troubleshoot the LOS-O alarm via the same instructions for the LOS-P alarm.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

LOS-P

Alarm name

Loss of Signal (Payload) (LOS-P)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

The LOS-P alarm can be raised by the following objects:

General information
and causes

80

Amplifier Line port (OTS Sink and OMS Sink)


Transponder Line port (OCh Sink)
F40MP, F40VMP, and F09MDRT card input ports (OCh
Sink)
O02CSP-1 card Client In port
OPMDC-1 card input port

The LOS-P alarm is raised if the indicated interface detects a


loss of signal, but the Optical Supervisory Channel is still
working.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Troubleshooting instructions

Troubleshooting instructions
1

Troubleshoot and clear any upstream alarms first. If the LOS-P alarm persists,
continue to step 2.

On the craft terminals NE Configuration window, there is a checkbox named


Optical Channel LOS Declared by LOF. Enabling this checkbox causes a Loss of
Frame (LOF) condition to be reported as Loss of Signal (LOS-P). Is this checkbox
enabled?

Yes, checkbox is enabled: the LOS-P alarm could be caused by a Loss of


Frame condition. Temporarily disable the checkbox. Does the LOS-P alarm
clear?
Yes, LOS-P alarm clears: this proves that a Loss of Frame condition was
causing the LOS-P alarm. Therefore, re-enable the checkbox, go to the troubleshooting instructions for the LOF alarm and use those instructions to
clear the LOS-P.
No, LOS-P alarm remains raised: the LOS-P alarm is truly indicating a
Loss of Signal condition. Re-enable the checkbox and continue to step 3.
No, checkbox is not enabled: the LOS-P alarm is truly indicating a Loss of
Signal condition. Continue to step 3.

Operating tip for the Optical Channel LOS Declared by LOF checkbox: verify
that the checkbox is really supposed to be enabled. This checkbox should be
enabled only under very specific circumstances when hiT 7300 equipment is
interworking with third-party equipment from MPB Communications). Disable
the checkbox if it was erroneously enabled.

3.2.24

There may be missing or loose connections at the Line input to the affected card.
Verify that the Line input fiber is properly installed. If the cable was missing,
bent/pinched, or improperly connected, correct the problem. The LOS-P alarm
should clear when the correct connection is established.

If the alarm persists, disconnect the fiber at the Line In port of the affected card.
Clean all optical connectors, then re-connect the fiber. The LOS-P alarm should
clear within 15 seconds. If it does not clear, continue to step 4.

If the alarm persists, Warm Start the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, Cold Start the card raising the alarm.

f the alarm persists, replace the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support. There may
be an outside plant fiber break causing the LOS-P alarm. Once the fiber break is
repaired, the alarm should clear. After a fiber break is repaired, re-check the
Span Loss as described in the hiT 7300 Optical Link Commissioning (OLC)
Manual. If the span loss has significantly increased, it will be necessary to
perform a link shutdown (see the hiT 7300 Operating Manual (OMN). Then
perform a new Link Startup as described in the OLC Manual.

LSM

Alarm name

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Link State Mismatch (LSM)

81

Troubleshooting instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

Amplifier card OMS Layer Sink

General information
and causes

A mismatch has been detected in the link state, i.e., the link
state running received at the OSC does not match the link
state prestart as configured by link control.

Troubleshooting instructions
1

3.2.25

Call your next higher level of technical support. It may be necessary to re-start the
entire link.

LSS

Alarm name

Loss of PRBS Lock (LSS)

Default severity

Minor

Alarm object

The LSS alarm can be raised by:

General information
and causes

I01T10G-1 and I05AD10G-1: ODU2P PRBS Sink


I08T10G: ODU1P PRBS Sink
I01T40G-1: ODU3P PRBS Sink
I04T40G-1: ODU2P PRBS Sink

The above-mentioned transponder cards support generation


and detection of a PRBS (Pseudo-Random Bit Sequence)
signal for test purposes. The LSS alarm will be raised if the
indicated card does not detect the PRBS. For testing, the
typical procedure is to provision a transponder at one end of
a link to send a PRBS signal in the ODUk payload. The
matching receive transponder at the other end of the link is
provisioned to detect the PRBS signal. If the PRBS is not
detected at the receive end, the cause is likely incorrect cable
connections, high bit errors on the line, or incorrect PRBS
provisioning.

Troubleshooting instructions

82

Verify that the two transponder cards under test have the correct PRBS settings.
One card must be set to PRBS Source and the other card must be set to PRBS Sink.
When set correctly, the test should work and the LSS alarm will clear.

If the alarm persists, verify that there has not been a cabling mistake. Check the endto-end path connections via the ODU TTI (Trail Trace Identifier) feature for the two
cards under test. If the transmitted and received TTI strings do not match, then there
is a cabling mistake somewhere. Correct the cabling error and re-test. The LSS
alarm should clear.

If this does not clear the alarm, the problem may be due to a high bit error rate on
the line. Follow the troubleshooting procedure for the LOS alarm and/or the DEG
alarm..

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

3.2.26

Troubleshooting instructions

LTC

Alarm name

Loss of Tandem Connection (LTC)

Default severity

Minor

Alarm object

The LTC alarm can be raised by the following objects:

General information
and causes

Transponder TCM Layers

LTC functions according to ITU G.798. The LTC alarm is


raised if the Tandem Connection Monitoring (TCM) sink is
configured, but the TCM source is not configured.

Troubleshooting instructions
1

Typically, the LTC alarm will be raised if TCM sink and source are set-up in an incorrect sequence. Complete instructions for setting-up TCMs appear in the hiT 7300
Operating Manual (OMN). Configure TCMs only in the sequence described in the
OMN. When a TCMs source and sink are properly configured, the LTC alarm will
clear.

Important points for I04T2G5-1 transponder cards:

3.2.27

f the transponders at both ends use GbE/SDH clients, TCM is NOT recommended since enabling TCM will cause temporary traffic loss. Use management by regular ODU Path termination instead.
If one end (A) is a GbE/SDH client, and the other end (B) is an OTU client,
configure TCMs in the following sequence: Source at B, then Sink at A, then
Sink at B.
If both ends are OTU or FC client, configure the TCM source at one end (A),
then the sink at other end (B), then the source at B, then the sink at A.
To monitor the tandem connection at an intermediate point (which, consequently must be an OTU client), take the value MONITORED for the corresponding sink, and TRANSPARENT for the source.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

MSIM

Alarm name

Multiplex Structure Identifier Mismatch (MSIM)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

The MSIM alarm can be raised by:

General information
and causes

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

I08T10G-1 card: ODU2 layer


I04T40G-1 card: ODU3 layer

The MSIM alarm will be raised if the MSI fields do not indicate
a multiplex structure that is correct for the card type raising
the alarm. This may occur if the transmitting transponder at
the far end is an older hiT 7300 transponder.

83

Troubleshooting instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Troubleshooting instructions

3.2.28

Upgrade the far-end hiT 7300 transponder card to a version which inserts the correct
MSI.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

NFR

Alarm name

GFP No Frames Received (NFR)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

I05AD10G-1 card Line Port (GFP_TT_Sink):

General information
and causes

The NFR alarm will be raised (per GFP-T channel) if no frame


is received for the channel within a period equivalent to the
time required to transmit 20 frames of the corresponding
client signal type. The alarm will be cleared when a new
frame is received for the respective channel.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.2.29

If an NFR alarm occurs, system self-recovery to proper signal framing is often


achieved very quickly. If self-recovery occurs, no further action is necessary. Otherwise, continue to step 2.

Warm Start the card raising the alarm. If the alarm persists, Cold Start the card. If
the alarm persists, dispatch personnel to the site.

Once on site, disconnect the fiber at the Line In connector of the affected transponder card. Clean all optical connectors and re-connect. If the NFR alarm persists,
replace the fiber cable with a cleaned, inspected spare.

If the alarm persists, try another Warm Start the card raising the alarm. If the alarm
persists, Cold Start the card. If the alarm persists, the card is defective. Replace the
affected card with a spare.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

OCI

Alarm name

Open Connection Indication (OCI)

Default severity

Minor

Alarm object

The OCI alarm can be raised by the following objects:

84

Transponder Line Port (ODUk Sink)


Transponder Client Port (ODUk Sink)
Transponder TCM Layers (ODUk Sink)

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

General information
and causes

Troubleshooting instructions

Open Connection Indication (OCI) is monitored at the ODUk


layer. Detection of OCI signifies that there is a Loss of Signal
defect due to an output connection point not connected to an
input connection point.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.2.30

Ensure correct configuration of ODUk connections in upstream NEs.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

OOS

Alarm name

GFP Frames Out Of Sequence (OOS)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

I05AD10G-1 card Line port (GFP_TT_Sink function):

General information
and causes

In the sink direction, the GFP Frame Sequence is extracted


and used to detect missing GFP-T frames (monitoring is done
per GFP-T channel). If there is a mismatch between the
expected value of the GFP Frame Sequence and the
received value, the OOS alarm will be raised.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.2.31

If an OOS alarm occurs, system self-recovery to proper signal framing is often


achieved very quickly. If self-recovery occurs, no further action is necessary. Otherwise, continue to step 2.

Try to clear the alarm remotely first. Warm Start the card raising the alarm. If the
alarm persists, Cold Start the card. If the alarm persists, dispatch personnel to the
site.

Once on site, disconnect the fiber at the Line In connector of the affected transponder card. Clean all optical connectors and re-connect. If the OOS alarm persists,
replace the fiber cable with a cleaned, inspected spare.

If the alarm persists, try another Warm Start the card raising the alarm. If the alarm
persists, Cold Start the card. If the alarm persists, the card is defective. Replace the
affected card with a spare.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

OPR

Alarm name

Optical Power Received Too Low (OPR)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

The OPR alarm can be raised by the following objects:

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Transponder Line Port (OCh Sink)

85

Troubleshooting instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

General information
and causes

A transponder card will raise the OPR alarm if the incoming


signal power at the line interface falls below the alarm threshold. OPR is intended to be a "degraded signal" alarm threshold that is reached before the more serious LOS threshold is
reached.

Important Note

The OPR raise and clear time is 100 seconds. So, after each
troubleshooting step, wait at least 100 seconds to see if the
alarm clears.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.2.32

Troubleshoot and clear any upstream alarms first. If the alarm persists, Warm Start
the card raising the alarm. If the alarm persists, dispatch personnel to the site.

There may be missing or loose connections at the Line input to the affected card.
Verify that the Line input fiber is properly installed. If the cable was missing,
bent/pinched, or improperly connected, correct the problem. The OPR alarm should
clear when the correct connection is established.

If the alarm persists, disconnect the fiber at the Line In port of the affected card.
Clean all optical connectors, then re-connect the fiber. The OPR alarm should clear
within 15 seconds. If it does not clear, continue to step 4.

If the alarm persists, try another Warm Start the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, Cold Start the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, replace the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

PESF

Alarm name

Preemphasis Section Fail (PESF)

Default severity

Minor

Alarm object

Link Control: Preemphasis Section Layer.

General information
and causes

The PESF alarm indicates that 10 consecutive power preemphasis routines have failed. This could be due to a faulty MCP
card, a faulty CCEP card, or a DCN communications failure.

Troubleshooting instructions
1

86

When NEs are using Released Service Provisioning mode, the user can change the
pre-emphasis mode from pre-calculated to automatic. If this is done (and the
required new MCP card is installed in the head end node, software will wait for a preemphasis measurement from the tail end. After 10 cycles (10 x 5 minutes), if the tail
end MCP has not been installed yet, the PESF alarm will be raised. This is expected
behavior since 10 consecutive pre-emphasis routines have failed due to the missing

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Troubleshooting instructions

MCP card. To clear the alarm, install an MCP card in the tail end node. For all other
scenarios, proceed to step 2.

3.2.33

Troubleshoot and clear any other alarms first, especially alarms raised by amplifier,
CCEP, or MCP cards.

If the PESF alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support. There
may be a problem with the DCN.

PHF

Alarm name

Power Too High Failure (PHF)

Default severity

Minor

Alarm object

The PHF alarm can be raised by the following objects:

General information
and causes

Transponder SDH/SONET Client Port (OS Sink)


Transponder OTU Client Port
Transponder 10G Ethernet Client port (ETY4 Sink)
Transponder 1G Ethernet Client port (ETY3 Sink)
Transponder Fibre Channel Client port
MCP card input ports
F40MR-1 card input ports

The PHF alarm will be raised if the optical power of the input
signal at the indicated port is above the user-specified PHF
threshold.

Troubleshooting instructions
1

Was a Channel Upgrade (addition of new channels) or a Channel Downgrade


(removal of existing channels) recently performed and the MCP card is raising the
PHF alarm?

Yes: Channel Upgrades or Channel Downgrades can cause significant changes


to the monitored spectrum, whereby a PHF alarm is an expected result. There
is no actual fault in the system, but it is necessary to take new power reference
values. Wait 30 minutes after the Channel Upgrade/Downgrade, then open
the MCP cards Channel Monitoring window. Click the Take Power Reference
Values button. Once the new reference values are captured, the PHF alarm will
clear. If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.
No: go to step 2.

Verify that the relevant user-configurable PHF threshold is set to the proper value.
If set incorrectly, set it to the proper value.

If the PHF alarm persists, the signal power entering the card is too high. Check the
output power of the upstream equipment. If the power is too high, lower the equipments output power (or, insert an attenuation fiber to lower the signal level into the
transponder card). This should clear the alarm.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

87

Troubleshooting instructions

3.2.34

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support before proceeding. Warm start the card raising the alarm. If the alarm persists, cold start the
card raising the alarm. If the alarm persists, replace the card raising the alarm.

PLF

Alarm name

Power Too Low Failure (PLF)

Default severity

Minor

Alarm object

The PLF alarm can be raised by the following objects:

General information
and causes

Transponder SDH/SONET Client Port (OS Sink).


Transponder OTU Client Port
Transponder 10G Ethernet Client port (ETY4 Sink)
Transponder 1G Ethernet Client port (ETY3 Sink)
Transponder Fibre Channel Client port
MCP card input ports
F40MR card input ports
OPMDC card input and output port

The PLF alarm will be raised if the optical signal power at the
indicated port is below the user-specified PLF threshold.

Troubleshooting instructions
1

Was a Channel Upgrade (addition of new channels) or a Channel Downgrade


(removal of existing channels) recently performed and the MCP card is raising the
PLF alarm?

88

Yes: Channel Upgrades or Channel Downgrades can cause significant changes


to the monitored spectrum, whereby a PLF alarm is an expected result. There is
no actual fault in the system, but it is necessary to take new power reference
values. Wait 30 minutes after the Channel Upgrade/Downgrade, then open
the MCP cards Channel Monitoring window. Click the Take Power Reference
Values button. Once the new reference values are captured, the PLF alarm will
clear. If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.
No: go to step 2.

Verify that the user-configurable PLF threshold is set to the proper value. If set incorrectly, set it to the proper value.

If the PLF alarm persists, the signal power entering the card from the upstream
equipment is too low. Disconnect fiber and measure the power at the output port of
the upstream equipment. If it is too low, increase the output power. If the power is
OK, the problem is between the upstream equipment and the card raising the alarm
(bad fiber or dirty connectors). Clean all connectors and re-attach the fiber. If the
alarm persists, replace the fiber cable with a spare.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support before proceeding. Warm Start the card raising the alarm. If the alarm persists, Cold Start the
card raising the alarm. If the alarm persists, replace the card raising the alarm.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

3.2.35

Troubleshooting instructions

PLM

Alarm name

Payload Mismatch (PLM)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

The PLM alarm can be raised by the following objects:

General information
and causes

Transponder SDH/SONET Client port (ODUk Sink)


Transponder Ethernet Client port (ODU2 Sink)
Transponder Ethernet Client port (ODU1/ETC3 Sink)
ODU2P/ODU1 in the muxponder if the received ODU2 is
not ODU1-structured.
ODU3P/ODU2 in the muxponder if the received ODU3 is
not ODU2-structured.

A channel traversing the optical path must use the same transponder card type and Client signal type at each end. If both
ends do not match, the PLM alarm will be raised at the
receive end.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.2.36

Ensure that identical transponder card types are used at both ends of the affected
channels optical path and that both cards are configured for the same Client type.
In addition, verify that the Tx line interface of the transponder card at the head end
is connected to the line properly.

Then, if necessary to restore traffic, execute a warm start of the card(s) raising the
PLM alarm. If the warm start does not restore traffic, execute a cold start.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

SSF

Alarm name

Server Signal Fail (SSF)

Default severity

Minor

Alarm object

Transponder cards and amplifier cards

General information
and causes

The SSF alarm indicates a signal failure on a server layer.


The signal failure could be on the card raising the SSF alarm,
or on another upstream card.

Troubleshooting instructions
1

An SSF alarm always results from some other alarm (e.g., LOF, LOM, PLM,
SYNCF). For transponder cards, clear all other alarms on the client ports or
upstream of this cards client ports. For amplifier cards, clear all other alarms on the
line port or upstream of this cards line port.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

89

Troubleshooting instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

g Background information about SSF: The principle of SSF (an alarm name
defined by ITU-T) is very similar to an Alarm Indication Signal (AIS). The word
"Server" in "Server Signal Fail" refers to lower transport server layers. If a layer
receives SSF, it is not considered to be service affecting because the layer that
inserted the SSF will have already reported the root-cause problem (incoming
signal problem or equipment problem) as a service-affecting alarm.

