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P436p

1865

SURGEON GENERAL'9^R0ic

LIBRARY.
No.

_____

>,

PHYSICIANS'

PRESCRIPTION BOOK:
CONTAINING

LISTS OF THE TERMS, PHRASES, CONTRACTIONS, AND ABBREVIATIONS, USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS, WITH EXPLANATORY NOTES J

THE GRAMMATICAL CONSTRUCTION OF PRESCRIPTIONS; RULES


FOR THE PRONUNCIATION OF PHARMACEUTICAL TERMS A
PROSODIACAL VOCABULARY OF THE NAMES OF DRUGS,
ETC.
AND A SERIES OF ABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS
ILLUSTRATING THE USE OF THE PRECEDING TERMS.
;

TO WHICH

IS

ADDED

KEY

PRESCRIPTIONS I^A
i

LITERAL TRANSLATIONFor the Use of Media d and Pharmaceutical Students

... Jty

JONATHAN PEREIRA,

>

M.D., F.R.S.

Ml

FOURTEENTH EDITION.

PHILADELPHIA:

LINDSAY AND BLAKISTON.


1865.

QV
]g&5

jo-

HENRY

B.

5W% -3

A8HMEAD, PRINTER,

Nos. 1102 and 1104 Sansoni St.

PREFACE
TO

THE FOUETEENTH EDITION.


In the preparation of the edition of

which

is

now

this

work

presented to the public, the matter

has been carefully revised, and such alterations

and additions made as were found


for the

By

continued fulfillment of

its

to be required

original objects.

the publication of the British Pharmacopoeia

certain changes have been effected, especially with

reference to weights and measures and the


of medicines, and these

changes
however,

it

was necessary

of this little

sent the prevailing

work

mode

names

and some other similar


to notice.
is

The

object,

not merely to repre-

of prescribing medicines

according to the instructions of Pharmacopoeias

which continue

in authority, but to explain

and

illustrate the use of

used or

may

terms which are commonly

be occasionally met with in extempo-

raneous prescriptions, and a knowledge of which


is

required alike by medical and pharmaceutical

students.

The

prescriptions

contained

in

the

second and third parts of the work are intended to


represent such as are met with in practice, and in

which old as well as modern names and other terms


are employed.

TABLE OF CONTENTS.

PART

I.

General Remarks on Prescriptions.

CHAPTER

I.
PAi

DEFINITIONS.
Prescription, Formula, Receipt or Recipe.
nents of Formulae,

CHAPTER

Compo-

II.

HISTORICAL NOTICE.
The Pentateuch.
len,

Sabur, the

Nicander, Scribonius Largus, GaBritish Pharmacopoeia,

first official

CHAPTER

III.

OF THE PARTS OF A PRESCRIPTION,

CHAPTER

IV.

LANGUAGE USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.


Customs of

different countries.

ing the Latin language,


1*

Reasons

for prefer-


CONTENTS.

VI

CHAPTER

V.

TERMS AND PHRASES EMPLOYED IN PRESCRIPTIONS:


PAGE.

1.
Terms relating to General Blood-letting.
Phlebotomy. Arteriotomy. Fainting. Instruments used for blood-letting,
.12

Sect.

Terms relating to Local Blood-letting.


Sect. 2.
Cupping, and apparatus for. Leeches, their application.

Scarification,

Sect.

3.

Terms relating

Sect.

4.

Terms

.18

Extraction of Teeth,
dec. Toothache.
Extraction of Teeth. Lancing
the gums. Tooth instruments,
.2.3
to

the

malagmata,
blisters,

relating to Plasters, &c.


Plasters,
pastilli,
cataplasms, epispastics,

25

Terms relating to Friction. &c. Friction,


Sect. 5.
inunction and dusting or besprinkling,
.

Terms relating
Sect. 6.
shaving, a razor,
Sect.

7.

Terms relaxing

ture, d-c.

Issues,

Sect.

Shaving, &c.

to Issues, Setons,

mode

28

Hairs,
31

Acupunc-

of production.

Acupuncture,

Seton needle.

......
to

Setons.
.

.32

Terms

relating to Electricity, &c.


Electricity, positive and negative.
Apparatus for
electrization,
diiferent modes of electrifying.
8.

Voltaic electricity. Electro-magnetism.


tro-puncture.
Magnetism,
.

Elec.

.35

Terms relating to Purging, d-c. Stools or


SECT. 9.
excrements, purging, constipation, to purge, to
bind the bowels. Clysters. Suppositories,
.

Sect. 10.

Terms

Vomiting,

Sweating,
Sneezing, dec. Vomiting, to promote it, to suppress it; infusion of emetics into the veins.
Sweating, to promote it, to suppress it. Sneezing, to excite it.
Diuresis, to promote it.
Carelating

to

42


CONTEXTS.
theters to

draw

mote them,

Yll

PAGE.
Menses, to pro-

.......

off

the urine.

Of Worms. Intestinal worms (and other


entozoa), to expel them,
Sect.
Terms relating Baths, Fomentations, &c.

47

Sect. 11.
12.

52

to

Baths, different kinds of; ancient baths, local


baths.

fumes.
Sect. 13.

Affusion.

Fomentation.

Aqueous vapors,

Washing. Dry

.53

Terms

relating to Doses.
Doses or portions.
Spoonfuls, cupfuls, glassfuls. Volume of
solid medicines.
Different modes of administer-

.......

58

Sect. 11.
Terms relating to Time. Months, weeks,
days, hours. Immediately, occasionally, <fec,

63

Sect. 15.
Terms relating to Parts of the Body. Head,
neck, body, chest, abdomen, extremities, &c,
.

70

relating to the Symptoms of Diseases.


Cough, pain, watchfulness, tenesmus,
fever, spasm, hiccup, &c,

75

ing medicines,

Sect. 16.

Terms

Terms relating to the Powers and Uses of


Sect. 17.
Remedies. To cure, to prevent relapses, to appease pain, to promote urine and the menses, to
correct acidity, to fumigate, to allay spasm, to
expel worms, to cauterize, Ac,
.79
.

Terms

General Therapeutics and


Pharmacology. Dr. Duncan's classification of
the general terms used by writers on general
therapeutics and pharmacology, with additions,

81

Terms relating to Food, &c. Food or aliment. Diet. Corn and its alimentary preparaDrinks broth, milk, spirit, wines, beer,
tions.
aqueous drinks,

87

Sect. 18.

used, in

Sect. 19.

Sect. 20.

Terms relating

to

Pharmaceutical Instru-

Thermometer, syringes, sponges, rods,


ments.
camel's hair pencils, funnels, bandages, splints,
trusses, boxes, gallipots, bottles, corks and bungs,
papers,

95


CONTENTS.

Vlll

Sect. 21.

FAGB.

Terms relating

to

Terms relating

to

Sect. 22.
tions,

Surgical Instruments,

99

.........
Pharmaceutical Opera-

CHAPTER

108

VI.

NOMENCLATURE EMPLOYED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.


and barbarous names. Origin of
the nomenclature now used in natural history and
chemistry. Advantages and disadvantages of the
modern pharmaceutical nomenclature. Germs of
101
a new nomenclature,

Scientific, classical,

......

CHAPTER

VII.

ABBREVIATIONS AND CONTRACTIONS USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.

Dangers arising from the use of abbreviations. List


of abbreviated names which refer to two or more
Directions for writing labels
Table of abbreviations used in pre-

dissimilar substances.
for medicines.

scriptions

.....

and pharmacy,

CHAPTER

107

VIII.

SYMBOLS OR SIGNS USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.


List of those in most frequent use.
Mistakes from
the similarity between the symbol for an ounce and
that for a drachm,
124

CHAPTER

IX.

ON THE GRAMMATICAL CONSTRUCTION OF PRESCRIPTIONS.


1.

Rules of Syntax.
"
"

Concords,

2.

Government,
Grammatical Explanation of Prescriptions,
.

129
132
136


CONTENTS.

IX

CHAPTER

X.
PAGE.

ON THE PRONUNCIATION" OF PHARMACEUTICAL


TERMS,
.143
.

.......

Sect. 1. Pronunciation of Letters.


Exceptions,

General rules

143

Pronunciation of Syllables: Accent. EnRules


glish mode of accenting Latin words.

Sect.

2.

148

usually followed,

Length or Quantity of Syllables or Vowels.


English scholars do not usually retain in all
cases the Greek and Latin quantities in pronouncing Greek and Latin words. General rules

Sect.

3.

commonly

followed,

......

PART

150

154

Prosodiacal Vocabulary,

II.

Prescriptions in an Abbreviated Form.

CHAPTER

I.

FOR BLOOD-LETTING,

CHAPTER

165

167

.169

.183

III.

FOR MIXTURES,

CHAPTER

II.

FOR BLISTERS,

CHAPTER

IV.

FOR DRAUGHTS,

CONTENTS.

CHAPTER
FOR POWDERS AND

V.
PILLS,

CHAPTER

200

202

VII.

FOR EXTERNAL APPLICATIONS,

PART

PAGE.
191

VI.

FOR LINCTUSES,

CHAPTER

III.

Abbreviated Prescriptions, with Translations.

CHAPTER

I.

FOR BLOOD-LETTING,

CHAPTER

.218

.222

.245

III.

IV.

FOR DRAUGHTS,

CHAPTER

FOR MIXTURES,

CHAPTER

II..

FOR BLISTERS,

CHAPTER

213

V.

FOR POWDERS AND PILLS,

258

CONTENTS.

CHAPTER

VI.
paoe.

FOR LINCTUSES,

CHAPTER

278

279

VII.

FOR EXTERNAL APPLICATIONS,


Index,

294

PART

I.

GENERAL REMARKS ON PRESCRIPTIONS.

CHAPTER

I.

DEFINITIONS.

In medicine the term 'prescription (prcescriptio,

from prce before, and scribo

I write

ordonnanee,

French; Verordnung, German; avaypafi/*)

is

usu-

ally applied to the written directions of a physician

or surgeon for the preparation and use of remedies.

The terms formula


form

(the diminutive of forma, a

formule, French; Vorschrift, Formel, Ger-

man) and receipt (recepta,-f recette, French Recept,


German), or recipe (from recipe, take thou), have
a more limited acceptation, and are applied to the
;

and use of

directions given for the preparation

pharmaceutical remedies or medicines.

physician prescribes blood-letting, bathing,

* Fcesius,
f

QCconomia Hippocratis.

R-.cejjta is

a barbarous term.

synonymous, tbough
1

still

Dufresne also mention*, as a

more barbarous word,

recetta.


DEFINITIONS.

2
exercise,

as medicines;

&c, as well

but he uses

formula' for the preparation of medicines only.

Formulae are of two kinds,


magistral, and officinal.

extemporaneous or

Extemporaneous formula'

[formula; magistrates) are so called because they


are constructed by the practitioner on the instant,

"ex tempore."

Officinal formulae

[formula

<

nales) are those published in pharmacopoeias, or

by some other authority.* Officinal preparations


presumed to be kept ready for use.
Formulae are either simple or compound. A

arc

simple formula [formula simplex) consists of only

one

officinal (either

tion.

simple or compound) prepara-

consists

compound formula [formula composita)


of two or more officinal preparations.

The principal medicine


(1) basis; that

of the basis
that

is

in a

formula

which promotes or
termed the

is

called the

assists the action

(2) auxiliary (adjuvans);

which corrects some objectionable quality

the other ingredients


(corrigens);

and

form

whole

to the

is

named

lastly, that
is

of

the (3) corrt

which gives a proper

denominated the

[constituent, excipiens, vol vehicula).

(4)

These four

parts of a formula are intended to accomplish the


object of Asclepiades

" curare

cilo,tuto etjucunde;"

* In Fiance, the term ordonnance is applied to


formula, and the term formule to an officinal one.

magistral

HISTORICAL NOTICE.
in other words,

quickly

to

enable the basis to cure

(2), safely (3),

and pleasantly

CHAPTER

(1),

(4).

II.

HISTORICAL NOTICE.

The most ancient


mentioned
of

in the

recipes on record are those

Pentateuch for the preparation

an odoriferous ointment and confection.* Their

date

is

1491 years b.c

About 2,000 years


tion

ago, formulae for the prepara-

of antidotes (uitiSotci, antidote)

or counter-

among

the Gi-eeks.f

poisons [antitoxica) were in use

Scribonius

Largus,

Roman

physician,

who

lived about the middle of the first century after

Christ, wrote a work entitled Compositiones Medicoe,


which contains nearly 300 medical formulae taken
from various authors. It is the oldest pharmacopoeia extant; but

its

style

Exodus xxx. 23-25 and

is

inelegant.

34-3">.

t Antidotes against the bite of poisonous animals were called


while those which acted against
treacles (dqpiaKa, theriaca)
as taken inwardly were termed alempharmics(aK^uj>apiJiaKa,
Phe most ei lebrated antidote of antiquity was
that called milhridate {ixi6piS6.Tnov, mithridatum), after MithriIt was modified
VI, King of Pontus (about B.C. 132-63).
by Andromachus, physician to Nero (a.d. 51-68), and was then
185
termed theriaca Andromachi Nicander (who flourished b
or 135) wrote two poems about poisons; one called Tjpiaxa, the
:

other termed

'A\et.<t>dpiJ.a.Ka..

OF THE PARTS OF A PRESCRIPTION.

Galen,

two

who lived a.d. 130200 or 201, wrote


On the composition of medicines, Uepl
containing a considerable num-

treatises

,<.>r,

ber of formulae for the preparation of compound


medicines.

Sabur, the son

of

Sahel

(Sabur Ibn

Sahel),

the director of the medical school of Ion<?isabur

(Nishapoor),

century

said to have published in the ninth

is

the

a.d.,

first

Karabadln, but which

The

first official

is

Arabic
not

now

dispensatory

or

extant.

British pharmacopoeia

was that

published by the Royal College of Physicians of

London,

a.d.,

Londinensis,

1618.
in

It

was

entitled

Pharmacol
et nova

qua Medicamenta antiqua

usitatissima collecta, opera Medicorum Collegii Londinensis, Lond., 1618.

lished in 1851.

It is

The last edition was pubnow superseded, as also arc

the Edinburgh and Dublin Pharmacopoeias, by the


British Pharmacopoeia of 1864.

CHAPTER

III.

OF THE PARTS OF A PRESCRIPTION.*

The

parts of a prescription or formula are the

heading, the designation of /he ingredients

is

to

be

* For further details on the subject of this chapter, the reader


referred to H. D. Gaubii Libellus de Methodo concinnandi

OF THE PARTS OF A PRESCRIPTION'.

and the

the directions to the compoundei\

used,

At the bottom

directions to (he patient.

of the pre-

scription are placed, on the left hand, the

and the date

the patient

name of

(in separate lines); and,

on the right hand, the signature of the prescriber.


In ancient times every prescription or formula
had, at

commencement,

its

certain characters, ab-

breviations, or sentences of a superstitious or pious

nature
(the

such as

first

and

(the sign of the cross)

last letters

and u

of the Greek alphabet,

Christ being designated the " Alpha and Omega,

the beginning and the ending," Rev.

[cum Deo)

i.

8); C. D.

J. D. (juvante Deo)-. L. D. (laus Deo)

N. D. (nomine Dei);

J.

J.

(juvante Jesu), &c.

These constituted the invocation

or, as it

was

called,

the inscription (inscriptio),

The heading (pr&positio). The symbol R,


word Rec. (Recipe, take thou), usually commences every formula:"- but in French
prescriptions the letter P., or the word Prenez (take
1.

or abbreviated

thou),

is

generally substituted.

Formulas Medicarnentorum. Lugd. Batav., 1739; ed. 3tia, 1767.


English translation of tliis work was published uuder the title
A Complete Extemporaneous! Dispensatory ; or, the Method of
\ounding, and Exhibiting Extemporaneous
Prescri

An

of

Medicines, 2d ed., 1742. See also Paris'* Pharmacoloyia, 9th ed.,


1843; and Phcebus's Handbuch der Arzneiverordnungslehre,
3tte
*

An-.
For some remarks on

this

symbol, see the chapter on Symbols.


1*

OF THE PARTS OF A PRESCRIPTION.

Designation of the ingredients

2.

(materi<v designatio).

consideration here:

Two

firstly,

a.

employed

the order in which the

ingredients are to be taken

mode

to be

points are worthy of

and secondly, the

of writing them.

With

respect to the order in which the in-

gredients are taken,


1.

2.

it

may

be observed that

Each ingredient should have


The basis should be placed

a distinct line.
first,

then the

auxiliary, afterwards the corrective,

and

lastly the vehicle.


/?.

With

mode

respect to the

of writing, the

fol-

lowing points should be kept in view


1. The writing should be plain and legible.
2. The orthography should be that
which

is

customary, "to avoid the sneering of an


apothecary or his man" (Gaubius).
3.

Abbreviations, though admissible, must be


cautiously used, to avoid the possibility

4.

Symbols or signs must be carefully made.


The ingredients should be designated by

of error.

5.

their Latin

names.

(In

barbarous Latin name


to the scientific
is

some cases the

is to

be preferred

Latin name,

when

there

a possibility of mistake on the part of

compounder.)

OF THE PARTS OF A PRESCRIPTION.


6.

The

quantities indicated should be express-

ed, if

by weight, in Troy grains and

dupois ounces and pounds

minims,

in

and

pints,

if

fluid-drachms,

now used

as

in

avoir-

by measure,
fluid-ounces,

the British

now

Pharmacopoeia.

The numbers

recommended

be stated in Arabic nu-

to

are

merals.

The direccompounder as to the


form, manner of preparation, and method of use,
constitute what Gaubius calls the subscription
They are always written in Latin
[subscripHo).
3.

The directions

to the

compounder.

tions to the apothecary or

for example, " misce ; fiat bolus."


4.

tute

The directions to the patient. These constiwhat Gaubius terms the signature [signatura).

This part of the prescription declares the

di

method, and time of administration: the proper


vehicle, regimen,

&c,

to the sick patient

as

times preceded by the letter


[i.e.

"let

it

far, at least, as relates

and his attendants.


S., or

It is

some-

the word Signetui

be entitled").

This part of the prescription

is

sometimes writ-

is

always written

ten in English (see p. 9).


5.

in

Tlie patient'* mi tin?.

This

English.
G.

The date.This is written in Latin, T

LANGUAGE USED

month

of the

is

IN

PRESCRIPTIONS.

generally put in

Roman

numerals,

and the year of the Christian era frequently in


common or Arabic figures: e, <j. " Novembris IV

1850."
7.

The sign-manual or signature.

usually sign their initials

(inly to

Physicians

a prescription,

when they prescribe for members of the


when it is etiquette for them to sign
names in full. Surgeons usually put their

except

royal family,
their

surname

at length, but only the initials of their

baptismal name.

CHAPTER

TV.

LANGUAGE USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.


In Great Britain, as well as in Germany,! prescriptions are usually written in the Latin language.
* By the Apothecaries' Act of 1815, it' is enacted tbat any petson nsing or exercising the art and mystery of an apothecary sha(j
refuse to compound, or deliberately or negligently, falsely, unfaithfully, fraudulently, or unduly make any medicines, compound medicines, or medii
isitiona "directed by any
prescription, order, or receipt, signed ;'///< Hi, initials, it] his own
handwriting," of any physician licensed to practice physic by the
President and commonalty of the Faculty of Physic in London,
or by either of the two Universities of Oxford or Cambridge, Mich
persons shall forfeit for the first offence
"Hence
10, and for the third offence shall forfeit his certificate or license
to practise as an apothecary
n-dnungslehre, 3tte
f See Phoebus's Handbuch da
--., Ausg. ler Th. S. 99.
!

LANGUAGE USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.

In France, and some other countries, the mother

tongue

is employed.
There are several reasons

Latin
tions,

preferring

for

the vernacular language

to

at least, for the

in

the

prescrip-

designation of the ingredi-

ents to be employed, and for the directions to the

compounder.

"If not spoken,

it

written

is

throughout the civilized world


be said of

and understood

and that cannot

any other language. An invalid travelmany parts of Europe might die before

ing through

a prescription written in English could be inter-

preted."*
concise

names

for

nearly so

names

Moreover, Latin professional terms are

and dehnite.

Furthermore,

the

Latin

drugs and chemicals are the same, or

all

over Europe

differ for

each province.

whereas the vernacular

each nation,
Lastly,

it

is

nay, sometimes for


sometimes necessary

or advisable to conceal from a patient the pri

nature of the remedies which are employed.

These reasons, however, do not equally apply

to

the use of the Latin language for writing the directions to the patient

for as these are intended for

the use of the patient or his attendant, and as,

sooner or

later,

he must have them

in English,

there does not appear any advantage to be gained


* Paris's Pharmacologics, 9th ed., p.

10:>,

1843.


LANGUAGE USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.

10

in practising a

them

temporary concealment by writing

On

dead language.

in a

the contrary, there

are several weighty objections to this practice,

such as the embarrassment which some prescribes feel in giving in good and intelligible Latin
;

the requisite directions for the patient; the imperfect or

limited acquaintance with the Latin lan-

guage possessed by many dispensers or compounders


of medicines and lastly, the difficulty, and in some
cases impossibility, of finding concise and intelli;

gible English

words which are the exact equivalents

of many Latin professional terinsf not unfrequently

used in prescriptions.

By throwing on

the com-

pounder the responsibility of expressing in appropriate language,

and

in the

brief compass of a

exact intentions of the prescriber, in a

label, the

language which the latter did not use,

ment the

we

and mistakes

risk of errors

greatly

In writing Latin prescriptions, the student should


* I once heard an eminent hospital surgeon confess his inability
n Latin the directions to
he patient.
.fauces externa, jugut For example, larynx,
lum. abdonu a. hypogastrium, kypochoadrium pi rvigilium, acccsatv
&c.
Many Latin terms iii frequent use are
vague and ambiguous; as pro re nata, urgente dolore, urgente
lussi, &c
he apothecary of Eei
Queen Charlotte, consort of Qeorge III, was on
d much embarrassed how
to translate into intelligible and decent English the phrase "urgente
borborygmo," which occurred in a prescription written by the
I

Francis Millman.
+ On this subject, see some pertineut observations by Mr. Donovan, iu the London Medical Gazette for Sept. 1, 1S4S.

late Sir

LANGUAGE USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.


endeavor
est

to imitate the style of Celsus,

and almost only authority

11

"our great-

in every thing relat-

ing to medical Latinity." for no physician would

think of writing a prescription in English terms


derived from Shakspeare, Milton; Johnson, Scott,
or

Byron

nor a prescription in Latin terms drawn

from the works of Roman poets or historians. The


correct use of medical terms can only he obtained
in the

works of standard medical authors.

All the Medical Colleges formerly published


their pharmacopoeias in the Latin language.

But

the French Codex,* and the American, f Greek,!

Edinburgh,! and Dublin

many

||

pharmacopoeias have for

years been printed in the vernacular lan-

guage, and the British Pharmacopoeia, which has

superseded the two

last

named,

is

published in

English.

There

is

acountry
*

an obvious advantage

in

having

to the natives of

pharmacopoeia

in their

mother

Codex Pharmacopie Francaise redigiepar ordre du Gouvernc-

mentpar une Commission composee


la Faculte" dr
Paris. Paris,

Midecim

et

de VEcole

de

MM.

spe'ciale

lei Professi

de Pharmacit

dt

1--:;;

f The Pharmacopoeia of the United States of America. By authority of the National Medical Convention held at Washington.
8vo.
J YLkkr)viK7) bapnaKonoua. "Ev 'Atfrji/is, 1S37. Pharmacopeia
Athenis, s 37
Grccca.
I

The Pharmacopoeia of the Royal College of Physicians of


Edinburgh. Edinburgh, 1841. 12mo
The Pharmacopoeia of the King and Queen's College of Physicians in Ireland, Ml) CCC.L.
||


12 TERMS

tongue

AMI PHRASES USED

IN'

PRESCRIPTIONS.

but, for the use of foreigners, the Latin

language would be more convenient. Hence, in


Mime countries, as Greece, the pharmacopoeia is
published both in Latin and the vernacular lan-

guage.

In the Pharmacopoeia

of America

for

of the United States


was adopted; but

1831, this plan

work published

and

in

the edition of this

in

subsequent editions, the English language has

in 1842,

been exclusively employed.

CHAPTER

V.

TERMS AND PHRASES EMPLOYED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.


Sect. 1.
De sanguinis
sione* generali.\

'Sanguis, Gees.
i

mis-

Of

General Bloodletting.

Cruorj Cels. ^lood

Grumus.

s e

(in
s.)

the ves2

'

o r e

* On the chrouology and literature of blood-letting, coi


u r Chronologie unci Literalur m bat inem Systemder
Ann den vorzuglichsten Woken geschopfi
Blvtentziehungen.
run Dr. Carl 1'ricd Nopitsch. Nurnberg, is:;;;.
plied to bloodf The propriety of this and all similai
letting, notwithstanding the opinion of Dr. Gregory, that ''.Sanguinis uiissi,, nou inepte vooator geueralis," when it is intended
that its effeel
general, 1 must consider to be very quesi

They seein to signify that a man is to lie pricki


tionable
over, fur the. purpose of drawing blood IV m him, rather than anything relative to the effects of bleeding
Hard Svt>8<
% Occasionally the word cruor is met with in prescriptions in-

differ in respect to the state in


I"

it

ins

agree

which

as circulating through the veins,

in

denoting blood, but


is.
The est refers
to the ex-

that fluid

and ministering

li

OF GENERAL BLOOD-LETTING.
(

blood

13

from

wound or ulcer).
Grume (a clot,

as of blood.)

Sanguinis

missio,

detractio, Blood-letting.

Cels*
Sanguinem 1

2
mittere,
detra3
extrahere, Cels. :
here,
5
4
emittere, Pliny
elicere,

To

let

blood (Ho

or send, -detract or abstract,


'extract, 4 let out
Cic.
or emit, 5 to elicit
or draw out).
Sanguinem amittere, perdere. To lose blood.
Sanguinem supprimere, Cel- To staunch or stop
blood.
To supsus;-sistere, cohibere, Pliny.
press
haemorlet

Sanguinem

incisa vena mittere,

Cels.
Phlebotomia,t

rhage.
let blood by an

To

incised vein.

phlebotomice,

'Phlebotomy.

It is applied also to that which is allowed


istence of animal life.
by a surgical operation. Cruor differs from sanguis in
never denoting blood confined and circulating in the veins, but
such as is shed, and no longer subservient to the support of ani-

to flow

mal life; in other words gore. The same fluid which, in coming
from the vein, is called sanguis (blood), is afterwards denominated
cruor (gore).
Thus Celsus applies the word ctmoc to the blood discharged from
the bowels in dysentery, from the kidneys in injuries of these
glands, from ulcers in the ears, &c.
* De remedial, lib. ii. cap 10.
'I>Ae/3o5, the genitive ease of <I>Ae'i|/, a vein,
f 4iAf/3oTOfita from
aud tcmcw, I cut. The student will observe that Celsus nejer
employs the term ptlleboiomia, nor any of its derivatives. Cic9ro
has "incidere venam.quod medici phlebotomare dicunt." Phlebotomy was first practised by Podalirius, B.c.llS-t. (Le Clerc,
Hist dela Med. liv. i. ch. IS.) The operation is said to have been
learned from the hippopotamus. "For he finding himself overgrosse and fat, by reason of his high feeding so continually, get-

AM) 1TIRASES USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS'.

14 TERMS

Aursr.i..

Venaesectio

venae

Yenesection.

inrisio.

'Phlebotomiamadhibere;
botomare, Aurel.

-PIilc

^o

use phleboto-

my;

to

phleboto-

mize.

Venam

Cels.

incidere,

pertundre,
Juv.
Becare.
Virg.
;

To cut into a vein

*Venam

cultello solvere, Oic.

perforate a
vein;
'tOWOUnd
or cut a vein.
*To open a vein

ferire,

Venas

sanguine exonerare.

to

by a

knife.

To

unload the veins


of blood.

'Sanguinem, incisa arteria,


tere,
3

Cels.

To let blood

niit-

Arteriotomia.*
2

by an

incised artery.

-Arteriotomy.
Let the section
of the temporal
artery be made.
'Sanguinem mitterc ox bra- J To take blood from
2
2
from
cliio,
juxta
talum,
ex
the arm,
Fiat

sectio

arterise

tempo-

ralis.

(lie water to the shore, having espied afore where the


ud rushes have been newly cut and where he seeth the
sharpest cane and best pointed, liee setteth his body hard to it,
for to prick a certaine veine in one of his legges, and thus by letting himselfebloud.maketh evacuation, whereby his bodie, otherwiseencliuiug to diseases and maladies, is well eased of the superfluous humor : and when he hath thus done, he stoppeth the orifice
again with mud, and so stancheth the bloud, and healeth up the
wound.'' (Pliny, The Hiatorie of the World. Translated by P.

tiug forth of

Holland, M.D.

Book

viii.

ch. 26.)

* From dpTTjpc'a, an artery, and re'/urio, 1 cut. The ancients did


not understand the use of the arteries and veins. Cicero says,
;uis per venas in omne corpus diffunditur, et spiritus per
arterias " Aretaeus, who lived in the first century after Christ, is
the earliest surgeon known to have practised this operation. Celsus (lib. ii. cap 1Q) speaks of " arteria incisa '' as an accident
which may attend the operation of phlebotomy.

OF GENERAL BLOOD-LETTING.

utroque crure, Cels.*


'Si

both

vires aegri patiuntur; 2 si


3
vires sinunt. Cels.
Permit-

animi,

Cels.

Lei-

pothymia:f deliquium animi.


Syneope.J

near

legs

the ankle.
the patient's
strength allows

tentibus viribis, Aurel.

Defeetio

1")

t;

-i

li

strength suffers
3
it.- The strength
permitting.
fainting fit or

swoon.

* Phlebotomy is practised in various parts of the body as,


1st. In the arm : this is the part usually selected for the operaphlebotomy. At the bend of the arm there arc four veins
the Vena basilica, V. cephalica, V. basilica mediana and V cephalica mediana, any one of which may he opened oue of the
two latter, however, is commonly selected. In the forearm, where
the operation is occasionally performed, there are three veins; the
V. mediana major, the V. cubitalis interna, and the V. radialis
externa, any one of which may be opened
2dly. In the hand: occasionally, in fat subjects, this part is
chosen. The operation may be performed in the I". salvatella
(salvatella quasi sa/vator being opened as a sovereign remedy in
melancholia), running from the little linger, or in the V. cephalica
;

tion of

pollicis.

3dly. In the foot: in France, the operation is very frequently


performed in this part ; it may be done in the V. saphena for
saphena) externa (or s. minor), or in the V. saphena interna (or
s. major).
4thly. In the neck: it may be done in the V. jugular-is externa
5thly. In the penis: it may be done in the V. dorsalis penis.

And
6thly. In the tongue: in the V.ranina.
This locality is now
rarely selected.
t Leipotliymia (Aet7rofli/|in'a, from AeiVw, deficio, I leave: and
flujuo;, animus, the mind) is considered by Ctclius Aurelianus
(Acut. Morb. lib. i. cap. 10) to be synonymous with def
Syncope i- a more violent and dangerous form of this affection
(vide Castelli, Lean
vm).
"The leipothymia of Sanvages," says Dr. M. Good, "is only syncope in its first attack or
mildest degree "
from crvyKonTui, concido, to fell or cut
J Syncope (o-vyico7rj
;


1G TERMS

AND PHRASES USED

IN PRESCRIPTIONS.

Usque ad animi defectum, Until


Aurel. Usque ut liquerit

fainting.

animus.

Semperque ante

quam

est.

finis

faciendus

anima

An
to

deficit,

end

is always
be put to it

fainting

before
occurs.

Cels.
'Collocare in lecto,
mint,
'supinus,*
4
ereetus.f

2
ut dorCels.:

put to bed, that the patient

^l'o
2

may

go

to sleep,

"supine
laid on the back),

(i.

e.

*erect.

'Bene largo canali,t Cels.


Pleno rivo.$ 2 Ex largo vul-

In a full stream.
2
From
wound

nere.
Scalpeilus,||

Cels.

Phlebo-

large

[i. e.

in-

cision or orifice].
scalpel or lancet;

is of the feminine gender, and is thus declined: N. Syncope, G. Syncofies, D. Syncope, Ace. Syncopen, V. Syiicojtc, Abl.

down)

Sym

"\"
* Patients are bled, while in the recumbent posture, to avoid
The. practice of bleeding them to fainting in this posture, as recommended by Mr. Wardrop, is highly dangerous.
Marshall
Hall {Introd. Led. to a Course of Lectures on
f Dr.
the Practice of Physic, p. 36) employs blood-letting as a source
of diagnosis. He places the patient upright and looking upwards,
,

syncope.

to incipient syncope
"in inflammation, much blood
"
n ow^ in irritation, very little
J This phrase is applied by Celsus (lib. i. cap 4) to a stream of
water.
Rivus is usually translated " a river ;" but it means lit
" Pliny
"a stream," e. ff. " Si
bl
(Hist. Nut. lib. xi.cap SS, ed. Valp.) calls the veins "sanguinis
'
Virgil (jEn. lib. ix. v. 455) has
rivi."
plcnos spi
guine -i
Celsus (lib ii. cap. 10) employs the word scalpellus to designate the instrument used in phlebotomizing: "Atsitimidi
pellus demittitur, summam cutein lacerat, neque venam iucidit."

and bleeds

||

OF GENERAL BLOOD-LETTING.

tomum

vel

phlebotomon,*

Lanceola; lancetta.
Cels.

an instrument

Aurel.
'Fascia;

-'fascia lintea,

17

fillet,

roller, or

band a g e
Ligatura.

Penicillum {vel. penicillus),


2
Cels.
Deligandumque brachiumsuperimposito espresso
ex aqua frigida penicillo,f

to

blood with.

let
l

2
;

linen bandage.
ligature.
tent or pledget.

A
A

The arm
2

is to

be bound up, and


a pledget wrung
Cels.
out of cold water
placed on it.
Incidatur vena sic ut ne san- Let a vein be cut
guis effluens lambatj cutem,
into, so that the
verum recte libereque problood which
siliat.
flows out may
not trickle (or
flow) down tho
skin, but gush
out directly and
freely.

(Armamentarium Ckirurgicum, p. 49, Lugd. Batavonun, *;r)3) describes the laacet thus: Sxalpellus rectus est et ex
atraque ineidens lanceola d ictus."

Scultetus
1

Phlebotomum

(</>Ae/3oro|U.oi', the neuter singular of $Ae/3oTd(xos,


a ui ineidens, that opens a vein) includes both the phleme
veterinary surgery, and the lancet.
| In this sentence Celsus (lib ii. cap. 10) obviously
word penicillus to signify a pledget; but uu some occc
employs it to indicate a teat introduced into a wound to keep it
open, as in the following " Exigua penicilla interponenda " lib.

ii

vii.

cap

7).

| Lambere signifies to lap. to lick as a (log does; and, figuratively, to run or flow (jenlhj by, as iu the following from Horace
(i.

carm. xxii.

7)

vel qua; loca fabulosus


'

Lambit Hydaspes,
whtch the fabulous Hydaspes

or the countries through

[or

Hows gently]."
2*

glides

AM) PHRASES ISED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.

18 TERMS
^'1.5

tantuni,

saltern.*

To

ounces only,
at least.

Sect.

2. De

sanguinis

mis-

Of

Local

stone locali.

Cels.; *CucurAurel. Cucurbita venJuv.J Cucurbita medi-

'Cucurbitula.f
I'ita,

tosa,

Pliny.

cinalis,
(

Blood-

letting.

lucurbitula sineferro.g

Cels.

cucurbital or
cupping-glass;
2
a cucurbit or
cupping-glass.
The cucurbital

Cucurbitae Ieves,|| Aurel.


Cucurbitula sine scarificatione,cucurbita sicca.

(cupping-glass)

without
scarificator

the
(/. c.

dry cupping, or
cupping without
,~

scarification).

Lucurbitae

Aurel.

cum
2

scarificatione,

Cucurbitula

!The cucurbits

cru-

enta; 'cucurbitula cum ferro.


T
lp.r,
least)

Ud

[i.e.

cupping-glasses]

with

scarifica-

Rh0Uld b careful not t0 confound saltern


?
l'
,f saltim

with
or per saltum (by leaps).
!t

ltU ' a

u,

(at

" rbital

r cupping-glass, is a diminutive
and was so called ou account of its shape,
e,M I ,lo ypd to indicate the cucurbit used in cupninj t '!
"'" rh ""l" is
applied to small cucurbits
e.
f'lut-hu
Th :- esse s were formerly made of brass (..r (i
cop7
}
Dd of horn (Oelsus,
lib. ii. cap. U), and to these it
is obvious
'
Pp,Dg ffteM 1S not aPP'icable. Hippocrates employed
nf , ,;ru7-i
r,u. ,,V

',

"""'

',

^ ^
'*;,

eupS

the windy
vcVoiZ^l" ^^("te^ly,
he adjunct is a term USI

ffi

'

cucurbit), or simply
-' b * s
e writ*" to
Others U a Castelli iu
dry cu P ping.J[ass
;ll ~" "'"''
of

ft. cupping-glass
indicate the
generally.
.con Medivum) limit it to the
i

,fle

irL
vron.As
rSth?5Si
tne cupping

"Lrimnt

JmS?52

ff?fii2

r
!'

'

'

ir<m

""

scarificator.
li Pla ly

'

'

'

*"<*

'W

' nlh * mild cucurbits.


*J
<**Jnwf,
quasGrad oC*aS vacant,
!

'

(Cl. Aurel.

^.^o^lVi,

OF LOCAL BLOOD-LETTIXG.
tion

19
2
;

the bloody

cupping
3

the

glass

glass';

cuppingwith the

scarificator,

Cucurbitae arentes
cataB,*

atque

sic-

Aurel.

Parched and dried


cupping-glasses,
( cupping-glasses
affixed by means
of flame as distinguished from
those affixed by

means

of

hot

water).

Cucurbitulas

^dmovere,

commodare,
figere, Cels.

ponere,
8

imponere

adhibere,

;6infigere,

affigere,
9
;

ac-

deap-

Aurel

applicare.|

To apply cuppingglasses (Ho move


to,

to

put to or
3
tohave

to adapt,

near or to make
use of, 4 to fix or
fasten on,

to fix

* Areutes et siccas cucurbitulas dicit, qua; admoventur


cum
llamma. Iuterduin enim cum aqua calida apponebatur, quemadscripsit Albucasis cap.
De usu cucurbitularum." (C*l

modum

Aurel. ed supra, cit. p 31, foot-note by Dr. J. C. Amman


)
t Applicare (plicare ad), to lay one thing to or near another.
Admot-i ii (movere ad), to move towards, to approach. Applicare
Bcalas minis, Liv., to set ladders against the walls.
Admovere
would only signify to bring them near the loalls (Dumesnil). Dr.
Fletcher, iu his Horce Subsecivee, says "the word applicare, to
signify the external use of medicines", should be altogether banished
is always improper."
ii
It certainly is not employed in
this sense by classical medical authors. Pliny (lib. xxx cap. 21,
ed. Valp.) uses the veil, applico to siguify'the application oi
whelps to the stomach. "Si catuli, priusquam videant, appli\r triduo stomacho maxime ac pectori," &c.
"If whelps
before they can see, be applied to the stomach, and especially to
the breast, for three days,'' &c.
:

20 TERMS AND PHRASES USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.


nr fasten in,
put or set to,
fix
8

t"u

to

6
7

to
to

upon, to affix,
put or lay on,
apply).

Cucurbatio, Aurel.
Cupping.
Cucurbitare.
To cup.
Cucurbitulas
accommodare, To apply cuppingin
cute
concisa],
glasses, the skin
Cels.
being cut.
Infra prsecordia quatuor digi- Tlic cupping-glass
tis cucurbitula utendum est,
is to be used four
(

Si

'els.

fingers belowthe
prsecordia.

veroetiam vehementius dolor But if yet [or notcrevit, admovendae


cerviciwithstanding]
bus cucurfeitulae sunt, sic ut
the
has
pain
cutis incidatur, Cels.

grown

[or

)>e-

come]

more

in-

tense,

cupping-

glasses are to

lie

applied to the
neck, so that the
skin may be cut.
Confugiendumque ad cucurbi- And recourse must
tulas est ante summa cute
be had to the
incisa, Cels.
cupping-glasses,
the skin being
previously cut.
..
c
N dolor discussa
non est qua If the pain" is not
dolet, cucurbitulas sine ferro
removed to an*
defigere, Cels.
ply the cupping.

without

the

scarificator

(/. e.

to

use dry

OF LOCAL BLOOD-LETTINtl.

Cucurbitula quoque recte sub-

mento

et circa fauces

admo-

vetur, ut id, quod strangulat,


evocet, Cei.s.

21

cupping) to the
part affected.
cupping-glass is
also properly applied below the
chin and about
the fauces, that
it may draw out
that which suffo-

cates.

Explicita scarification e, rursum Scarification havcucurbitas imponimus, ut


ing been effected,
sanguinis detractio fiat, Auwe again apply
REL.
cupping-glass^.
that the drawing
away of blood

may
Hirudo,

Plinv; sanguisuga,*

Cels.

be

accom-

plished.
leech or bloodsucker.

* Themison, the founder of the Methodic

D. 63, is
h

Sect, and who lived


the earliest writer in whose works we fiud mention ol
as a therapeutic agent. The Greeks called it /SSe'-Ua,

from (ISdAAix), to suck. The Romans termed it sanguisuga (i. e.


bloodsucker) or hirudo. Celsus (lib. v. cap. 27) mentions the
animal once only, and then calls It sanguisuga. Pliny (Hist.
Nat. viii. 10, ed Valp.) speaking of elephants, says "Cruciatum
in potu maximum sentiunt, haustu hirudine, quam sanguisugam
vulgo ccepisse appellarl adverto." "They [i. e. elephaDts] exgreat agony from swallowing, in the act of drinking, a
leech (hirudo), which I observe has begun to be commonly termed
a bloodsucker (sanguisuga)."
Several sorts of leeches are Bold
in the shops for medicinal use.
The most esteemed is that called
the true English or speckled leech, whose belly is spotted with
black. A less esteemed sorl is the green leech, whose belly is
usually unspotted. These two sorts are. by some naturalists,
considered to he distinct species; the former being termed Sanand the latter. Sani
guisuga (or Hirudo)
But Moxain-Tandon (Monographit de
(or Hirudo) officinalis.

22 TERMS AND PHRASES USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.

Sanguisuction

Sanguisugium, Callisen.*

or

(The

leeching.
extraction

of

from the
vescutaneous
sels by the sucblood

tion 01 leeches.)

To apply leeches.
Hirudines apponere, A.tjrel.
admovere, accommodare, ad;

hibere, defigere, affigere, im-

ponere
1S

[set

Cucurbitula,

p.

1-

'Levibusplagisfincidere, Cels., 'To make superincisions,


ficial
ire. 2 Scarificare, Atjrel.
2

Si

per haec

ultlmum

parum

proficitur,

incidere satis
altis plagis sub ipsis maxillis
supra collum, et in pallato
eirca uvam, vel eas venas quae
ut per ea
Bub lingua sunt
est,

morbus

vulnera
Cels.

erumpat,

to scarify.

from

these

things but

little

If

good
last

to

the

arise,
[rented;/]

make

is

suffi-

ciently deep in-

under the
jaws above the
neck, and in the
cisions

palate about the


lafamilie des Hirudin, <>$, 1846) regards them as varieties of the
same species, which he calls Hirudo medicinalis.
The Hamojiin sanguisuga, Moq -Tand., or horse-leech, was
y dreaded oo account of the Bupposed dangerous wounds
which it was said id make. but it appears from the reports of
MM. Huzanl fits and Pelletier, confirmed by those of M. MoquinTandon, that though it sucks the blood, and punctures the in neons
;

membranes

cannol perforate the Bkin of vertebrate animals.


to the Arliculata of Cuvier, cl
of the same naturalist.
gic Hodv rna, p. 100, Hafn. 1815.
used by Celsus to siguify an incision,

it

Leechc- belong

Abranchidra
t

Plaga

is

OF THE EXTRACTION, ETC. OF TEETH.


uvula,

23

or

those

into

veins

which

are

be-

neath the tongue;


that the disease
may discharge

by these wounds.

Ferrum*CELS. Searificatorium
(est vel .simplex, seu unus cul-

scarificator

(it is

either
simple,
consisting of one
cutting
instru-

tellus, i.e. lanceola chirurgica; vel compositum e pluribus cultellis capsula comprehensis constans, i. e. machina

mon

scarificatoria).

compound,

ment,asthecomlancet; or
con-

many

taiuing

one
cutters in
case, as the cup-

ping

scarifi-

cator).

Partem morsam excidere.

To cut out

the bit-

ten part.

Sect.

o.

dentium

!>'

s:Oit<'.

Dolor

dentium,

(I

evul-

&c, of

Cees.

Extinction,

Of the

'

Teeth.

Odon- Toothache.

talgia.

Dentes 'eximere, -evcllere, 3 ex- To extract (Ho take


out of; 2 tO pluck
cipere, Cels. 4 extrahere, 5 ex;

out;

pel ere.

Dentium

co

to

take out;

draw out

evulsio, &c.

teeth
drawing).
* See foot-note * at

5
;

ex pel) teeth.
The extraction

p.

13

to

of

(tooth-

24 TERMS AND PHRASES USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.


'Gingivas incidere, Cels. ; 2gin- *To cut
gums
givas levibus plagis secare.

into

the

to

make

superficial

inci-

sions in the gums


(/. e. to lance ths

gums).
exesus est, foramen If the tooth he (lecayed, the cavity
vel linamento, vel bene acis to be filled up
commodate plumbo [reZauro]
replendum est, Cels.
either with lint,
or
lead
well
adapted to it [or
with gold].
Si vero exesus est dens, festi- If the tooth be denarc ad oxiinendum emu, nisi
cayed, it is not
res co'egit, non est necesse,
necessary to be
Cels.
hasty in extracting it, unless cir-

Si

[ilcns]

cumstances

mand

de-

it.

Instrumenta dentaria.

Teeth instruments
[i.e. instruments
for operation on

Clavis dentaria [anglicana].

The

the teeth).

[English]

tooth-key instru-

Dentiducum, Aurel.

Dentar-

paga, 'Odovraypa.
Forfex, Cels.

"Forceps
'-'forceps

dentaria communis;
ad dentes expellen-

dos 'forceps cum rostfn corvino [vel 4 ro8tro psittacino,


:

vel

rostro vulturino, vel 6 ros-

ment.
instrument for

An

drawing

teeth.

Forceps.

'Common

tooth

forceps ; 2 fori
for
d r a w n g
teeth;
'crow'sbill forceps (or
i

OF PLASTERS, ETC.
tro gruino),

25

Scultetus.

parrot's-bill,

or

vulture's-bill, or

crane's-bill forceps).

'Vectis;

vectis trifidus, Scult.

^he

lever;

the

trifid lever.

Martial; A

Pentiscalpium,
Scult.

Mar-

toothpick,

TIAL;

also,

gum-lancet,
Scult.
Sect.

4. Be

tmplastris,

dec.

Empla'strum

Of Plasters,

Emplastrum,* Cels.

&c.

plaster.

Let a plaster be
made.
Emplastrum imponere, adhi- To apply a plaster,
bere, injicere, Cels.; apponere, Aurel. admovere, ap~
fiat.

plicare.f

Superponi emplastris, Pliny.

To be applied on
plasters.

Aluta.
Linteum; linteolum. leather. 2 Linen
3
Linteumcarptum; linamenta small piece of
5
3
um. 4 Stupa.
Gossypium.
linen.
Scraped
;

Pannum

7
;

pannum

linteum;

linen;

lint.

* Celsns (lib. v. cap. 17) points out the circumstances which


distinguish emplaslra from malagmata and pastilli (called by the
Greeks rpoxio-icovs). Malagmata were soft vegetable compounds,
analogous to our cataplasms, applied to the unbroken skin. Pastilli and emplastra contained some metallic ingredient, and were
applied to -.rounds. The former (pastilli) consisted of dry substances united by some non-oleaginous liquid, and were used
either by friction or with some soft ingredient.
The latter (emplastra) contained fusible ingredients, and were simply applied
to the part.

t See note *,
3

p. 19.

20 TERMS AND PHRASES USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.


8

pannum cannabinum ^annum gossypinum; l0pannum

laneum.

"Sericum;

*Tow.

taffeta.

cloth

Cotton.

"Cloth;

cloth

cotton

l0
;

woolen

cloth.

"Silk;

taffeta

(a

fine,
glossy,

smooth,

Emplastrum

linen

'hempen

cloth;

silky tissve).

To spread

illinere.

;i

plas-

ter.

In alutam extendendum indu- To be spread


upon

cendum.
Emplastrum in linteolo superimponendum, Gels.

'Emplastrum ad exemplar (vel


ad normam);* 2 hujus magnitudinis.

leather.

plaster [spread]

on a small piece

of linen

is

put over

[it],

be

plaster to pat2
tern
of this
;

size.

'Magnitude)
hujus
chartse
2
semi-coronse nummi.

'The size of this


paper; 2ofa half-

crown
Pollex Iatus

to

pollicaris latitudo.

Renovere emplastrum.

piece.

A thumb's breadth
To renew the plaster.

Emplastra
Cels.

ad

extrahendum, Plasters

epispastica

(&r-

for

draw-

ing; epispaslics.

OTraGTind) .f

n
acc ord,n '" "a^. custom, or
in
p
t
wnat ,V
the anc
T
epispastica were such external
applications as only reddened the
skin, and, a,,nli, '., uV


OF

2
Tela vesicasericum
vesicans
{French Codex); taffeta vesi-

'Vesicatorium.
toria ;*

27

PLASTERS, ETC.
J

vesicatory

or

blister.f

tering

tissue

4
paunus vesicatocatoria;
rius 6 charta vesicatoria.

[cloth]

^Blis-

blister-

ing taffeta; ''blistering


cloth;
blistering
pa-

per.

To

Vesicare; quod vesicat.

raise a blister
that which raises
;

a blister

[i. e.

vesicatory].

Until vesication is

Usque ad vesicationem.

produced.
Cicatricem inducere, perducere. To promote [the
formation of] a
Cels.
cicatrix.

Ulcus diuturnum, Cels.

long-continued
ulcer [as the socalled perpetual
blister].

Fluxum

To

elicere.

Nutrire ulcus, Cels.