3.2.37

SSF-egress

Alarm name

Server Signal Fail (egress) (SSF-egress)

Default severity

Minor

Alarm object

Transponder cards

General information
and causes

An SSF-egress alarm is raised due to a signal failure on a


server layer on the Line that is mapped to the Client (egress)
SDH/SONET or Ethernet port.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.2.38

Troubleshoot and clear all other alarms on the transponder cards line port or
upstream of this cards line port. Once cleared, the SSF-egress should also clear.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

SSF-O

Alarm name

Server Signal Fail (OSC) (SSF-O)

Default severity

Minor

Alarm object

Amplifier card line ports

General information
and causes

The SSF-O alarm indicates an SSF condition that affects the


Optical Supervisory Channel, but not the payload. The fault
could be on the card raising the SSF alarm, or on another
upstream card.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.2.39

90

Troubleshoot the SSF-O alarm via the same instructions for the SSF alarm.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

SSF-P

Alarm name

Server Signal Fail (payload) (SSF-P)

Default severity

Minor

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Troubleshooting instructions

Alarm object

Amplifier card line ports

General information
and causes

The SSF-P alarm indicates an SSF condition that affects the


payload, but not the Optical Supervisory Channel. The fault
could be on the card raising the SSF alarm, or on another
upstream card.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.2.40

Troubleshoot the SSF-O alarm via the same instructions for the SSF alarm.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

SSF-prot

Alarm name

Server Signal Fail (protection) (SSF-prot)

Default severity

Minor

Alarm object

Transponder cards

General information
and causes

The SSF-prot alarm is raised due to an SSF condition on the


signal after the protection switch. If there is no operator
command on the protection switch, SSF-prot will occur if both
the working and protection line fail.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.2.41

Troubleshoot the SSF-prot alarm via the same instructions for the SSF alarm.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

SYNCF

Alarm name

Synchronization Failure (SYNCF)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

Ethernet and Fibre Channel client signals of transponder,


muxponder and Carrier Ethernet (I22CE10G-1) cards.

General information
and causes

Ethernet or Fibre Channel synchronization failure in Client-toLine direction.

Troubleshooting instructions
1

The problem is with the Ethernet router at the NE raising the alarm. It is not supplying
a valid Ethernet signal to the indicated client port. Correct the problem with the
router.

For I04T40G cards, netlists from hiT 7300 Release 4.30 and 4.30.01 are not
compatible with earlier hiT 7300 netlists (Release 4.25 or earlier). So, if the
SYNCF alarm is raised by an I04T40G card, check whether the netlists on this
card and the corresponding upstream card are the same release. If the netlists

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

91

Troubleshooting instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

on the two cards are incompatible, the SYNCF alarm will be raised. To clear the
alarm, the netlists on the two cards must be upgraded to match. Cold start both
cards (the I04T40G raising the SYNCF alarm, and the corresponding card
at the other end of the link). This is traffic-affecting! This will upgrade the
netlists and clear the SYNCF alarm.
2

3.2.42

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

SYNCF-egress

Alarm name

Synchronization Failure (egress) (SYNCF-egress)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

The SYNCF-egress alarm can be raised by the following


objects:

General information
and causes

Transponder Ethernet and Fibre Channel Client port

The SYNCF-egress alarm is generated from a SYNCF defect


detected by the mapping of the ingress line port signal to the
egress direction of a directly-mapped 1G or 10G Ethernet or
Fibre Channel client port.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.2.43

The problem is with the router at other end.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

TCLL

Alarm name

TDC Control Loop Limit (TCLL)

Default severity

Minor

Alarm object

40G cards (I01T40G, I01R40G, and I04T40G) Optical


Channel

General information
and causes

The TCLL alarm is raised if the cards TDC control loop


reaches the upper or lower limit of its range (+/- 700 ps/nm).
Such a condition indicates that traffic loss may soon
occur since dispersion present on the line may no longer
be adequately compensated.

Troubleshooting instructions

92

Try to clear the alarm remotely first. Warm Start the card raising the alarm. If the
alarm persists, continue to step 2.

Open the Line Traffic-Config window for the card raising the alarm. Click the Optical
Channel tab. Verify that the TDC Value field reads near the upper or lower limit (+/700 ps/nm). Then, check the same field for other 40G cards serving neighboring

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Troubleshooting instructions

channels. Is the TDC value near its upper or lower limit for the neighboring channels?

3.2.44

Yes: the problem is with the transmission line. Something caused the dispersion
to increase.
No: the card reporting the TCLL alarm is probably defective. Dispatch personnel
to the site and continue to step 3.

Verify that all fibers are connected properly to the card raising the alarm. If the alarm
persists, contact your next higher level of technical support before proceeding since
the following actions are traffic-affecting. Disconnect all fibers from the card and
clean fiber ends and connectors. Re-connect the fibers. If the alarm persists, replace
the defective card with a spare.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

TIM

Alarm name

Trace Identifier Mismatch (TIM)

Default severity

Minor

Alarm object

The TIM alarm can be raised by the following objects:

General information
and causes

Amplifier Line In port (OTS Sink)


Transponder/Muxponder Line In port (OTUk Sink)
Transponder/Muxponder Line In port (ODUk Sink)
Transponder SDH/SONET Client port (RS ingress)
Transponder/Muxponder Client In port (OTUk Sink)
Transponder/Muxponder Client In port (ODUkP Sink)
Transponder/Muxponder TCM Line In port (ODUkT Sink)
Transponder TCM Client In port (ODUkT Sink)

The TIM alarm is raised if the indicated card detects a


mismatch between the expected Trail Trace Identifier
message string and the Trail Trace Identifier message string
actually received.

Troubleshooting instructions
Trail Trace Identifier (TTI) is a feature that allows network operators to verify correct connectivity through the network elements. The basic principle is that specific overhead
bytes are reserved for Trace Messages of the users choosing. By specifying the transmitted and the expected received trace messages on various craft terminal windows,
the system can automatically verify that fiber connections have been made as intended.
This is accomplished by comparing the expected Trace Message to that actually
received. If they differ, the mismatch alarm is raised, alerting personnel of the incorrect
connections.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

93

Troubleshooting instructions

3.2.45

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Check the configuration of the Trail Trace Identifier message strings at both the
immediate upstream card and the card raising the alarm. Verify that the Trace
Messages were configured as desired.

If the Trace Messages were configured as desired and the TIM alarm persists, there
is a fiber misconnection somewhere between the two cards. Determine the location
and make the correct fiber connection.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

TIM-egress

Alarm name

Trace Identifier Mismatch (egress) (TIM-egress)

Default severity

Minor

Alarm object

The TIM-egress alarm can be raised by the following objects:

General information
and causes

Transponder SDH/SONET Client port (RS egress)

The TIM-egress alarm is generated from a TIM defect


detected by the RS trace monitoring of the signal mapped
from line to client.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.2.46

Troubleshoot the TIM-egress alarm via the same instructions for the TIM alarm (for
the NE feeding the RS trace at the remote end).

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

TNEF

Alarm name

Target NE Failure (TNEF)

Default severity

Minor

Alarm object

UDP port

General information
and causes

The TNEF alarm will be raised if a Network Element is not


reachable via the DCN.

Troubleshooting instructions

94

When configuring the NTP (Network Time Protocol), it is natural that the time can
jump. This can cause the allocation "leases" to expire, which will cause a temporary TNEF alarm. In this case, ignore the temporary TNEF alarm. It will clear by itself.
Otherwise, continue to step 2.

Although any primary or secondary DHCP server can be removed from the network
(i.e., is no longer reachable by any NE within the DCN) it cannot be deleted from the
Reachable Systems list. Attempting to delete a previously-discovered server from
the list will cause a TNEF alarm. Also, that NEs name will be displayed as *ame on
the Reachable Systems list. To clear this TNEF alarm, Cold Start the other (remain-

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Troubleshooting instructions

ing) DHCP server. After start-up, the TNEF alarm will be cleared. The deleted DHCP
server will still remain on the list - now with an asterisk (*) in the name field, signifying
that there are no alarms.

3.2.47

If the unreachable NE belongs in the network and uses external Ethernet connections, verify that these connections are all intact.

If the alarm persists, replace the NE Controller (CCEP or CCMP) card in the
unreachable NE. See Card replacement instructions in chapter 4.1.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

UCI

Alarm name

GFP Unexpected Channel ID (UCI)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

I05AD10G-1 card ODU2P/GFP_A_Sink

General information
and causes

The I05AD10G-1 uses channel IDs local to the segment


between two adjacent NEs. The channel ID is extracted from
the incoming signal (ODU2P/GFP_A_Sink) and a new
channel ID is inserted into the outgoing GFP-T frames
(ODU2P/GFP_A_Source). If the received and expected
Channel IDs do not match, the UCI alarm will be raised (individually per GFP-T channel).
An express connection is defined by associating an incoming
channel ID with a corresponding outgoing GFP channel ID.
For add/drop channels, the connection is defined by associating a certain client port with the incoming (drop) or outgoing
(add) channel ID. Drop & Continue channels have an association between incoming and outgoing channel IDs and with a
client port (egress direction).

Troubleshooting instructions

3.2.48

Verify that all express, add/drop, and drop & continue connections are configured
properly. If the alarm persists, continue to step 2.

Warm Start the card raising the alarm. If the alarm persists, Cold Start the card.

If the alarm persists, replace the card with a spare.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

UPM

Alarm name

GFP User Payload Mismatch (UPM)

Default severity

Major

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

95

Troubleshooting instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Alarm object

Transponder Ethernet, Fibre Channel, and STM-1/OC-3


Client port.

General information
and causes

The UPM alarm is raised due to a mismatch between the


received and expected values for the Generic Framing Procedure (GFP) payload User Payload Identifier (UPI) header
field.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.2.49

Troubleshoot the UPM alarm via the same instructions as the LFD alarm.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

VOATC

Alarm name

VOA Threshold Crossed (VOATC)

Default severity

Minor

Alarm object

Link Control: Optical Channel layer.

General information
and causes

A Variable Optical Attenuator (VOA) problem occurred during


a manual power adjust or manual pre-emphasis routine. A
setting higher than the upper VOA threshold (20 dB) or lower
than the lower VOA threshold (0 dB) is being attempted.

Troubleshooting instructions
1

Re-attempt the action (Manual Power Adjust or Enhanced Pre-emphasis - Manual)


that triggered the VOATC alarm. A second attempt will most likely work correctly and
clear the VOATC alarm. Ensure that unused channels are provisioned as unused.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support. There is a
slight chance that fixed attenuators may need to be inserted in various locations (inline with the F04 / F08 / F16 Filter cards) to clear a standing VOATC alarm. Contact
Nokia Siemens Networks Customer Support for guidance. Nokia Siemens Networks
will analyze characteristics of your network (fiber type, span counts, types of Filter
cards used, etc) and provide further instructions on the insertion of any required
attenuators.

g Behavior note: If a VOATC alarm is active and the NE Controller card (CCEP or
CCMP) is Cold Started, the VOATC alarm will no longer be raised (the root cause is
likely still present, but the alarm itself is no longer raised). However, after the next
link control action is performed (Power Adjust, Pre-emphasis, etc), the VOATC
alarm will be raised again if conditions warrant.

96

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

3.3
3.3.1

Troubleshooting instructions

Processing error alarms


APSM

Alarm name

APS Mismatch (APSM)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

Network Element

General information
and causes

Replacement of a faulty Compact Flash module on an NE


Controller card (CCEP or CCMP) can cause an APSM alarm.
See Compact Flash replacement in chapter 4.2. After
replacement, the APS version that is present on the new
Compact Flash is checked against the version number the
network element thinks it should have. (The latter is stored on
an EEPROM on the shelf backplane).
If there is a mismatch, the NE will enter Recover Mode (see
chapter 8 for details), and the APSM alarm will be raised.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.3.2

Since the NE has entered Recover Mode, Element Manager will display the Clear
Recover Mode window. This window will state that APS_MISMATCH is the
reason the NE has entered Recover Mode. It is necessary to download the correct
APS to this NE. So, click the Change APS button on this window, which will open
the Software/File Management window. Download the correct APS to this NE.
Detailed instructions can be found in the hiT 7300 Operating Manual (OMN).

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

CFFULL

Alarm name

Compact Flash Full (CFFULL)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

CCEP card and CCMP card

General information
and causes

The CFFULL alarm indicates that the cards Compact Flash


MIB partition exceeds 90% of total capacity.

Troubleshooting instructions
1

The Compact Flash card on the card is too full. This can be caused when an older
hiT 7300 Compact Flash (with low capacity) is used in newer hiT 7300 systems that
require larger amounts of NE configuration data.
Ideally, the Compact Flash should be replaced with one that has a higher capacity
(refer to chapter 4.2 for instructions). However, it is highly recommended that you
first contact your next higher level of technical support. It may be beneficial to

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

97

Troubleshooting instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

gather diagnostic data from the card to analyze memory usage to determine if some
other fault might be causing the CFFULL alarm.

3.3.3

DUPDHCP

Alarm name

Duplicated DHCP Server (DUPDHCP)

Default severity

Warning

Alarm object

Network Element.

General information
and causes

The DUPDHCP alarm will be raised if duplicate primary or


secondary DHCP servers are detected. This is often caused
by accidentally duplicating IP addresses when performing
DHCP configuration during commissioning.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.3.4

Carefully follow the procedures in the hiT 7300 Operating Manual Configuring
DHCP settings.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

LOTR

Alarm name

Loss of Time Reference (LOTR)

Default severity

Warning

Alarm object

Network Element

General information
and causes

The LOTR alarm will be raised if all configured external NTP


(Network Time Protocol) references have been unreachable
for a period of at least 30 minutes.
The alarm will self-clear as soon as an NTP server is available again (or, if all configured NTP servers are deleted by
the user).

Troubleshooting instructions

98

If the alarm is simultaneously raised on multiple NEs, the problem is likely with the
NTP Servers themselves. If the alarm is raised by a single NE, verify that the NTP
servers were set-up correctly during commissioning, especially each servers IP
address. [NTP server addresses must be provided by the customer]. Refer to the NE
Commissioning Manual for instructions.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

3.3.5

Troubleshooting instructions

MIBF

Alarm name

MIB Failure (MIBF)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

Network Element

General information
and causes

Each NEs Management Information Base (MIB) contents are


stored in two places: the flash memory on-board the NE Controller card (CCEP or CCMP) and on that cards removable
Compact Flash module.
The MIBF alarm can be caused by three related, yet distinct
events:

A sudden double hardware failure in an operational


network (i.e., simultaneous failure of an NE Controller
cards two MIB storage devices - its Onboard Flash and
its Compact Flash). Such a failure is extremely unlikely. If
it occurs, the NE Controller card and its Compact Flash
must be replaced.
A mismatch condition that might occur immediately after
(and as a direct result of) replacing a failed NE Controller
card and/or its Compact Flash module. Such replacements can sometimes result in a mismatch of the MIB
contents and/or a mismatch of the APS software versions. In such cases, the NE will re-start in Recover
Mode (meaning it could not find a valid MIB). No communication to peripheral cards is possible and the NE will
appear as an OLR network element on the Element
Manager Shelf Equipment window. A backup copy of
the MIB must be downloaded to the NE.
If the NE was in Recover Mode, setting the NE to default
(see chapter Resetting the NE to default configuration in
the hiT 7300 Operating Manual) will raise the MIBF
alarm. In this case, Recover Mode can be exited only via
manual methods as explained below.

Troubleshooting instructions

g NOTICE: Do NOT Cold Start a card that has an active MIBF alarm!
1

How was the MIBF alarm raised?

It was suddenly raised in an operational network (the double hardware failure


described above): Dispatch service personnel to replace the NE Controller card
and the Compact Flash module. For instructions, go to CCEP/CCMP replacement due to MIBF alarm scenario in chapter 4.1.
A failed NE Controller card and/or its Compact Flash was just replaced. When
the card was re-installed, the MIBF alarm, and possibly the APSM alarm, were
raised: go to step 2.
While the NE was in Recover Mode, the NE was set to default configuration. This
will erase the MIB data on the Controller cards Compact Flash and on-board

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

99

Troubleshooting instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

flash. In this case, go to step 3. (A backup copy of the MIB must be downloaded
to the Controller card in order to exit Recover Mode and clear the MIBF alarm).
2

If an APSM alarm is also raised, troubleshoot and clear that alarm first.

Download a back-up copy of this NEs MIB contents and activate the MIB. Instructions for doing so can be found in the hiT 7300 Operating Manual (OMN).

When an NE is is Recover Mode, a MIB can be downloaded and swapped only


if the NE Name of the downloaded MIB matches the NE Name stored on the
shelf backplane EEPROM.

3.3.6

After selecting Activate MIB, the Element Manager connection to this NE will be
temporarily lost again. The NE Controller card will start. Wait approximately 3
minutes for the NE Controller card to light its green OK LED. Wait an additional 1
minute, then re-connect to the NE over the Q or QF interface. Verify that all alarms
have cleared.

If the MIBF alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

MIBFULL_MAJOR

Alarm name

MIB Full Major (MIBFULL_MAJOR)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

CCEP and CCMP cards.

General information
and causes

The MIBFULL_MAJOR alarm will be raised if the contents of


the cards memory storage (PRAM or On-board Flash)
exceeds 90% of maximum capacity.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.3.7

100

If a CCEP-1 card is raising the alarm, replace it with a CCEP-2 card according to the
instructions in chapter 4.1. If a CCMP-1 card is raising the alarm, replace it with a
CCMP-2 card according to the instructions in chapter 4.1.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

MIBFULL_MINOR

Alarm name

MIB Full Minor (MIBFULL_MINOR)

Default severity

Minor

Alarm object

CCEP and CCMP cards.

General information
and causes

The MIBFULL_MINOR alarm will be raised if the contents of


the cards memory storage (PRAM or On-board Flash)
exceeds 70% of maximum capacity.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Troubleshooting instructions

Troubleshooting instructions
1

No immediate action is required. The MIBFULL_MINOR alarm serves as an


advance warning that serious memory shortage problems may eventually occur. As
a precaution, schedule a card replacement at the next convenient opportunity as
follows:

3.3.8

If a CCEP-1 card is raising the alarm, replace it with a CCEP-2 card at the next
convenient opportunity. Follow the instructions in chapter 4.1.
If a CCMP-1 card is raising the alarm, replace it with a CCMP-2 card at the next
convenient opportunity. Follow the instructions in chapter 4.1.

If the alarm persists after replacing the card, contact your next higher level of technical support.

NQO
Alarm name

Notification Queue Overflow (NQO)

Default severity

Minor

Alarm object

Network Element

General information
and causes

The NQO alarm indicates an internal overload of the Controller card software due to too many notification messages.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.3.9

Often, the NQO condition is only temporary. Wait a short time and see if the alarm
clears by itself.

If the alarm persists, the problem could be due to too many Element Managers connected at once. Reduce the number of Element Managers connected.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support before proceeding. Warm Start the NE Controller card (CCEP or CCMP). If the alarm persists
after recovery time, Cold Start the NE Controller card. Management visibility to this
NE will be lost while the Controller card executes its Cold Start routine.