Curare vulnus, Cels.
Resolvere vulnus, Cels.;

re-

promote the
discharge.
To dress an ulcer.
To heal a wound.
1
Toopeu the ulcer;
2

solvere fascias.

to

open the

dressings.

* This term is applied to both cloth and paper covered with a


thepapier
preparation of oantharidin It comprehends, therefore,
('n/.yjasli'/ui and taffetas vesicant of the French.
(e g.
substance
vesicating
both
a
The word blister signifies
bulla).
emplastrum cantharidis) and a vesieleorbU b (vesicula vel
prescription
a
oi
writer
the
led
This circumstance, it is presumed,
:-"Applicetur emplastrum
to commit the following gross blunder
ue
usu cerati sabinee
Iyttse thoraci.el servetur apertum
<J
*f
lyttce !
""
What is to he kept open ? Answer The emplastrum
I

28 TERMS AND PHRASES USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.


Nutri partem exulceratam un- Dress the ulcerguento sabinse, ut ulcus diuated part with
turnum fiat.
savine ointment,
thai a long-continued ulcer [i.
e. perpetual blis-

may

ter]

Promovere

detractionem
moris nati ah vesicatorio.

the
discharge offluid
produced by the
vesicatory.

2
ulcus,
Inspergere
soper
Cels. 'super emplastrum.
;

be

made.
hu- To
promote

To sprinkle or caBt
Upon;

ulcer,

OSOn

or

all

"ii

plaster.

Insperge

pulverem

antimonii Sprinkle the powder of the potas-

potassio-tartratis super emplastruiii piois in alutam ex-

sii

tensum.

antimony [emetic

of

.-tartrate

tartar] on
the
plaster of pitch

spread

on

leather.

dictum
im
{French (
Sect.
l

5.

Fricate,

anglicum E nglis h

Dejrictione, &c.
Cic.

court

plaster.

*perfricare,

Of
x

Friction, &c.

To rub;

to

rub

over; 3 to rub
in or upon.
Fricetur corpus lana, manibus, Lot the body be
Cels.; infrico, Pliny.

all

vel strigile.

ru bbed

with

flannel, with the

29

OF FRICTIONS, ETC.

hands, or with a

Caput unguento

flesh-brush.
the head

To rub

fricare, Cic.

with ointment.
Perfricare vehementer, leniter,
Cels.

To rub

Non

It is

alienum

extremas

est

partes oleo et sulphure perfricare, Cels.

not amiss to
rub the extremities with oil and

sulphur.
violent,
Friction
gentle, 3 plentilonga,
2 lenis,

'vehemens,
4modica,
multa,
Cels.

Frictio

ful,
6

Cinerem

Infrictionem
bere, Cels.

HJngere
gere

ei

4 moderate,

long.

To rub
membro adhi- To use

infricare,

violently,

gently.

Plixy.

in the ash.
friction to

that limb.
[as

3
perun- 'To rub
inungere
o i n t in
superinungere, Cels.
2

n t]

an
to

anoint;

o
anoint or rub
3
to
in or upon
anoint or rub all
t

over.

Cerato liquido primum cervi- First rub the neck


over with liquid
cem perungere, Cels.
cerate.

Post unctionem
iLinere;

ci-bo uti,

illinere

3
:

Cels.

delincre

*superillinere, Cels.

After unction to
take food.
'To besmear [with
something thick],
2
to spread in or

upon

3
;

rub

to

over with
spread upon.
;

to

30 TERMS AND PHRASES USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.


Lasere linguam ipsam linere,
Cels.

To

besmear

to

g u e

tl

the
itself

with Laser [Assqfoztida?].

Idque in linteolum

illinere, et

fronti agglutinare, Cels.

And

to

spread this

on

a
linen,

piece

of

and apply

ittothr forehead.

Delinendus homo est vel gypso, The patient is to


vel argenti spuma, Cels.
be rubbed over
with gypsum or
litharge.

Idque

intus est, digito ill I


nendum si extra, Buper-illituin panniculo imponendum
si

est,

Ckls.

And,

if

the disor-

(i. e.
der
/// e
hcemorrhois] be
within, it [the
medicine] is to
be applied with
the
finger,
if
without, it is to

be

applied
upon

spread

cloth.

Pul pare.

To Btroke
(as is
horses).

To

Titillare.
l

Spargere,

Cic.

(I

gently
uiw to

tickle.

inspergere, 'To strew or throw


8
ri.s.
respergere,
about; -to sprinkle in or upon
3
to besprinkle.
Super eas nitrum inspergere, To sprinkle nitre
Cels.
carbonate of so(

iipon these.

Inspergatur pauxillum

super Lei

little

be

31

OF SHAVING, ETC.

upon

sprinkled

mamillas.

the nipples.

Ea membrana acri
genda

est,

Sect.

6. De

Puny

tum,

Apuleius
Pili,

membrane

is

be besprinkled
with sharp vine-

to

lonsura,

Cels.;

Capilli,*

aceto resper- This

Cels.

Of Shaving. &c

&c

capillamen- The hair


head.
capillitium,

of

the

crines.f

The

Cels.

hairs of other

parts.

Barba, Cels.

^adere

deradere,

Cels.
3
circum;

The beard.
To shave

Ho

to
shave off
shave round or
scrape about.
To shave the head.
Caput radere, Cels.
Omnia, derasa ante, si capillis It is proper to cut
previously
all,
conteguntur, per medium
shaven, if they
oportet incidere, Cels.

abradere, Pliny;
radere, Cels.

* Cavillus, quasi capitis pilus, is sometimes employed by Latin


" Cutibusque cum capUlo
authorsto signif the hair generally.
Hist. Nat lib. vn.
pro mantelibus ante p.ctora uti." fPUny,
all instead or mancap 2.) "To weave the scalpes, haire and
s lraasHolland
breasts.
their
before
dellions or stomachers
1&

set in
Tcrinis (from KpCvto, discerno) is said of the hair when
Synonyms Trausl. by Rev.
order or plaited (Durnesnil, Latin
ringlets and locks ot a
the
rather
signifies
Crines
J M Gosset)
course, less
woman, than simply and generally the hair: it is, of
( from
applicable to medical subjects -Cincmnus
said of a
particularly
is
curl ofhair.Ccesaries (from ctedo)
ot hair never were
man's head of hair, because women's heads
or
dressed
either
hair
of
cut.-Coma (from k6m) signifies a head

wum) wo

not.


32 TERMS AND PHRASES USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.
ivered with
hairs,

through

the middle.
The tooth ought to

Dens circumradi debet, Cels.

all
be Bcraped
round.
Barba abraditur, praeterquam The
is
beard
in superiore labro, Plint.
shaven off except
on the upper lip.
shear,
Tondere; attondere, Cels.
clip
To
cut
or
close,

short.

Ail

cutem

The hair to be clip-

tonderi, Cels.

ped close

to the

skin.

To keep

Caput attonsum habere, Cels.

the [hair

qfthe] head clipped


i

Novacula, Cels.

Sect.

Of

7.

De/ontieulis,setaceis,

aeupunctwrd, &c.

razor.

Issues, Setons,

the

Acupuncture,

&c.

Fonticulus* purulentus.
An issue
Fonticulus excitetur incisione Let an issue he
(eel ferro, vel vesicatorio, vel
produced hy inmedicamento caustico, vel
cision
(by the
cauterio, vel ferro ignito).
lancet, by a vesica to ry, by
caustic, or by the
cautery).
Fiat fonticulus

purulentus in Let

Fonticulus, dim. of font.

little

an
fountain.

OF ISSUES, SETONS, THE ACUPQNCEURE, ETC.


interstitiis

chii

ope

musculorum

33

made between

bra-

ferri vel caustici.

e.

in

stices

the

[i.

inter-

the
of the
by the lanof]

muscles

arm

cet or caustic.

Fiat fonticulus in

musculorum Let an issue be


duorum interstitio ad prohi- made between [i.

bendum dolorem quo impe-

e.

ditur facilis mot us.

stices

in

the inter-

two

of]

muscles, to avoid

which

pain,

would impede
easy motion.

musculum Let an
Vastum intermade

Sit fonticulus inter

Sartorium

num

et

(vel inter principia

musculi

mus-

Deltoidis

be

between
theSartoriusand
Vastus internus
muscles (or between the heads

culi Gastrocnemii, vel interstitio

issue

et

Bicipitis).

of the Gastrocnemius, or between


[i.e. in the interstice] of the Deltoid and Biceps
muscles)."

Fascia pro fonticulis in brachio


(vel femore, vel sura)
t

Setaceum.*
Acus; acus

A
A

ferrea, Cels.

bandage

for is-

sues in the

arm

(thigh, or calf).
seton.

needle

an iron

needle.

*
first

From
used

seta, a bristle, or horse-hair;


to

keep open the wound.

because horse-hairs were

34 TERMS AND PHRASES USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.

Arus pro Betaceo.


Inseratur
setaceum

a-needle.

nuchas Let a aeton be

capitis.

serted

in

in-

the

nape of the neck.


idoneS serici fasciculurn Let the skin al the
ducente perforetur cutis colli
back part of the
posterions partis, serico in
neck be perforvulnere relicto ut fiat diuated by a proturna suppuratio.
Qui
per needle carpus eft'undi eessaverit (vel
rying a skein
hac deficiente) illinatur aeriof silk; the silk
cuin unguento Sabinae.
being left within
the won ml to excite
a constant
discharge of pus.

Acu

Whenever

the

pus ceases to be
discharged
(or

when

the pus

is

deficient in quan-

the silk
be anointed with
Sayine ointment.
Acua admovere, Cels.
To apply a needle.
Acu 'apprehendere, 2transuere, To ^ak'e
hold Of,
3
trajiccre, Cels.
'-'sew
through,
3
traverse
wi th
a needle.
Cutem eandentibu8 ferramentia To make ulcers
in
exulcerare, ('els.
the skin by hot
tity), let

Non, ut primum

irons [i.e. by the


actual cant
fieri

ulcera eanare, Cels.

potest,

Not

to Ileal

cers

as

possible.

(he ul-

soon as

OF ELECTRICITY, ETC.

35

Turn, qua notas sunt, cuti


Then, where
iilum
ducente
transuitur,
marks are,

ejusque

capita

fili

deligantur,

movetur,

mina

intei

quotidieque

donee

circa

id

fora-

cicatriculse fiaut, Cels.

the
the
skin is pierced
by a needle carrying a thread,
and the two ends
of this thread are

tied together,
and the thread is
moved daily un-

small

til

trices are

about

cica-

formed

the

orifi-

ces.

Eumque

acu trajicere

linum

trahente, Cels.

And

to traverse it

by a needle drawing a thread after


it.

Ad imum

acu trajecta duo lina Traversed

ducente, Cels.

bottom
needle

at

the

by a

carrying

two threads.

Acupunctural"
Sect.

8.

Be

electricitate,^ &c.

The acupuncture.

Of Electricity, &c.

2
l
'Electrogenium
electricitaa
Electrogen
(the
3
aura electrica: *fluida elec- p r i n c /|> le or

* Acupunctural from acus, a needle, and pungo, I prick.


f Nearly all the words in this section are of modern origin, and
ly so; for, with few exceptions, electrical phenomena
are of modem discovery, and the language of the ancients is inThe Greeks and Romans were accompetent to express them
quainted with the attractive power which amber acquired by
being rubbed an I, as (he Greeks called amber r/AexTpov, and the
Latins eleclrum. Dr. Gilbert (in his Tractalus de Magnete, Lond.
1600) called all bodies which manifested a similar attractive
;

36 TERMS AND PnRASES USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.


trica;

virtus festucarum

fcra-

cause ofelectrical

hax.
[This last phrase occurs in sonic Latin Diction-

phenomena)

aries.]

cause of electrical
phenomena], 3 tlie

Electricity

[the

electric
a u ra
electric
*the
fluid; 6 tlic force
a t t i a c t i n g

straws.

'Trahere in se [said by Pliny To attract [eleetriHo draw


of the action on straws, &c. cally
to or towards:
of amber, when rubbed); 2 ra2
to take suddenpere ad Be [said by the same
ly, to catch at.
author of the action of the
[Tourmaline ?]
Lf/ncurium
On straws and metallic plates.
2
Torpere
torpescere
'obtor- 'To be numbed or
pore (Pmnv uses all these
benumbed; 2 to
;

three verbs to signify the beeffect of the electric


discharge,of the torpedo.

numbing

Electrisatiu

electrificatio.

grow torpid or
benumbed; 3 to
grow numb.
Electrisation
act

of

[the

electrify-

ing).

The word electricity \v;is soon after introduced


to indicate the power which electrics thns evince
It occurs in
the writings both of Sir Thomas Browne {Inquiries into Vulgar
and Common Errors, Load. 1646) and the Hon. Robert Boyle
Experiments and Notes about the M< chemical Origin or Production of Electricity, 1676)
It was used in a Latin form (elecpower,

electrics.

I.

by Enter iJ)isquisitio de causa physica electricitalis,


Petropoli [1755] by JSpinns Ti ntamen tkeoria electricitatis et
magnetismi, Petropoli [1751]; by Beccaria {Experiment a atque
cbservationes quibus electricitas vindex late constituiiur atque
exjilicatur, Augusta Tanrinornm [l7o!iJ. and by many other
writers of the last century. The word electrisatio was employed
in the last century by Bohadsch {Dissertatio de utilitate etct trial ionis in arte medica, Pragse [1701]).
tricitos)

OF ELECTRICITY, ETC.
Electricitas positiva; negativa.

37

posi-

Electricity

tive; negative.
Electricitas frictione (vifri,sul- Electricity obtainphuris,
corporum resiaosoed by friction [of
rii in, (t'v.) obtenta.
glass,
sulphur,

resinous
(('<.):

bodies,

friction

electricity.

Machina
Machina

An

electrica.

electrica cyliiftrica:
vitreo
instructa;

electric

ma-

chine.
cylindrical elec-

cylindro

trical

domina Nairnei.

made

machine

with a
cylinder;
Mr. Nairne's.

glass

Machina

electrica discoidea;
disco vitre:) polito instructa;

domini Cuthbertsoni.*

plate electrical

machine
made
with a polished

glass

plate

(disk);Mr.Cuthbertson's.

Conductor
marius;

(elcctricus)
3

2
;

imperfectior

pri-

(e.

g.

'The

conductor

(electrical);

* When vegetable species are named after individuals, the rule


of construction among botanists is tins: If the individual is the
discoverer of the plant or the describer of it, the specific name is
then i" be the genitive singular; as Gaprifolium Douglasa, Carex
MeDZiesii; Messrs. Dojglas and Meozies having been the discoverers of these species. But if the name is merely given in
compliment, without, reference to either id' those circumstances,
the name is then rendered in an adjective form, with the termination anus a, inn; as l'inus Lambertiana, in compliment
(See Liudley's Introduction to Botany.) The
to Mr L mbert.
same rule may lie conveniently extended to cases like those in
the texi
and instead, therefore, of calling respectively Mr.
Nairne's ami dr Cuthbertson's machina electrica Naimiana,
and machina electrica Cuthbertsonia, I have preferred to adopt
the rule followed by botauists.
;

38 TERMS AND PHRASES USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.


8
-prime
imperfe<
[for example, a moistened

filumcannabinummadidum);
4flexilis; Bmobilis.

hempen thread)
flexible (pliant);
'moveable.
2 articu- 'The director (i
^Director [electricus)
4metallicus
trim!); pointed
latus; 8insulatus
(articulated);
manubrio vitreo adfixus et in
'insulated; 'meglobum terminatus.

tallic
w ith a
glass handle and
terminated by a
:

ball.

Lagena

(seu pbiala)

Lugdu- The Leyden phial


o;-jar.

nciisis.'

'Scabellum

insulatum;

sella

insulated

'The

stool; -the insulated chair.

insulata.

Electrometrum

(dotin'ni Lanei.)

Acus metallica;

lignea.

The

electrometer
[Mr. Lane's).

point, metallic,

ligneous
en

[wood-

).

chain
Metallic
(slender orjine).
Netumf metallicum; filum me- Metallic wire.
tallicum.
Aura electrica.
The electric aura.
Catena metallica

(tenuis).

'Scintilla electrica;

An

scintillula

An electric spark

combination of Leyden jars bo


charged or discharged at once as a

electrical battery (a

ranged that they


gle jar)

is

may

called

l>e

by Gehler, " Suggestus pkialis

Leidei

ntibua" {Physikali sokes Worterbuch).


t

From

neo, to spin.

ar-in-

OF ELECTRICITY, ETC.
electrica;

pollices

duo vel

39

small electric
spark; Equalling
'-'a

tres longitudine tequans.

two

three

or

inches in length.
'Ictus* electricus; Commotio
electrica;
'concussio electrica; 4 explosio electrica.

The electric
shock;
3

electric

electric

m motion:

o n

concus4 electric

explosion.
Frictiof electrica.
Electric friction.
Balneum} electricum.
The electric bath.
Electricitate per scintillas [vel To electrify [toafper ictus] anicere.
feet or influence
with electricity]

by sparks

[or

by

shocks].

To

Scintillas elicere, educere.

draw

(from
To give

spark?

the body).

(or communicate) sparks.


Electricitas voltaica (galvanica Voltaic (galvanic
or animal) elecVoltaismus
vel animalis].

Scintillas admovcre.

* Ictus, a stroke or blow. Ictus fulminis, Oickro, a stroke of


lightning: ictus fulmineus, Horace, the lightning stroke.
The term electric friction has
t Frictio electrica, Callisen.
been applied to a mode of electrifying which consists iu drawing
sparks from the patient through a piece of flannel. (See Cavallo,

Complete Treatise on Electricity,

ol.

ii

p.

136,

3d

ed.).

of the word balneum will be explained


balneis). The term balneum electricum
eeSect
it is applied to the simple comis used by Callisen and others,
munication established between an individual and the excited
prime conductor of an electric machine, by means of a chain, or
| Tin' correct

meaning
si.

Di

The individual is generally


Other metallic communication.
Rostan
seated on an insulated stool (scabcllum imulatum).
(Diet, de Midecim ) however, states that the individual may, or
may not, be insulated.

40 TERMS AND PHRASES USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.

Galvanismus.
[Electricitas
metallica; irritamentum me-

Volta-

tricity.

ism

tallicum!!)

Galvan-

or

Metallic

ism.

electricity,

electricity

e.

i.

of me-

I nls,

or the metalinciiorl J)

lic

Aura voltaica

(pel galvanica).

Voltaic
[or
galvanic) aura.
Canalicus voltaicus (vel galvan- Voltaic [or galicus).
vanic) trough.

Columna

voltaica.

Machina

electro-magnetica
2
machina magneto-electrica.

The
'An

voltaic pile.

electro-mag-

netic
machine;
2
a magneto-elec-

machine.

tric

Electrostixis; electro-punctura.

The

'Polus;
electtodua;*
positivus; cathodua;f
negativus; anodus.J

electro-punc-

ture.
2

polus
polus

The

pole or electrode; 2 the positive pole or ca-

thode;
gative

ne-

[)ii-

pole

or

ide.

* The term electrode, which bag been latinized elrctrodus, was


proposed by Faraday as a substitute for the word poh
rived iV.ua the Greek words ^AeKTpop and 6809, a way.
Thi
I

objectionable on the ground of its prior use


Hippocrates (p. 1135, ed. Fees uses the word f/AtKTpuSfis, from
i^AeicTpoi/, amber, and elSos, (external appeara;
of amber-lik* in reference to the stools, which
sembling amber in their external appe*
eli-coccurs in Calligen's Lexicum Medicum (Lipsite, 1713),
is

and

is

said to signify "guccino similis."

t Cathode, from Kara,

downwards, and

6605,

<i

way: the way

which the sun


% Anode, from
the sun rises.

a^io,

upwards, and

66os,

a way: the way which

OF ELECTRICITY, ETC.
Excitctur commotio electrica
per explosionem lagenae Lugdunensis.

41

Let the

electric

commotion
(shock)

be pro-

duced by the explosion (i. e. discharge) of a Ley-

den phial.
Administrare frictionem elec- To administer electric friction to a
tricam ad hominem insulatum

cum

conductors

patient insulated

primario

communicantem.

and

in

communi-

with the
prime conductor.

cation

Eliciantur scintillas electricse Let electric sparks


be drawn from
ex orbitis oculorum, temporithe orbits of the
busque, per horse sextam
eyes and the tempartem, alternis diebus.
ples, for the sixth

part of an hour,
every other day.
Iteriun aura electrica coxae do- Again let the electric aura be apleuti admoveatur.
plied to the painful hip.

Fiant

ictus

gionem

per

electrici

re-

Let electric shocks

be

uteri.

passed

through

the re-

gion of the uterus.

Auram galvanicam

trajicere,

To

galvanize.

trahere, educere.

'Magnes, Pliny; 2magnes lapis,

magnes

tural magnet; 8 an

artiticialis;

magnea

A magnet;

loadstone; a na-

magnes

arte paratas.

naturalis;

Pliny;

artificial magnet.

42 TERMS AND PHRASES USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.

northern,

Polus septentrionalis, meridion- Pole,

southern.

alis.

Magnetic

Magneticus, Claudianus.

[of,

belonging

or
a

to,

magnet or loadstone).

plures Magnetic collars,


girdles, bracelets
oontigui, juxta polos inimicos
[several artificial
dispositi, aut linteo sen serico
in a ;/ a r l s
with
obducti, coliaribus, cingulis,

Magnetes

artificiales

their opp <> s ite


poles in contact,

brachialibua inclusi.

r e r t

i>

'I

V> i I

ll

or silk, dud
inclosed in col-

I i in

ii

lars,

bracelets.)

Magnetic plates
(/// u g n e I i s e d

Laminae magnetic*.

plates).

steel
|

Magnetismus Magnetism. Mineral magnetism.

Magne^ismus.
mineralis.*

De

ven-

Of

Dejectiones;f dejectiones alvi;


stercus; alvus:J quod ex-

The

Sect.

9.

resolutions

//is,

Purging, &c.

(fee.

stools

or ex-

crements;

or-

* The term mineral magnetism has been absurdly ufed in order


magnetism from what is vulgarly termed at
(See Dir mineral'ische Magru
Anwendung in der Htilkunsl, von C. A. Becker, Jl I), Miihlhausen,
t From de, downwards, ami jaeiu, I c
and sometimes masc. It signifies the belly,
J Alvus, i, fern
the bowels, aud also the stools.

to distinguish

magnetism.

OF PURGING, ETC.
cernitar;
quod descendit.
Cels.
Sedes.* Fceces.f

Finns

et fiiiium.

dure;
alvine
evacuations.
Dung or ordure of

man,

birds, cat-

&c.

tle,

'Alvus cita;
alvus
soluta; Frequent, loose, or
8
alvus fusa; 4 alvus flu ens;
liquid stools.
6
alvus liquida, Cels. 6 Alvus
Purging; loose2

fluida.

'Kesolutio

Cels.
fusus;
venter li10
quidus, Cels.
Ventris
u Ventris resofluor, Cels.
12
lutio, Cels.
Ventris fluxiones; 13 solutiones, Pliny.
ls
15
Dejectiones crebrae.
Catharsis.J 16Diarrhoea. 17 Coalvi,

H'enter

ness.
[o?*

J
(

stools] quick-

moved, loosened; 'relaxed;


Moose or flowing;
sliquid; 6fluid;
ly

'looseness
8

of.

Bully relaxed or

9
loose
1 i q u i d
10
flux of; u loose-

prophoria.^j

12
alvine
a1 v n e
looseness; u frequentdejections;

ness of;
flux

15

13

urging;

* Scdcs means, literally, a seat in an exteuded sense, the fundament. It is also applied to that which comes from the fundament, or, in other words, an evacuation. Pharmaceutical Guide.
f Faces, the nom. pi. from fax, cecis, f. a noun wanting t he
" We meet with Faces vini, Faces ace.ti, &c. in classical
gen. p
authors, but nowhere Faces hominis: the word in tins sense is
iiy and improper. " Horee Subsecivce.
Catharsis is not found in Latin dictionaries. It is a Greek
J
word (xdOapK; from Ka6aipw, purgo) adopted by Latin writers,
and means a purging It is thus declined:
V. Catharsi.
D. Catharsi.
N. Catharsis.
Ab. Catharsi.
A. Catharsin.
Q. Catharseos.
stercus, et<ope'(o,
Coprophoria idem quod Purgatio, ex Koirpos,
Blancard, Lexic. Medicum.
fero, gesto.
;

TERMS AND T1IRASES USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.

4-4

"
o o s e n e
"purgation).
;

s s;

'Alvus dura; 2alvus suppressa Bound, constipat'alvus adstricta; 4 alvus coned, or confined
6
alvus
tracta;
compressa,
bowels (or belCels. 'Alvus tenax; 'alvus
ly).
Constipacompacta; Balvus constipata.
tion. (' Belly [or
B
stools] bard;
Venter astrictus; '"venter
z
contractus; "venter suppressupp e s sed
3
12
)> o u n (1;
sus,
Cels.
Ubi noii de*connilit
alvus; "venter [vel
tracted;
Comalvus] nihil reddit, Cels.
pressed Or cos18
tive; ''retained;
"Obstipatio.
Constipatio,
;

i-

alvi.

compacl

'con-

'Belly
"con-

stipated.

bound;

"sup-

tracted;
pressed;

''when
one does nut go
t

l3

stool

h e

belly produces
nothing; "obstipation; '"'constipation (of the

Alvum

'solvere,

belly).)
ait un, or open,

movere, Tu

4
liquare,
Cels.;
mollire,
emollire, 5 elieere, 'evacuare,
7
exinanire, 8 trahere, 9 purgare,
10

ciere,

Cato.

l2

Pliny; "dejicere,
Purgatione ahum

solicitare, Cels.

Ven

re

umollire, 15 liexinanire,
quare, ''solvere, "resolvere,

13

Cels.

18

Sedcs promovere.

or

Ions

b o

purge.
Loosen

the

To

e Is.
2
;

m ove;

'make liquid;
'soften;

"elicit;

'evacuate

ty

lead;

Mr a
9

'emp\v

o r

purge;

45

OF PURGING, ETC.
10

to

move

or pro-

voke; "deject or

down

cast

bel12

ly or stools;

[or stools]
purgation;

empty
15

to

the Lolly

solicit

uto

liy
ls

to

soft-

make

en
liquid "'loosen
''unloosen the
18
belly
to pro;

mote

stools.)

'Alviini dueere, subducere.CELS. *To acton the


2

Alvi duetio, Cels.


ductione uti, Cels.

A
3

bow-

by clyster.
2
The action on
the bowels by
s
clyster.
Touse
els

clysters.

Alvum

'astringere,

compri- Tobindorastringe
4
the bowels.
To
suppri-

mere, 3contrahere,
mere, Cels.} 6sistere, 6cohibere, Pliny.
'Ventrem
firmare, Cels.

constipate.

bind;
pate;

To
]

*consti-

'contract;
5
stop;

Suppress
Restrain
or stools;

bowels
"tobind

the belly.
movet, vel *Any thing which
2
opens the bowpurgat, &c.) alvum.
Pur2
A purgaels.
gans. 3 Laxans. 4 Cathar3
6
tive.
A laxaticum.*
Hydragogum.f

'Quod

solicitat

(vel

* KnGapTiKa: from Ka0aipu>, to purge.


t From vSojp, water, and ayto, to bring away.

46 TERMS AND PHRASES

Dras

cu m.*-

SED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.

tive.4 A catharj
6
tic.
A hydragogue. 8 dras-

Ecc<)jirdti-

cum.f

An

tic.

ecco-

protic.

Posl alvi

longam resolutionem, After long purg-

Cels.

ing.

Frequens dejiciendi

[vel

desi-

dendi) cupiditas, Cels.

Post alvum exoneratam.

Freqnenl desire to
go to stool.
After the bowel is
unloaded (i. e.
after an evacuation).

Post

singulas liquidas dejec- After every loose


tiones; post nnainquamque
stool
[or liquid
sedern mollem.
evacuation).
Urgenti Ims torminibus.
The gripings being
urgent violent ).
'A<1 plenam alvi solutionem.
To (or until) a full
(

Ad ahum

officii

excitandam.

immemorem

Nisi alvus

sit

interea copiose soluta.

(<jr

evacu-

free)

ation of the bow2


els.
To excite

the bowel unmindful of its


office

cite

/.

the

to ex-

consti-

pated bowels).
Unless the bow-

els

have been

co-

piously relieved
in the meantime.

* From Bpdui, to do, or to be active.


f From , out, and Kowpos, excrement,
cines winch expel iiecal matter.

Eccojnotics are medi-

OF VOMITING, SWEAT, SNEEZING, ETC.

Donee alvus

clejecerit;

donee Until

alvus ('probe vel bene) responderit; donee venter


('-'rite) solutus fuerit; donee
alvus (8 commodfe) purgetur;
donee ( 4 ample) purgaverit;
donee sedes ( 6 tres vel quatuor)

bowels

the

opened;

are

^well;

2
t

roughly;
ciently;
6

47

o-

suffi-

three

freely;
or four

times)

deponentur.

Clysma; enema; lavamentum


mtestinorum.

A clyster;

Suppositorium.

Bevomitu; desudore;
de sternutamento, &e.

Sect. 10

a lave-

ment.
suppository.*

Of

Vomiting; of
Sweat; of Sneez-

ing,

tC-c.

Nausea, Cels.
Sickness; nausea.
Vomitus, Cels.; vomitio, Pliny. Vomiting.
Quod excitat vomitum; vomit- That which excites
vomiting; a voorium emeticum.
mitory; an eme;

tic.

Vomere, evomere, Cels.

To vomit or cast
up the contents

Vomitum

To produce vomit-

of the stomach.
3

movcre, Cels.

citare,

'elicere,
6

facere,

4
;

excitare,

creare, 5 con7
pro-

Pliny;

ing.
2

excite

x
;

To elicit;
"move or

4
create
or occasion 5 stir
up or excite;
6
oiake; 7 provoke

provoke:

ritare.

vomiting.
* The term suppository

is

applied to a solid substance placed


and gradually dissolve.

in the rectum, there to remain

48 TERMS AM) PHRASES USED IX PRESCRIPTIONS.

Vomitum
sistere,

Bupprimere,
Plint.

Cels.;

To suppress

or al-

lay vomiting.

Donee evomuerit 8donec probe Tntil the patient


may have vomitvomat; 3 supervenerit vom2
e<l
n t
itus: *vomitione urgente; 5ad
he may
well vomit; 3 if
vomitum sedandum, compevomiting should
scendum; 6 .lonee sedantur
supervene; *tbe
vomitiunes.,
vomiting being
troublesome; 6 to
allay vomiting;
.-i

>

uMiil the vomitings are allayed.


Injice in venam brachii grana Inject six grains of
emetic tartar,
sex tartari emetici soluta in
dissolved in half
aquae uncia dimidia.*

a n

n c e

it

water, intoa
of the arm.

of
ein

To vomit blood.
Post vomitum, si stomachus in- If the stomach is
firmus est, paulum cibi, sod
weak after vohujus idonei, gustandum, et
miting, a little
aquae fiigidse cyathi trcs bifood is to be
bendi sunt; nisi tamen votaken, but of

Sanguinem vomere, Cels.

mitus

fauces

proper

kind,
three cups
of cold m ater are
to be drunk
mt
only if the \ omit-

exasperavit,

Cels.

and

* The injection of a solution of emetic tartar into the veins has


"''"--'
y employed to excite vomiting in w
- frum
the lodgmeul of pieces of mi
In
ipl
(See Di I'ereira'u Elements of Materia Medica, vol i. p G!
1

edition.)


OF VOMITING, SWEAT, SNEEZING, ETC.

49

ing has irritated

Sudor: sudores, Cels.


s

the fauces.

Mul2

'Sweat; sweats.
2
frigidus sudor,
AIuch sweat;

(us sudor;
3
Cels.
cold sweat.
Sudorem morere, elicere, Cels.; To promote sweat.
ciere, Pliny.
Sudores evocare, facere, Pliny: exudare,
prsestare, promovere.
Sudan', Cels.
Sudare m ul- To sweat; to sweat
turn, Cels.
much.
Sadorem prohibere, Cels.; sis- To stop or check

sedare, Pliny; comsweat.


peseere.
Sudatio; sudationessiccae, Cels. Sudation; a sweattore,

ing; alsoasweat-

ing place.

Dry

sweating places.
Usque ad sudorem, Cels. donee Until sweat [isprosmlor prodeat.
duced].
;

Diaphoresis,* Auhel.

Quod elicit sudores;


am; sudoriiicum;

diaphoresis or
perspiration.
sudatori- That which excites

diaphc-

reticum

sweats; a sudatory; asudorific;


a diaphoretic.

Sternutamentum, Cels. Ster- Sneezing.


nutatio, Apul.
Sternutamenta excitare, mo- To excite
vere, evocare, Cels.; facere,
Pliny; concitare, proritare,

sneez-

ings.

ScRin. Larg.
*

From

p. 43).

8iai/)dp/)<Tis.

Diaphoresis

is

declined like Cat harsis (see


50 TERMS axii PHRASES GSED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.

Quod movet Bternutamenta; That which excites


sneezing; a sterstemutamentum * sternutanutatory; an

torium; erruinumjf ptarmi-

er-

rhi no aptarmic.
cum.f
Sternutamentaalboveratrocon- Sneezings arc ex;

Vi

excitanturj

nares

iu

jecto
ls.

Ducerenaribusutsternutamenturn excitetur.

cited by putting
into the n o
white hellebore.
To snuff or draw

up the

[it]

that

nossneez-

may

be ex-

trils

ing

cited.

Haec per calamum scriptorium,


Scrib.
naribus
Bufflentur,
Larg.

These may be
blown into the
it
strils by a
(|

writing pen.

Aliquantillum

naribus

insuf-

Let

little

be

into

the

blown

flctur.

nostrils.

Urinam movere,
concitare,
pellere,

citare, Cels.

cierc,
excitare,
impellere, solvere,

Pliny.

Urinam supprimere;

tardare,

Cels.

To

promote,

n-

crease,

or provoke the flow of


urine.

To

suppress, to
check the flow of

urine.

Urinam reddere, Cels.;

facere,

Pliny.

following passage, Pliny {Hist. Nat lib. xxv. cxp.


employs sternut /i mentum \<> indicate a sternutasicca concha, stemutamentum est." Borne crihowever, read lt ciet
facit," for "est;" and then

* In

109, ed.

tory:
tics,
sti

To pass the urine:


to make water.

tlie

Valp

"Eadem

rnul amentum

ting.

si

t "Eppu'or; from iv, in,


+ From nraipw, I mi

and

piv, the nose.

A
OF VOMITING, SWEAT, SNEEZING, ETC.
Crinae

crebra

magna

cupiditas
difficultas, Cels.

sed Frequent

tion

51

inclina-

make

to

water, hut great


difficulty in doing so.

Quod

niovet urinam; diuretic-

um.*

Urinam manu

That which excites


a flow of urine;
a diuretic.
To discharge the

emolire, Cels.

urine by the
hand
Catheter. f

Fistula,

Cels.

i.
|

e.

operation

by an

\.

catheter.

Fistula urinaria.

pipe [for drawing offtheurine],

Explorare vesicam.

To examine [e.g.
/'/
sound] the
bladder.

Extrahere (vel educere, vel eli- To draw off the


cere) urinam ope catheteris.
urine by the aid
of a catheter.

Menstrua ci ere, pellere, solvere, To promote or


Pliny; evocare, movere, elibring on the
menstrual

cere, excitare.

dis-

charge.

Quod evocat menstrua ennnen- That which brings


;

agogum.j

on

the menses:

em e n agogue.
In feminam bene respondenti- In [or to] a woman
an

* AiovprjTixds"

from

Sid,

through; ovpov, the wine; and pew,

lflow.
t
|

From KaOerqp, Galen.


UalhSter, eris, m,
From e/jLfj.r]i>a, the menstrual discharge, and ayui, 1 pro-pel or

bring away.


TERMS AND PHRASES USED IX PRES< RIPTI0N8.

k>2

whose

bus menstruis, Cels.

menses

are regular.
The menses being
Menstrua suppressa, Cels.
suppressed.
Menstrua non feruntur; non The menses are
stopped.
proveniunt, Cels.

De

Sect. 11.

Vermes*

Of Worms.

vermibus.

dejicere, expellere, eli-

To expel worms.

cere.

* The following is a tabular arrangement of tlie iDtema] ]>:intsii"- of the human body
-pD-i-ct " in the classes ><> which they
appear respe tivrly to belong, according to their organization
(Owen, art Entozoa, Cyclop, .luni and Physiology).
04 FTominis.
Classis Pstchodiari
Bory St. Vii
1.
Acephalocystis endogena, Pill-box Hydatid. In the liver,
.1

abdomen, &c.
Echinococcut hominis, Living Hydatid
ca vity

2.

i.r

the

omentum.
POLTOASTRICA

3.

Am

Liver. Bpleen,

Kill.
ci.

Animalcule of the Echinococcus.

L ver, &c. contained within the echinococcus


Classis Protb lm n iha
4. Ceri
X.n.snerm, Spermatozoon, Seminal animalcule. In the semen.
5. Trichina spiralis.
In the voluntary muscles.
Clas-is Steerlmintha
'rj.trg.
In the muscles, cereliruni, and eye.
7.
Tcenia solium, Long-jointed tapeworm, or common tapeworm. In the small intest oes.
i

8.

0.

10
CUt88is
11

12.
13.
14.

5.

lb\

Bothriocephalic lalus, Broad tapeworm. Small intestine.


Polystoma pinguicola. In the ovaries.
Disloma htpaticum, Liver-fluke. In the gall-bladder.
<

ir.l.n.MINTII

\.

Filaria Vledinensis, Guinea-worm. In the cellular tissue.


Filaria ocali.
In the crystalline
Filaria bronchialU.
In the bronchial glands,
Tricocephalus dispar, Long thread-worm. In the caecum
a mi colon.
SpiropU ta hominis. In the urinary bladder.

Slrongylus gigas.

Kidney.


OF BATHS, FOMENTATIONS, ETC.

Lumbricus

latus;

teres, Cels.

53

tapeworm

lumbricus The

{Taenia solium);
the round worm.

Quod

expellit vermes; anthel- That which expels


minticum ;*
helminthagogworms; an anum vermifugum.
thelmintic or
;

vermifuge.
Sect.

12. De

balneis;
mentis, &c.

Of Baths. Of

de fo-

Fomentations,

(Sec.

Balneum,! Cels.;

Balineum. 'A bath [private].


a
3
Balnae'; Balinae.
Balneum 2Baths [public],
3
medicatum.
A medicated
bath.

Balneum

fervens (sen fervidum), calidum, tepidum.J

The hot, warm, and


tepid bath [artificial].

Tepidarium, Cels.

tepid bath.

17.

Ascaris lumbricoides, Long round-worm.

18.

Ascaris vermicularis,

In the small

intestine,

Maw-worm

or thread-worm.

In

the rectum.

From di'i-l, against; and, e\nivt a worm.


t Balneum and balineum were used for the water-hath, which
every mas er of a fam'ly had iu his house; balnea and balinece,
*

for

public bathing-places.

All

referred

to

baths artificially

"The cold bath and shower bath, therefore, and, in


heated
pharmacy, the sand bath, water bath, &c, require a very different form of expression."
Horas Subsec.
J The temperature of the different kinds of baths is as follows:
Deg. Fahr.
from 33 to
1. Very cold
SO
2. Cold
50.. I 65
3. Cool
65.. :
85
1.

Tepid

5.

Warm

6.

Hot

85. ."8 f 92
98

92
9S

the

highest degree of heat the patient

can bear, perhaps


5*

110

or

112

A
;

54 TERMS AND PHRASES USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.

Hot baths [natu-

Thermae.*
'Lavatio,f Cels.

ral].

Lavacrum.

'A

washing

bath in

g.

or

-A

bath or washing
place.

Ablution.
In balneum ire sincere in bal- rTo go into a bath
2
3
uti
to
take [liim|
neuin
balneo calido;
3
to
into a bath
in balneum mittere, Cels.
use the warm
demittere in balneum; debath; t o p u t
scendere in balneum.
[h i in] i n t ii a
bath.
Eliccre sudorem sicco calore, To procure sweat
Cels.
Balneum siccum.%
by dry heat.
Ablutio, Pliny.

dry bath.
* Thermo: signifies baths of water naturally hot: balnea, baths
Hence the phrase balnea mxneralia is not
hot by fire.
correct
f La rni in also signifies a bathing vessel.
+ By lie term h/ilncum siccum, or dry bull), are meant applications of dry heated substances (as hoi air, Band, ashes, salt,
&c to the -kin in promote sweating. But the term balneum le
inapplicable to such, since Celsus evidently c manes it to a water
bath,
while, under the head of ,l .siccus color," he includes amia
calida, the laconicum, and the cHbanum (lib ii. c. 17). The
terms Sudatorium, Laconicum, and Clibanum, were applied to
different kinds of dry baths.
The Sudatorium was a swi
house. The Laconicum was a hot and dry room at a bath
in which sweat was excited; it was, iu fact, a Sudatorium.
CMbanum was the name of a particular kind of oven among the
Romans. As it is mentioned by Celsus, besides the Laconicnm,
or hot room at the bath, he probably intends by it a stove placed
in a common room so as to heat it.
In the baths of the Romans
there were five apartments: the eleolherium. the frigidarium,
the tepidarium, the concamerata sudalio (calidarium or laconicum), and the balneum.

made

BATHS OF THE ROMANS.

From

a painting found at the

Therma of Titus (De Montfaucon),

A
OF BATHS, FOMENTATIONS, ETC.

Uti aquis frigidis, Cels.

Bal-

neum frigidum*
Calidus vapor, Cels.
vaporis.-\

Vaporarium.

V Antiquitee expliquie
2'"

1 '-',

Balneum

et

To use the
bath. A

55
cold
cold

bath.

Hot vapor.
vapor bath.

representee en figures, torn. 3 m e, part

p. 201.

On

the right is the cleolherium (aAei7TTrjpioi') where the oils


and perfumes are kept in vases: next to this is the frigidarium
the third is the tepidarium:
(am>8vTripu)i') or undressing room
the fourth is the sudatory (concamerata sudatio), in which are
seen the laconicum (so called from being first used in Lacouia),
a brazeu furnace to heat lie room, and persons sitting on the
steps: the filth is the balneum, with its huge basin (Inbrinn) supplied by pipes communicating with three large bronze vases,
called milliaria, from their capaciousness; the lower one contained hot, the upper one cold, and the middle one tepid water.
The bathers returned to the frigidarium, which sometimes conThe subterranean portion of the building,
tained a cold bath.
where the fires were placed for heating the baths, was called hypocaustum. The strigil (a in the above cut) was a scraper, or
currycomb, used at baths to scrape the skin. Celsus (lib. vi. cap.
V) uses the term to signify a tube or syringe.
* As the term "hid netim" applies to a heated water bath, it is
obvious that the phrase "balneum frigidum " is incorrect,
"
f Equally improper is the phrase balneum vaporis." Celsus
regards calidus vapor as one kind of "siccus color."
:


5G TERMS AM) PHRASES USED IX PRESCRIPTIONS.

'Semicupium

excathisma encathisma; insessio; insessus,


2
Coxeeluvium. 'Pediluvium.
;

'Capitiluviuui.

Manuluvi-

The

half-bath, or
slipper-b a th.

-The hip-bath.
'The foot-bath.
4

ura.

The head-bath.
The hand-bath.
To pour much hot
B

Multa calida aqua per caput

se

uin perfundere,tumtepida,
deinde frigida, Cels.
tut

water over his


head so that it
may run over all
his body], then
[

and, lastwater.
Utar semicupio ad x. vel. xij. Let the patient use
minuta horae in aqua adhuc
the h a 1 f-b a h,
calcnti modice.
made moderatetepid,

ly, cold

ly

warm,

for ten

or
twelve
nutes.

Pedes cruraque in aquam

cali-

dain demittere.

mi-

To bathe the feet


and legs in warm
water.

The

Perfusio corporis aqua, calida.

affusion of the

body with warm


water.

Lavare egelida* aqua.

To use

tepid wash-

ing.

* Oelidus and tcjtlidus agree in denoting objects not as in a


state of heat, batdiffer in respect to the distance of each from thai
state The first term (from gelu, frost or ice) applies to waterthal
is either frozen or just at the freezing point. Egelidus diffei
gelidus, in denoting a diminution of the cold implied in the latter,
or a step in the progress towards heat.
See Bill's Vict of Syno-

nyms.

Gerard [Thesaurus) defines the word egeltdus, fthns:


jam non est caiidum neque frigidum,
tepidum."

"Qimd

gelu. amisit, et

OF BATHS, FOMENTATIONS, ETC,


Is

per aestatem id bene largo


canali
quotidie debet aliquamdiu subjicere, Cels.

He

ought,

daily,

during the summer, to hold his


head for s o m e
time under a

pretty

strong

stream [of water].

Admovere glaciem

vel nivem.

To

apply ice or
snow.
Linteola in aqua frigida made- Linen dipped in
facta dein bene expressa,
cold water, and
Cels.
then well squeezed.

Fomentum.CELS.;

fotus,

Pliny;

fomentation.

fomentatio.

Naresexulceratas fovereoportet It is proper to fovapore aquae calidaj, Cels.


ment the ulcern ostri1s
the vapor
of warm water.
ated

with

Vaporare,

suffire,

Pliny.

To foment with

abstergere.

To cleanse or

vapor.

Detcrgere, Cels.
'Lavare, Cels.
s
eluere, Cels.
;

'-'abluere,

"Suffitus. -Ilalitus.
tio.

Cic.

wipe.
'To bathe or wash
2
to c e a n o r
;

cleanse; 3 to wash.
8
or
Inhala- *D r y

fumes

2
smoke.
Aqueous vapors.in-

halation or inspiration.

Inspiretur halitus aquas chlo- Let the vapor of


chlorine w a t e r
rinii per apparatum aptum.


58 TERMS AND PHRASES USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.
inhaled by
of a proper apparatus.
bolster or pillow
for the bead.

be

means
Pulvinar;*

pulvinus;

'iXatov,

ii<-,ih;iji'i/(i/v.

Sect. 13.

De

ivpog-

Of Doses,

portionibus, &c.

Portio, Cels.; dosisf (66oig).

&c,

portion, allotment, or dose.

sequis In equal proporparibus;


tions,
portionibus, Cels.
l
l
In small, large,
Portionibus exiguis magnis
2
divisis ; crebro adhibitis, redivided, 2 repeatpetitis, iteratis.
ed doses.
'Partitis vicibus ;% -'ad tres alias l Atdifferent times;
-to
vices.
three other
times.

Portionibus

Dosi pedetentim crescente.

Gradually increas-

Cochlear, Cels.; cochlea.


Cochleare; cochleare plenum, $

A
A

*
for

ing the dose.


spoon.
spoonful [when

The pulvinar humuli. or hop pillow, has been longemployed


producing sleep. Dr. Willis brought it into
scribi:

"There

III.

'

no sort of occasion in medical language for this


lie place of which may be always directly supplied by
'Ratio,' 'Modus,' 'Copia,' 'Pondus.'
">
Meosura,' &c
as, What is the dote?
rectly by uttering the phrase:
Th
is ten grains; In the same dose; Too lai
Poo small 8
dose, &c
'Quantum, quot grana, guttse, &c dantur?' 'A'l decern,
'Tantundem, tntidein grana,' &c.
Niiniuni,' 'Parura,'
&c.
I hi, if Subst
t Partitis vicibus is an idiomatical expression, implying "in
different doses," or "at different times."
icibusU the ablative
plural <>f oicis and partitis the ablative plural of partitus, the
participle til' partior.
t

is

'

'

'

'

(per apocopen) cocKL nr,

spoon, a mea>ure, and a spoonful.

mis,

As a Roman measure

of ca-

OF DOSES, ETC.

59

Cochlearium ;* cochmensura, Plint.

Cels.

no

learii

is

qualification

added

to it, it

generally understood to mean


" a
tablespoonful"].
small, tea, or
cliild's spoonful
equal to onefluir
drachni\,
middling-sized
dessert or pap
spoonful
[equal
is

Cochleare parvulum
ilium

(vel mini-

medi-

vel infantis).

Cochleare modicum

um

(vel

vel mediocre).

to tW O
drachms.

Cochleare magnum

(vel

largum

amplum).

vel

II

i-

large or table[equal
t
J' a ii
fi u idrachms, or half

spoonful
a

Cochleatim.

Jl

S[

afiuidounce\.
f'ul by spooni

ful.
2

fCyathusjf

cyathus vinarius: *A

'cyathus magnus.
pacity

it

drinking cup

[generally under-

(Littleton's Latin Dictionary) to

is saiil

have been equal

the ligula, thai is one-fourth part of the cyathus, and consetin- one-forty-eighth *part of the English wiue pint, or
one-third of tin Suidounce
* Cochlearium rii, u. signifies a measure of liquids, a spoonto

quently

As a Konian measure of liquids it is said to have been


ful, &c
the one-twelfth pari of the cyathus, and, therefore, the one-third
pari 'if tin' cochlea re.
Cyathus (from Kva0os) was a sort of vessel used by the Romans to in' 'a- nil- the wine and water that were poured into cups.
Dr. Grieve (Translation of Celsus)
It was equal to four ligula.
states thai it was equal 10 the one-twelfth pari of the English
wine pint. It was also used to indicate anything to drink outof.
Cantharus (from Kai'tfapos) was a sort of cup, somewhat larger
-(

GO TERMS AND PHRA8ES USED

l\

PRESCRIPTIONS.
stood to mean a
wineglass oj the
capacity of two
jluidounces]; also
;i
measure
o r
liquids -a w ine3
glass
.i
large
I

>1

r
-/,

ii

11

g cup

rally undt r-

a,

mean a
tumbler of tin capacity of eight
stood to

'Poculum

;*

'pocillum

Jluidounces].
'vascu- 'A cup [generally

understood

linn.

to

im mi a teacup of
the capacity of
six or in/Ill jlniilalso a
ounces]
potion
-a little
3
cup; a little ves;

'

sel.

Duo aut

tria cochlearia uno die


Bumpsisse, satis est, Cei.s.

It

is

sufficient to

have taken
or

three

fulsf
than the cyathus, and having a handle;

oftankard

Scyphv

in

two

spoon' day.

other words, a kind


id of bowl, without
Cuj/a
of.

either foot or handli


iraes to drink out
was a Cap or drinking vessel used in taverns or olh

Poculum, a drinking cup.