If the alarm persists, replace the NE Controller card.

RAMFULL

Alarm name

RAM Full (RAMFULL)

Default severity

Major

Alarm object

CCEP and CCMP cards.

General information
and causes

The RAMFULL alarm will be raised if the contents of the


cards memory storage area exceeds a pre-defined threshold.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

101

Troubleshooting instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Troubleshooting instructions
1

Wait 30 minutes. The high memory usage may have only been temporary. If
memory usage returns to a sufficiently low level, the alarm will self-clear.

If the alarm persists for more than 30 minutes, Cold Start the card raising the alarm.

If the alarm persists after recovery from the Cold Start, upgrade the Controller card
to the new model (which contains more memory):

3.3.10

If a CCEP-1 card is raising the alarm, replace it with a CCEP-2.


If a CCMP-1 card is raising the alarm, replace it with a CCMP-2.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

RQO
Alarm name

Request Queue Overflow (RQO)

Default severity

Minor

Alarm object

Network Element

General information
and causes

The RQO alarm indicates an internal overload of the Controller card software due to too many requests.

Troubleshooting instructions

3.3.11

102

Often, the RQO condition is only temporary. Wait a short time and see if the alarm
clears by itself.

If the alarm persists, the problem could be due to too many Element Managers connected at once. Reduce the number of Element Managers connected.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support before proceeding. Warm Start the NE Controller card (CCEP or CCMP). If the alarm persists
after recovery time, Cold Start the NE Controller card. Management visibility to this
NE will be lost while the Controller card executes its Cold Start routine.

If the alarm persists, replace the NE Controller card.

TL1NQO

Alarm name

TL1 Notification Queue Overflow (TL1NQO)

Default severity

Minor

Alarm object

Network Element.

General information
and causes

The TL1NQO alarm indicates an internal overload of the TL1


Gateway software due to too many notification messages..

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Troubleshooting instructions

Troubleshooting instructions

3.4
3.4.1

Often, the TL1NQO condition is only temporary. Wait a short time and see if the
alarm clears by itself.

If the alarm persists, the problem could be due to too many TL1 sessions active
simultaneously. Reduce the number of TL1 sessions.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support before proceeding. Cold Start the NE Controller card (CCEP or CCMP). Management visibility
to this NE will be lost while the Controller card executes its Cold Start routine.

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

Environmental alarms
EXT

Alarm name

External Alarm (via TIF Sensor) (EXT)

Default severity

Minor

Alarm object

Telemetry Interface (TIF) Monitor

General information
and causes

The EXT alarm is raised when one of the user-defined Telemetry Interface input relays (TIF Monitors) is activated. The
alarm message will identify (by number) which TIF Monitor is
raising the alarm as: TIF Monitor nn, where "nn" is the
number of the Monitor (01 to 16).

Troubleshooting instructions

3.5
3.5.1

The input relays are intended to be used as traditional "housekeeping" alarm inputs
connected to customer facilities of his choosing (door alarm, temperature alarm,
etc). These inputs are configured via the craft terminal. Note: the cable for TIF
Sensors attaches to the connector named "TIF IN" on the NE Controller card (CCEP
type only). So, to clear the alarm, the relevant facility at the customer premises must
be dealt with (example: if a door open monitor is activated, then the door at the site
must be closed).

If the alarm persists, contact your next higher level of technical support.

Quality of Service alarms


TCA

Alarm name

Threshold Crossing Alert (TCA)

Default severity

Warning

Alarm object

Monitored Performance Parameter

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

103

Troubleshooting instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

General information
and causes

The TCA alarm is raised if a monitored performance parameter counter exceeds its user-defined threshold.

Troubleshooting instructions
1

SURPASS hiT 7300 monitors various performance parameters, (e.g. CV, BBE, ES,
SES, SEFS, UAS, Avg-BER, Max-BER), on many layers in order to calculate the
transmission quality.
Performance monitoring provides the capability to signal performance degradation
(via a TCA alarm) before a more serious failure occurs. Each transponder card accumulates its performance measurements every 00, 15, 30, and 45 minutes past each
hour. At the end of each 15-minute reporting period, each card automatically reports
its performance counts to the Controller card. In addition, 24-hour performance
counts are obtained by summing all 15-minute counts of the day. The user may set
the desired 15-minute and 24-hour alarm threshold for each monitored parameter.
A TCA alarm will be raised if the count for a monitored parameter exceeds its userdesignated threshold.

104

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Card replacement instructions

4 Card replacement instructions


This section contains instructions for removing a faulty card and replacing it with a spare
of the same type. Once the replacement card is inserted, the software detects the
presence of the new card, performs the necessary validation, and automatically configures the card for normal operation. Upon completion of the configuration, the fault management software will re-evaluate the alarm conditions and raise or clear the alarm(s)
as appropriate. There is no need for the user to issue any reset command or restart the
NE during these procedures.

DANGER!
Always use appropriate laser eye protection when working with the hiT 7300 system.

g NOTICE: always use appropriate ESD grounding devices and practices to avoid
damaging the equipment.

g NOTICE: all plug-in cards must be inserted slowly and carefully to avoid damage to
components.If a card seems to require unusual effort to insert - STOP. If anything is
physically interfering with card insertion - STOP. If a card is not correctly engaging
the shelf guide rails or backplane connector - STOP. Never apply excessive force
when installing a card; otherwise severe damage can occur to the card and
shelf.Always insert one card at a time. Never attempt to simultaneously insert two or
more cards into the shelf.

g NOTICE: Before replacing any card, attach an identifying label to each fiber connected to the failed card (if such labels are not already present). This will help ensure
that each fiber is re-connected to the correct port on the replacement card.

g NOTICE: The small captive screws that secure hiT 7300 plug-in cards in the shelf
are the Pozidriv type. Specifically, a screwdriver equipped with a Pozidriv #0 bit
is mandatory to loosen or tighten these screws. Do not use a Phillips screwdriver.
Use of a Phillips screwdriver will damage the screw. When re-installing a plug-in
card, tighten these screws to a maximum torque of 0.63 N-m (equivalent to 0.46
ft-lbs or 5.57 in-lbs).

4.1

How to replace the CCEP and CCMP card


Each Network Element (NE) includes an NE Controller card, which will be either a CCEP
or CCMP card. This card functions as the central management controller for the NE.
Replacement of these card types requires special care since they contain a fieldreplaceable Compact Flash (CF) module used for persistent storage of the MIB and APS
software. Card replacement procedures vary, depending on the failure scenario (as indicated by different alarms). These different scenarios are as follows:

CP alarm or OBFF alarm scenario (see chapter 4.1.1)


MIBF alarm scenario (see chapter 4.1.2)
Loss of communication scenario (see chapter 4.1.3)
g If any configuration changes have been made to the NE within the previous 10
minutes, do NOT replace the CCEP or CCMP card yet! Wait at least 10
minutes after making any NE configuration changes before replacing the
CCEP or CCMP card.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

105

Card replacement instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

g When an NE Controller card (CCEP or CCMP) is removed from the shelf, the
management system will lose connectivity to that NE. During this time, neither
the management interface nor the local Element Manager interface is functional.
Note that traffic is preserved and all peripheral cards continue to operate normally.
If a network is configured so that only one Controller card is assigned to provide
the Gateway Function, removal of that card will cause the management system
to lose connection and visibility to the whole network. In addition, the network
will not have the support of a DHCP server, NTP server, or FTP server, which
means file transfer (APS or NCF files), new NE addition, or time synchronization
are not possible for the network. For such a case, consider temporarily enabling
a redundant Gateway Function NE before the removal of the Controller card.
g When replacing a failed CCEP-1 card, check the part number of the replacement card:
if the spare card has part number S42024-L5424-A101, note that it cannot
be used in a system that is still running software earlier than R4.1.1. If your
system is running 4.1.1 or later, it is OK to use this card. But, if your system
is still running software earlier than 4.1.1, you must obtain CCEP type
S42024-L5424-A100 to replace the failed card.
if the spare card is S42024-L5424-A100, note that this card type can be
installed in a system running any software version up to and including 4.2.
When replacing a failed CCMP-1 card, check the part number of the replacement card:
if the spare card has part number S42024-L5424-A201, note that it cannot
be used in a system that is still running software earlier than R4.1.1. If your
system is running 4.1.1 or later, it is OK to use this card. But, if your system
is still running software earlier than 4.1.1, you must obtain CCMP type
S42024-L5424-A200 to replace the failed card.
if the spare card is S42024-L5424-A200, note that this card type can be
installed in a system running any software version up to and including 4.2.
g Replace a CCEP-2 card or CCMP-2 card only with a spare of the same type.

106

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

4.1.1

Card replacement instructions

CP alarm or OBFF alarm scenario


A CP (Card Problem) alarm or an OBFF (Onboard Flash Failure) alarm raised by a NE
Controller card (CCEP or CCMP card) indicates that the card has suffered an internal
fault, but the removable Compact Flash module is still OK. Since the Compact Flash
module contains the MIB and APS software, it must be physically transferred to the
replacement card. Detailed instructions are as follows:

4.1.2

IMPORTANT! Before doing anything else, upload a back-up copy of the MIB (from
the faulty Controller card). Instructions for doing so can be found in the hiT 7300
Operating Manual (OMN).

Disconnect all cables from the failed Controller card. Remove the failed card from
the shelf.

Follow the instructions in Figure 1 to remove the Compact Flash module from the
failed Controller card. Install this same Compact Flash onto the new Controller
card. After inserting the Compact Flash into its holder, be sure to rotate the
hinged arm of the ejector button back to its folded position. Otherwise, the
ejector button can be broken when the Controller card is inserted into the
shelf.

Insert the new Controller card into the shelf and re-attach all cables. The card will
automatically boot using the MIB contents of the Compact Flash module. Verify that
the green OK LED on the card front panel lights, indicating a successful re-boot. If
boot-up does not occur within 15 minutes, withdraw the card from the shelf and reinsert it. If boot-up still does not occur within 15 minutes, stop. Contact your next
higher level of technical support. If boot-up is successful, wait 2 minutes, then
continue to the next step.

Re-connect to the NE over the Q or QF interface. Verify that all alarms have cleared.
PROCEDURE COMPLETE.

MIBF alarm scenario


g Do not Cold Start a card raising a MIBF alarm! When a MIBF alarm is raised, the
NE can still function normally utilizing the working copy of the MIB residing on the
NE Controller cards PRAM. But, if the NE Controller card is Cold Started while in
this condition, the PRAM copy of the MIB will be lost, and the NE will not be able to
recover to the state that existed prior to the Cold Start. That is why it is important
to regularly maintain a backup MIB copy for each NE in your network. If
recovery is required, having the backup MIB copy available will make restoration
easier. If a backup MIB is not available, the NE can be recovered with a default MIB,
but traffic most likely will be impacted and all manual provisioning data will be lost!
A network elements MIB contents are persistently stored in two areas on the CCEP (or
CCMP) card; the cards Onboard Flash, and the cards replaceable Compact Flash
module. A MIBF alarm indicates that both these storage areas have failed. Dispatch
service personnel to replace the failed Controller card and its Compact Flash module,
i.e., it is necessary to take a spare Controller card and a spare Compact Flash module
to the site. Detailed instructions are as follows:

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

107

Card replacement instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Disconnect all cables from the failed Controller card. Remove the failed card from
the shelf.

Install the replacement Compact Flash module onto the new Controller card. See
Figure 1 for details.

g The APS version loaded onto each Compact Flash by the Nokia Siemens
Networks factory is identified on a label attached to the outside of the Compact
Flash module. It would be best if the replacement Compact Flash has the correct
APS version on it, but this is not a strict requirement.

g Never replace a failed Compact Flash with one that has a smaller capacity. If a
1 GB Compact Flash is being replaced, it is not permitted to replace it with a 256
MB type. If an 8 GB Compact Flash is being replaced, it is not permitted to
replace it with a 1 GB or 256 MB type.

If the spare Compact Flash is the original type (256 MB), it is highly recommended to instead obtain a newer type of Compact Flash (1 GB or 8 GB) to
replace the failed unit. In fact, the 1 GB or 8 GB type is required for systems
running Release 4.20 (or higher) software. The 1 GB or 8 GB Compact Flash is
also required for any system using TL1.
3

Insert the new Controller card into the shelf and re-attach all cables.

Various automatic procedures will now be executed by the system in an attempt to


get everything synchronized. The entire process may require up to 20 minutes to
complete.
a) If the NE goes into Recover Mode and an APSM alarm is raised, stop. Go to the
troubleshooting instructions for the APSM alarm.
b) If the process completes successfully (indicated by the Controller card lighting
its front-panel green OK LED), continue to step 5.

4.1.3

After the green OK LED comes on, wait 2 minutes. Then, re-connect to the NE over
the Q or QF interface. Download a previously-made copy of the MIB contents to
this NE. Verify that all alarms have cleared. PROCEDURE COMPLETE.

Loss of Communication scenario


There are cases in which the failure of a CCEP or CCMP card is of such a nature that it
affects the ability of the card (or the cards software) to report its own failure, or even its
ability to communicate with other devices such as the network management system. In
such cases, the failure likely is detected by the Element Management System as a loss
of communications to the network element. In such a case, a replacement of the
relevant Controller card is warranted. Detailed instructions are as follows:

108

If the network management system reports a Loss of Communication to an NE,


dispatch service personnel to that site with a spare CCEP card (or CCMP as appropriate) and a spare Compact Flash module. (It is impossible to know at this point
whether the loss of communication was caused by a failed Controller card or a
failure of its Compact Flash. So take both to the site to avoid making a second trip).

First, assume the problem is a faulty Controller card. Complete the procedures in
paragraph 4.1.1.

If the problem persists, assume the problem is a Compact Flash failure. Complete
the procedures in paragraph 4.2.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

4.2

Card replacement instructions

If the problem persists, assume there is a failure of the Controller card and the
Compact Flash, which is equivalent to a MIBF condition. Complete the procedures
in paragraph 4.1.2.

If the problem persists, contact your next higher level of technical support. PROCEDURE COMPLETE

How to replace the Compact Flash


Each CCEP and CCMP Controller card contains a removable Compact Flash module.
The Compact Flash module is used for persistent storage of the MIB and APS software.
If the Compact Flash fails (indicated by the CFF alarm), the correct APS and the working
MIB contents must be restored onto the replacement Compact Flash module (which
should occur automatically). Detailed instructions are as follows:

g The APS version loaded onto each Compact Flash by the Nokia Siemens Networks
factory is identified on a label attached to the outside of the Compact Flash module.
It would be best if the replacement Compact Flash has the correct APS, but this is
not a strict requirement.

g Never Cold Start a CCEP or CCMP card that has an active CFF alarm.
g Never replace a failed Compact Flash with one that has a smaller capacity. If a 1
GB Compact Flash is being replaced, it is not permitted to replace it with a 256 MB
type. If an 8 GB Compact Flash is being replaced, it is not permitted to replace it
with a 1 GB or 256 MB type.

If the spare Compact Flash is the original type (256 MB), it is highly recommended
to instead obtain a newer type of Compact Flash (1 GB or 8 GB) to replace the failed
unit. In fact, the 1 GB or 8 GB type is required for systems running Release 4.20 (or
higher) software. The 1 GB or 8 GB Compact Flash is also required for any system
using TL1.
1

IMPORTANT! Before doing anything else, upload a back-up copy of the MIB (from
the Controller card that contains the failed Compact Flash). Instructions for doing so
can be found in the hiT 7300 Operating Manual (OMN).

Locate the card (CCEP or CCMP) that contains the failed Compact Flash. Disconnect all cables from this card. Then, remove the card from the shelf.

Refer to Figure 1. Remove the failed Compact Flash module from the card. Install
the replacement Compact Flash. After installing the new Compact Flash, be sure
to rotate the hinged arm of the ejector button back to its folded position. Otherwise, the ejector button can be broken when the Controller card is reinserted into the shelf.

Re-insert the Controller card (with new Compact Flash) back into the shelf. Reconnect all cables to the card. Various automatic procedures will now be executed
by the system in an attempt to ensure the correct APS and MIB contents are present
on the new Compact Flash, synchronized with the Controller card software. The
entire process may require up to 20 minutes to complete.
a) If a MIBF alarm is raised, stop. Go to the troubleshooting instructions for the
MIBF alarm.
b) If an APSM alarm is raised, stop. Go to the troubleshooting instructions for the
APSM alarm.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

109

Card replacement instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

c) If the process completes successfully (indicated by the card lighting its frontpanel green OK LED), continue to step 5.
5

110

After the green OK LED comes on, wait 2 minutes. Then, re-connect to the NE over
the Q or QF interface. Verify that all alarms have cleared. PROCEDURE COMPLETE.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Figure 1

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Card replacement instructions

How to remove / install the Compact Flash

111

Card replacement instructions

4.3

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

How to replace the CCSP card


CCSP controller cards are responsible for the management of shelves other than the
main self. The CCSP does not contain any MIB data or APS. Therefore, replacement
procedures are very simple as follows:

4.4

Disconnect all cables from the failed CCSP card. Remove the failed CCSP card from
its shelf.

Insert the replacement CCSP into the shelf and re-attach all cables. Normal operation will automatically resume. Verify that all alarms are cleared and that the green
OK LED on the CCSP front panel lights.

How to replace the CFSU card


The CFSU card monitors the fan-driven airflow through the shelf. This card has no
optical connections. Detailed replacement instructions are as follows:

g NOTICE: If the CFSU card is used to manage the UDCM tray, the electrical cable
connected between the UDCM Tray and the CFSU card must be disconnected and
re-connected only when the CFSU is disengaged from its backplane connector.
Otherwise, equipment damage may result. Carefully follow the instructions below to
prevent damage.

4.5

Withdraw the failed CFSU a short distance until it is disengaged from the backplane
connector.

If the CFSU is being used to manage a UDCM Tray installed in the rack, there will
be an electrical cable connected to the D-sub connector on the front of the CFSU.
Disconnect this cable now.

Fully remove the failed CFSU from the shelf.

Insert the replacement CFSU into the shelf, but do not fully plug-it in yet. If there
was a UDCM cable disconnected in step 2, re-attach this cable to the D-sub connector on the front panel of the CFSU. Only after this cable is re-connected, insert the
new CFSU fully into the shelf and lock it in place.