It

was

also said of the liquor

itself.

Sometimes very erroneously written spo


mfnl,
like mouthful, &c, is an individual c
pouud noun; ii^ plural
poonfuls.
Although the word spo
qoi English,
yet it is remarkable how frequently it is written by ignorant
t


OF DOSES, ETC.
2

'Cochlearis;

cochlearis

men-

sura, Pliny.

6
'Of, or

pertaining

a spoonful;
a spoonful.

to,
2

^agnitudoj'amplitudo; 'moles; 'Magnitude;

am-

s
plitude
mass
'quantity.
'Ad nucis juglandis magnitudi- 'To the size of a
nem ; 8quod fabae magnitudi- walnut; 2 that
3
lii'in
habet, Cels.
Magniwhich has the
tudo nucis avellanse, Scrib.
size of a bean.
L argus; *magnitudo cas- 3 The size of a fil6
4
taneae
inagnitudo fa baa
t li e
bert-nut;
equinae.
sizeof achesnut;
5
the size of a
horse-bean.
Moles nucis moschataj.
The size of a nut-

*quantitas.*

meg.

The

Instarf juglandis.

size of a wal-

nut.

'Quantum satis est [vel sitj 'As much as is suf2


ficicnt; 2 asmuch
quantum res patitur; squanturn fieri potest; 'quantum
as circumstances
;

tribus digitis comprebendi


potest; 'quantum volet;

"quantum

patiuntur;

vires

3
as
as can be
done, or as far

will

allow;

much

On the same ground that "spoonsful" is used as the


persons.
supposed plural for "spoonful," we ought to have " niouthsful,"
" bellie-fiil," " spoonsrneat," &c, instead of "mouthfuls," ''bellyfuls," " fpoonmeats," &c.
* 3/agniludo is said of any sort of greatness. Amplitudo is
said of extent.
Moles indicates anything huge and va-t. Quantilns is a term of relative import, and, when qualified by some
adjunct, may signify much or little.
f Instur is usually denominated an indeclinable noun; but
Dumesnil {Latin Synon by the Rev. J M. Gosset) calls it a pre"Ad instar is not found in
position requiring the genitive case.
the best Latin authors."
6
.

G2 TERMS .VXD PHRASES USED [N PRESCRIPTIONS.


7
B
quantum jurat
vino
quantum libebit, Cels.
;

possible; 4 as
as can be
held by three fingers;
as much
as he will; 6 as

uti

as

much

r,

in u c h
s

re

ii

mits;

as

as, or as

h e

per-

much

long

as,

agreeable;
to take as much
\v
11 e
a s
h e
it

is

pleases.

Quantum cuspide

[vel

apice)

As much

as can
be taken on the
point of a knife.

cultri capi potest.

'Quantum sufficit [vel sufficiat); *As much as may


'quantum eonvenii
"quanbe sufficient -as
tum velis quantum lubet;
much as is con'quantum sitis exigat.
venient Or suitable; ? as much
as you please:
;

'as much as the


thirst
re-

may

quire.

Pu^rillus.

pinch

much
c o

(i. e.
as
as may /><
a a ed bei

tween the Hi a in h
and two Angers
about from Jss
'

tO o.i).

Manipulus, Cels.

Sumere

capere.

A
Cels.

handful.

To take
al I li\

[gener-


OP TIME.
Devorare, Cels.

deglutirc.*

G3

To take

(in a solid

form, as a powder or

Bibere

sorberc
ham-ire.
;

potare, Cels.;

jrill).

To take (as
draught)
;

a
to

drink.

take (as an
linguam liquare.
electuary).
Manducare; mandere, Cels.; To take (as a masDelingere, Cels.

lambere; sub To

ticatory);

masticare.

to

chew.

adhibere;

exhibere, To give or administer.


administrare.
In ahum ex parte inferiore To administer by
the rectum (as
dare in alvum ex partibus
inferioribusindere(eimmitan injection or
tere, seu infundere). Cels.
clyster).
Suffumigare, Cels. ; fumigare. To fumigate.
To gargle.
Qargarizare, Cels.

Dare

Cels.

Sect. 14.
1

Annus

2
;

nium;

De

tempore.

sesquiannus

3
;

trienniuni.

bien-

Of Time.
'A year 2 a year
and a half 3 two
;

years;

three

years.
hiennis, 'Every year, an3
nual
'biennial,
triennis, triinus.

'Quotannis,

bimus

animus;

lasting two

two

years, of
years; 'triennial,

lasting:
* GltUio (but uot dcglutio)
I

swallow down.

three

is found in the smaller Latin diceswe Hn&deghitio, vowmedictsfamiliaris,


Pharmaceutical Guide.

04 TERMS AND

Annus

1'IIR.VSES

intercalaris

USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.

years, of
years.
vel bisex- Leap year.

three

tilis.

Annus

The

climactericus.

climacteric or
perilous year.
Carolines temporum.
The four seasons
of the year.
3
Meneis; 'sesquimensis; bimen- A in o nth; 2 a
4
sis
.s]):itiuin bimestre;
in o n
b
and a
3
'menses biseni.
h a 1 f
t W
in (i n tlis; 4 six
;

months

t\velve

months.

'Menstruus
mestris

;*
4

"bimestris;
quadrimestris.

tri-

'.Monthly; 'of two


m o n t h s; 3 o f
i

li

months

e 6

*of four months.

'Janu

a
u
*F eb ru ar u s, 'January 'Febru3
Martius, *Aprilis, 6Maius,
ary
M arc
B
Junius, "Julius [vel Quinc* April;
6
tilis),
'Augustus [vel Sex-l
u n e; 7 -J uly
B
tilis), "September, "October,
August 9 S e pr

s,

May

"November,

12

December.

tember;
ber;

10

Octo-

"Novem-

ber; '-December.

Septimana; hebdomada; hebdomas hebdoma.

Dies

A day.
'Sunday; Mon-

week.

Dies

lux.

Gels.

Solis;
4

Martis;
Formerly

or substance

Lunae;
Mercurii;

1).

I>.

3
5

D.
D.

day;

'Tuesday;

n was
to

the custom for chemists to digest the sol vend,


he dissolved, in the solvenl for ;t philosophical

mouth, or forty days: hence arose the names of


menstrual
or

menstruum.

sol

at

65
6

Jovis;
D.
Saturni.

Veneris;

D.

'Wednesday;
6

Thursday; Friday 7Saturday.


:

'Calendar

J
;

nona3

3
;

idus

'The calends

[the

day of

first

h\\

the

h e
nonea[fhe seventh
in o a

day ofthe months

Ma

May,

r c h.

and Octoand tin- jij'th,

July,
ber,

of the other
in o

nt h

ides

eight

[these

3
the
fall

days

later

s]

than tin nones:


hence they occur

on the fifteenth

day ofthe months

Ma r c h.

and

July,

May,
Octo-

ber, inut the thir-

teenth

Hodie; hodiemo

of other

months\.
To-day.
Yesterday.

die.

Heri besterno die.


Cras crastino die.
Postero die, Cels.

Tomorrow.
The day after.

Nudius

Th

Primo

tertius.*

die,

day

before

yesterday; three
davs ago.
The first day.

Cels

* This phrase is derived from nunc dies est teiiins.


We ha iv
also nudius quartus, four days ago; nudius quintus, five days
ago, &c.

6*

6G TERMS AND PHRASES USED


Pereiulif

perendino

die.

IN PRESCRIPTIONS.

The next day

after

to-morrow.

Proximis diebus, Cels.

Tlie

lull

wing

days.

Proxima

The day

luce.

before.

Quotidianus, Cels.; indies; Daily, or every


quotidie, Cels. omni die.
day.
Alternis diebus,' Cels. Alternd Every other day.
;

I'riinda) die

quaque.

Tertiis diebus.

Every third day.


Post paucos dies; paucis post
few days after.
diebus.
'Biduum, Cels.; 2 triduum, 'Two days; *three
CEL8. 'quatriduum.
days 'four days.
De die in diem.
From day to day.
Mane, Cels.;- aurora; tern- Morning,
pore matutino; bora matu-

tina.

Diluculo; multo mane; primo Early in the mornmane; prima luce, Cels.;
ing; at daylight,

summo mane.
Crastino mane.

To-morrow morn-

Tempus antemeridianum.

Forenoon.

Meridies.f Cels.

i\<

ing.

Pomeridies; tempus postmeri- Afternoon.


dianum.
Vesper, Cels.; vespertina, ves- Evening.
pere appropinquante.
* Mane is a tnptote, having only three oasesthe nom., ace,
and ahl s^ng
in all of which it is mane, except the ablative in
which mani is sometimes louud.
t The division of the day generally observed by the Romans
ial
into tempus antemeridianum and pomeridianum,
the
;

meridw

itself being only considered as a point


ended and the other commenced.

at

which

the one

G7

Nox, Cels.
lliic

nocte

Night.
To-night; nightly.
Night and day.

sero.

nocturnus.

Nycthemerum.*
Ilesterna. nocte.

Last night.
'Hora somni; 2 hora decubitus 'The hour of sleepdormiturus, Cels.; cubitum
ing; 2 at bedtime.
iturus ubi it cubitum.
Jentaculum.
Breakfast.
;

Prandium, Cels.
Dinner.
tempore coenandi. Supper;

Cociui, Cels.;

Hora.
Tota hora, Cels.
In boras singulis boris
;

supper-

time.
An hour.

A
;

omni

whole hour.

Hourly;

hora.

every

hour.

Per horam integram.

During an hour.

Sesquihoris.

An

hour

and

half.

Alterna hora

secunda

bora

bihorio; horia intermediis.


Trihorio; omnio tenia bora.
Quadrihorio.
Semihora, Cels.; semihorio.

Every other hour.


Every third hour.
Every fourth hour.

A half hour

every

half hour.

Omni quadrante

Every quarter of

hora3.

an hour.
the accustomed

At

Horis consuetis.

hours.

Sexagesima pars horae; minu- The

sixtieth part
of an h
u r
a

tum.

minute.

Momentum

vel

punctum tem-

poris.

From

vu'f,

night; and

moment or instant of time.

riixepa,

day.

68 TERMS AND PHRASES USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.


2

'Statim

il!ico

templd;
T

3
;

^jam

protinus

4
;

cx-

jamjam;

6
;

Immediately

('on

the spot, -without

leaving the

quamprimum.

place: -in that


veryplace; forth8

with;

at the

instantly;

first,
4i

m medi ate] y
[custom has given

extemplo
meaning:
all 1/

//

i<jiu-

related f

it

ugu

ries]

6
;

al-

ready, even now,

immediately

[re-

peated

before
ever// incut her of

sentence,
"

sitjni firs

times"]

<lc imti's

6
;

jam
someforth-

[jamjam
more ce-

than jam];
very shortly).
'Occasionally; 2according as cirlerity
7

'Prorenata;* prout res poscit


2

prout res postulet.

cumstances may
* Pro renatd is an idiomatical expression:
it signifies "according as circumstances arise ;" that is, ' occasionally." Pharmaceutical Guide.
" a prescription was sent by an accoucheur
for (lie usual medicines for e lady after her delivery.
The child was dead
In addition, there was also a prescription for some sorl
ol
for her breasts the affected parts to be rubbed with the
1

nald (occasionally). The compounder knew very well that


pro was 'for,' but not being quite satisfied about re, goes to his
re

G9
require; According as circumstances may de-

'Subinde; 2 interdum;
3

den tid
tempore in tempus.
q u a n d o;

ali4

m; de

mand.
and

'Now

then

upon which

Sometimes
"now and then
ever and anon
4
from time to

rursus vel rursum


denuo quasi de novo.

'Itcrum
8

time.
'Again, the second

time; 2 once
more, another
time; "anew,
afresh.

The newest

Novissime.

the

last.

Nuper, Cels.
Nuperrimfe.
Perpetuus.*

Lately.

Very

lately.

Perpetual,

ever-

lasting.

dictionary, and there, finds res, a thing; then turns to nala, and
tin l> niilus, a, um,
born ;' now, then, he has it right
For the
born' ; but deeming little thing' as too familiar, he,
wishing to show all due respect to his master's patient, wrote on
the label,
Tht little infant newly born to be toell rubbed with
this embrocation "
Chamberlain's Turociniurn.
* The pilula perpetua, or everlasting pill, was composed of
metallic antimony, which was believed 10 have the property of
purging as often as it was .swallowed. This was economy in right
earnest, for a single pill would serve a whole family during lives,
and mighl be transmitted as au heirloom to their posterity.
have heard of a lady who, having swallowed one of these pills,
became seriously alarmed at its not passing: "Madam," said her

'

'

'

little tiling

'

'

We

physician, "fear not; it has already passed through a hundred


patients without dilliculty" (Paris's Pharmacologia, p. SOI, 9th
edit. 1S43).

70 TERMS AND PHRASES USED IX PRES<

i:

"I

[OK

De corporis partibus. Of the Partsofth

Sect. 15.

Body.
Calvaria: cranium.
A Bummo capite;
CeLS.
Occipitium.

a vertice,

The skull.
At the top

of the

head.

The back

part of
head.
forehead.

tlie

Frons.
Uuttur, Cels.; (jugulum, Cels.;
vel. jugalus;*) larynx.
Cervix: cervices,! C e L s.
nucha.

The
The neck

Collum, Ci

The neck [whole).


The nape of the

Nucha

capitis.

{fore-

part).

The neck

(/*</,

part).

neck.

Xasus;

-naris, nares,?

Cels.

'The

nose:

nostril,

thc

the nos-

trils.

Ex medio naso imisve narium From the middle


partibus, Cels.

Jagulum

(vel

of th
se, or
the lower parts
of the nostrils.

Jugulug)

signifies the

forepart of the

tl

Guttur

la more general than Jugulum, and denotes


both tl
and the inside of the throat. It is said to come from
because whatever liquor is drunk passes through it drop by

side

drop,

aterior pari of the neck Jugulut


rather the lower and anterior part.
" Ibscindere eervicit Cervicet is elegantly used for Cervix.
bns caput "Cicero; " To cut off the head from the should
The same author also uses
rvixi
[mpendel eervlci gladius."
X Nucha is from the Arabic, and signifies medulla
emphatically it- origin and commencement,
which Dart of tie
organ the term is applied, in the technical language of
the day.
;

'<

'

>

Good s Kosology.
Nave is by far a more general and elegant term in medicine
than nasus, which is confined to the mere external
feature [Mora
Subsecivce).

OF THE PARTS OF THE BODF.

71

2
labra 'A lip z two lips.
duo, labia duo.
Ex angulis labrorum, Cels.
From the angles of
the lips.
Os, oris, Cels.; stoma (aro/ia). The mouth.
Gingiva gingiva;, Cels.
The gum; the

'Labrum, Cels. labium


;

Tonsilla, Cels.
'Auris 2auricula, Cels.;

The
3

tonsil.

he ear; 2 the
auricle; 3 the

pin- 'T

na.*

pinna.

Auricularum
]

Ex

dolore.s,

imis auribus;

Cels.

^ummis

au-

The earache.
'From the lortcr
parts of the carin the uppe r
parts of the ears.
Behind the ear.

ribus, Cels.

Post aurem, Cels.


In

aurem

instillari,

Cels.

To be dropped

into

the ear.

Aurem

infundere aliquod medi- It is proper to pour


oportet, Cels.
s o m c medicine

cameatum

into the ear.

Gena

bucca,

Cels.;

mala.f The cheek.

Cels.

The windpipe.
Aspera arteria; trachea.
Bronchus; bronchium; bron- The bronchial
chia

tube.

bronchitts.%

* Auris signifies the ear generally; auricula the flap of the


ear wiili lie auditory lube pinna the flap of the ear only.
external and
t Mala is generic, and expresses tin' cheek (the
Gena differs from .'///" in refleshy part) and the cheek-boue.
Bucca refers to the
ferring only to the external part of the face
v, nli
Gena, but regards it as capable of collapsing and being Inflated at different times
generally
| The two latter words, and their plurals, are very
and improperly used The Latin terms air derived from theGreek
t

Ipoyyo? and
and "bronchium."

which can only make "bronchus'

fip6y\i.ov,
Uorcc Subsecivte.

72 TERMS AND PHRASES USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.

Gula pharynx
;

oesophagus.

Fauces.

The
The

gullet.

throat (inter-

nal),

the

pha-

rynx.
I va, Cels.

The

uvula.

'Humerus, Cels.

2
;

os humeri.

Clavicula; os jugulare

uvula.

'The Bboulder

[ge-

nerally); -'(he
arm bone.
jugu- The clavicle or col-

lum.

lar bone.
2

'Scapula,CELS.; os scapularum,

'The shoulder
(backpart) -'the
shoulder blade.
The armpit.
The upper arm.
The forearm.
The elbow.
;

Ala, Cels.: axilla, Cels.

Brachium, Cels.
Cubitus,* Cels.
caput cubiti.
Carpus.
Palma, Cels.; vola.

Ancon

The wrist.
The palm

of the

hand.

The back

Matacarpium.
'Digitus, Cels.

2
;

pollex, Cels.

of the

hand.
'The finger;

the

thumb.
Binif

digiti.

Two

fingers.

* Cubitus, us, signifies also a lying down; a bed or couch, a


nest.

f In

or

speaking of the numbers of things of which there are two


sets, it is much less elegant to use the simple numerals

more

than the distributives. Thus we should say with propriety,


''
Sent deni deutes" (sixteen tet-th); "Quiui digiti " (jive fingers);
but not '-Bina labra " (two lips), or "Bini ocnli" (two eyes);
which, if not uuelassical, is at least poetical. Hora Si
Bina is only used with a substantive in the plural uumber.
Cicero fonnd fault with his son for having said duas literas, because literal, used in the sense of "epistola," is always put in
the plural. We say binas literas, and duas epistolas.

OF THE PARTS OF THE BODY.

73

The chest*

Thorax, Cels.

Sternum: os pectoris, Cels.


Spina dorsi.
Tergum, Cels. dorsum.

(the

"cavity"),
The breastbone.

Abdomen, f Cels.

The "backbone."
The back.
The belly [exter-

Venter; alvus, Cels.

The

nally).

belly

(inter-

mi//!/).

Lata- (lateris) Cels., Vim;.,


Horace.
Dolor laterum, Horace.
In latus aut dextrum aut Binistrum, Cels.
Latus dolet, Cels.

The

side (below the

axilla).

Pain of the sides.


Either upon his
right or left side.
side is in pain.

The

chondrium dextrum, sinistrum "umbilicus *hypogas-

the
the
hypochondrium
right, left; Na-

trium; 5lumbus, lumbi;

vol;

'Praecordia, Cels.
scrobieulus 'The pit of
cordis: epigastrium; 2 hypostomach;
;

'ilia.*

the hypo-

* An Irishman applied at a dispensary for relief. He was suffering from bronchitis, and was ordered to put a blister on his
chest. On the n'\i day of attendance, Pat, in reply to a question,
" How long did you keep
slated thai the blister had uot drawn.
it applied?"
Ans. " It is on now. " "Let me look at it." Ans.
" I can't it's at home." On further inquiry, it appeared that he
had fulfilled the directions given to him by applying the blister
(A fact.)
to his tool chest !!
t From abdo, to hide, because it hides the viscera. "Abdomen"
is very Improperly used, although by reputedly good authors, to
signify the cavity of the belly; it is evident, from its etymology
as well as from its employment, that it should be confined to the
;

parietes (Horce Subsi


* The abdomen is divided

regions

by anatomists

into three zones or

The epigastric,
2 The umbilical,
8. The hypogastric,
subdivided into three minor regions; the epigastric
1.

Each zone
7

is

TERMS AND PHRASES USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.

r4

gasirium
6

tlie

The

Jecur, Cels. hepar.*


Fel bilis.
Lien splen, Cels.
Ren, Cels.
Inguen, Cels.
Lumbus, Cels.
;

6
;

the

loin,

li

loins

flanks.

liver.

Bile.

The spleen.
The kidney.
The groin.
The loins.
The female

Loci.

geni-

tals.

Vulva seu uterus

os \ ulv33.

Canalis vulvae.
Coxa, Cels. coxendix
;

arum.
'Femur;

os cox-

womb;
mouth of

the
the

womb.
The vagina.
The hip the

hip-

The

bone.
'The thigh;

crus, Cels.

f,he

leg.

into the scrobiculus cordis or epigastrium, and the two hypochondriac regions; the umbilical into the umbilicus, and the two lumbar regions; and the hypogastric into the hypogastrinm or pubic
The reportion, and the two iliac regions or Hanks at the sides.
lative positions of these parts are shown by the following dia-

gram

right

hypochondrium
right

lumbar

region
right iliac

region

epigastrium.

umbilicus

hypogastrium

left

hypochondrium
left

lumbal

region
left iliac

region.

* The Latin tongue has two distinct terms to express the organ
of the liver, hepar and jecur. Tlie first is easily refei red
Greek finap for the second, the critics have scarcely a guesa to
offer.
It is, in fact, a Persian term (Jekur), which has been
copied into the Turkish as well a- into the Latin; in the former
being pronounced jegur. Good's NosoI<j<j>j.
;


75

OF THE SIGNS OF DISEASES.


2

Patella, Cels.;

kneo

'The

'Genu ; poples, Cels.


mola; rotula.

2
;

the

ham.
The kneepan.

The calf.
Sura, Cels.
z
the
'Moris pedis; Malleolus, Cels.; 'The instep:
3
ankle 3 theheel.
r, I talus, Cels.
calx.
The sole of the
Planta pedis, Cels.
;

foot.

The

Digiti pedis, Cels.

Sect. 16.

De signis morborum. Of

toes.

(he

Signs of

Diseases.

The cough

Tussi ingravescente.

increas-

ing.
in

mak-

ing water

con-

The heat

Perstante ardore urinae.

tinuing.

Dolore rheumatico torquente.

Durante fluxu cruento.

rheum a tic
pain being troublesome.
During the bloody
The

flux.

stomacho The stomach being


empty.
si tussis If the cough shall
Si tussis increbuerit
have increased.
accreverit.
If the patchings
Si vigilice anxerint.

Ventriculo jejuno
vacuo.

Si pervigilium* supervenerit.

should be troublesome.
If intense watching should come
on.

* Pervigilium
se it
however, great

expresses

it,

is

frequently

translated

"a watching;

in

would he synonymous with mmha. It signifies,


asGesuer (Thesaurus)
01 intense watching; or,

"Multee Vigilice."

'

76 TERMS A\D PHRASES USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.

malum

Si

arthriticum redintc-

the arthritic
(gouty) pain

i'

graverit.

should

be re-

newed.

non dormiat

Si

si

non somnum

If the

maxime augeat dyspnoea aut

Si

patient

do

not sleep.

capiat.

difficulty of

If

bre

tussis.

ng, or

cough, should be
^ ery
tr oublesi me.
If the patient complains of pain.

dolorem.*

Si conqueritur

tenesmus iterum

Si vires sinunt, Gels.

If tenesmus should
again return.
If the strength per-

Si febris adest,

mit.
If the fever be pre-

Si

redierit.

sent.

per baec dolor non finitur, If the pain be not


Cels.
allayed by these

Si

means.

Ubi

vigilia torsit, Cels.

Cum

When

nocturna vigilia premitur,

he is trouwith night
watching.
If the pain should
be argent.
If the patient be

Cels.
Si
Si

bled

malum
Bitis

urgeat.

iiis

sitis vexat,

* It is

much

Cels.;

Ips.s

est;

si

si sitiat.

thirsty.

usual, and, therefore,

words with a preposition and ablative


sative thus, " Conqueritur
kc. (Hora: Subsecivte.)
:

1i e n
w a n t of
sleep distresses.

dolorem "

is

* j proper, to use those


than with tlie accupreferable to " dedolore,
1<

case,

OF THE SIGNS OF DISEASES.


Si

spasmus ventriculi

adorit.

If the

77

spasm of the

stomach be present.
Si

minetur morbus.

Urgento dolore vel

disease

If the

threaten.
The pain or cough
being
trouble-

tussi.

some.
Digitis cedcre

foveolamque ac- To

pit

on pressure.

cipere.

Dentium stridor; dentibus Grinding

of the
teeth
to grind
the teeth.
Cibi fastidium (anorexia seu in- Want of appetite.
frendere.

appetentia).
Cibi aviditas (l)ulimia).

Too great appetite.

Molestante languore aut

flatu-

The

languor or
flatulence being

lentia.

'Febre aggrediente: 2 febrc absents 3 febre durante {vel adstante vel astante) durante
febris exacerbatione.*

troublesome.
the fever

'When

coming

Donee

Vhen

afficiantur gingiva1

is

on;

the fever

absent 3during the fever.


Until the gums are
is

affected.

Donee gingivae intumescant.

Until the gums become swollen.

* The interval between the paroxysms of an intermitting lever


was termed by the Greeks apyrexy (a7rupefi'a), by the Latins intermission (intermissio). It', however, the interval were only a
remission, instead of a perfect intermission, the return of the hot

was denote nated exacerbation [exacerbatio).


lit
Good uses the term to signify the paroxysm of a
intervals are merely imperfect or remission
of paroxysm when Literally rendered,
:

is

J'r.

Mason

disease whose
the strict meaning

78 TERMS AND PHRA8BS DSBD

IN

PRESCRIPTIONS.

(sew cursus Until ptyalism is


produced.
adauctus, seu fluxus
salivas adauctus) cieatur.
spasm
Until
the
Donee abierii spasmus.

Donee ptyalismus*
saliva'

have

shall

mux

re-

ed.

Until the pain shall

Donee dolor exulaverit.

lia\ e

Doner evanesoant symptomata. Until

removed.
the symp-

Donee dolor mitescat.

toms disappear.
it
excites
Until
pustules.
Until the pain mi*

Donee somnus obrepat.

Until

Donee pustulaa

excitet, Oels.

tigates.

sleep

come

on.

Donee

seger convalescat.

the patienl
well
ad Until the hiccup
Until
is

Donee singultus et nisus


vomitum cessaverint.

Donee

altera accessio accedat,

Cels.I

PtyalismUS,

TTTiieAicr/iO!

and attempts to
vomit shall have
Until another accession
accedes
or comes on.

or 7TTvaAi<7Hos, from

nTi/co,

exscreo.

(accessio or accessus) was employed by


t
the Latin writers in a sense precisely parallel with thi
word /
-<ipoi'<rnios), aud either embraced the cold "i'
lie seizure, the only stages into which such
hotstaj
seizure was divided
the declination (declinatio) a<
.1 a
Hence paroxysm Is a term not
art of the paroxysm.
to be found
Celsus, who uniformly em)i
in it-.

The term Accession

stead.

Among

recpnt writers, however, and perhaps generally in the


present day, while the term paroxysm is app
rely to


OF THE POWERS AND USES OF REMEDIES.

Pro caus exigcntiit

pro

rei

exigentia\

According to the
urgency of the
case.

Dum

corporis

vires

sinunt.

As

long as the
perstrength

Cels.

mits.

When

Ubi dolor urget, Cels.

the pain

is

violent.

Dum

While the

febtis ahsit, Cels.

fever

is

absent.

Sect.

De

17.

virihis

et

remediorum, &c.

usu Qfthe Powers and


< s of Remedies.
'

perdu- To cure.

Sanare; ad sanitatem
cere, Cels.

to flts of every violent and intermitting


the term accession la limited to the commencement or
fit, its insulins, as denominated by the Latin writers
sect. Ivi.) .-peaks of
and bence Dr. Cullen (First Lines, chap.
cession of paroxysms," a phraseology which would be
sense upon the original meaning of the terms while Dr. Tarton, with evident indeeisi.ni upon the subject, defines net
his Glossary, "'the beginning or paroxysm of an intermitting

fever

fits,

but

.'*,

fever"

(a

take which sensi

," giving
(It, or exacerbation ol adiseoa
as well in respect to thi genus as the stage

access,

iter latitude,
is in

to

paroxysmus, "an

The "access,
rhid affi tion
"
the language of the Latin translat >rs of Oaten,
(Gal. de Differ. Feb. lib. 2, cap. iv.)
in his definition of hectic fever),
erm " accession" as synonymous

im
In

some

with paroxysm.

Notwithstanding the general appropriation of the word


duration of a fever tit. or
ie Latin writers to the whole
illed a paroxysm, its radical idea imports simply
" and in this n
avenue
entrance,
"advance, approach,
Celsus himself is perpetually using the term in its verbal form,
.

indeed

nical signification, as
es the

term
if

in

"donee

altera a

any kind.

lot."

Dr.

the commencement or ons


See his Nosology.)

to signify

Mason

80 TERMS AM) PHRASES USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.

Morbum

curtare; ad morbum To shorten the


rase.
curtandum.
Ad recidivum prsecavendum. To prevent :i

dis-

re-

lapse.

To apprehend

Recidivum timere, Cels.


Dolorem

lenire,

Cels. (vel

or
fear a relapse.
se- To
allay (or re-

dare, vel tollere).


Somnum molire, movere, Cels.
(

facer e,

vel

afferre,

vel

lieve) pain.

To produce

sleep.

con-

ciliare).

Efficere ut quiescat

ad quietem To keep quiet.

conciliandum.
In lecto collocare, Cels.

Drinam

excitare.

Menstrua evocare.

To
To

place in bed.
increase the
flow of urine
To promote the

menses,

orem compescendum.

To moderate

the

acidity.

Acorem, ardor em que corrigere. To correct the


acidity and heat
(of the stomach).

Ad guatum

conciliandum.

To

please the pa-

late.

Gratum saporem

Ad

reddere.

future

bstandum.
Caput sublime habere, Cels.
Os fumigare.
Valetudinarium
fumij

et

To

give an agreeable taste.

To prevent fetor.
To raise the head.
To fumigate the

mouth.
vestimenta To fumigate the
and
sick-room

the clothing.
Inhalare vapores aqua: tepidae Toinhalethe^

GENERAL THERAPEUTICS AND

of tepid (warm)
water.

(vel calidae).

Vaporem calidum

IRMACOLOGY. 81

I'll

To

ore recipere,

warm

receive

vapor into
mouth.

Cels.

To obviate

Putredini occurrere.

the

putres-

cency.

Spasmos discutere

(vel

depel-

To remove spasm.

lere).

flatum) de- To expel worms


(wind, &c.)
jicere {vel expellere, vel elidere, &c.)
Vermes 'protruhere 2 enecare 'To extract, -'to de-

Vermes (spiritum

8
take
to
out worms.
Ad calculos valere, pnrstare, To act on calculi.
&c.
To cauterize.
Adurere, Cels., &c.
To corrode.
Rodere, exedere, Cels.. &c.
Quod occurrit putredinem an- That which obvi-

stroy,

educere, Cels.

tisepticum.

ates putrescency

an anti-

septic.

Sect. IS. Br. Duncan's Classification ofth


ral Terms used by Writers on General Therap
additions.
tles and Pharmacology, with some

ti-

"Although many of these terms are obsolete,


some of them vague and ill-defined, and others hypothetical, vet, as they occur in writers of authority,
and are sometimes useful, I have collected them

together.

Dr. Cullen-

has given a pretl

A Treatise on Materia Medica, in two volumes,


burgh, 1780. See Vol. i. p. 161.
*

4to.

Edin-


82 TERM- AND PHRASBS USED

IN

PRESCRIPTIONS.

alphabetical catalogue of many of them, stating, in


regard to each term, in what sense it baa been commonly or particularly employed, with what |>n>priety it has been used, why be does not employ
it, and very often why it should not be employed
at all. I have attempted, in imitation of Linnaeus,*
to arrange them systematically, generally contrasting with each term its antagonistic or opp
term, when any lias been used, ao as to abbreviate
explanation, and frequently to render it unnecessary."

Terms derived from


I.

ox

Till.

the Action

II

of External Agents.

NOTION OF ASSIMILATION.

tend to the formation of the body.


Synthetics
Analytica tend to decompose and waste it.
nourish the body.
Nutrientia
Restaurahtia, Analeptica
restore lost strength.

II.

OX

Tin;

Humectantia,

MECHANICAL STATE OF THE

SOLIDS.

Absorbentia, Exeiccantia.
Emollientia, Laxantia, Relaxantia, Chalastica, ImSinguantia, X Astringentia, [ndurantia, Tonica,
Loborantia.
III.

OX THE

VITAL FUNCTIONS OF

Till.

SOLIDS.

Stimuli, Stimulantia, Alexiteria, Hypersthenica,


Contrastimuli, Hyposthenica.
Excitantia,
Sedantiai Deprimentia.
Intoxicantia, Inebriantia, Narcotica, Fatuantia,
Temulentia, Phantastica,
Antitoxica, Antidota, Alexipharmaca, Alexicaca, Theriaca, Be-

zoartica.
* Materia Medica, liber

De Planus.

8vo.

Amsteledemi, 1749.


GENERAL THERAPE1

Anthypnotica,

l(

MJ PHARMACOLOG

Hypnotica,

Somnifera, Agry-

pnotica.
Hypcra3sthetica,
AnsBsthetica.
Spastica, Convulsiva, Tetaiiica,
Calefacicntia,
Refrigerantia.

Paralytica.

ON VESSELS OR CANALS.

IV.

Anastomotica

opening

tin'

extreme

orifices

of

Styptica, Stenotica, Ishsema


blood-vessels.
contracting the orifices of vessels or calibre of
canals.

Aperientia, Solventia, Deobstruentia, Deoppilantia


removing obstructions.

V.
1.

Implentia,

ON FLUIDS.

Altering quantity.

Deplentia.
'J.

Altering distribution.

Attrahentia, EpiBpastica, draws fluids to a part,


Repellent ia, Kepercutientia.
Intercipientia, Apoorustica, drive fluids from

X
a

part.

Derivativa Revulsiva, draw fluids from a part.


3.

Altering consistence, Diathetica.

Diluentia, Inundantia,
Incidentia, Attenuantia,
4.

Inspissantia.
Incrassantia.

Altering quality.

Dyscrasiaca, Immutantia, Alliotica, Alterantia.


In Ob-volventia, Obtundentia, Inviscantia, blunting acrimony.
Lenientia Temperantia, Demulcentia, Edulcoran^

tia,

Antacria, correct irritants.

84 TERMS

AND PHRASES USED

IN

PRESCRIPTIONS.

Antaeida, Absorbentia, X Antalkalina.


Depurantia, Abstersiva, removing acrimony.
Balsamica, resisting bitter putridity.
Spansemiea, X Hwmatinica.
VI.

o\

Ml HAL SECRETION'S AND EXCRETIONS.

Eccritioa.

Evacuantia, Evacuatoria, X Sistentia, Ueprimentia,


Cohibentia.
Errhina, Ptarmica, Sternutatoria.
Anacathartica, Pituitosa, Apophlegmatizonta, Apophlegmatizantia, Apophlegmatica, purge upward-.
Masticatoria, Sialogoga, Salivantia, Ptyalagoga.
Expectorantia, Tussiculosa.
Emetica, Vbmitoria, Singultuosa, X Antiemetica.
Physagoga, Ructatoria, Carminativa, Borborygmica, Flatulent ia.
Cathartica, purge downwards.
Eccoprotica, Alviduca, Laxativa, Laxantia,
Lenitiva, Purgantia leniora et mitiora.

Pargantia draBtica.

Panchymagoga.
Hydragoga.
Phlegniagoga.
Cbolagoga.

Melanogoga.
Diuretica.

Menagoga, Emmenagoga.
Abortiva, Amblotica, Ecbolica, Amblothridia.
Aristoloohica.
Lactifera, Galactophora,

Lactifuga.
Diapnoica, Diapboretica, promote insensible perspiration.
Sudorifica, Hidrotica, Perspirantia, produce sweat.

GENERAL THERAPEUTICS AND PHARMACOLOGY. 85


Terms derived from
VII.

the

Body

ilself.

TERMS DERIVED FROM DISEASES.

Acopa. against lassitude.


Antisthenica, Debilitantia.
Antipyrctica, Antiphlogistic*, Antifebrilia, Febrifuga.

Antiquartana.
Antiloimica, against plague.
Antihectica.
Anticacbectica.
Antiseptica, against putrid diseases,
Antispasinodica.

Septica.

A nti paralytica.
Antidydinica. against giddiness.

Anodyna, Paregorica, Sopientia, against pain.


Antastbmatica.
Antiphthisica.
Hysterica, Antihysterica, Anthypochondriaca.
Anticolica.

Antidysenterica.
Arthntica, Antarthritica, Antipodagrica.

Ant [scorbutica.
Antilvssus, against the bite of a

mad

dog.

Antivenerea.

Antiambusta, Anticaustica, against burns.


Antiscolica, Anthelmintica, Helminthagoga, Vermifuga, against worms.
Pbtheiroctonia, Pbthiriaca, against lice.
Lithontriptica, Lithonthryptica, Saxifraga, Lithica,
Antilithica.
VIII.

TERMS DERIVED FROM PARTS AND FUNCTIONS


OF THE BODY.

Generalia,

Topica.

86 TERMS AND PHRASES USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.

Nervina.
Cerebralia, Spinalia, Ganglionica, acting on
the respective systems of nerves.

Muscularia.
\

isceralia.

Absorbentia.
Cephalica, Anamnestioa, improving the memory.
Cosmetica.

phthalmioa.

Nasalia.
Acoustioa, Otica.
Odontica, Odontalgica, Deutifricia.
Depilatoria, Psiluthria,

remove

hairs.

Thoracica.
Pectoralia, Arteriaca,

Pneumonica, Pulmonica,

Becchica.
lardiaca,

Jordialia.

Abdominalia.
Stomaohica.
Enterica.

Hepatica.
Splenica.
Sialica
Pancreatica.
Antinephritica, Nephritica.
renetica.
Uterii ia.

Aphrodisiaca,

Anaphrodisiaca, Antapbrodisiaca,

Suphisticaiitia, Sterilitantia.
IX.

TERMS APPLIED

TO EXTERNAL
REMEDIES.

AND TOPICAL

Abstergentia, Detergentia, Abluentia.


Lubricantia,
Absorbentia.

OF FOOD, ETC.

Resolventia, Discutientia,

87

Matu-

Sappurantia,

rantia.

Emollientia,

Adstringentia, Roborantia externa,

Indurantia

Etubefacientia,
Refrigerantia.
Vesicatoria, Excoriantia, Exulcerantia, Corrosiva.
Escharotica, Erodentia, Phagedsenica, Caustica,
Cicatrizantia, Epulotica.
Anaplero ica, Sarcotica, Consolidantia, Vulneraria,
Glutinaiitia.
Exsiccantia,
Digerantia, Digestiva.
Mundificantia, Catneeretica.

Vulneraria, Traumatica, Agglutinantia.


Catagmatica, Syllotica, uniting fractured bones.

Tains derived from Medicines.


Aloedaria, Aloetica.
Aloephangina, a mixture of aloes and aromatics.
Mucilaginosa, Oleosa, &c.

Terms from imaginarg

virtues.

Archsealia, agreeable to Arcbseus.


Basilica, of noble power.
Heroica, of great virtue.

De

Sect. 19.

'Cibus;

ali

Of Food,

eibo, &c.

men turn

3
;

esca,

Cels

ishment
'Yietus, Gels.

diseta.

food)

'plenus
lentissimus
bustior,

Cels

plenior)
'uberior

-\
;

'eat-

able food.
Regi- 'Diet (course

men.
Cibus

it-c.

'Food (any kind)


-aliment or nour-

a-

*ro-

z
;

of

Regimen.

Food

'plenteous
full diet]
2
nourishvery
[i.e.

ss TERMS

AM> PHRASES USED

PRESCRIPTIONS.

in

n g

''in

a b u

Diseta

'carnis,

^stronger.
Diet 'meat, -'soup,
milk, 'simple.

lactis,

'jusculi,

ant:

'1

ii

:,

simplex.
Food moderate.
Cibus mediooris, Cels.
s
Cibus 'tenuis, 'simplex, mollis, Food 'light, 'sim3
8
B
ple, 8oft, ''warni,
levis,
exiguus,
*calidus,
"small in quanCels.
6

tity,

Alimentum

li-ht.

Nourishment

liboralc, Cels.

ple

i.
|

am-

a liberal

e.

allowanee of

Drink ample

Totio liberalis, Cels.

|.

[i.

e.

allow-

liberal

ance of].

Cum

With appropriate

debito regimine.

'Hordeum, Cels.; 2 farina hordei


s,

a hordeacea, Cels.

um mundatum

horde-

hordeum
perlatum. 6Maltum, byne
[/3bvq),

brasium;

infusum

7
<lebynes, brasii seu malti
coctuin hordei vel aqua borde;

ata.
;

barley

pot
or*pearl

barley. 6Malt;
6

barley

oats

or

groats

*water gruel.
'Wheat J w beaten
;

flour;

wh eaten

mylum, from a, not; and muAt), a mill: because


without the aid of a mill.
]

sweet

Or

\YOVt,

wort;
w ater.
;

'Tritieum, Cels. 'farina tritici,


3
Cels.
amylum* tritici
:

hulled,

3
'oatmeal
avena 'Oats
3
dec o r t eated
grutum; *de-

'Avena; -Carina avenae


excorticata sew
COCtum avena'.

regimen.
8
barley
Barley;
meal
'Scotch,

It is

made

OF FOOD, ETC.

89

4
furfures tristarch
bran
;
E
farina tritici fcosta.
baked flour.
'Secale; z secale corn u turn vel 'Rye Spurred rye
ergota.
or ergot.
)r\ za, Cels.
Rice.
2
2
'1'anis, Cels.
Panis fermen- 'Bread.
Bread
fermented
or
tatus; 3 sino fermento, Cels.
panis azymus. 4 Panis bis
leavened; 3 unferV.i.s.
mented or unpanis iterum
coctus,
5
Panis nauleaven ed.*
COCtus, Pliny.
4
6
ticus, Pliny.
Biscuit. 6 Ship
Panis tostus;
8
ji;inis aridus,
bread or sea bis'panis ustus
biscuit.
CoastCels.
interior pars panis,

furfur, Cbls.

bici

mica panis. ,0 Crusta


panis, Pliny.
"Panis hes12
ternus, Cels.
Panis hordcCei.s.

aceus, Cels.;
l4
linus
panis

13

"Panis
16

panis

candidus,
panis furfuraceus.

bread;
bread.

seca-

o f
10

triticeus.

ed bread

burnt
8

1)

r e a d.

C rust of bread.

"Y esterd

Cels.;

'Crumby
ay's

l2

Barley
13
1) r e a d
r y e
bread; l4 wheaten
bread.

bread.

'

White

bread; 16 brOwn
or bran bread.
Italian pasti

Turunda' Italic*.

maecaroni,
micelli,

ver-

and Ca-

gliari paste).

Broth.
Jus, Cei.s. jusculum.
2
broth.
Jus 'Goose
'Jus anserinum, Cels.^
-'.Mutton broth.
jus verveovilluni, Cels.

Dodson's patent unfermented bread


kind of bread.

of this

8*

is

a well-known

example

90 TERMS ami PHRASES USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.


8

cinum.8Jus bovillum; jus


4

Beeftea.*Veal
broth.*Chicken

vitulinum,
Cels.; jus vituli, Pliny.
r
'-lus pulli gallinacei, Cels.
jus gallinaceum, Pliny jus

bovinum.

.lus

broth.

test

ml in is

Jusculum

Polenta, Plint.
muliebre,
Lac

,;

lac

Lae

ex

Iao

Woman's

mulierum

human

asininum,

-Ass's

Pliny;

Lac bubulum,

asiriis,

lac assclhc.f

of thick

Celp.;

[vel
B

kind

porridge, pap.
'Thin porridge.
Polenta.

Pliny].

Qruel.

a\ enaceum.
^uls, Pliny.2 Pultioula,CELS. 'A

bumanum

6
Jus
mil inum.
concentratum.

')

'Turtle

soup.

Cow'a
roat's

milk;
milk
milk.
milk.
milk.

The polenta of the ancients was barley bread dried at thi


111
The snbfried after It had lain soaking in wa
Rold in tin' London shops under the name of polenta in the
The Italians apply the
meal of Indian com [Zea Mm/::)
pohnta to a kind of padding made with Indian corn
The t* ord

and

om
t

Asella

is

word

polli n

little she-ass.

inis,

Aseuus

Soar.

young

signifli

also been extended to Ashe


as the Cod
(Morrhua vulgaris), which nave the color of the
Varro, in speaking of fishes named from their color, d
dream
Axellus, or Cud, a-~ deriving ii^ name fr
hose, therefore, who trnsi to
dictionary, no
tell wl
lecoris aselli mean) thooilofa co
tin- oil of the lir> r of an ass.
in 1839, the latti
m was
actually adopted by a writer in a medical journal, who gravely
informed his readers that the Germans had
n^iun oil of asses'
Pliny says that there were two kind of
for fifteen years !
Asi-lli: one smaller, called ('all a rid-, /be other found in deep
Phis

lias

1 1

water, and denominated Hindu


Asellus bas been extended to several spe<
i tribe,
Thus
lie coin m on Cod is called AselluS major: lie- Ling,
SeU/Ut Iutkjus;
theCoal-fish,
the Whiting, Asellus albusi the
Asellus striatus; the Pollack, A. Haifingo, &c. Milu pi des (Art

OF FOOD, ETC.

91

lac vaccinum, Pliny.


Ewe's milk.
6
caprinum, Cels.
lac
Mare's milk.
6
caprarum, Pliny.
Lacovillum,CsLS.; lacovium, Pliny.
6
Lac equinum, Pliny.
In lacte exhibendum.*
To be administered

Cels.

Lac

in milk.

2
cremor lactis.
'('ream.
Butter.
s
Lac butyratum.
'Butte rmilk.

'Flos lactis
-'ISutyrum.

Serum

5
Serum lactis
Seram lactis tar7
tarizatum.
Serum lactis

lactis.

viuosum.

aluminatum; serum aluminosum. 8 Serum lactis tamarindatum. 9 Saccharum lac-

*Whey. 5 Wine
whey.

Cream

of tartar whey.

Alum whey.

7
B

Tamarindwhey.

9
Sugar of milk,
saccholactin.
or saccholactin.
Ex gelatin a ribesia, vel ribesi- 'In currant
it jell;
jelly.
2
orum. 2 Ex gelatins vituli.
In calf s [foo VI
jelly
'Ex melle pinguiveullo humore: 'In honey, or any-'in quovis vehiculo crasso
thing thick 2 in
;f
3
any thick vehiin quovis grato vehiculo.

tis

cle; 3 n any
agreeable vehii

cle.
1

2
Rum.
Spiritus vini Gallici. 2 Spiritus 'Brandy.
3
r r a c k. %
sacchari.
'Spiritus oxyzse.

madiU.0 officinarum) have been denominated asetti on account of


Dioscorides calls them otoi, or
their color being that of an ass.
asses; others have termed them onisci (bvio-Koi), or little asses.
* "1 have known the loll., wins;' Latin (which, by the by, ia
continually written) translated thus: Maneat in lecto, 'in milk
in a morning.'
Mane in lacte exhibend, 'and be particular to
remain in bed.' " Chamberlain's Tirocinium Medicum.
have
been translated, " in a stout hackney coach."
Said to
j Arrack, or Rack, is the name applied not only to rice spirit
i

92 TERMS AM) PHRASES USED ix PRESCRIPTIONS.

"Spiritus
*Spiritusjuniperi.
8
Spiritus frulactis equini.

*Gin,

nienti.

111

Hollands,
B

Geneva.
s s.

Kou-

(i

spirit.
Viniiiii

merum

album

\iiuiin

Wine.
White or red wine.
Cape \\ inc.

temetum.f
rubrum:

;*

ril

Vinum Capense.
'Vinum Gallicum -'V. BurgunV.
Burdieale
dicum

1'

*V.

Campanicum

liini s( a

anum

5
;

Y. Rubel-

Helvolum vd lra\
C
V. Languedocium.
<

i-

-li
3

''

:!

1>

4i

li

(1

!i

gun

u r
o r

o a

<1
ii

y
x

pa g n e
8
Fron"Claret;
!

h a in

tignac.
\
wine
'German
lermanicum
2
wine
Rhenish
sew Rhenense V.
Hochheim(as
Hoohheimense) 3 V. Moselcommonly
lanum.
er,J
culled
Hock);

'Vinum

Rhenanum

'Moselle.
sew Portu- Port wine.

Vinum Lusitanicum
gallicum.

Vinum Toccaviense

(sen

Ti-

Tokay.

bicense).

white
'Vinum Hispanicum album, sen 'Spanish
wine,
Bherry
Xeres vel Xerse V. Xericum;
2
wine;
V. album; 2 V. Illicitanum
Alicant
;

sew Alicanticum;

V. Malac-

'M

;i

(spirilus oryzce), but also to the spirit obtained by distillation


from fermented cocoanut toddy (by some called Vnlm <
* Merum, is properly an adjective, and signifies pure, unmixed.

When

said of wine,
wine.
| Temeti
f The termination
to

many

water

is

vinum

is

understood, and

it

signifies

pure

and heady wine.


(Heim, home) is in Germany given

a sir onq
hi

inn r

wines; as Laubenheimer, Rudesheimer, &c. Pump


sometimes jocosely called at table Pumpenkeimer.

OF FOOD, ETC.
cense

4
;

V. Tinto.

93

o u n

entwine

(Rota).

Vinuin Maderaicum.

Vinum

Madeira wine.
Canary wine.

Canariense.

'Vinum pomaceum;

V. pyra- 'Cider

ceum.
Vinum generosum, Hor.

2
;

perry.

Generous or strong
wine.

edentulum, Mellow wine.

Vinuin vetustate
Plaut.

'Cerevisia l>eZ cervisia, zythum,*


3
-cerevisia familiaris
cere;

4
cerevisia
visia Londinensis
tenuis, sent ikI<i riti vel eibaria;
;

'cerevisia primaria, generosa;


cerevisia fortis ;f 6 alla: 7 eerevisia vetula; 8potus acidns;
9
vappa; l0potus recens; "cerevisia lupu lata, non lupulata.