Normal operation will automatically resume. After a delay of 15 minutes, the card will
automatically perform an airflow measurement. When the measurement is completed, verify that all alarms are cleared and that the green OK LED on the CFSU
front panel lights. PROCEDURE COMPLETE.

How to replace the F02MR card


Detailed replacement instructions are as follows:

112

If not already present, attach a label to each fiber connected to the F02MR-1 card to
ensure that all fibers are re-connected to the correct ports on the new card.

Disconnect all fibers attached to the failed card.

Remove the failed card from the shelf. Install the replacement card in the shelf and
latch it into place.

Clean all fibers and connectors as described in chapter 5. Re-connect all fibers to
the new F02MR-1 card. Be sure to re-connect each fiber to the same port that it was
connected to before.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Card replacement instructions

Verify that all alarms are cleared. PROCEDURE COMPLETE.

Impact: The F02MR-1 card carries traffic in both Tx and Rx directions. When the
F02MR-1 card is removed for replacement, all transmit, receive, and express traffic are
lost for the line direction corresponding to this F02MR-1. All express traffic is lost for the
other line direction opposite to this F02MR-1 card.
After the new F02MR-1 card is inserted, the NE software will automatically return the
card to the traffic-carrying state. In addition, once connectivity is restored, LOS will no
longer be detected, and consequently amplifier card APRM (Automatic Power Reduction Mode) will be disabled to restore the drop and express traffic. No additional user
actions are required.

4.6

How to Replace the F09MDRT card


The following instructions are valid for:Detailed replacement instructions are as follows:

F09MDRT-1/S
F09MDRT-1/O

Detailed replacement instructions are as follows:


1

If not already present, attach a label to each fiber connected to the failed card to
ensure that all fibers are re-connected to the correct ports on the new card.

Disconnect all fibers from the failed card.

Remove the failed card from the shelf. Install the replacement card in the shelf and
latch it into place.

Clean all fibers and connectors as described in chapter 5. Re-connect all fibers to
the new card. Be sure to re-connect each fiber to the same port that it was connected
to before.

Verify that all alarms are cleared. PROCEDURE COMPLETE.

Impact: The F09MDRT-1 is a bidirectional card that carries add, drop, and express
traffic. When an F09MDRT-1/S card is removed for replacement, all standard-grid add,
drop, and express traffic is lost. When an F09MDRT-1/O card is removed for replacement, all offset-grid add, drop, and express traffic is lost.
In an ONN-RT (which is designed for standard-grid wavelengths only), when the
F09MDRT-1/S card is removed from the shelf, APRM will likely be triggered in that half
of the NE.
After the new F09MDRT-1/S or F09MDRT-1/O card is inserted, the NE software will
automatically return the card to the traffic-carrying state. No additional user actions are
required.

4.7

How to replace F06-type and F09-type cards


These instructions are valid for the following cards:

F06DR80-1
F06MR80-1
F09DR80-1
F09MR80-1

Detailed replacement instructions are as follows:

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

113

Card replacement instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Disconnect all fibers attached to the failed card. Make sure to note which fiber is connected to which port to prevent misconnections when the fibers are re-connected in
a later step. If not already present, attach a label to each fiber for identification.

Remove the failed card from the shelf. Install the replacement card in the shelf and
latch it into place.

Clean all fibers and connectors as described in chapter 5. Re-connect all fibers to
the new card. Be sure to re-connect each fiber to the same port that it was connected
to before.

Verify that all alarms are cleared. PROCEDURE COMPLETE.

Impact: F06 and F09 cards are unidirectional. The F06DR80-1 and F09DR80-1 are
wavelength-selective switch cards that handle local drop channels in the demux direction. When such a card is removed for replacement, all drop channels will be lost. The
F06MR80-1 and F09MR80-1 are wavelength-selective switch cards that handle local
add channels in the mux direction. When such a card is removed for replacement, all
add channels will be lost.
After the new card is inserted, the NE software will automatically return the card to the
traffic-carrying state. No additional user actions are required.

4.8

How to replace the F08MR-1 card


Detailed replacement instructions are as follows:
1

Disconnect all fibers attached to the failed card. Make sure to note which fiber is connected to which port to prevent misconnections when the fibers are re-connected in
a later step. If not already present, attach a label to each fiber for identification.

Remove the failed card from the shelf. Install the replacement card in the shelf and
latch it into place.

Clean all fibers and connectors as described in chapter 5. Re-connect all fibers to
the new card. Be sure to re-connect each fiber to the same port that it was connected
to before.

Verify that all alarms are cleared. PROCEDURE COMPLETE.

The F08MR-1 card is bidirectional. This card is a wavelength-selective switch that


handles local add/drop and express channels, which will be lost when the card is
replaced.
After the new card is inserted, the NE software will automatically return the card to the
traffic-carrying state. No additional user actions are required.

4.9

How to replace F40-1 and F40V-1 cards


These instructions are valid for the following card types. For convenience, they are all
referred to as F40-1 in the instructions below.

F40-1/S
F40-1/O
F40V-1/S
F40V-1/O

Detailed replacement instructions are as follows

114

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Card replacement instructions

Disconnect all fibers attached to the failed F40-1 card. Since there are up to 41 fiber
connections to/from an F40-1 card, make sure to note which fiber is connected to
which port to prevent misconnections when the fibers are re-connected in a later
step.

Remove the failed F40-1 card from the shelf. Install the replacement card in the shelf
and latch it into place.

Clean all fiber ends and connectors as described in chapter 5. Re-connect all fibers
to the new F40-1 card. Be sure to re-connect each fiber to the same port that it
was connected to before.

Verify that all alarms are cleared. PROCEDURE COMPLETE.

Impact: The F40-1 card can be equipped in ONN-R, ONN-T, and SON. It can be used
as the demultiplexer of the ONN-R, and as a multiplexer and a demultiplexer (2 separate
cards) in ONN-T.
When F40-1 is used as a demultiplexer
When the F40-1 card is used as a demultiplexer and is removed for replacement, all
drop traffic is lost for the line associated with this card. Note that in hiT 7300 R4.2, there
is no alarm correlation and suppression between the F40-1 card and the affected transponders. Therefore, a burst of transponder LOS alarms is expected when an F40-1
card is removed.
In addition, a LOS detector is used to detect the optical power at the common input when
the card is used as a demultiplexer, which can trigger APRM. Therefore, when the card
is removed for replacement, APRM will be triggered, causing the pre-amplifier output to
be reduced to conform to laser class 1M. Consequently, all drop traffic will be lost. In
addition, if the NE is an ONN-R, all the express traffic is also lost.
After the new F40-1 card is inserted, the NE software will automatically return the card
to traffic-carrying state and turn off APRM to restore the traffic. No additional user
actions are required.
When F40-1 is used as a multiplexer
When the F40-1 card is used as a multiplexer (only in ONN-T) and is removed for
replacement, all add traffic is lost for the line associated with this card. Note that in R4.2,
there is no alarm correlation and suppression between the F40-1 card and the affected
transponders. Therefore, a burst of transponder LOS alarms are expected in the downstream NEs. In addition, the booster amplifier will detect no optical input power and will
be shut down.
After the new F40-1 multiplexer card is inserted, the NE software will automatically turn
on the booster amplifier and orderly bring the channels back into service according to
the channel upgrade rule. No additional user actions are required.

4.10

How to replace the F40MR-1 card


Detailed replacement instructions are as follows:
1

Disconnect all fibers attached to the failed F40MR-1 card. CAUTION: Since there
are up to 45 fiber connections to/from an F40MR-1 card, make sure to note which

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

115

Card replacement instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

fiber is connected to which port to prevent misconnections when the fibers are reconnected in a later step.
2

Remove the failed F40MR-1 card from the shelf. Install the replacement card in the
shelf and latch it into place.

Clean all fibers and connectors as described in chapter 5. Re-connect all fibers to
the new F40MR-1 card. Be sure to re-connect each fiber to the same port that it was
connected to before.

Verify that all alarms are cleared. PROCEDURE COMPLETE.

Impact: The F40MR-1 card carries traffic in both Tx and Rx directions. When the
F40MR-1 card is removed for replacement, all transmit, receive, and express traffic are
lost for the line direction corresponding to this F40MR-1. All express traffic is lost for the
other line direction opposite to this F40MR-1 card.
After the F40MR-1 replacement card is inserted, the NE software will automatically
return the card to the traffic-carrying state. In addition, once connectivity is restored,
LOS will no longer be detected, and consequently amplifier card APRM (Automatic
Power Reduction Mode) will be disabled to restore the drop and express traffic. No additional user actions are required.

4.11

How to replace the F80DCI-1 card


Detailed replacement instructions are as follows:
1

Disconnect all fibers attached to the failed F80DCI-1 card. Make sure to note which
fiber is connected to which port to prevent misconnections when the fibers are reconnected in a later step. If not already present, attach a label to each fiber for identification.

Remove the failed F80DCI-1 card from the shelf. Install the replacement card in the
shelf and latch it into place.

Clean all fibers and connectors as described in chapter 5. Re-connect all fibers to
the new F80DCI-1 card. Be sure to re-connect each fiber to the same port that it was
connected to before.

Verify that all alarms are cleared. PROCEDURE COMPLETE.

Impact: The F80DCI-1 is a unidirectional card that carries drop and continue traffic.
When this card is removed for replacement, all drop and continue traffic is lost.
After the new F80DCI-1 card is inserted, the NE software will automatically return the
card to the traffic-carrying state. No additional user actions are required.

4.12
!

How to replace the F80MDI-1 card


DANGER!
Cabling mistakes made when re-connecting fiber to an F80MDI-1 card can result in light
being emitted from an open port at hazardous power levels. Carefully follow the instructions below to avoid exposure to hazardous optical power levels.

Detailed replacement instructions are as follows:

116

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Card replacement instructions

Before disconnecting any of the F80MDI-1 cards optical fibers, ensure that
the optical power at all connectors is below 18 dBm. To do so, disable the
pump lasers on the Pre-amplifier card connected to the F80MDI-1. Open the
Element Manager Card - Config window for the Pre-amplifier and uncheck the
Pump Lasers Enabled checkbox.

WARNING!: Since it is very important that each fiber is re-connected to its original
port in a specific sequence, make sure to note which fiber is connected to which port
to prevent misconnections when the fibers are re-connected in a later step. If not
already present, apply a label to each fiber for identification. Then, disconnect all
fibers from the failed F80MDI-1 card.

Remove the failed F80MDI-1 card from the shelf. Install the replacement card in the
shelf and latch it into place.

Clean all fibers and connectors as described in chapter 5.

Re-connect the F80MDI-1 cards fibers in the following sequence:

First, re-connect S-IN and O-IN. Your system may only have one of these connections depending on the wavelengths used: Standard grid (S) or Offset grid
(O).
Next, re-connect Tx-OUT. This completes the fiber connections in the Mux to
Booster direction for transmission downstream. Do not re-connect any other
fibers yet.
Verify that the LOS alarms are cleared on downstream transponder cards. If the
LOS alarms have not cleared, verify that the fibers re-connected so far are
routed properly. Make sure that:
F80MDI-1 Tx Out is connected to LAxB IN.
F80MDI-1 S-IN is connected to the COM port of the F40-1/S (or F40V-1/S if
applicable) Mux card.
F80MDI-1 O-IN is connected to the COM port of the F40-1/O (or F40V-1/O
if applicable) Mux card.
Only after the LOS alarms clear on the downstream transponder cards is
it permitted to continue to the next step.

Now, re-connect these fibers in the following sequence:

Re-connect S-OUT and O-OUT. Your system may have only one of these connections depending on the wavelengths used: Standard grid (S) or Offset grid
(O).
Make sure that S-OUT is connected to the COM port of the F40-1/S (or
F40V-1/S if applicable) Demux card
Make sure that O-OUT is connected to the COM port of the F40-1/O (or
F40V-1/O if applicable) Demux card
Lastly, re-connect Rx-IN from the LaxP card Out port.

Re-enable the Pre-amplifier cards pump lasers that were disabled in step 1.

Verify that all alarms are cleared. PROCEDURE COMPLETE.

Impact: The F80MDI-1 card carries traffic in both Tx and Rx directions. When the
F80MDI-1 card is removed for replacement, all transmit, receive, and express traffic are
lost for the line direction corresponding to this card.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

117

Card replacement instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

After the new F80MDI-1 card is inserted, the NE software will automatically return the
card to the traffic-carrying state. No additional user actions are required.

4.13

How to replace the LIFB-1 card


Detailed instructions are as follows:

4.14

Disconnect all fibers from the failed card. Remove the failed card from the shelf.

Install the replacement card in the shelf. Clean all fiber ends and connectors as
described in chapter 5. Re-connect all fibers. Upon card startup, the system will
automatically restore provisioning data and return the affected channels back to
normal. The link control process will restore to the running state without user intervention.

Verify that the new card lights its front-panel OK LED and that all alarms are cleared.
PROCEDURE COMPLETE.

How to replace MCP-type cards


These instructions are valid for the following card types. For convenience, they are all
referred to as MCP in the instructions below.

MCP404-1
MCP404-2
MCP4-1

MCP cards are used for measurement of the channels at the output of the amplifiers.
MCP cards are necessary for automatic and continuous preemphasis. Replacement of
a failed MCP is not traffic-affecting. NE software will automatically suspend the continuous pre-emphasis (if enabled) during MCP replacement. Detailed MCP replacement
instructions are as follows:
1

Disconnect the fiber from the failed card.

Remove the failed card from the shelf.

Insert the new card fully into the shelf and latch it in place.

Clean all fiber ends and connectors as described in chapter 5. Re-attach all fibers to
the new card. PROCEDURE COMPLETE.

Impact: For ONN-T and ONN-I, there will be no degradation of system performance
since continuous pre-emphasis is optional. For ONN-R, if continuous pre-emphasis is
compulsory, then the system will maintain service without degradation at least within the
duration of the typical maintenance window (i.e., at least 3 to 4 hours).

4.15

How to replace an OPMDC card


It is assumed that an OPMDC card has suffered an on-board fault and must be replaced.
Detailed replacement instructions are as follows:

The following procedure is valid for OPMDC-1 and OPMDC-2 cards.

118

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

4.16

Card replacement instructions

Disconnect all fibers from the failed card. NOTICE: Make sure to note which fiber is
connected to which port to prevent misconnections when the fibers are reconnected
in a later step. If not already present, attach a label to each fiber for identification.

Remove the failed OPMDC card from the shelf.

Insert the new OPMDC into the shelf. Clean all fiber ends and connectors as
described in chapter 5. Re-connect the fibers to the OPMDC card. The new card will
automatically perform its normal boot-up sequence and the correct provisioning
information will be restored to it. Full traffic recovery for the channel served by the
new OPMDC may take up to 30 minutes while the OPMDC closes its loop control
and achieves steady state. Note that during the recovery of this channel, no other
channels will be impacted.

Verify that the new OPMDC lights its front-panel OK LED and that all alarms are
cleared. PROCEDURE COMPLETE.

How to replace the PL-1 card


Detailed PL-1 replacement instructions are as follows:
1

Withdraw the failed card from the shelf a short distance. Disconnect the fiber from
the failed card.

Remove the failed card from the shelf.

Insert the new card a short distance into the shelf - do not fully insert it yet. Clean all
fiber ends and connectors as described in chapter 5. Re-attach the fiber to the amplifier card.

Fully insert the new card into the shelf and latch it into place. PROCEDURE COMPLETE.

Impact: Bit errors may occur during card replacement since the required output power
cannot be reached with a missing/failed PL-1 card. After the new PL-1 is installed, the
software will automatically start the PL-1 card, and the amplifier card software will automatically re-enable the PL-1s pump laser and restore the necessary pump power.
There are no additional actions required by the user (e.g., restarting the link).

4.17

How to replace a transponder,muxponder,


and regenerator cards (all types)
The following instructions are valid for all sub-types of hiT 7300 transponder, muxponder, regenerator, multi-service, and Carrier Ethernet cards:

CAUTION! XFP metal casings can become extremely hot (close to 70 C). This is especially true in the case of DWDM XFPs used in an I05AD10G-1 card.
So, when removing any XFP from a card, do not touch the XFPs metal casing. Exercise
caution to avoid injury.

It is assumed that a card has suffered an on-board fault and that any SFP or XFP
modules installed on the card are OK. Detailed replacement instructions are as follows:
1

If the faulty card is part of a Protection Group, (Working and Protection cards),
perform a Forced Switch to place traffic on the other card (the card which is not

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

119

Card replacement instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

being replaced). Note that this step is not required for I04T2G5-1 or I05AD10G-1
cards.
2

Disconnect all fibers from the failed card. Remove any SFP or XFP modules present
on this card, noting carefully which module was installed in which port.

Remove the failed card from the shelf.

Insert the new card into the shelf. Clean all fiber ends and connectors as described
in chapter 5, but do not re-connect any fibers yet.

Re-install all SFP/XFP modules in their former positions in the new card.

g Always insert a pluggable module (SFP or XFP) into its card port before connecting fiber to the pluggable module.

4.18

Now, re-connect all fibers to the new card. The card will execute its normal boot-up
sequence and be restored with correct provisioning information. Full recovery time
will require 5 minutes or less. Card types that automatically receive a downloaded
netlist to maintain support of provisioned client types may require a few extra
minutes.

Verify that the new Transponder lights its front-panel OK LED and that all alarms are
cleared.

If the Forced Switch command was done in step 1, issue a Clear command. PROCEDURE COMPLETE.

How to replace Filter cards


These instructions are valid for the following card types:

F04MDN-1
F04MDU-1
F08SB-1
F16SB-1

Filter cards are basically passive in nature, therefore the probability of failure is small.
However, if card replacement is required, all the interconnecting fibers must be disconnected, and consequently, such a card replacement operation is always service affecting. While it is expected that the channels directly connected to the card being replaced
will be lost during the replacement procedure, it is necessary to ensure that other
channels are preserved without service impacts. The major concern is the sudden loss
of channel powers when the fibers are disconnected. For example, if an F04MDN-1 card
is being replaced, when the fiber at that cards 1C-out port is disconnected, up to 4
channels are dropped from the line, which can cause severe transient conditions. As
such, an orderly procedure is required to drop the channels gradually if the expected
channel power drop is greater than 3 dB, i.e. if half or more of the total number of
channels will be interrupted due to the card replacement. Detailed replacement instructions are as follows:

120

Identify the Transponders that are connected to the failed filter card.