'Beer or ale;
household beer
3
London beer or
4
porter
table
s
beer:
strong
beer; 6 ale: 'stale
beer; 8 hard or
acid beer; 'dead
;

beer: '"fresh
beer "beer hopped, not hopped.
;

'Cerevisia avenacea -cerevisia 'Beer made from


eats: -frumrye;
secalina; 3 cerevisia hordea3
barley^
from
cea; 4 cerevisia pini; 'cerevisia
beer;
*spruce
lagenaria.
s
bottled beer.
Bitter beer or ale.
Cerevisia amara.
;

* Zytlium

(v0o<;)

irley.

was a kind of beer obtained by fermentation


was made from unmalted barley: its

Cervisia

in pale, and in this respect would resemAle and beer of the present day are flavored with hops,
and hence they are sometimes called hopped bar {Cervisia Iwpu-

color, therefore,

would

ble ale.
lata).

to certain states of the


t The word fortis is applicable
only, aud, therefore, is inapplicable to beer.

mmd

94 TERMS

AND PHRASES

Pro potu

commune;

BED IX PRESI RIM

pro potu

For

common

drink.

ordinario.
Potua inebrians.

Strong

liquor

or

drink.
l

Aqua communis;

destillata;

'Common

fervens; *fluviatilis; B fontana


8
s
pluviatilis seu
seu
pluvia 'nivalis.
t <

>

9
;

hoi

*river; 'spring;
8
rain "snow.

.\<|iia

water;

^distilled

Admirable or won-

mirabilis.

derful water [an


spirit
aromatic
with
prepared
l-'n mil
brandy,
cinnamon, mace,

and

other

aro-

mati
l

Aqua

panis; zdecoctum
infusum these; 'in-

tosti

hordei

3
;

fusum carnis bubulse;

inf.

carnis bubulse concentratum;


cacao; 'cbocolata; Bcoffea,

infusum

coffeas.

Toast-water; *barley-water; 'infusion of tea, or


tea commonly so
called ; 4 beef-tea;
'beef gravy or
Boup
"cocoa
:

'chocolate; 'coffee, or infusion


of coffee.
vinolentse Spirituous, vinous,

Potiones ardenteB
seu mcraciores cerevisiae.
;

and

fermented

drinks.
*

Aquafontis has been misread aquafortis.

Chap. VII.

p. 108.

See foot-note to

OF PHARMACEUTICAL INSTRUMENTS.
Sect.

20.

De

instrumentis

pharmaceutii
Instrument;!,

OfPharmaceutical
Instruments.

i.s.

apparatus,

ma-

An

chinamenta.
Pi.stillum.
3

fictile,

marmoreum, *ferreum,

A
A pestle.
A mortar
'glass,

A
A

Porphyrias.

(of

earthenware,
"marble,
4
5
iron, wood.

lig-

neum).
Spathula.

apparatus (ge-

nerally).
knife.

Cultcr, cultcllus.

Mortarium ('vitreum,*

95

spatula.
levigating or
smoothing stone

(sometimes made

or porphyry).
vessel ('of earth-

Vas, vaseulum ('fictile, figulare;


2
loricatum, vitreatum).
enware; 2glazed).
'Vitruini-vitrea, Pliny; 3 phiala; 'Glass;
'glasses
4

lagena

6
;

ampulla.

{vessels

glass)
"

made of
3

a flask

a phial
5

a bot-

tle.

Orificio

amplo

prsedittis.

Furnished with a
wide orifice.

In vitro charta nigra involuto In glass [that is,


[seu obducto).
in a glass vessel]
which is enveloped by black paper [to exclude
the light].
* "In expressing the mutter of which any substance was directly composed, as well as the vegetable or animal from which
anything was derived, the Romans almost always used au adjecthis, in the former case, usually termiuated iu ctw."
llorcc SubseciwB
I

06 TERMS AND PHRASES

SI

D IN n;i:s< RIPTIONS.

H)bturamentum, Punt; epistomium 'operculum.,


'Obturamenta Buberea; opercula suberea; 2obturamenta

A stopper; 2a cover
or

lid.

^ork stoppers
[corks and

vitrcu.

bungs];

2
glass
stoppers.
'Pyxis (pyxidis), Punt; z pyxis 'A box an apothestannea, PuNY; 8 pyxislignea,
eary's boxor jal!
"fi.'tilis, 6chartacea.
lipoi
a tin box;
;

a wooden box
an earthen box
or gallipot; 6 a
paper box.
A little box used
by apothecai ies,
and capable of
holding liquids
a gallipot,
:

Pyxidicula,

Cm

ocatuia.

a wooden

or chip

box [as the


ointment,
ZClK/r

pill,

or

lni.r

/"-

.
|

"Ollii.

Puny;

nils.

Puny;

ollula;

'olla fie-

'A

*ollaalba,gris*ea,

put

(usuaUy

earthenwart

fusca s olla epistomiosubereo


vel vesica da,,

little

pol

|;

earthen pol

an

*a

white,

gra
brown pot; 5 a
pot closed by a

cork stopper [as


by a bung] or l,\

Narthecium, Cn

box, gallipot,or
place
to
keep

medicines

in.

//

OF PHARMACEUTICAL INSTRUMENTS.

07

applies
to
the
pots or jars in
which the apothecary keeps his
medicines].
An ointment box.

Arcula.
Fictilia.

Infundibulum

per inf'utnlilm-

lum.

Earthen
vessels,
earthenware.
A funnel through
;

funnel.
'A rod or twig;
;i

baculus

vel

baculum

*bacillum.

stick

little

stick.

Virga

Ope

vitrea.

glass rod.

By means

bacilli lignei.

small

of

.stick.

Thermometrum

(Fahrenheit-

ianiim).
Pannus ('crassus, -tenuis,

*cannabinus,

tens.
6

nus, sericus,

thermometer
(Fahrenheit's).

:5

lin-

cloth
2

gossypilaneus).

ti

('coarse,
:!

e,

n e n,

*hempen,
ton,

"cot-

silk,

'wool-

en).

Cribrum (setaceum).
Pei cribrum.*

sieve (hair).
a sieve.
Hip- 'A bag, a little

Through

'Sa.ceus. Bacculus; -nianica

bag;

pocratis.

Hippo-

crates's sleeve (a

conical

flannel

bag used for filtration).

Typus.
* "Ope cribri"
9

is Ie>s classical

mould.

than ''per cribrum."

;;

RM8 ami PHRASES OSED


Tegula.
'Charta

l\

;
;

PRESCRIPTIONS.

A
l
:

chartula

tile.

'Paper;

thartulse.

small

'a

paper
small papers [as
the papers kept
rendu cut in apopie

if

thecaries' shops
2

\.

emporetica

'Bibulous or blottiug paper


epistolaris
8
V.
or brown paper
c. cerata
3
8
laevigata seu dentata
c. exb
e pa p e r
*writing paper;
ploratoria [eserulea vel rube-

'Charta bibula
erulea
V. augusta

c.

tacta

11

s
fi

|.

(>

waxed

smooth

tcst

paper;
paper;
i

paper blue
m- reddened |.
'Clean paper [not
|

Charta pura

fechediasma.

ir

tilt

ii

ii )

'waste paper.

Let them be

Dentin- in chartis.

in

uenl

papers.

[Other terms pertaining to pharmaceutical instruments, &c, which occasionally occur in prescriptions, have been already mentioned.
Relating to plasters
p. 25-28
electrifying
p. 35-39.
galvanising
p. 39-41.
magnetising
1. 41-42.
bathing,
p. 53-58.
measu
p. 58-63.
.

OF SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS.

De instrumentis

Sect. 21.

chi-

Of

rurgicis.

Bracherium

seu.

'

retinaculum.

99

Surgical
strum

In-

bandage
hernia

(i.

for

e.

truss).

'Ferula;
z

canalis;

canalicus; 'A splint

a sling.

mritella.

Sypho ('eburneus,

vitreus).

syringe ('ivory,
'glass).

Spongia, spongiola.

^\

Penicillus

Ope

vel

penicillum.

sponge.
painter's pencil
or brush.

By means of
c am e l's h a

penicilli camelini.

pencil.

'Fistula:

tubus; calamus.

'A pipe;
3

Per fistulam vitream.

a tube

a reed.

Through

a glass

tube.

[Other terms pertaining

which occur

in

to surgical instruments,
prescriptions, have been before

mentioned.
Relating to blood-letting
cupping
tooth-drawing
"
shaving
issues ami setons
.

....

injections

"

catheterism

p. 16.
p.

18-23.

p.

2'-].

p.

p.

31-32.
3235.
47-51.

p.

p. 51.1

100 TERMS AM) PHRASES USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.

Dc modis pharma- OfPharmaceutical

Sect. 22.

Operations.

ceuMcis.

Formula,

modus,

ratio,

&c.

processus, opt rutin.


Compositio, I'r<cpmatio.
Parare,* comparare, eonficere,

process,

opera-

tion, &c.

preparation.

To prepare or com-

componere, jirceparare.

pose.

Medicamentum ouratum,

prep-

prepared
treated

parafiuii.-f

or

medi-

cine.

Ad aptam crassitudinem

ad To a proper consistenee.
aptam mollitiem ad idoneam
spissitatem ad debitam spissitudinem ad debitam tena;

citatcm.

Ad gratam aciditatem

To

{vel acer-

bitatem).
Concusso prius vitro; phialS
prius concussa
vase prius
agitato; ante usum concutiendo lagenam.

The

"In

how

stating

ordering at any time


apparently c
future

ol

in ollam

It

the Indicative

to
i

bottle
r

e v

io u si

sbaken.J

was (o he pre
Bed In
was more usual among the Roman!
is arbitrary and offensive, to a
Millet
Phu
than the Imperative mood

el

a mediciDe

classical form
expression th;iu
calejuc. "
Horce. Subsecivce.
'

agreeable

iin

aridity.

a politi

I"!

the

modern one

t " In almost the only example of the use of

this

of

'

more

Mitte

word hy

et

fiel-

evidently signifies not treated, in general, for medicinal


< uratus,' in the forn
bnt 'got ready before

use,

'

18

and Pliny."

Hon

opinion that rubbing or hh&kiiig


of a medicine.
Hence they lay down the
exact period ol time requisite for these operations, or the number
of rubs and shakes the medicine is to receive
For example, in
dissolving a solid iu water, we are told to move the phial ''circa
X

'1

lie of

augments the activity

axin swim, and it each attenuation


brachio quidem bis moto, concute " 1
'

to

shake

it

twice

"6i,

NOMENCLATURE EMPLOYED
'More

solito

modo

2
;

IN PRESCRIPTIONS. 101
'In the accustomed

prsescripto.

manner
in a

-'in

nner

the
r e-

scribed.

Accurate pensus.

Accurately weigh-

PeractS effervescentia.

The

ed.

effervescence

being finished.

APT Kit

II

NOMENCLATURE EMPLOYED

VI.
IN PRESCRIPTIONS.

The Latin names by which the various articles


Medica are usually designated in
prescriptions, are these employed in the Pharmacopoeia.
They are, for the most part, scientific.
of the Materia

Many
faet,

of the medicines of recent discovery have, in

only scientific names

as the salt called iodide

of potassium [potassii iodidum),


hydriodate ofpotash

substances which were

and Romans have

names
&0.

as

spuma

or, less correctly,

potasscehydriodas). But those

known

to the

ancient Greeks

also their appropriate classical

argenti (litharge), alumen (alum).

Lastly, there

is

another description of names

which, as being neither seientifical nor classical,


shall call barbarous.
to

These are the names applied

substances discovered subsequent to the downfall


9*


102 NOMENCLATURE EMPLOYED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.
of the

Roman

empire, but anterior

tion of a scientific

to

the introduc-

nomenclature into pharmacy.

Calomel* (calomelas) and corrosive sublimate (sublimatus oorrosivus) are illustrations of the

last class

of names.

The following arc a few examples of the unnames formerly in use: those in italics

scientific

occur in Gelsus

Mineral Substances. JErugo, alumen, atramentum sutorium (sulphate of iron), auripigmentum (orpiment), borax, butyrum anti-

1.

monii, calx,

causticum

calomel or mercurius dulcis,


lunare,

cerussa,

cinnabar is,

cremor.tartari, kali, minium, natron, nitrum

plumbum album (stanammoniacum, sal commune, sal

(carbonate of soda),
nuin), sal
tartari,

sandaracha (realgar, or red

spuma

argenti (lithargyrus),

spirit us nitri (nitric acid),

rosivus, bartarum

arsenic),

squama

ferri,

sublimatas

oor-

emeticum.

Vegetable Substances.

Ammoniacum, amy'
lum, anethum, balsamum (halm of Gilead),

2.

* Various opinions are held respecting the

fie

"Calomel." Some assert thai Str Theodore Turguei


(who
id the words Calomtlas and

word

mclanius) applied this term to it In co


his having
had a black servaut who prepared it; others Bay, "qaodnioro
humori sit bonum," a good (icaAds) remedy tor black duKas) bile.
i|

NOMENCLATURE EMPLOYED

IN PRESCRIPTIONS. 103

galbanum, hyoscyamus, papa-

cassia, eicuta,

veres lachrymce (opium), piper longum, rata,

mnl rum
3.

album, thus,

Animal Substances.

sum pis, pyrethrum.

IehihyocoUa,

sangui-

suga (hirudo), sepia.

For the nomenclature now used


Zoology

we

are indebted

to

Botany and

in

Rivinus, in-

Linnaeus.

deed, "lias the merit of originality, having been


the

first

words.
finitions,

naming each plant in two


names were meant for specific de-

contrive

to

But

his

for

which they are wholly inadequate.

Linnaeus, in constructing his more accurate and

intended the latter should

full specific characters,

serve as names, and, therefore, called them nomina


specijica.

and

When

he,

most fortunately

for the popularity of his

for the

ture, invented the present simple specific

he called them nomina

common

use

trivialia,

but that term

whole System of Na-

is

now

trivial,

names,
or for

superfluous."*

The nomenclature now employed

in

Chemistry

that proposed by the French chemists,! Morveau,

is

Lavoisier, Berthollet and Fourcroy

but modified

so as to suit the present state of science.

When

the philosophical world had adopted the reformed

Sir

James Edward Smith's Litroductionto Physiological and


tiical Hot, mi/, -nil ed.

288.

1819.
Paris, 1787

Mithode de Nomenclature Vhimique.

]li|

\umi:m

i,\ti

RE EMPLOYED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.

chemical nomenclature, the medical colleges substituted, for the ancienl


tific

names

of medicines, scien-

supposed nature

ones, expressive of the

composition of these substances.

From

or

this pro-

ceeding both advantages and disadvantages have


resulted to

Pharmacy, though on the whole

former greatly preponderate over the

latter.

the
I

formity of nomenclature could be obtained

no

in

For though, by the adoption of the

other way.

arbitrary classical and barbarous

names used by

the ancient writers, convenient terms (having no


pence to the nature or composition of the substances to which they are applied) might be obd for all

we should

the older medicines,

for

newly -discovered substances which have had


rbitrary or unscientific,

The use

names given

to

them.

of a philosophical language has another

and obvious advantage.


all

still

nomenclature

bliged to resort to a scientific

countries,

and

It

renders intelligible

at all times, the

in

terms employeo

by the pharmaceutist. "Let the reader." says

Dr.

"wade through the prescriptions of the


writers, and lie may well fancy himself in

Paris,--

older

the land of Shinar; whereas,


i/.ed

by adopting the

language of science, whatever

future revolutions,

the

articles

* Vharmacologia,b

ed. p.

of
i"'J.

may

the

be

reit-

Materia

NOMENCLATURE EMPLOYED
Medica

IN PRESCRIPTIONS. 105

will be readily identified in

every age and

country."
It

must he

.admitted however, that great incon-

venience, not to say danger, attends the employ-

mentof

a philosophical nomenclature in pharmacy.

names represent opinions rather than


and hence require to he altered according to

Scientific
facts,

the fashion of the day.


scientific

The numerous changes

in

nomenclature which have occurred during

the last forty years have proved extremely embar-

rassing and vexatious both to the pharmaceutist

and medical practitioner;* and we have only to


look at the writings of some of the most distinguished scientific chemists of the present day
see that a

change

is

now taking

sive anil important than any


more than half a century.

to

place more exten-

that has occurred for

In the British Pharmacopoeia, 1864, several alter-

have been made in the names by which


chemical substances are proposed to be called when
ations

used

in

medicine.

The following

table represents

* A( tin' time when


olera was raging in England,
- fram the
old medical practitioner residing more
tropolia, thus iccosted the traveller of a London drugs
jood remedy for cholera; and
hear thai chloride of l
;i ounces
try it. I will thank yon
aid like
The traveller,
of thai Bubstance, provided it be not very costly.
ittle of nii'drin chemical nomenclature as his cusmployer in London, and, in due time,
it the order to his
d "per coach," much to his
:in

ni.

surprise, four ounces of table~*alt'

iMENC] \tiim;
the

oames used

EMPLOYED

in

the

London Pharmacopoeia

new oames used

1851, and the

PHBSCRIPTI0N8.

in

for

same

the

of

sub-

stances in the British Pharmacopoeia.

London Pharm. 1851.

Ammonise

sesquicarbo-

British Pharm. 1864.

Ammonise

carhonas,

nas.

Antimonii

oxysulplnr-

Antimonium

retum.

sulphura-

turn.

tartaratum.

potassio-tar
tras.

Bismuthi

Bismuthum

nitras.

allium.

Calx cblorata.

Calx chlorinata.
Chloroformyl.

Chloroformum.

Ferri ammonio-citras.

Ferri

carbonas

cum

et

ammonise

carhonas

sac

citras,

saccha-

rata.

charo.
potassio-tartras.

Ferrum tartaratum.

sesquioxidum.

Ferri peroxidum.

Hydrargyri

ammonio- Hydrargyrum ammonia-

chlorid.

turn.

iCalomelas.
Hydrargyri
ridum.

..,,.,

Hydrargyrum

corrosi-

vum

bichloridum.

suhlimatum.
cnloriHydrargyri

TI
|

dum.

iodidum.

subchlo-

-^,
viride.

iodidum

ABBREVIATIONS USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.

London Fharm, 1851.


Hydrargyri

nitrico-oxi-

dum.

British

Pharm. 18G4.

Hydrargyri oxidum rubrum.

Iodinum.

Iodum.

Magnesia.

Magnesia

Magnesiae carbon as.

Magnesias carbonas

Plumbi oxidum.

Lithargyrum.

Potas88B bitartras.

107

levis.
lc\ is.

Potassae tartras acida.

hydras.

Potassa caustica.

Potassii sulphuretum.

sulphurata.

Quinse disulpbas.

Quiniss sulphas.

Sodaa chlorinates liquor.

Sodae chloratae liquor.

potassio-tartras.

et potassae tartras.

Spiritus eetheris nitrici.

Spiritus aetheris nitrosi.

Sulphur.

Sulphur sublimatum.

CHAPTER

VII.

ON [UK ABBREVIATIONS AND CONTRACTION'S

PRESCRIPTIONS.
\\< save time and space, the words employed in
prescriptions arc frequently abbreviated or contracted; but the practice is objectionable, and in
many cases dangerous.*

The use of abbreviations is sanctioned by Cicero. "When


was about to consecrate the temple of Victory, a difficulty
nanner in which he should express his th
i

"

ABBREVIATIONS OSBB

108

IN

PRESCRIPTIONS.

unfrequently happens thai the abbreviused to designate certain medicines are


equally applicable to other article-- contained in
and, therefore, errors may be
the Pharmacopoeia
The following area
readily made in dispensing.
It not

ations

few examples

Medit Ines

Abbreviations.
Acid. Hydroc.

<
|

Acomt

j
i

Ammon.

,.

(,

Fontl8.t

to

which they

may

apply,

Aciduin Hydrochloricum, or

Acldum Bydrocyanicum.
Aconitimi {the plant), or
Aconita [thi alkaloid)

Ammonia {tin alkali), or


Ammoniacum (the yum resin).
Mav bo misread for Aq. Fortis

(nitric

a ci(1)

ul Tn-tium
whether il should be Consul i<
Mm-, man of Rome were divided in opinion
In order to
question m
he directed it should be abbreviated as Consul Tert." Pa

p;

left this

Pharmai

ologia, p, 467, 9tb ed.

* Tins abbreviation

anic or pr
Journal, vol.

11.

is

frequently used to designate hydrocyrmaeeutical

employed

It is al

p. 539),

Mr. Richard Phillips


cate hydrochloric acid.
vol. ii. p. 320)
pplied to
pared, in which twenty drops of bydn

to indi-

(Pharm Journ

;i

hydrocyanic
be taken twice a day, The
hydrochloric acid, and omitted to pul the number of " drops
be I;
t The following alarming mistake occurred within the know"I bad heen sent
ledge of Dr Paris, who relates the anecdote:
to

<

for
to

for to see

child

\v itb

bo

ipin

a
found its mother
le pain in her hand and arm
medical mai
escribed fox the child, and hie pr
tion was sent to a neighboring chemret ; be bottle arrived when
the mother, on taking it in her
it according to the directions given, was surprised by the eX|
of the cork, and the contents of the phial flying over her band and
arm.
In si
I at once perceived the nature of the mistake
The presi
is now before me. and I will copy it literatim: fy Syr I
I

alb.

gij.;

Aqua? font is

Svi. //.

mistura

at diet,

sumend.

The


ABBREVIATIONS USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.
(

Calc. Chlor.

Emp Lvth
'
g

\
\
S

109

Chloridum {muriate of lime), or


CalcisChloridum (c/t/orideo/Zime, or Weacfting powder).
Calcii

Emplastrum Litbargyrl. May !>e misread


for Emp. Lytt.
(Emplastrum Lyttiu).
Extractum Coluhlci, or
Extractum Colocynthidls.

(Hydrargyrum

(quicksilver), or

Hydras [hydrate), or
Hydriodas (hydriodate), or
Hydrochloricum [hydrochloric), or

Hydrocyanicum (hydrocyanic).

Hvdr
nyar

Pot-iss-e
t
i
oiassm.j

f|

$
|

dou

y ulas Potass* ipolassafusa), or


(iVx/tY/, of potassium).

Hydriodas Potass*

stroke of the might certainly have been mistaken for r.


scuse for lie chemisl who ought to have known
pre cribi c never c >uld have meant to give the child Aqua
fcrtis." (This prescription is in the Museum of the I'haimaceuii

but tins was


Mi.

iii.'

leal Society.,

* " One of our eminent surgeons having occasion to direct the


application of a lead plaster (Emplast. Litharg. P. L 17S7), he
:. il
[be term as follows, substituting at the same time //
for that of i, Emp. Li/fli
when lie compounder, reading the /(
As it was applied to the
for the /. sent the Emplast. Lyttcel
groin, it is .scarcely necessary Instate, the distress of the patient
anil he dismissal of the practitioner."
Paris.
written so
f The abbreviation Hyosc (Hyoscyamus) may be
t

confounded with Hydrar. (Hydrargyrum)


Richard Phillips states [Pharm. Journ. vol iii. p, 244)
presented to a. chemist anil druggist a paper on which
was clearly written " Potasscc llydratis 5ij ," and he was supThe
Hydr. Pot 5i.i
plied with iodide if potassium, labelled
following is an instance in which the converse error was made.
Anapabstituted fortodidi of potassium:
and hydri
onths at .the business of a
en seven!
Illegibly us to ho

X Mr.

that

lie

'

'

c lie in ist

was
ii

left in care of the shop while his master


\
prescription, of which the following is a copy,
arch
bo dispensed:

and druggist, was

left to

Hydr. Potassse
Syr Croi
,\ij

r.iss.

capiat coohl.

amp.

ter in die.

to prepare any medimedicine \\ a- wanted inae


to the Pharmacopoeia he found that
y, and on referring
preparation of potash with the above commencement

The youth had

b ol the least

10

ul

doubt

orders never
of: tin-

11"

ABBREVIATIONS USED

.,

Hydrargyrl bichloridom (corrosivt

tubli-

lining

PRESCRIPTIONS.

IN

II

inidum (bicyanide of mcr-

{Hydrargyri biniodidnm

mcr-

cury), or

Hydrargyri binoxydum (red oxide of merrl

fHydrargj
mercury),
Hydrargyrl
/0<(

J
{

i)

S
j

B0U

j
-

(
i

oxydum

Mentha piperita
Mentha pulegium
Pota
Potassa

Salph.

<

(/<</

01
p< nny royal).
.

/),

or

poi
Ilydr. i*ot.)

PotassU sulphuretum [liver of sulphur), or


Potasaas sulphas {sulphate of pott

Sodium the metal), or


Boda {soda).
i

chloridam (common

Bodii

irinata
(

Ditricum

lor.

ii

nigi

or

Potae. llyilr.
.,
Uni-i
iotas, ouipn.

oxydum

Suda; chloridam

salt), or

(chlorinated
bleaching lit

suda

or

Sulphur (brimstone).
Balphuretam (suljjhuret), or
Sulphas (sulphate).

'
In writing directi ms for taking any Bort of
medicine, avoid abbreviations as much as possible.
Let numbers be expressed in words, uoi in figures;
and let every word, throughout, be perfectly legible.

"Do

not icrite

tablespflB. at 1st,

was

"

Dissolve
in this manner
a pint of gruel or broth take
and 2 tablespfls. every
hour

a label

these ingredients in

'

'

Potassm Hydras." this ho

us<ed,

ami fortunately, the error

being discovered alter one dose only bad been taken, and
proper antidotes 1 eing administered early, tbe patient la not likely
1

to feel
p. 539.

auy

ill

effects

from

it,

Pharmaceutical Journal,

vol.

1>

>

li.