Determine the current total number of booster amplifier input channels. If the
number of channels affected by the failed filter card is greater than or equal to half
of the total channels, go to step 3. Otherwise, skip step 3 and go directly to step 4.
Note that the fiber connected to a single port on a Filter card may be carrying one or
more entire sub-bands. Do not mistakenly count that as one channel!

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

4.19

Card replacement instructions

Temporarily modify the channel count as follows: reduce the channel count by an
amount equal to the number handled by the affected Transponders (as identified in
step 1). This is done via the Booster amplifiers cards Traffic-Config window. See the
chapter entitled Updating the Channel Count in the Operating Manual (OMN) for
instructions how to enter a new channel count value on this window.

Disconnect all input fibers attached to the failed Filter card. Then, disconnect the
output fibers.

Remove the failed Filter card from the shelf. Install the replacement card. CAUTION:
since there are many Filter card types with similar names, take extra care that the
replacement card is the same type.

Clean all fiber ends and connectors as described in chapter 5. Re-connect the
output fibers to the new Filter card. Then, re-connect all input fibers.

IMPORTANT: if step 3 was performed, change the channel count back to its original
value.

Verify that all alarms are cleared. PROCEDURE COMPLETE.

How to replace the O08VA-1 card


g NOTICE: Due to the type of VOAs used inside the O08VA-1 card, it is extremely
important to follow the card replacement steps below in exact sequence. Otherwise,
channels being carried by other O08VA-1 cards may be affected, and in rare cases,
transponder cards may be irreparably damaged.
Replacement of an O08VA-1 card is service affecting for the (up to 8) channels passing
through it. As mentioned above, follow the instructions below in exact sequence to avoid
affecting other channels or damaging equipment. Detailed instructions are as follows:
1

Identify the Transponders that are connected to the failed O08VA-1 card.

Determine the current total number of booster amplifier input channels. If the
number of channels affected by the failed card is greater than or equal to half of the
total channels, go to step 3. Otherwise, proceed to step 4.

Temporarily modify the channel count as follows: reduce the channel count by an
amount equal to the number handled by the affected Transponders (as identified in
step 1). This is done via the Booster amplifiers cards Traffic - Config window. See
the chapter, entitled Updating the Channel Count in the Operating Manual (OMN)
for instructions how to enter a new channel count value on this window.

Remove the input fibers to the failed O08VA-1 card. Then, remove the output fibers.
Place a safety cap on each disconnected fiber.

Remove the failed O08VA-1 card from the shelf. Install the replacement card.

Wait until the new O08VA-1 is up and running as verified by its front-panel green OK
LED and the card becoming yellow on the Element Manager Shelf Equipment
window. Do not proceed to the next step until after the card is up and running.

Carefully remove the safety caps and clean all fiber ends and connectors as
described in chapter 5. Re-connect the output fibers to the new O08VA-1 card.
Then, re-connect all input fibers.

IMPORTANT: if step 3 was performed, change the channel count back to its original
value.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

121

Card replacement instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

This step is not required for SON systems. Perform a Power Adjustment procedure as described in the Optical Link Commissioning (OLC) Manual. This must be
done to guarantee that all traffic is recovered properly.

10 Verify that all alarms are cleared. PROCEDURE COMPLETE.

4.20

How to replace an Amplifier card (all types)


If an Amplifier has failed and the card software is able to detect the failure, the software
will raise the appropriate alarm, update the channel status and send it downstream, and
shut down the amplifier output. The downstream amplifiers will adjust according to the
updated channel status and there will be no impact on the downstream Add traffic. The
failed Amplifier can then be replaced. Detailed instructions are as follows:
1

It is possible that the failed amplifier card has not been automatically shut down as
described above. So, before replacing any amplifier card, it is safest to perform a
Link Shutdown to minimize the impact on downstream Add traffic. Refer to the hiT
7300 Operating Manual (OMN) for Link Shutdown instructions. Note that the procedure varies slightly, depending on whether or not Raman cards are used on the link.

Once the link is shut down, disconnect all fibers from the failed card. Remove the
failed card from the shelf.

Install the replacement card in the shelf. Clean all fiber ends and connectors as
described in chapter 5. Re-connect all fibers. Upon card startup, the system will
automatically restore provisioning data.

Wait for the new amplifier card to light its green OK LED.

Perform the appropriate task described below:

4.21

If the link section contains ONN-S NE(s): perform a Link Recovery to reoptimize link performance. Follow the Link Recovery procedure in the hiT 7300
Operating Manual (OMN). Note that the OMN describes two different Link
Recovery procedures - one for link sections with an ONN-S NE and one without
ONN-S. Be sure to use the Link sections with an ONN-S procedure.
If the link section does not contain ONN-S NEs: simply re-start the link
according to the instructions in the hiT 7300 Optical Link Commissioning (OLC)
Manual.

Verify that all alarms are cleared. PROCEDURE COMPLETE.

How to replace the PRC-1 card


If a PRC-1 card has failed and the card software is able to detect the failure, the software
will raise the appropriate alarm and shut down the PRC-1 output. When this occurs, the
affected channels will typically exhibit high BER or a Loss of Frame condition. Detailed
instructions to replace a failed PRC-1 card are as follows:
1

122

It is possible that the failed PRC-1 card has not been automatically shut down as
described above. So, before replacing a PRC-1 card, it is safest to perform a Link
Shutdown to minimize the impact on downstream Add traffic. Refer to the hiT 7300

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Card replacement instructions

Operating Manual (OMN) for Link Shutdown instructions. Be sure to follow the procedure for the case where Raman cards are used on the link.
2

Once the link is shut down, locate the Amplifier card that is connected to the failed
PRC-1 card. Unplug this Amplifier card from the backplane and slide it out a short
distance on its mounting rails.

Now, unplug the failed PRC-1 card from the backplane and slide it out a short
distance on its mounting rails. Disconnect all fibers from the failed card and then
remove the card completely from the shelf.

Slide the replacement PRC-1 card a short distance into the shelf, but do not insert it
fully yet. Clean all fiber ends and connectors as described in chapter 5. Re-connect
all fibers to the new card. Then, insert the new card fully into the shelf and secure it
in place.

Wait for the new PRC-1 to complete its initialization process. When the PRC-1
cards front-panel OK LED lights steady on, this process has been completed.

Now re-insert the Amplifier card (that was unplugged in step 2) fully into the shelf
again and secure it in place. The system will automatically restore provisioning data.

Wait for the Amplifier card to light its green OK LED.

Perform the appropriate task described below:

4.22

If the link section contains ONN-S NE(s): perform a Link Recovery to reoptimize link performance. Follow the Link Recovery procedure in the hiT 7300
Operating Manual (OMN). Note that the OMN describes two different Link
Recovery procedures - one for link sections with an ONN-S NE and one without
ONN-S. Be sure to use the Link sections with an ONN-S procedure.
If the link section does not contain ONN-S NEs: simply re-start the link
according to the instructions in the hiT 7300 Optical Link Commissioning (OLC)
Manual.

Verify that all alarms have cleared. PROCEDURE COMPLETE.

How to replace the O02CSP-1 card


Detailed instructions for replacing an O02CSP-1 card are as follows:
1

If not already present, attach a label to each fiber connected to the O02CSP-1 card
to ensure that all fibers are re-connected to the correct ports on the new card.

Disconnect all fibers from the failed card. LOS alarms will be raised.

Remove the failed card from the shelf.

Insert the new card fully into the shelf and latch it in place.

Clean all fiber ends and connectors as described in chapter 5. Re-attach all fibers to
the new card. Ensure each fiber is re-connected to the correct port. It is permitted to
re-connect the fibers in any sequence.

Wait for all LOS alarms to clear, which signifies that traffic has been restored.

For each protection group served by the new O02CSP-1 card, perform a manual
protection switch to verify that the new card is functioning correctly. PROCEDURE
COMPLETE.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

123

Card replacement instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Impact: During O02CSP-1 card replacement, the line traffic on both working and protection paths will be lost. Downstream transponders for the affected channels will report
line LOS.

4.23

How to replace the O03CP-1 card


Detailed instructions for replacing an O03CP-1 card are as follows:
1

If not already present, attach a label to each fiber connected to the O03CP-1 card to
ensure that all fibers are re-connected to the correct ports on the new card.

Disconnect all fibers from the failed card. LOS alarms will be raised.

Remove the failed card from the shelf.

Insert the new card fully into the shelf and latch it in place.

Clean all fiber ends and connectors as described in chapter 5. Re-attach all fibers to
the new card. Ensure each fiber is re-connected to the correct port. It is permitted to
re-connect the fibers in any sequence.

Wait for all LOS alarms to clear, which signifies that traffic is restored.

For each protection group served by the new O03CP-1 card, perform a manual protection switch to verify that the new card is functioning correctly. PROCEDURE
COMPLETE.

Impact: During O03CP-1 replacement, the client traffic (for up to 3 protection groups
served by the failed card) will be lost. The working and protection transponders will
report a Client LOS alarm.

4.24

How to replace the CDMM-1 card


The CDMM card manages the UDCM modules residing in the UDCM Tray. Detailed
instructions for replacing a CDMM card are as follows:

g NOTICE: The electrical cable connected between the UDCM Tray and the CDMM
card must be disconnected and re-connected only when the CDMM is disengaged
from its backplane connector. Otherwise, equipment damage may result. Carefully
follow the instructions below to prevent damage.
1

Withdraw the failed CDMM a short distance until it is disengaged from the backplane
connector.

Disconnect the UDCM cable from the CDMM card.

Fully remove the failed CDMM from the shelf.

Insert the replacement CDMM into the shelf, but do not fully plug-it in yet. Re-attach
the UDCM cable to the D-sub connector on the front panel of the CDMM. Only after
this cable is re-connected, insert the new CDMM fully into the shelf and lock it in
place.

Normal operation will automatically resume. Verify that all alarms are cleared and
that the green OK LED on the CDMM front panel lights. PROCEDURE COMPLETE.

Impact: When there is no CDMM card installed, the NE Controller card will not be able
to access the inventory information about the UDCMs residing in the UDCM Tray. When
the new CDMM card is installed and the cable re-connected, the NE Controller will automatically retrieve UDCM inventory information again.

124

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Card replacement instructions

When there is no CDMM installed, do not replace any of the UDCMs in the UDCM
Tray since such a change will not be detected by the NE Controller card (UDCMs
are unmanaged while the CDMM card is removed). If a UDCM change is necessary,
wait until a working CDMM is installed in the shelf.

4.25

How to replace a DCM card or UDCM


These instructions are valid for DCM Cards (which are installed in a regular shelf slot
like other traffic cards) and UDCM modules (which are installed in the separate UDCM
Tray typically mounted at the bottom of the rack). Detailed instructions are as follows:
1

If not already present, attach a label to each fiber connected to the failed DCM (to
help ensure that each fiber will be connected to the correct port on the replacement
card).

Withdraw the failed DCM from its shelf a short distance. Disconnect the fibers from
the failed card.

Remove the failed DCM fully from the shelf.

Refer to the table below. DCM cards that occupy 2 or 3 shelf slots are being phased
out. New cards occupy fewer slots, and are direct replacements for the larger cards.
If you are replacing a DCM card that is on the phased out list shown on the
left side of the table below, you must replace it with its newer equivalent listed
on the right side of the table.
After removing the failed DCM card, several slots adjacent to each other will now be
empty. Always put the new DCM is the left-most of these empty slots. This will
result in 1 or 2 empty slots on the right side of the new card. These empty slots must
be filled with blank panels. Each empty slot must have a blank panel installed
(Nokia Siemens Networks part number C50117-A29-B84).

These DCMs have been phased out


Name

P/N

Slot
size

Use these DCMs as the replacement


Name

P/N

Slot
size

D0170DCF

S42024-L5445-A10

D0170DCF-2

S42024-L5445-C10-2

D0340DCF

S42024-L5445-A20

D0340DCF-2

S42024-L5445-C20-2

D0510DCF

S42024-L5445-A30

D0510DCF-2

S42024-L5445-C30-2

D0680DCF

S42024-L5445-A40

D0680DCF-2

S42024-L5445-C40-2

D0850DCF

S42024-L5445-A50

D0850DCF-2

S42024-L5445-C50-2

D1020DCF

S42024-L5445-A60

D1020DCF-2

S42024-L5445-C60-2

D1190DCF

S42024-L5445-A70

D1190DCF-2

S42024-L5445-C70-2

D1360DCF

S42024-L5445-A80

D1360DCF-2

S42024-L5445-C80-2

Table 9

Phased-out DCM cards and required replacements


5

Insert the replacement DCM a short distance into the shelf. Do not fully insert it.

Clean all fiber ends and re-connect all fibers to the new DCM.

Fully insert the replacement DCM into the shelf.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

125

Card replacement instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Be sure to install required blank panel(s) as described in step 4.

Verify that all alarms are cleared. Prepare the failed DCM for return to Nokia
Siemens Networks.

Impact: Complete loss of traffic passing through the DCM during replacement.

4.26

How to replace a UDCM Tray


Before replacing a UDCM tray, verify that the actual failure is the tray - not one of the
UDCMs housed in the tray. A failure of the tray is typically indicated by the inability to
retrieve inventory data from any of the UDCMs in the tray. However, if inventory data
can be retrieved from one of the UDCM modules but not from the other, it is more likely
that an individual UDCM module has failed - not the tray.
The complete UDCM tray can be replaced from the front without interrupting traffic by
following the steps below. Rear access is not required to replace the DCM tray.

g NOTICE: A CFSU card (or CDMM card) mounted in another shelf is used to manage
the UDCMs in the UDCM Tray. The electrical cable connected between the UDCM
Tray and the CFSU/CDMM card must be disconnected and re-connected only when
the CFSU/CDMM is disengaged from its backplane connector. Otherwise, equipment damage may result. Carefully follow the instructions below to prevent damage.

126

Locate the defective UDCM tray. The UDCM tray is usually mounted at the bottom
of a rack.

Carefully uncover all optical fibers that lead to/from the UDCM tray from the vertical
plastic fiber duct without disconnecting or straining any of the optical connectors or
fibers. Make sure that all fibers leading to/from the UDCM tray are completely loose.

Place a lab trolley or sturdy box close to the UDCM Tray. The top surface of the
trolley or box must be approximately the same height as the DCM tray mounted in
the bay and must be large enough to accommodate all UDCM modules. Make sure
the fibers connected to the UDCM modules have enough slack to permit placing the
modules onto the trolley/box.

Remove one UDCM module at a time from the faulty UDCM tray and carefully place
them on the trolley/box without straining or bending the fibers excessively.

The UDCM tray is connected via cable to D-sub connector on the front panel of a
CFSU (or CDMM) card. Withdraw the CFSU (or CDMM) card slightly from the shelf
to disengage it from its backplane connector. Now, disconnect the cable.

Unscrew the UDCM tray's grounding cable - it is attached to the right-hand rack
upright

Carefully remove the four screws that attach the UDCM Tray to the rack (two each
side). While loosening the screws, make sure to hold the UDCM tray in place with
your other hand. Note: if the mounting bracket of a rack end-guard is obstructing the
direct removal of the faulty UDCM tray, move the tray to the left or right (away from
the rack end guard) until the tray's mounting flanges are free.

Lift the faulty UDCM Tray carefully out of the rack and prepare it for the return and
repair process. Mark it with a defective label and attach a short failure description

Unpack the new UDCM tray and cable. Do not fasten the cable to the tray yet.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Card replacement instructions

10 Carefully route the cable from the bottom of the rack, behind the mounting flanges,
up and connect it to the D-sub connector of the CFSU (or CDMM) card. Do not fully
insert the CFSU (or CDMM) fully into its shelf yet.
11 Fasten the cable to the new UDCM Tray.
12 Roll up (and secure) the excess cable and store it behind the mounting brackets.
Place the new UDCM tray in the same location in the rack as the one removed.
13 Align the mounting holes of the UDCM tray with the ones of the rack beams. Hold
the tray in place with one hand and attach the new tray to the rack with the four
mounting screws that were removed in Step 7.
14 Attach the tray's grounding cable to the same hole in the rack upright. Use the same
screw and lockwasher that were removed in Step 6.
15 Carefully place the UDCM modules into the new UDCM tray without straining or
bending the fibers excessively.
16 Carefully slide the optical fibers back into the vertical fiber duct and place the slack
in the Fiber Storage area. Do not disconnect any optical fiber! Ensure fibers are not
squeezed, strained, or bent beyond the minimum allowed bend radius.
17 Now, fully insert the CFSU (or CDMM) card back into its shelf and latch it in place.
18 Verify operational status via the Craft Interface:

No alarms should be raised.


All UDCM modules can be "configured" via the Craft Interface
Inventory data from all UDCM modules can be retrieved.

19 Prepare the failed tray for return to Nokia Siemens Networks. PROCEDURE COMPLETE.

4.27

How to replace a failed shelf


Procedures for replacing a failed shelf are different for a main shelf and an extension
shelf.

4.27.1

Main shelf (i.e., shelf with CCEP or CCMP): go to chapter 4.27.1.


Extension shelf (i.e., shelf with CCSP): go to chapter 4.27.2.

Replacing a main shelf


This procedure is valid no matter if the main shelf is the standard SRS-1 ANSI
or ETSI type, or the SFL-1 flat pack shelf. The procedure for replacing a main shelf
is as follows:
1

IMPORTANT! Before doing anything else, upload a back-up copy of the MIB from
the faulty shelfs Controller card (CCEP or CCMP). Instructions for doing so can be
found in the hiT 7300 Operating Manual (OMN).

Disconnect all electrical cables from the failed shelf (including ILAN connections to
other shelves).

Disconnect all fibers from the failed shelf. Disconnect in a sequence that keeps
power transients low on surviving traffic directions, i.e., disconnect channel-bychannel.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

127

Card replacement instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Disconnect power from the shelf.

Remove all cards from the shelf. Or, temporarily leave them in the old shelf, especially if there is no means available to provide static protection for removed cards.

Remove the failed shelf from the rack. Install the new shelf in the rack, but do not
apply power yet.

Install the cards into the new shelf. Clean all fiber ends and connectors as described
in chapter 5. Restore all fiber connections.

Re-connect all electrical cables, including ILAN connections to other shelves.

g All ILAN cables must be re-connected with the new shelf powered OFF.
9

Apply power to the new shelf. The NE will boot-up with a Default MIB.

10 Is a back-up copy of the MIB available for download?

Yes: Download and activate the back-up copy of the MIB. The NE will reboot
and load the MIB. Then, the NE will start with the correct MIB active.
No: Perform a complete NE commissioning procedure by following the instructions in the NE Commissioning Manual

11 Check that all channels affected by the failed shelf are working again (good BER and
optical power). PROCEDURE COMPLETE.

128

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

4.27.2

Card replacement instructions

Replacing an extension shelf


This procedure is valid no matter if the extension shelf is the standard SRS-1
ANSI or ETSI shelf, or the SFL-1 flat pack shelf. The procedure for replacing an
extension shelf is as follows:
1

Shut down the link of the affected traffic side if the entire traffic for that side will be
affected.

Disconnect all electrical cables from the failed shelf (including ILAN connections to
other shelves).

Disconnect all fibers from the failed shelf. Disconnect in a sequence that keeps
power transients low on surviving traffic directions, i.e., disconnect channel-bychannel.

Disconnect power to the shelf.

Remove all cards from the shelf. Or, temporarily leave them in the old shelf, especially if there is no means available to provide static protection for removed cards.

Remove the failed shelf from the rack. Install the new shelf in the rack but do not
apply power yet.

Install the CCSP into the new shelf. Restore ILAN cable connections to neighboring
shelves.

g All ILAN cables must be re-connected with the new shelf powered OFF.
8

Apply power to the new shelf.

On Element Manager, go to the Shelf Configuration menu and set the old shelf to
not commissioned.

10 Configure the new shelf to the desired Shelf ID, according to NE Commissioning
documents.
11 Once the shelf is properly recognized, and communication to the Shelf Controller is
established, install the other cards. Clean all fiber ends and connectors as described
in chapter 5 and then restore fiber connections. Here, also try to keep power transients low (see step 2).
12 Restart the link (if it was shut down in step 1).
13 Check that all channels affected by the failed shelf are working again (good BER and
optical power). PROCEDURE COMPLETE.

4.28

How to replace the air filter element


Which type of shelf requires an Air Filter replacement?

Shelf with a single Fan Unit (Air Filter is mounted inside the Fan Unit): go to chapter
4.28.1.
Shelf with multiple Fan Units (Air Filter is separate from the Fan Units): go to chapter
4.28.2.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

129

Card replacement instructions

4.28.1

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

For shelves where the Air Filter is mounted


inside the Fan Unit
For these shelf types, the air filter element is mounted inside the shelfs Fan Unit. So, it
is necessary to remove the Fan Unit from the shelf to replace the air filter.

g NOTICE: Do NOT remove the Fan Unit unless the replacement air filter is readily at
hand. In these shelf types, there is only one Fan Unit. So, when it is removed from
the shelf, there is no forced-airflow cooling. Therefore, perform all steps in the procedure below as quickly as possible to minimize the time the shelf is without a Fan
Unit.

g NOTICE: When replacing the Air Filter, use only a spare provided by Nokia Siemens
Networks or a spare that is explicitly approved by Nokia Siemens Networks for use
with SURPASS hiT 7300 equipment. Use of a non-approved Air Filter will cause
equipment damage and erratic system behavior.
1

Open the latches of the Fan Unit (the Fan Unit on the Flat Pack shelf has one latch
while the Fan Unit on other shelves has two latches). Carefully slide the Fan Unit a
short distance out on its mounting rails. Wait for all fans to stop spinning. Note:
alarms will be generated when the Fan Unit is removed. Ignore these alarms; they
will clear when the Fan Unit is re-installed.

Now, remove the Fan Unit completely from the shelf. Carefully place it on a surface
(workbench, table) suitable for this work.

The filter element is contained in a dedicated cavity in the Fan Unit as shown in
Figure 2. Slide the filter out of its housing. Wipe the entire Fan Unit clean with a soft
cloth to remove any dust that may have accumulated.

Install the new filter element in the Fan Unit. One side of the filter will have the
manufacturers logo printed on it - this is the filters high-density side. Make
sure the filter is installed with that side up (closest to the fans).

Re-install the Fan Unit in the shelf and latch it in place. Verify that the fans are
running again and the Fan Alarm LED on the Fan Unit is off. Discard the old filter.

Reset the Air Filter maintenance timer. There are two ways to do this:

130

If the shelf contains the optional CFSU card, there is a button on the cards
front panel named Restart Timer. Press this button (a small tool is required)
and hold the button for 5 seconds. The CFSU will perform and airflow measurement and the filter replacement timer will be reset. As a result, the new
filters Insertion Date (visible on the Element Manager Shelf - Config window)
will be set to the current date and time.
If the shelf does not contain a CFSU card, restart the timer via Element
Manager. In the Shelf Equipment window, right-click on the Shelf bar and
select Configuration. On the resulting window, click the Fan filter Configuration button, enter the current date and time in the fields provided, and then click
the Apply.button.

Verify that all alarms are cleared PROCEDURE COMPLETE.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Card replacement instructions

Figure 2

4.28.2

SRS-1 shelf Fan Unit: air filter is inside the Fan Unit

For shelves where the Air Filter is mounted


outside the Fan Units
In these shelf types (SRS-2 and SRS-19), the air filter element is a separate component
from the shelfs Fan Units. Therefore, the Air Filter can be removed/replaced without disturbing the Fan Units.

g NOTICE: When replacing the Air Filter, use only a spare provided by Nokia Siemens
Networks or a spare that is explicitly approved by Nokia Siemens Networks for use
with SURPASS hiT 7300 equipment. Use of a non-approved Air Filter will cause
equipment damage and erratic system behavior.

g NOTICE: Remove the Air Filter only if all Fan Units are installed in the shelf. If
the Air Filter is removed while one or more Fan Units are also removed from the
shelf, cooling airflow will be insufficient and damage to cards will occur.
1

Remove the plate that covers the Fans and Air Filter. Slide the Air filter out of the
shelf. A Fan Filter Missing (FF_MISS) alarm will be raised. Ignore this alarm. It will
clear when the new filter is installed.

Install the new filter element in the shelf. Make sure it is installed in the correct orientation (up is marked on the filters metal frame).

Re-install the plate that covers the Fan Units and Air Filter.

Reset the Air Filter maintenance timer. There are two ways to do this:

If the shelf contains the optional CFSU card, there is a button on the cards
front panel named Restart Timer. Press this button (a small tool is required)
and hold the button for 5 seconds. The CFSU will perform and airflow measurement and the filter replacement timer will be reset. As a result, the new
filters Insertion Date (visible on the Element Manager Shelf - Config window)
will be set to the current date and time.
If the shelf does not contain a CFSU card, restart the timer via Element
Manager. In the Shelf Equipment window, right-click on the Shelf bar and

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

131

Card replacement instructions

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

select Configuration. On the resulting window, click the Fan filter Configuration button, enter the current date and time in the fields provided, and then click
the Apply.button.
5

132

Verify that all alarms are cleared. PROCEDURE COMPLETE.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Fiber cleaning instructions

5 Fiber cleaning instructions


Three cleaning methods are approved for use with the SURPASS hiT 7300 system.
These are described in chapters 5.1 through 5.3. The choice of cleaning method
depends on the optical power present during cleaning and the type of component
being cleaned. Applicable rules are as follows:

If the optical power during cleaning is higher than 15 dBm, only Method 3 may
be used. This rule is valid no matter what type of component is being cleaned.
If the optical power is 15 dBm or less, any of the three methods may be used.
Exceptions: For SFP pluggable modules, XFP pluggable modules, and connectors
on the front panels of plug-in cards, only Method 2 or Method 3 may be used.
To determine the optical power present, read it from craft terminal GUIs, instead of
measuring with a power meter. Reason: even though the power meters fiber pigtail
may be clean, it will be making physical contact with a system fiber that likely has
dust on it. If the power level proves to be high, this physical contact will likely cause
fiber damage.

DANGER! when cleaning optical connectors, always wear appropriate eye protection
suitable for the potential power levels and wavelengths that may be present.

5.1

Method 1: Dry cleaning cassette


This method is permitted only when optical power is 15 dBm or less. The recommended
type of dry-cleaning cassette is the CLETOP FCC-02R (Type A). This device can be
used to clean the ends of fiber patchcords and pigtails used in the hiT 7300 system.
Follow the manufacturers instructions supplied with the device.

5.2

Method 2: Blast of clean, compressed air


This method is permitted only when the optical power is 15 dBm or less. Use a can of
compressed air specifically marketed as appropriate for cleaning fiber-optic telecommunications components. Follow the manufacturers instructions supplied with the compressed air.

5.3

Method 3: Westover Scientific CleanBlast system


This method may be used if the optical power is 15 dBm or less. However, this is the
only approved method when the optical power is greater than 15 dBm. This is a
wet method (with cleaning fluid). Use the Westover Scientific CleanBlast system (FCLP1100) and cleaning fluid FCLP-SOL1 according to the manufacturers instructions.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

133

Warm Start and Cold Start

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

6 Warm Start and Cold Start


Many troubleshooting procedures covered in this document call for a Warm Start or Cold
Start to be executed on a plug-in card raising an alarm. This chapter provides a
complete description of these features.

6.1

Differences between Warm and Cold Start


Via Element Manager, the user can command individual plug-in cards to execute a
Warm Start or Cold Start. The differences are explained in Table 10. Note the following:

The NE State must be active in order to execute a Warm Start or Cold Start on any
plug-in card. The current NE State is displayed in the Status Bar at the bottom of the
Element Manager Main Window.
For some cards, it is not possible to execute a Warm Start. Only a Cold Start is possible.
Plugging a card into the shelf will automatically cause a Cold Start of that card.

Possible on:

Warm Start

Cold Start

All cards can execute a Warm


Start except the following
(which can execute only a
Cold Start):

All cards can execute a Cold


Start.

How to perform:

Right-click on the desired


card replica in the Shelf
Equipment window and select
Card > Warm Start.

Right-click on the desired


card replica in the Shelf
Equipment window and select
Card > Cold Start.

Time required for the


card to fully recover:

Approximately 3 minutes.

Approximately 5 minutes.

Result:

Card software is re-started.

Card hardware and software


are re-started.

Table 10

134

CCEP, CCMP, CCSP


F04, F08, F16, and F40
Filter cards
O03CP cards
F80DCI, F80MDI cards
CPFLAC cards
DCM cards

Differences between Warm Start and Cold Start

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

6.2

Warm Start and Cold Start

Impact of Warm and Cold Start


Table 11 explains the impact of Warm Start and Cold Start on various system functions.
Warm Start

Cold Start

CCEP, CCMP, CCSP

Not applicable

Traffic not interrupted. All


data will be restored to the
CCxP from the MIB. See
Behavior Note 1 below.

Traffic-carrying cards

For all card types except


I22CE10G-1, traffic will not
be interrupted. All card
configuration data will be
restored. However, Warm
Starting an I22CE10G-1 is
traffic-affecting!

Cold Starting Amplifier


cards and Transponder
cards will interrupt
traffic. See Behavior Note
2 below.

Performance-monitoring
(PM) data

The PM data of the current monitoring interval will be


marked with the suspect interval flag due to a Warm
Start or Cold Start.

Alarms

If the alarm condition still exists after a Warm or Cold


Start, the alarm will continue to be raised. If the alarm
condition was cleared as a result of the Warm or Cold
Start, it will no longer be raised.

Table 11

Impact of Warm Start and Cold Start

g Behavior Note 1: during a CCEP Cold Start, the connection to the network element
is not lost, so it is not possible to determine exactly when the network element has
recovered and is available again. As a workaround, do the following:
1. Wait 5 minutes after initiating the CCEP Cold Start command.
2. Via TNMS-CT, disconnect from the network element.
3. Then, periodically (recommended: once every minute) try to re-establish the
connection with the network element. If the connection cannot be re-established,
the NE is not ready. When the CCEP has recovered from the Cold Start, it will
be possible to re-connect.

g Behavior Note 2: After Cold Starting Amplifier, Transponder, Muxponder, or


Regenerator cards, traffic will be lost for up to 90 seconds. For some card
types (principally 40G cards) traffic may be lost for up to 160 seconds.

g Behavior Note 3: After Cold Starting an LALx amplifier card, or after recovery from
Automatic Power Shutdown (APSD), there will be a delay in link recovery of 12
seconds per LALx amplifier card on the link. Similarly, after Cold Starting a PRC-1
Raman card, or after recovery from Automatic Power Shutdown (APSD), there will
be a delay in link recovery of 60 seconds per PRC-1 card on the link.

g Behavior Note 4: If the wrong fiber directions were accidentally connected at an


NE, perform the following steps:
1. Correct the fiber connections.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

135

Warm Start and Cold Start

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

2. Cold Start the NE Controller (CCEP or CCMP card) in order to get the DCN
working again.

136

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Card LED behavior

7 Card LED behavior


LEDs on the front panel of hiT 7300 plug-in cards provide information useful for operation and troubleshooting purposes. This chapter explains the following LED behavior:

7.1

FAULT and OK LEDs: see chapter 7.1.


LED behavior specific to Controller cards: see chapter 7.2.
Port LED behavior on I22CE10G-1 cards: see chapter 7.3.
Mux / Demux LEDs: see chapter 7.4.

FAULT and OK LEDs


All hiT 7300 active cards (i.e., those that contain an on-board processor) feature a
front-panel red LED named FAULT and a green LED named OK. The functions of these
LEDs are summarized in Table 12. In addition, note the following important points:

Normal operation for an in-service card correctly installed in its proper slot is indicated by OK LED on and FAULT LED off.
During a cards Cold Start process and built-in self-test, LEDs will be temporarily on,
off, or blinking as described in the table below.
If the FAULT LED comes on, it indicates that the card has detected an on-board
hardware or software failure. The appropriate alarm(s) will be raised, so troubleshoot the alarm(s) as instructed in this document to restore normal operation.
For applicable card types, the FAULT LED will blink to indicate that a loss-of-signal
(LOS) condition exists for the card. The appropriate alarm will be raised, so troubleshoot the alarm as instructed in this document to restore normal operation.
When the fault condition has been corrected, the FAULT LED will extinguish.
Condition

FAULT LED

OK LED

Lamp test at beginning of card Cold Start


process (LEDs light temporarily)

on

on

During card Cold Start process

off

off

During card built-in self test

off

blinking

Normal operation: expected card is installed


in the slot, power is applied, card is operating fault-free, and software is OK.

off

on

Wrong card is installed in the slot

off

off

Card suffers hardware or software failure

on

on or off

LOS condition exists on the card

blinking

on

Table 12

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

FAULT and OK LED behavior

137

Card LED behavior

7.2

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

LED behavior on Controller cards (CCEP, CCMP, CCSP)


Controller card LED behavior is explained in the following tables:

Controller card LED behavior during NE startup: see Table 13.


Controller card LED behavior after NE start-up: see Table 14.
FAULT LED

Meaning

on

off

Start-up of boot software.

Blinking (1 Hz)

off

Start-up of Linux (kernel running and driver


loaded).

off

Blinking (0.5 Hz)

Start-up of application software.

off

Blinking (1 Hz)

NE State has changed to enabled.

off

on

SNMP start-up finished - end of start-up


process.

Table 13

Controller card LED behavior during NE start-up

LED name

Color

Description

FAULT

Red

If the FAULT LED is on, the card has detected an


on-board hardware or software failure. The
appropriate alarm(s) will be raised, so troubleshoot the alarm(s) as instructed in this document
to restore normal operation.

OK

Green

When the OK LED is on, power is applied, the


card is operating fault-free, and software is OK.

UBAT 1 to
UBAT 4

Green

Individual LEDs for the four shelf DC power


feeds. When LED is on, power is supplied to that
feed.

COM Alarms
CRITICAL

Red

When on, this LED indicates that one or more


Critical Communication alarms are active in the
shelf / shelves managed by this Controller card.

COM Alarms
MAJOR

Orange

When on, this LED indicates that one or more


Major Communication alarms are active in the
shelf / shelves managed by this Controller card.

COM Alarms
MINOR

Yellow

When on, this LED indicates that one or more


Minor Communication alarms are active in the
shelf / shelves managed by this Controller card.

EQUIP Alarms
CRITICAL

Red

When on, this LED indicates that one or more


Critical Equipment alarms are active in the shelf /
shelves managed by this Controller card.

Table 14

138

OK LED

Controller card LED behavior after NE start-up

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Card LED behavior

LED name

Description

EQUIP Alarms
MAJOR

Orange

When on, this LED indicates that one or more


Major Equipment alarms are active in the shelf /
shelves managed by this Controller card.

EQUIP Alarms
MINOR

Yellow

When on, this LED indicates that one or more


Minor Equipment alarms are active in the shelf /
shelves managed by this Controller card.

INFO

Green / Red When this LED is on in red, it indicates that the


NE has entered Recover Mode (see chapter 8 for
further details).
When this LED is blinking in green, it indicates
that a MIB backup is in progress. Never unplug
a card when the INFO LED is blinking!

Table 14

7.3

Color

Controller card LED behavior after NE start-up (Cont.)

Port LED behavior on I22CE10G-1 cards


Each port on an I22CE10G-1 (Carrier Ethernet card) has a dedicated LED. Behavior is
summarized in Table 15.
Condition

Port LED status

Port role = Client


on
Link is available, no frames being transmitted or received
Port role = Client
Frames being transmitted or received

blinking

Port role = Line


blinking
Pluggable Module problem or loss-ofsignal.
The appropriate alarm(s) will be raised, so
troubleshoot the alarm(s) as instructed in
this document to restore normal operation.
All other conditions
Table 15

7.4

off

Port LED behavior on I22CE10-G-1 card

Mux and Demux LEDs


F40 cards (F40-1/S, F40-1/O, F40V-1/S, and F40V-1/O) can be used in either the mutiplexer (Mux) role or demultiplexer (Demux) role. Accordingly, the front panel of these
card types feature an LED named MUX and an LED named DEMUX. The appropriate
LED will light to signify the operating mode of the card.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

139

Hints for Recover Mode

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

8 Hints for Recover Mode


If an NE cannot complete its startup, it will be forced into Recover Mode. This is typically
caused by APS or MIB inconsistencies. Therefore, Recover Mode provides a safe operating state for the user to recover proper NE operation. User intervention is required to
clear Recover Mode.

Recover Mode means the NE is using a default MIB. The default MIB has only the
default user and password. So, when in Recover Mode, only an Administrator-level
user can log-in via the default password.
Only the following operations are possible while in Recover Mode (all other configuration
actions attempted will be rejected by the NE):

APS download and swap


MIB download and swap*
NCF download and swap
Cold Start of cards
Upload of (most) diagnostic data

* When an NE is in Recover Mode, a MIB can be downloaded and swapped only if the
NE Name of the downloaded MIB matches the NE Name stored on the shelf backplane
EEPROM.
Whenever Element Manager connects to an NE, it will check to see if the NE is in
Recover Mode. If so, as soon as the start-up is finished, Element Manager will display
the Clear Recover Mode window. This window will list the reason the NE is in Recover
Mode, along with various clickable buttons that are directly linked to specific Element
Manager windows used to remedy the situation. Table 16 (on the next page) lists the
Recover Mode reasons displayed on the Clear Recover Mode window, along with the
appropriate remedy for each.

140

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Hints for Recover Mode

Listed Reason for


Recover Mode

Description

Remedy

APS_MISMATCH

The APS version stored in the shelf


backplane EEPROM does not
match the version on the
CCEP/CCMP Compact Flash. The
usual cause is that a faulty Compact
Flash was just replaced. The APSM
alarm will be raised.

Manually install the correct APS.


Click the Change APS button on the
Clear Recover Mode window. This
will open the Software/File Management window.

APS_MISMATCH (application
startup failed after max # tries)

End of Startup could not be reached


after 3 attempts (usually caused by
a software anomaly).

Manually install the APS from a


known-good source. Click the
Change APS button on the Clear
Recover Mode window. This will
open the Software/File Management window.

APS_MISMATCH (ILAN IP
address conflict)

ILAN cables are not connected


properly or duplicate main controller
cards (CCEP or CCMP) have been
installed in the NE.

Refer to the Installation and Test


Manual (ITMN) for instructions to
properly connect ILAN cables from
shelf to shelf.
Only one shelf in an NE can have
the main controller card (CCEP or
CCMP). All other shelves must each
have a CCSP card.

MIB_MISMATCH

Typically occurs after replacing a


failed CCEP or CCMP card and/or
its Compact Flash module. Such
replacements can sometimes result
in a mismatch of the MIB contents.
In such cases, the Controller card
cannot find a valid MIB. A MIBF
alarm will be raised.

Download a backup copy of the MIB


to the NE. Click the Change MIB
button on the Clear Recover Mode
window. This will open the Software/File Management window.

MIB_MISMATCH (APS Downgrade)

A failure occurred with MIB migration during an APS downgrade.

Download a backup copy of the MIB


to the NE. Click the Change MIB
button on the Clear Recover Mode
window. This will open the Software/File Management window.

Table 16

Clear Recover Mode window - reasons and remedies

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

141

Glossary

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

9 Glossary
@CT

@CT is a web-based craft terminal (i.e., element manager) software which provides web
access to SURPASS hiT 7300 NEs in the customer network without the use of a management system. It communicates via SNMP with the NEs and uses the FTPS for
upload/download of software or other data configuration (e.g., log files).

10 Gbit/s Small
Form-Factor Pluggable

An XFP module is a swappable component mounted at the front panel of some types of
hiT 7300 transponder cards. It acts as a boundary interface between the client signal
and the DWDM line signal by performing the bidirectional optical/electrical traffic conversion.

Add/Drop channel
Air filter

An add/drop channel is an active channel added or dropped at any ONN-S NE at the


considered pre-emphasis section.
An air filter is a one-piece replaceable element mounted in the shelf to protect the shelf
from ingesting environmental dust or other airborne contaminants.

Alarm

An alarm is a management mechanism intended to inform the user that there is a


standing fault condition in the system.

Alarm log

An alarm log provides a list of the alarms associated with a managed object, and
provides the following information about each of the alarms:
the identification of the affected object
the identification of the failed NE or the NE in which the failed unit resides
the alarm severity
the time the event occurred
the indication whether the alarmed event is service affecting or not
the location and the affected traffic

Alarm severity

Each failure is assigned a severity. The following values are used:


critical
major
minor
warning
Element Manager (EM) can configure the severity which is assigned to each fault cause
by an alarm severity assignment profile. In addition, EM can specify that a fault cause
shall not be alarmed. These fault causes will be blocked, hence do not lead to any LED
alarm indications, log entries or alarm reporting.

Amplified Spontaneous Emission

ASE is produced when a laser gain medium is pumped to produce a population inversion. Feedback of the ASE by the laser's optical cavity may produce laser operation if
the lasing threshold is reached. Excess ASE is an unwanted effect in lasers, since it
limits the maximum gain that can be achieved in the gain medium. ASE creates serious
problems in any laser with high gain and/or large size.

Amplifier card

The line amplifier cards provide the optical signal amplification via a gain block with one
or two pump lasers, interstage access for dispersion compensation, a stage for connection of external pumps, and gain control mechanisms.

Attenuator card

A VOA card is a variable attenuator that can supply up to 8 EVOA channels. The VOA
card is applicable in pre-emphasis.

142

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Automatic Laser
Shutdown

Booster
Booster-less card

C/DWDM filter pack

Glossary

ALS acts by disabling the laser of the forward transmission side if the receiving line is
inactive (i.e., no signal is detected). During service provisioning, the ALS checks for link
restoration in small time intervals and resumes the transmission (i.e., enables the transmission laser) when the line is restored.
A Booster is an optical amplifier placed at the link section head end.
A booster-less line interface card is a unidirectional line interface card for the transmit
direction of a DWDM line interface without amplification functionality. The booster-less
line interface card can replace a booster amplifier card for short span applications.
C/DWDM filter pack is a passive filtering solution realized in a small filter pack shelf
(SPF-1) which allows up to 4 filter modules to be plugged-in.
The C/DWDM filter pack does not require power supply. It is completely independent
from the SURPASS hiT 7300 system from a management point of view.

Card

A card is a plug-in unit that occupies one (or multiple) shelf slots. Cards perform specific
electrical and/or optical functions within an NE.
Each card has a faceplate with information LEDs and, in most cases, several ports for
interconnection of optical fibers and/or optical interfaces (e.g., SFP).

Card faceplate

Card LEDs

Card slot

All cards are equipped with individual faceplates in order to meet EMI/ESD requirements, and ensure heat dissipation. The card faceplate contains LEDs, and in some
cases optical or electrical interfaces.
Card LEDs are luminous signals that can alert the user to:
The state of the power supply.
A card problem that requires card replacement.
The existence of communication or equipment alarms.
The presence or absence of traffic in the card.
A card slot is the insertion facility for a card in a shelf. Each card slot is designed for one
or several particular card types.
Mechanical coding elements make sure that each card can be fully inserted only into a
card slot that is suitable for the given card type. Therefore, fundamental shelf equipping
errors (which might cause hardware damage or fatal malfunctions) are impossible.

Chain network

A chain network is a network topology characterized by a chain connection between


several NEs, i.e., the optical signal is transmitted from one end-point NE to another but
new channels can be added, dropped or re-routed (to another optical path) along the
optical path.

Channel power
monitor card

Channel power monitor cards provide in-service monitoring of optical channel power
levels via an on-board Optical Spectrum Analyzer. The card has four input ports to
monitor the channel spectrum from four separate points in an NE.

Chromatic dispersion
Client interface

Chromatic dispersion has the effect of spreading the signal pulse width, no longer
allowing an accurate recognition of a single one bit or a single zero bit.
A client interface is a transponder interface that faces the client side of the link. Contrast
with line interface which faces the transmission (line) side of the link.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

143

Glossary

Coarse Wavelength
Division Multiplexing
Commissioning

Controller card

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

CWDM solution allows a simple and low-cost implementation of a passive optical multiplexing system (with compact passive multiplexer modules), which can be used for data
collection and aggregation of multiple client data from different remote locations within
enterprise, or small metropolitan networks.
Commissioning an NE is the process of taking an installed NE and bringing it in to an
operational state. The NE commissioning phase is performed after the NE is installed
and powered-up.
NE controller cards (CCEP-2 and CCMP-2) provide the central monitoring and controlling functions of the system, as well as the MCF to operate the Q and QF Ethernet interfaces.
The controller card performs the following main functions: Fault Management, Performance Management, Configuration Management, Security Management, Equipment
Management, Communication Management, Software Management (performing all
software downloads, uploads, and software integrity functions) and controlling the NE
alarm LEDs.

CWDM patch-cord

A CWDM patch-cord solution is provided by the add/drop patch-cord. The patch-cord is


an optical Y-cable with 3 LC/PC connectors, which allows the add/drop of a single
CWDM channel.

Data Communication Network

A DCN domain interconnects several NEs for the purpose of network management. The
communication is established via the OSC of the optical links and an Ethernet/L2 switching network implemented by the NEs.

Dense Wavelength
Division Multiplexing

DWDM is a technology which simultaneously places a large number of optical signals


(in the 1550 nm band) on a single optical fiber.

Differential Phase
Shift Keying

A digital modulation technique used in the transmission of optical signals. DPSK is used
in the optical line interface of the I01T40G-1, I01R40G-1 and I04T40G-1 cards, as well
as the OPMDC-2 card.
DPSK transmits data by modulating the phase of a signal. The phase is changed if the
current data bit is different from its predecessor. At a receiving end, phase changes are
detected by comparing the phase of each signal element with the phase of a preceding
signal element. ?

Dispersion Compensation Module card

DCM cards counteract the chromatic dispersion of the signal traveling through the
optical fiber.

Element Manager

SURPASS hiT 7300 EM enables the user to perform operation, administration and
maintenance tasks with the SURPASS hiT 7300 system in a GUI environment.

Engineering Order
Wire

The EOW interface is located at the NE controller cards and is used to establish conference and selective calls from one NE to another NE(s) using a handset.

Erbium Doped Fiber


Amplifier

An EDFA is an optical fiber doped with a rare earth element (Erbium), which can amplify
laser light in the 1550 nm region when pumped by an external laser source.

Error correction

Error correction in a DWDM system is achieved with FEC and S-FEC functions. These
functions ensure the detection and correction of data errors carried by a channel or
channels.

144

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Ethernet

Express channels

Glossary

Ethernet is a family of frame-based computer networking technologies for LANs. It


defines a number of wiring and signaling standards for the physical layer, through
means of network access at the MAC/Data Link Layer, and a common addressing
format.
An express channel is an active channel that travels over an entire pre-emphasis
section, from ONN to ONN (except ONN-S) without being added (or dropped) at any
ONN-S multiplexer (or demultiplexer).

External pump card

An external pump card can be connected to an amplifier card to increase its normal
output power, which is sometimes needed for longer spans, different fiber types.

Fan unit

Each shelf is equipped with one or more fan units that provide cooling airflow for the
cards.

Fault management

Fault management reports all hardware and software malfunctions within an NE, and
monitors the integrity of all incoming and outgoing digital signals.

File Transfer
Protocol

FTP is a network protocol used to transfer files from one computer to an NE and viceversa through the network.

Filter card

Filter cards act as multiplexers/demultiplexers by providing the primary wave division or


aggregation of all the transponder signals and allowing access to a particular set of
wavelengths from an optical fiber while passing the remaining wavelengths.

Forward Error Correction

FEC is a technique that optimizes signal performance by providing a better OSNR tolerance at the transponders, i.e., FEC enables the system to withstand more signal
noise.
FEC is a coding algorithm that enables bit error detection and correction. FEC is a "forward" scheme, i.e., the receiver receives only the information needed to detect and
correct bit errors and never requests a re-transmission.

Frequency

Frequency is a physical attribute of a wave (e.g., an optical wave), defined as the


number of wave cycles per time unit. The frequency is directly related to the wavelength.

Gain control

Gain control of SURPASS hiT 7300 is provided by the EDFA modules in the line amplifier cards. Gain control ensures a sufficiently fast response to transients and keeps
constant the gain between input and output of the EDFA line amplifier card.

Interstage Loss

Most hiT 7300 amplifier cards feature two ports to connect an interstage device (typically a DCM). Interstage loss is the power loss experienced by the optical signal passing
through the interstage device.

Laser
Laser safety
Laser Safety Bus
Line interface
Link section

A laser is a device that generates an intense narrow beam of light by stimulating the
emission of photons from excited atoms or molecules.
Laser safety rules are a group of mechanisms and actions necessary to protect all users
from harmful laser light emissions.
SURPASS hiT 7300 LSB rings provide a reliable communication between cards to
ensure a safe NE operation via APSD and APRM functions.
A line interface is a transponder interface that faces the line side of the link. Contrast
with client interface which faces the client equipment side of the link.
See Optical Multiplex Section

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

145

Glossary

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Long Haul

SURPASS hiT 7300 LH segment is a DWDM application characterized by a reach of


more than 500 km and up to 1200 km.

Mesh network

A mesh network is a network topology which is characterized by the constant routing of


the optical channel between the NEs. It allows a continuous connection and a reconfiguration around a broken or blocked optical path by "hopping" from NE to NE until the
destination is reached. A mesh network whose NEs are all connected to each other is a
fully connected network.

Metro

SURPASS hiT 7300 Metro segment is a DWDM application characterized by short path
lengths of up to 200 km.

MPB communications

The RMH07 and 1RU-R Long Reach Transport Series from MPB Communications
consists of amplifiers designed to transmit and receive signals over fiber optic links from
100 to more than 400 km in a single span using SON NEs.

Network Craft
Terminal

NCT is a network management craft terminal (i.e., element manager) software which is
used for either local or remote network management.

Network Element

An NE is a self-contained logical unit within the network. The NE can be uniquely


addressed and individually managed via software.
Each NE consists of hardware and software components to perform given electrical and
optical functions within the network.

Network Element
Configuration File

NCFs contain most of the necessary configurations for each NE of the planned network.
However, several configurations (e.g., DCN and NE configurations) must be performed
manually with the support of the NE commissioning manuals.

Network Management

The network management layer includes all the required functions to manage the optical
network in an effective and user-friendly way, such as the visualization of the network
topology, creation of services, and correlation of alarms to network resources.

Network topologies

A topology of a network is defined by the list of NEs included in the network and the list
of links that connect those NEs (e.g., point-to-point, chain, ring, etc.)

Nodal degree

The nodal degree of an NE is the number of NEs that are directly connected to the NE.

Non-return to Zero

A data encoding technique used to transmit digital data over the line interface of the following cards: I04T2G5-1; I01T10G-1; I08T10G-1; I05AD10G-1; I04TQ10G-1 and
I22CE10G-1. In telecommunication, a non-return-to-zero (NRZ) line code is a binary
code in which 1's are represented by one significant condition (usually a positive
voltage) and 0's are represented by some other significant condition (usually a negative
voltage), with no other neutral or rest condition.?

OADM architectures

146

OADM architectures refer to the capability of an OADM NE to perform some optical


tasks within the SURPASS hiT 7300 network. In SURPASS hiT 7300 the following
OADM architectures are available:
Small
Terminal
Flexible
FullAccess
Reconfigurable
PXC

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Optical Add-Drop
Multiplexer

Glossary

An OADM is an optical node NE used for multiplexing and routing different optical
channels of into or out of an optical fiber. An OADM NE is generally used for the construction of a ring-based network. "Add" and "drop" refer to the capability of the NE to
add one or more channels to an existing DWDM signal, and/or to drop one or more
channels and/or routing those signals to another optical path.

Optical Channel

A predefined wavelength that can be used to transmit a bit stream by means of a modulated light signal.

Optical channel
control

Optical channel control manages the optical channel state information through the entire
optical path. The optical channel control activates mechanisms to recover the normal
operation of the optical path in a link failure scenario, or activate mechanisms to manage
operations in case of an optical channel upgrade/ downgrade scenario. The activation
of such mechanisms, depends on the optical channel state information monitored on
each NE. The transmission of this information along the optical path, between NEs, is
provided by the OSC.

Optical channel protection card

An optical channel protection card is a passive card which contains 6 optical splitters.
Three of those splitters act as combiners to switch the traffic together with the transponder cards. The remaining three are used for bridging the traffic for protection.
Up to three protection groups can be created and managed by the optical channel protection card (i.e., three pairs of client interfaces).

Optical Line
Repeater

An OLR is an NE which is used for optical signal amplification and dispersion compensation.

Optical link control

Optical link control optimizes and maintains the operation of individual link sections and
pre-emphasis sections. Most of the optical link control functions are executed by the
CCEP card, and the time-critical functions are executed by the line amplifier cards.

Optical Multiplex
Section

An optical multiplex section (or link section) is the optical segment from the booster of
an ONN to the pre-amplifier of the next adjacent ONN.

Optical Network
Node

An ONN is an NE where the incoming channels are either dropped or routed to a line in
a different direction, outgoing channels can also be added locally. Apart from multiplexing and demultiplexing an ONN NE implements optical or 3R signal regeneration and
dispersion compensation.

Optical path
Optical Signal to
Noise Ratio

The path followed by an optical channel from the first multiplexer to the last demultiplexer.
OSNR is the ratio of an optical signal power to the noise power in the signal.

Optical Spectrum
Analyzer

An OSA is a device that measures properties of an optical signal within a defined spectrum.

Optical Supervisory
Channel

An OSC is a supervisory channel that is transmitted/received by the line amplifier cards.


It provides all the network management communication required to set-up and maintain
a DWDM system configuration, fault management, performance monitoring, and
software maintenance.

Optical Transmission Section

An optical transmission section (or span) is any fiber segment between two adjacent
amplifiers (i.e., between two NEs).

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

147

Glossary

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Performance management

Performance monitoring and signal quality analysis provide information for detecting
and alerting, a cause that could lead to a degraded performance before a failure is
declared.

Point-to-point
network

A point-to-point network is a network topology characterized by a connection between


two end-point NEs, i.e., the optical signal is transmitted from one end-point to another
end-point without add or drop of channels. Applications where the span length is considerably big may require an amplification/regeneration (done by OLR NEs) along the
optical path.

Power Distribution
Panel

A PDP is the device responsible for the power distribution of all the racks of an NE. It
contains fuses (or circuit breakers) to protect all the dual-redundant power feeds connected to each shelf in the rack.

Power meter

An optical power meter is the equipment recommended to use in case of single optical
channel power measurement.

Power tilt

Spectrum power tilt occurs when a flat DWDM signals travel through transmission fiber.
Due to stimulated Raman scattering, shorter wavelength channels will pump longer
wavelength channels, and so transfer their energy to longer wavelength channels.

Preamplifier

Preamplifier is an optical amplifier placed at the link section tail end.

Pre-emphasis

The Pre-emphasis method is applied to pre-emphasis sections, and is used to optimize


the optical link by means of optical power adjustment (manual or automatic).

Pre-emphasis
method

The pre-emphasis method is applied to pre-emphasis sections and is used to optimize


the optical link by means of optical power adjustment.

Pre-emphasis
section

A pre-emphasis section is the optical segment from the booster of an ONN (except
ONN-S) to the pre-amplifier of the next adjacent ONN (except ONN-S).

Pump laser

A pump laser is a laser with a wavelength different from the signal laser, used as the
energy source for signal amplification.

Rack

A rack is the main unit of the SURPASS hiT 7300, it carries all system devices in a
specific arrangement. The most important elements placed in the rack are the shelves
and the Power Distribution Panel.

Raman amplification

The basis of Raman amplification is the energy scattering effect called SRS. The SRS
is a non-linear effect inherent to the fiber itself. SRS involves a transfer of power from a
signal at a higher frequency (lower wavelength) to one at a lower frequency (higher
wavelength), due to inelastic collisions in the fiber medium. It can be used for optical
amplification, in which the higher frequency laser serves as a pump source, amplifying
the lower frequency wave carrying the actual traffic signal to be amplified.

Raman pump card

Raman pump cards must be inserted at the receiving line interface. They are normally
used in long span applications to ensure that the same amplifier spacing can be
achieved with lower EDFA output power per channel, allowing a higher total number of
channels.
For certain links where the non-linear effects limit an increase in the number of spans,
a channel power reduction decreases the non-linear effects, and therefore allows a
higher number of spans. Raman amplifiers are preferably applied to bridge single extra
long spans.

148

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Regenerator

Glossary

A regenerator is a device used to extend the reach of fiber-optic traffic communications,


by compensating the attenuation and the distortion of the optical signal.
The regenerator converts the received optical signal to an electrical signal, processes it,
reconverts it to an optical signal and retransmits it.

Regional

SURPASS hiT 7300 Regional segment is a DWDM application characterized by path


lengths starting at 200 km and for high traffic volumes. These networks are often used
as regional collector networks to feed into LH portions of the network. Regional DWDM
networks have typical path lengths of up to 500 km.

Remote Optically
Pumped Amplifier

A ROPA module is a passive unit with a Erbium doped fiber to amplify the optical signal.
It is placed in the transmission cable to extend the long single span length.

Ring network
Security management
Service Provisioning

A ring network is a network topology in which each NE connects to exactly two other
NEs, forming a circular optical path for signals (i.e., a ring).
Security Management controls the individual access to particular NE functions via the
network management system and/or via a craft terminal, using a hierarchical security
management user ID, and password concept.
Service provisioning consists of establishing and managing OCh connections via
GMPLS signaling.

Shelf

The rack-mountable housing into which cards are installed. The shelf contains terminals
for connection of the power supply voltage that is distributed to each card. Major components of each shelf are card slots, backplane, Connector Panel, Fan Unit(s) and Air
Filter.

Simple Network
Management
Protocol

SNMP is used in network management systems to monitor network-attached devices for


conditions that warrant administrative control. It consists of a set of standards for
network management, including an application layer protocol, a database schema, and
a set of data objects.

Small Form-Factor
Pluggable

An SFP module is a swappable component mounted at the front panel of some types of
hiT 7300 transponder cards. It acts as a boundary interface between the client signal
and the DWDM line signal by performing bidirectional optical/electrical traffic conversion.

Software management

Software management performs all software downloads, uploads, and software integrity
functions.

Span
Span loss

See Optical Transmission Section


Span loss is the optical power loss measured in dBs between two adjacent NEs.

Standalone Optical
Node

A SON is a DWDM NE that can be used in passive DWDM (e.g., point-to-point and
remote transponder solutions) and long single span applications.

Standalone Optical
Node Flatpack

A SONF is a DWDM NE realized in a flatpack shelf which can be used in passive DWDM
(e.g., point-to-point and remote transponder solutions).

Stimulated Brillouin
Scattering

SBS is the interaction of photons and optical phonons (acoustic phonons). The latter are
the particles, which can be assigned to vibrations of the array of atoms and electrons.
The SBS acts in backward direction and it is especially important when there is bidirectional transmission. In this case, a channel interferes with itself causing significant distortion and loss in forward direction.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

149

Glossary

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

Tandem Connection
Monitoring

TCMs are configurable parameters (via EM) of the transponders. They provide a PM of
the all OTN (i.e., end-to-end connection) or specific sections only and implement an
ODU termination provisioned to support up to six TCM levels.

Telecommunication
Network Management System
Core/Cross Domain
Manager

TNMS Core/CDM is an integrated solution designed for large, medium and small size
networks. It supports NEs with DWDM, OTH, SDH, PDH, Ethernet in line, star, ring and
mesh network configurations. TNMS Core/CDM can be used to manage networks in the
access, edge, metro, core and backbone levels.

Telecommunication
Network Management System Craft
Terminal

TNMS CT is a transparent software platform for SDH and DWDM NEs using QD2, QST,
QST V2, Q3 or SNMP telegram protocols. It supports line, star, ring and mesh networks
and provides access to NEs via Ethernet interface or via a serial line interface (RS232).

Telemetry Interface

TIF sensors (inputs) and TIF actors (outputs) can be found in the NEs controller cards
as a separate module called TIF module. The TIF module is intended to be used for traditional user-defined housekeeping purposes (e.g., fire alarm, over-temperature
alarm, door-open alarm, lights, air conditioning, etc.).

Trail Trace Identifier

TTI is a transponder card parameter (configurable via EM) of which is used to verify
correct cabling or correct TCM configuration. The basic principle is that specific
overhead bytes are reserved for Trace Messages of the user's choosing. By specifying
the Actually Sent (transmitted) and the Expected (received) trace messages, the system
can automatically verify that fiber connections have been made as intended. This is
accomplished by comparing the expected Trace Message to that actually received. If
they differ, an alarm is raised, alerting personnel of the incorrect connections.

Transaction
Language 1

TL1 is a telecommunications management protocol. It is a cross-vendor, cross-technology man-machine language, which is used to manage optical and broadband access
infrastructures in North America. It is defined in GR-831 by Telcordia Technologies.

TransNet

Planning of a SURPASS hiT 7300 network is done by the SURPASS TransNet tool.
SURPASS TransNet is a sophisticated software simulation tool developed specifically
for designing and/or upgrading optical DWDM networks with SURPASS hiT 7300. It
runs on PCs using Windows 2000 or Windows XP operating systems.

Transponder card

A transponder card receives an optical input signal and converts it to an optical output
signal suitable for DWDM multiplexing and transmission.

Transponder
loopback

Loopbacks are diagnostic tests that can be activated via EM. Loopbacks return the
transmitted signal back to the sending device after the signal has passed across a particular link. The returned signal can then be compared to the transmitted one. Any discrepancy between the transmitted and the returned signal helps to trace faults.

UDCM tray

A UDCM tray is a mechanical shelf mounted in a rack, which can hold up to 4 UDCMs.

Ultra Long Haul


Unidirectional Dispersion Compensation Module

150

SURPASS hiT 7300 ULH segment is a DWDM application characterized by long path
lengths of up to 1600 km.
UDCMs provide a dispersion compensation of the DWDM signal. They are not supplied
as shelf plug-in cards, being mounted in a specific plug-in box inside the UDCM tray.
UDCMs are available in "single-height" UDCM and "double-height" UDCM. A blank
(dummy) UDCM is also available to be installed in those positions that do not have an
actual UDCM installed.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

User Channel

VOA
Wavelength

Glossary

SURPASS hiT 7300 user channels are used for bidirectional connections between NEs
via the OSC or GCC0, providing the customer with a point-to-point Ethernet connection
for specific data network or remote access to NEs not reachable via DCN.
See Attenuator Card
Wavelength is a physical attribute of a wave (e.g., an optical wave), defined as the
distance between corresponding points of two consecutive wave cycles.
The wavelength is directly related to the frequency of the wave.

Wrist strap

A grounded anti-static strap worn on the wrist to prevent electrostatic discharge that may
damage electronic equipment.

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

151

Abbreviations

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

10 Abbreviations
AC
@CT

Web-based Craft Terminal

ADF

Armored Fiber Distribution Frame

AIS
ALS

Alarm Indication Signal


Automatic Laser Shutdown

ANSI

American National Standards Institute

APD

Avalanche Photodiode

APR

Address Resolution Protocol

APRM
APS
APSD
ASE
ASON
AWG
BBE
BDI

Automatic Power Reduction Mode


Application Program System
Automatic Power Shutdown
Amplified Spontaneous Emission
Automatic Switched Optical Network
Arrayed Waveguide Grating
Background Block Errors
Backward Defect Indication

BER

Bit Error Rate

BOL

Begin-of-Life

CAPEX
CARP
CCAMP

152

Alternating Current

Capital Expenditure
Common Address Redundancy Protocol
Common Control And Measurement Plane

CD

Compact Disk

CE

Communaut Europenne

CLI

Command Line Interface

CML

Command and Message List

CMS

Control plane MIB Stub

COPA

Connector Panel

COS

Class of Service

CT

Craft Terminal

CV

Code Violations

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

CWDM
DC

Coarse Wavelength Division Multiplexing


Coding Violations

DCF

Dispersion Compensation Fiber

DCM

Dispersion Compensation Module

DCN

Data Communication Network

DGD

Differential Group Delay

DHCP
DLI

Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol


Delay Line Interferometer

DNS

Domain Name Service

DOP

Degree Of Polarization

DPSK
DSF
DSLAM
DTMF
DWDM

Differential Phase-shift Keying


Dispersion Shifted Fiber
Digital Subscriber Line Access Multiplexer
Dual Tone Multi-Frequency
Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing

EAM

Electro-Absorption Modulator

EBP

Earth Bonding Point

EDF

Erbium Doped Fiber

EDFA
EGB

Erbium Doped Fiber Amplifier


Elektrostatisch gefhrdetes Bauteil

EM

Element Manager

EMI

Electromagnetic Interference

EN
EOCI
EOL
EOW

European Norm
External Open Connection Indication
End-of-Life
Engineering Order Wire

EPC

Enhanced Power Control

EPL

Ethernet Private Line

ERO

Explicit Route Object

ES

Abbreviations

Errored Seconds

ESD

Electrostatically Sensitive Device

ETS

European Telecommunications Standard

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

153

Abbreviations

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

ETSI
EVPL
FBG
FC
FCC

Ethernet Virtual Private Line


Fiber Bragg Grating
Fiber Channel
Federal Communications Commission

FDI

Forward Defect Indication

FEC

Forward Error Correction

FIT
FPGA
FTP

Failures In Time
Field Programmable Gate Array
File Transfer Protocol

FTPS

File Transfer Protocol Secure

G-AIS

Generic Alarm Indication Signal

GbE

Gigabit Ethernet

GCC

Generic Communication Channel

GFP-T
GMPLS
GMT
GUI
HTTP

Generic Framing Protocol - Transparent


Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS)
Greenwich Mean Time
Graphical User Interface
Hyper Text Transfer Protocol

HU

Height Unit (1 HU = 1.75 inches)

HW

Hardware

I2C

Inter-Integrated Circuit

ICMA

Interconnect, Configuration and Mechanical Assembly manual

ICMP

Internet Control Message Protocol

ID
IEC
ILAN
INNI
IP
ISL

154

European Telecommunications Standards Institute

Identifier
International Electrotechnical Commission
Inter-shelf Local Area Network
Internal Network to Network Interface
Internet Protocol
Interstage Loss

ITMN

Installation and Test Manual

ITTI

Internal Trail Trace Identifier

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

JRE

Java Runtime Environment

LAN

Local Area Network

LAx

Line Amplifier

LEAF
LED
LH
LLDP

Large Effective Area Fiber


Light Emitting Diode
Long Haul
Link Layer Discovery Protocol

LOM

List of Material

LOS

Loss of Signal

LSB

Laser Safety Bus

LSP

Label Switched Path

LSR

Label Switch Route

LWL

Lichtwellenleiter

MAC

Media Access Control

MCF

Message Communication Function

MDF

Medium Dispersion Fiber

MEMS-WSS
MIB

Micro-Electro-Mechanical System - Wavelength Selective Switch


Management Information Base

MLSE

Maximum Likelihood Sequence Estimator

MPBC

MPB communications

MPE
MPLS

Maximum Permissible Exposure


Multiprotocol Label Switching

MSA

Multi-Source Agreement

MST

Multiple Spanning Tree

MSTP
MS-AIS

Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol


Multiplex Section Alarm Indication Signal

MTU

Maximum Transmission Unit

MZM

Mach-Zehnder Modulator

NAPT

Network Address Port Translation

NCF

Network Element Configuration File

NCT

Network Craft Terminal

NE

Abbreviations

Network Element

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

155

Abbreviations

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

NMS

Network Management System

NNI

Network to Network Interface

NTP

Network Time Protocol

NZ-DSF
OADM

Optical Add-Drop Multiplexer

OChP

Optical Channel Protection

ODF

Optical Distribution Frame

ODU

Optical channel Data Unit

OEM

Original Equipment Manufacturer

OLC

Optical Link Commissioning

OLR

Optical Line Repeater

OMN

Operating Manual

OMS

Optical Multiplex Section

ONN

Optical Network Node

ONN-I
ONN-I80
ONN-R

Optical Network Node - Interconnect


Optical Network Node - Interconnect 80 Channels
Optical Network Node - Reconfigurable

ONN-R2

Optical Network Node - Reconfigurable 2

ONN-RT

Optical Network Node - Reconfigurable/Tunable

ONN-R80
ONN-RT80

Optical Network Node - Reconfigurable 80 Channels


Optical Network Node - Reconfigurable/Tunable 80 Channels

ONN-S

Optical Network Node - Small

ONN-T

Optical Network Node - Terminal

ONN-T80
ONN-X
ONN-X80
OPEX
OPU
OS

156

Nonzero-dispersion-shifted Fiber

Optical Network Node - Terminal 80 Channels


Optical Network Node - Cross-Connect
Optical Network Node - Cross-Connect 80 Channels
Operational Expenditure
Optical channel Payload Unit
Operating System

OSA

Optical Spectrum Analyzer

OSC

Optical Supervisory Channel

OSNR

Optical Signal to Noise Ratio

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

OSU
OTDR

Optical Supervisory Unit


Optical Time Domain Reflectometer

OTH

Optical Transport Hierarchy

OTN

Optical Transport Network

OTS

Optical Transmission Section

OTU

Optical Transport Unit

PC

Personal Computer

PD

Product Description

PDP

Power Distribution Panel

PDU

Packet Data Unit

PHF

Power High Failure

PIU
PLC-WSS
PLF
PM

Plug In Unit
Planar Lightwave Circuit-Wavelength Selective Switch
Power Line Filter
Performance Management

PMD

Polarization Mode Dispersion

PMP

Performance Monitoring Points

PRBS

Pseudo Random Bit Sequence

PSCF

Pure Silica Core Fiber

PSU

Power Supply Unit

PXC

Photonic Cross-Connect

QoS

Quality of Service

RAM

Random Access Memory

ROADM

Abbreviations

Reconfigurable OADM

ROPA

Remote Optically Pumped Amplifier

RSVP

Resource Reservation Setup Protocol

S-FEC

Super Forward Error Correction

SAPI

Source Access Point Identifier

SBS

Stimulated Brillouin Scattering

SDH

Synchronous Digital Hierarchy

SEFS

Severely Errored Framing Seconds

SELV

Safety Extra Low Voltage

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

157

Abbreviations

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

SES

Severely Errored Seconds

SFP

Small Form-Factor Pluggable

SLC

Stratalight Communications

SNC/I

Sub-Network Connection protection with Inherent monitoring

SNCP

Sub-Network Connection Protection

SNMP

Simple Network Management Protocol

SON
SONET
SONF

Synchronous Optical NETwork


Standalone Optical Node Flatpack

SPC

Standard Power Control

SPM

Self Phase Modulation

SRS

Stimulated Raman Scattering

SSM

Solution Sales Management

SSMF

Standard Single Mode Fiber

STP

Spanning Tree Protocol

SU

System Unit (1 SU = 25 mm)

SW

Software

TCA

Threshold Crossing Alert

TCM

Tandem Connection Monitoring

TCP

Transmission Control Protocol

TDC

Tunable Dispersion Compensation

TDM

Time Division Multiplexing

TID

Target Identifier

TIF

Telemetry Interface

TIM

Trace Identifier Mismatch

TL1

Transaction Language 1

TMN
TNMS Core/CDM
TNMS CT
TP
TPID
TSMN

158

Standalone Optical Node

Telecommunication Management Network


Telecommunication Network Management System Core/Cross Domain Manager
Telecommunication Network Management System Craft Terminal
Termination Point
Tag Protocol Identifier
Troubleshooting Manual

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

Troubleshooting Manual (TSMN)

TTI
TTL
TW-C
UAS
UDCM
UDP
UL

Trail Trace Identifier


Time to Live
TrueWave Classic
Unavailable Seconds
Unidirectional Dispersion Compensation Module
Universal Datagram Protocol
Underwriters Laboratories

ULH

Ultra Long Haul

UMN

User Manual

UNI

User-to-Network Interface

UNI-P

User-to-Network Interface - Port based

UNI-S

User-to-Network Interface - Service based

USM

User-based Security Model

UTC

Universal Time Coordinated

VACM

View-based Access Control Model

VLAN

Virtual Local Area Network

VOA

Variable Optical Attenuator

WAN

Wide Area Network

WDM

Wavelength Division Multiplexing

WEEE
WSS

Abbreviations

Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment


Wavelength Selective Switch

XFP

10 Gbit/s Small Form-Factor Pluggable

XPM

Cross Phase Modulation

A42022-L5972-E071-02-7619
Issue: 2 Issue date: September 2010

159