ABBREVIATIONS USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.


until

it

operates; adding,

\\"

Ill

you take each dose, 2

teaspfls. of tlic Tinct. sent herewith.'

"But write it in this manner:


Dissolve these
ingredients in half a pint of gruel or broth, and
take four tableapoonfuls at first, and two tablenfuls every half hour until it operates; adds]
ing, when you take each dose, two teaspoonfuls bf
the Tincture sent herewith.'
'
have known, even in cases where a man
writes a very g
hand, mistakes made by figures
'

resembling others, or being mistaken for others,


by readers whose Bight was not good. I have
known a 3 resembling an 8, and being mistaken
lor it
a 4 resembling a 7, and often a 7 tor a 4. In
;

writing, for the word half, the abbreviation .!, the 1


is often expressed by a dot so small as to be scarcely
visible, while the 2 is much larger than it ought
The consequence has been that a
to be [thus, a|.
medicine ordered to lie administered every half
hour, in a case of extreme danger, has been given
only every two hours, and the patient died."

Chamberlain's Tirocinium Medicum.

The following is a List of Abbreviations and


Contractions more or less frequently met with in
prescriptions
A. aa. (inn (ava), of each ingredient. It signi[ually of weight or measure, and in this sense
is used by Hippocrates and Diosoorides.
.1. or
it
aa. is used for brevity. In the Pharmacopoeia, the
term singulorum is employed instead of ana.
Abdom. Abdomen, the belly; abdominis, of the
belly abdomini, to the belly.
Abs. febr. Absente febre, in absence of the fever.
Ad - vie. Ail duos vices, at twice taking.
Ail Ztiam vicem.
Ad tertiam vicem, for three
:

times.

12

ABBREVIATIONS USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.

Ad

gr. acid.

Ad gratam

aciditatem, to an agree-

able sourness.

Ad

Ad

def. animi.

defectioncm animi,

to faint-

in,-.

Ad

Ad

libit.

libitum, at pleasure.

Adde, or addantur, add, or lei be added


addendus, to be added addendo, by adding.

Add.

Adjac.

Adjacens, adjacent.

Admov.
apply, or

Admove, or admoveatur, or admovt

antur,

be applied.

let

when

J'/x/. fibre. Adstantefibre,


.!</'-.
.I"V, rsimi. against.

the fever

ia

on.

Aggrediente fibre, while the


Aggred. fibre.
fever is coming on.
Altera, horia.
Altemis horis, every other hour.

JVro </'/.</.
bound.
Aq. asir.
.1'/.

bull,

adstrictd,

when

the belly

is

ttricta, frozen water.


.{qua buUiens, boiling water.

Aqua communis, common water.


Aq. flwoiatilis, river water.
Aqua marina, sea water.

Aq. com.
Aq.tfuc.
Aq. mar.
.

J/r<<

Aqua
Aqua

nir.

Aq. ]ihu\

nivalis,

snow water.

pluviatilis, or

Aqua

pluvialis,

rain water.

Aq.firv.
Aq. font.

Aqua /err, us. hot water.


Aqua fontama, or Aqua

foil

Aqu

spring water.
ml. Bis indies, twice a day.
Bib. Bib-, (drink :
BB. Bbds. Barbadensis, Barbados; or AloU*
Barbadensis.
feminine noun of the
is
I

'

*n. V.

a7t>.

Ab. a/oe.

declension, hut havio?


declined: K. aloe, G aloes,

first

ABBREVIATIONS USED

IX

PRESCRIPTIONS.

113

/.'. M.
Balneum Marios, or Balneum Maris,
warn, water bath.

Bull.

Bulliat, or bulliant, let boil.

But.

Butyrum, hotter.
Balneum vaporosum,

/!.
or Balneum vaporis
a vapor bath.
Cum, with.
Ccerul.
Cceruleus, blue.
''>'/<.
Capiat, lei the patient take.
Calom.
Calomelas (from /,..:.<,. good, and/tlAa?,
black), calomel, or the chloride of mercury.
C. C. Coy//// <<,//, hart-horn. < 'ami rla) ula cruenta, a cupping-glass with the scarificator.
It
means, literally, "//>< bloody cupping-glass."
C. C. ('.
Cornu* oervi ustum, burnt hartshorn.
CocA. a spoonful a tablespounful.f
Cochleat.
Cochleatim, by spoonfuls.
Coch. ampl.
Cochleare amplum, a large (or
table) spoonful.
About half an ounce of watery
fluids and two or three drachms of alcoholic.
Coch. infant. Cochleare infantis, a child's spoonI

ful.

Coch. magn.

Cochleare

magnum, a large spoon-

ful.

Coch. med.

Cochleare medium, ) a middling


Cochleare modicum, j or moderate
spoonful; that is, a child's or dessertspoonful.
About two fiuidrachms of distilled water.
parv.
Cochleare parvum, a small (or tea)
spoonful. It contains about one fluidrachm of dis.

mod.

Cornu belongs to the fourth declension, but, like all other


nouns in u. is inde Unable in the singular, though regular in the
mun, D. cornibus, A. eornua,
plural as plural N co\
;

V. eornua, Ab cornibus.
t See page (JO.

114

ABBREVIATIONS USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.

tilled

water.

I find

that a teaspoonful of this size

will hold

from half a draohm to two scruples of the


common carbonate of magnesia, when heaped up;
or ahout two drachms of sublimed sulphur.
Col.
(

'ol.

Cola, strain.
Colatus, strained.

Color,

Coletur, let it be strained


strained liquor.
Colentur, let them be strained.
Coloretur, let it be colored.

Comp.

Compositus,

Colat.

Colet.

cola-

turoe, to tlu>

Colent.

a,

um, compounded.

Con.

Concisus, out.
'"/i /.
Congius, a gallon.
Cons,
Conserva, a conserve; also, keep thou.
Cont, ran.
Continuentur remedia, let the medicines be oontinued.
Coq.
Cogue, boil; coquantur, lei them be boiled.
Cog. ad med. consumpt.
Cogue ad medietatis
consumptionem, boil to the consumption of half.
in
Cog.
I.
S.
Cogue in mfficiente guantitate
aquce, boil in a sufficient quantity of water.
Corf.
Cortex, bark.
C. v.
Cras vespere, to-morrow evening.
C. m. s.
Cras mane sumendus, to be taken to(

morrow morning.
C. ii.
Cras node, to-morrow night.
Crast.
Crastinus, for to-morrow.
Cuj,
Cujus, of which.
Cujusl.
Cujuslibet, of any.

Cyath.
Cyath.

Cyatho
Cyathus, vel

a oup of tea.
) a wine glass.
Cyathus vinarius,
Aboul
two
j
ounces of watery liquids (see page 60).
In the
Paris Pharmacopoeia it is estimated at five ounces.
C.

thece.

/'//////-.

thece, in

ABBREVIATIONS USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.


Deaur. pil.

Deaurentur pihdcc,

let

115

the pills be

gilt.*

Deb. spiss.

Debila spissitudo, a proper consist-

ence.
Decanta, pour off.
Dec.
Decubitus, of lying down.
Decub.
/>< ,/. in d.
De die in diem, from day to day.
Deglutiatur, may be (or let be) swalDe<jlut.

lowed.
Dejectiones alvi, stools.
Detur, let it be given.

DeJ. alvi.
J),

l.

Dieb.
Dieh.

alt.
tert.

Diebus alternis, every otber day.


Diebus tertiis, every third day.

Dil.
Dilue, dilutus; dilute (thou), diluted.
Diluculo, at break of day.
Diluc.
Vimidius, one-half.
Dim.
I), in 2plo.
Detur in duplo, let twice as much

be given.
* "The practice of gilding pills was formerly very much in
request; but lor the last titty years it lias grown into disuse.
Nevertheless, as unlikely thiugs do sometimes occur, it might so
happen that some very partieular old lady or gentleman, placing
peeuliar confidence in ome prescription of a hundred years old,

which the words

at the foot of
,,,,

in

,,,,i
i

'

Deaurentur

pilulee'

me

written,

its
be satisfied without having the same medicine in
how to
ndor; therefore it is well that we should know

is the easiest and simplest thing in the


it
book of leaf gold or leaf silver, and having formed
your pills perfectly roun I, lay them without rolling them in any
distances.
sort of powder on the leaf of gold, or silver, at equal
For boluses, four are enough for one leaf; for large pills, eight or
upon one
in
for very small Ones, sixteen or twenty
from off the hook, into
leaf- then pour off the pills, gold and all,
with the
gallipot
the
clean and perfectly dry gallipot, cover
a
in the same
palm of your hand, and shake it round and round,
going
yon
were
if
manner as on ordinary occasions you would do
he. n
any sort of powder; and, on taking ihem out, you

do

:,,.,,

this,

especially as

,!,!

Open

,|

to roll

in

with the leaf gold, or leal


will find the pills perfectly covered
silver." QuunberlaMa Tyrocinium Mcdicum.

ABBREVIATIONS USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.

11G

D. in p. ceq. Dividatur in partes cequales, lei it


be divided into equal parts.
/'.
/'//. prop.
l>.
Directione propria, with a
proper direction.
Ponce alvus bis dfjiciatur,
Donee alv. bis dej.
until the bowels have been twice evacuated.
Donee alvus soluta Juerit,
Donee alv. sol.'Jtier.
until the bowels be opened.
Donee dol. neph. exulav. Donee dolor nephritveus
exulaverit, until the nephritic pain is removed.
Dosis, a dose.

I>.

Ebum.

Eburneus, made of ivory.


Edvlcorata, edulcorated.
Ejusd.
Ejusdem, of the same.*
Elect.
Electuarium, an electuary.
Kin in.
clyster
enemata, clysters.
Ene'marf
Exhib.
Exhibeatur, lei it be exhibited.
Ext. sup. <il ill. moll.
Extende super alulam moliiii. Bpread (thou) upon soft leather.
F.
Fac,% make ; jiat, Jiant, lei it be made.
F. pil. xij. Fin- pilvlas duodeeim, make 12 pills.
Fasc.
Fasciculus, a bundle which can be carI'll.

-I.

ried

-.

under the arm.

* Dr. yfason Good relates lie following anecdote: "A gentleman of Worcester, who does not practice pharmacy, prescribed
t

for his patient as follows

hi met.. CancnriUtr. *vj.


Ttncti
-,
Sj.

I;

Misc.

The shopman of a neighboring apothecary, to whom tho prescription was sent, took it to
hr> gentleman
who bud written It, to
know what be should substitute for the Tinclura Ejusdi m, which
t

any of the Bfbi [is In the whole city "


commonly, though erroneously, pronounced

he could not procure


t This

word

is

in

Enema.
Fne

used ;i~ the imperative, instead of Face (from Facto),


|
which is but seldom found.
The
terms
Fasciculus, Manipulus, and Pugillus, are applied

\<

ABBREVIATIONS USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.

117

Feb. dur.

Febre durante, during the fever.


Ft in. intern.
Femoribus internis, to the inner
pari of the thighs.
/'.
vt noes.
Fiat venceseetio, bleed.
F. H.
Fiat haustus, let a draught be made.
Fict,
Fictilis, earthen.
Fil. Filtrum, a filter.
Filtra, filter (thou).
Fist. arm.
Fistula armata, a clyster-pipe and

bladder
Fl.
/*'.

fitted fur use.

Fluidus, liquid also, by measure.


L. .1.
Fiat t<>!i<> art is, let it be made by the
;

rules of art.
F. M.
Fiat in 1st lira, let a mixture be made.
Frust.
FrusMllatim, in little pieces.
F. S. A.
Fiat secundum artem, let it be made

according

to art.

Fiat secundum art is regulas, let it


be made according to the rules of art.
Gel. (jiiur. Gelatina quavis, in any kind of jelly.
G. G. G.
Guuiiui" guttce gambce, gamboge.
Gr.
Granum, grain grana, grains.
(!r. iy'. pond.
Grana sex pondere, six grains by
weight.
Gtt.
Gutta, a drop; guttce, drops.f
F. S. A. R.

principally to the measure of herbs and Bowers (see pp. 02, lis,
110).
There Is a considerable discrepancy among authors as
the quantities implied by these terms, as the following table

and
to

will

show

Linneeus.
Pugillus
Mil

111

1'iillis

r>j.

Geigt.r.
5ss. to 5j.

glT,

."iv.

Peris Thnrmacop.
5j. to 5ij.
Sj. to Siiss.

-,vj
Fasciculus
Sj.
* Nouns la i. as (iummi, are for the most part indeclinable in
both numbers.
f The sp. gr and cohesive power of liquids are various hence
the weight and the size of dr ps of different liquids are liable to
:

118

ABBREVIATIONS USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.

(lull,

Guttis quibusdam, with a few

quibusd.

drops.
Guttat.

Guttatim, by drops.

Ifur. pil

sum

Hi.

Harum

pilularum sumantur

three of these pills be taken.


llh.
Herba, a herb.
//. I>. or I l<>r. decub.
Hbrce decubitus, at
hour of going to bed.

tres, let

the

//. p. n.
Haustus purgans noster, a formula of
purging draught, made according to a practitioner's
own private pharmacopoeia.
N. or Hor. sum.
Horn somni, just before
//.
going to sleep; or, on retiring to rest.

Horn- unius spatio, at the exHor. mi. spatio.


piration of an hour.
Hor. interim,

//oris

intermediis, at

the

inter-

mediate hours between what has been ordered

at

stated times.
I lor.

Wiiu'i mill.

Horn

iiiiilrriu/i}

matutl inl

at

the eleventh hour in the morning


lad.
Indies, from day to day. or daily.
In

pulm.

lur.

In

pulmento,

Incide, incisus;

in <j;ruel.

cut (thou), being cut.

considerable variation. The following table, deduced from Mr.


Shut tie worth's experiments, proves these statements:
1 Fluidrachm of
Grains.
Drops.
lied Water consists of
60
or
60
Solution of Arsenic
or
60%
White Wine
94
58% or
Ipecacuanha Wine
84
5% or
Autimonial Wine
..i
84
iS
Spirits of
Spirit
I

Laudanum

Win-

gi^

,,,

i;,i

;-,".';

or

140

or
134
Tincture of Foxglove
."is
or
lit
The sizes of the drops <>i' liquid also vary according to \heshape
of the vessel, as well as according to the partoftfu Rpoftbi
vessel. Hence measuring by dropsought to be entirely abol
flf)j<j

ABnUEVIATIONS USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.


fnl'.

/>/ /)t 1/t/e,

cm

Tnj.

in.

pour

119

in.

Injiciatur enema,

let

a clyster be

given.
Jul.

Julepus, Julepum, Julapium, a Julep.*


Kal.ppt. Kalij /inipiini/iiu/ [Potassce Carbonas,
Ph. L.), prepared kali, or carbonate or subcarbonate of potash.
I.nt. <li,/.
Lateri dolenli, ou the side that is
painful.

M.

Misce, mix; mensurd, by measure; manipuhandful; minimum, a minim.


Mane pr. Mane primo, very early in the morn-

lus, a

ing-

Man. Manipulus, a handful.


Min. Minimum, the sixtieth part of a drachm
measure. Minutum,\ a minute.
M. P. Massa pilularum, a pill mass.
Ml,'.

Mistura, a mixture.
Mica panis, crumb of bread.

Mic Pan.

* Julep or Julapium is derived from the Arabic {julcb or julleb).


The Persians have admitted the word into their language, and
it imports literally a sweet medicated drink.
write itjulab.
Gaod's Nosology
Kali and alkali, commonly supposed to be Arabic, are Persi:iu terms, Italia and Alkali,
far more euphonious names than
the indeclinable nouns in general use, and signify the ashes of
marine plants whence the Turks employ Kal for ashes in geneGood's Nosology.
ral, as well av their Lixivium.
+ The following table shows the value of a Mu nipi'/us:
Grammes 3 5. Gr.
101,40 or .1 2
Manipulus seminum hordei
(-

.">

47/0 or 1 4 14Ji
0'$
105,00 or 3
43,90 or 1
:i
17>
32,00 <>r o S 14
40,10 or 1
2 18
florura tilise
is occasionally found in prescriptions, but is very
Minul
barbarous Latiu. The proper Latin tor a miuuto is sewagisma
pars horee.
lini

de MMMine llni
foliorum mttlva; siccorum
clchorii siccorum

um

'>

ABBREVIATIONS USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.

120

Mitte, send; mittatur, or mittantur, let be

Mitt.
sent.

Mitt. sang, ad xij. saltern.


uncias duodecim saltern, take

Mitie sanguinem ad
blood to 1- oz.

away

at least.

Mod.

Modo

prcese.

in

prcescripto,

the

manner

prescribed.

Moredicto, in the manner directed.*


More soliio, in the usual manner.
Ne tr. s. num. Ne tradas sine nummo, do not
deliver it unless paid.
(Used by apothecarie

More

diet.

Mor.

sol.

a caution to the assistant, when the presence of


the patient prevents the master ^ivin<;- a verbal
direction.)
N. M. Nux moschata, a nutmeg.

Numero,

No.

in

number.

Octarius, a pint.f

0.

Ol.linis.
linseed

Omn.
Omn.
Omn.
0.
ing.

Oh

i.

urn

liui

sine igne, cold-drawn

oil.

hor.

.'/.,

bid.

bih.

or

Omni hord, every hour.


Omni biduo, every two days.
Omni bihorio, every two hours.
Omn. man. Omni mane, every morn-

* A physician who is in the babit of leaving; verbal dir< c


with the patient how his medicines arc to in- alien, and very frequently writes the prescription in Latin, lint veryshori direi
in English, wrote, at the tout of in- pr<
more tint
" to be taken in the manner directed." Toe c in dicto being either
carelessly written as an c, or mistaken ae BUCh, the apprentice
read it diet, and. as he did not understand Latin, and the HOC 01
some more
often wrote directions in English, he took it to l.e
</tW," and therefore ""n v quite proud of the elegance of hU translation, in writing
to be taken with a more liberal allowance of
I

'

'

Tyrocinium Medicum.
food
the London Pharmi
f The pin
tains twenty fluidounces.
'

I
i

con-

ABBREVIATIONS USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.


0.

A'.,

121

Omni node, every night.


Omni quadrante horoe, every

or Onin. nor/.

Omn. quadr.

hor.

quarter of an hour.
0. 0. 0.
Oleum olives optimum, Lest olive
Or.
Oram, an egg.*

oil.

<)z.
The ounce avoirdupois, as distinguished
from the Troy ounce.

Pari, cequal.

Partes cequales, equal parts.


Per deliquium, by deliquescence.
Past.
Pastillus, Pastillum (dim. of pasta, a
lozenge), a little lump or ball of paste, to take like
/'.

ce.,

/'.

<l.

a lozenge, a troch, or pastil.


/'.
Pondere, by weight.
/'.

<\

Pondus

civile, civil

weight (Avoirdupois

weight).
P. M.
Pondus medicinale, medicinal weight
(Apothecaries' weight).
Ph. J). Pharmacopoeia Dublinensis.
PA. E.
Pharmacopoeia Edinensis.
Ph. L.
Pharmacopoeia Londinensis.
1'h. If. S.
Pharmacopoeia of the United States.
Partitis vicibus, in divided doses.
Part. rii'.
Peractd operatione emetici, when
Per. >>/>. emet.
the operation of the emectic is finished.
Pocul.
Poculum, a cup. A teacup holds from
four to six ounces of distilled water.
Pocillum, a little cup.
PocilL
Post, singulas sedes liquidas,
Post sing, sed. liq.
after every loose stool.
I'/it.
Prosparata, prepared.
Paris Pharmacopoeia,
large size, weighs
without the shell
The white weighs
*

According

The polk
11

to (lie

.-,.

.">.

Or

2
1

57
16

ABBREVIATIONS USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS.

122
/'.

Pro re nata, according as circumstam

a.

r.

arise (that

is,

occasionally).

Pro ratione, ceiatis, according to lie


age of tin' patient.
Pugillus, a pinch; a gripe between the
Pug.
rat. at.

/'.

thumb and

the two first fingers


Pulvis, puloerizatus ; a powder, powdered.

Pulv.
Q.

Quantum
;,
Quantum

I.

Q. p.
Q. s.
as

Quantum,

Q.
\

lubet.
,

)
.

placet,

as lniieli as Jyou please.


,

'

sufficiat, or

satis,

much

volueris, as

much

quantum

sufficient.

is

Quorum,
Quantum

Quor,
as

V.

of which.
vis,

quantum

will.

<>n

Redactus in pulverem, powdered.


Redigatur in pulverem, let it bo
reduced to powder.
Reg. iimbil. Regio umbilici, the umbilical region.
Repetatur, repetanlur, let it be continued.
Repet.
Secundum artem, according to art.
S. A.
lied, in pulv.

"Redig. in pulv.

Scatula,

Scat.

a,

box.

Secundum naturam, according to nature.


Semidrachma, hall' a drachm.
Semidr.

S.

hall' an hum-.
Sesuncia, an ounce ami a half.
Sesquih.
Sesquihora, an hour and a half.
Si nun ni/ni/, if it does nol answer.
Si II. ml.

Semthora,

Semih.

inc.

* The following table shows

tin:

value

"i'

the Pugillus.
I.

Pugillus florum antbemidls nobilie

ana

7,80 ot 2
6,20 or l

tawtilaxinis farfarae

6,!

alines

6,00
3.20
7,00
4,40

malvx
seminum
anisl
(See p. 62).

officinalis

faenieuU

or

l',r.

IflJ

1/5)5

17

8
8

ot

or
or

ABBREVIATION'S USED IN PRESCRIPTION'S.

123

Si op. sit.
Si opus sit, if there be occasion.
Si vir. pi rm.
Si vires permittant, if the strength
will bear it.
Signatura, a label (see p. 8).
Sign. re. pr.
Signetur nomine proprio, let it be
written upon with the proper name (not the trade

name).
Sing.
S. S. S.

Singulorum, of each.
Stratum super stratum, layer upon

la\ er.

Semi, a half.
it stand; stent, lent them stand.
Sub Jin. cod. Sn/> Jim in coctionis, when the
boiling is nearly finished.
Sum. /nl. Sumat talem, let the patient take one
Ss.
St.

Stet, let

like this.

Sum.
Sum.

Summitates, the summits or tops.


Si/iiir. sumat, sumatur, sumantur, sumendus; take thou, let him take, let be taken, to be
taken.

&

Spiritus

V.

vinosus,

ardent spirit of any

strength.
I'.
Spiritus
S.
spirit of wine.
1

S.

I.

Tulh

T.

I.

lozenge
Temp.

vini

rectificatus,

rectified

Spiritus vini tenuis, proof spirit.


Tabella (dim. of tabula, a table),

Tempori dextro, to the right temple.*


Tinctura n/>ii, tincture of opium; generally confounded with laudanum, which is properly
the wine of opium.
T. 0.
Tinctura oju'i camphorata, paregoric
T.

dext.

O.

* Tempora, the em pies, al (hough generally used in the plural,


is sometimes found in lie singular.
I

yet

124 SYMBOLS OB BIGNS DSHD IN PRESCRIPTIONS.


elixir.'

It

is

called Tinct. comphorce compo-

now

sita.

Tritura, triturate.

Trit.
'I

Tim-lii in. tincture.

r<i.

/',..

Trochisci, troches or lozenges.


I' ll i mo
prcescriptus,

the

prasscr.

I'll,

las!

ordered.
I.

O. S.

dissolved

Vitello ovi sola lux,

in

lie

yolk of an

Vom. urg.

Vomitione urgente, the vomiting being

troublesome.
I

s.

/-'.

Venouectio braehii,

bleeding

the

in

arm.
Zingiber, ginger.

Zz.

CIIA
ON

Tin;

PTER

SYMBOLS OB BIGNS

Formerly the

signs

or

VIII.
BED

in

PRESCRIPTIONS.

symbols employed

in

chemistry and pharmacy as substitutes for words,


were numerous. At the present time they are very
The following alone deserve notice:
few.

* Dr

Good, la his History of Medicine, published In tb<


1795, relates the following Btory: A physician prescribed for the
son of a poor woman, laboring tinder dyspnoea, the fallowing
draught, to be given at bedtime:

Si/r

papav

Tine opli

Aq

dentil,

"Hi 5J.
C. 5ijv.

M.

Unfortunately, the person to whom tins prescription was brought,


not beiui; acquainted with the new name foi paregoric elixir, and
not attending to theC. [camphoratte), madeil with r> j Tineturm
aid, though he advised the woman to give the chl
half the dAnght.it proved sufficiently strong to destroy life before
the evening of the following d;iy.
.

>

SYMBOLS OR SIGNS USED IN PRESCRIPTIONS. 125


Recipe, take.
Ancient authors use this sign
being the old heathen invocation to Jupiter,
seeking his blessing upon the formula, equivalent
1

11,

to the usual invocation of the poets

and of Maho-

medarj authors, or the Lous Deo with which


kkeepers and merchants' clerks formerly began their
books of accounts and invoices a practice now
almost extinct. "It is at present so disguised by
the addition of the down stroke, which converts it
into the letter R, that, were it not for its cloven
foot, we might be led to question the fact of its
superstitious origin."
Paris's Pharmacologia.
(See Chap. I. p. 6).
l\.
Minim inn, tho sixtieth part of a fluidrachm.
I

Guttce, drops.

(lit.

Granum

grain, or grains.
or Grana
part of the Troy ounce, the 7? Vo" P ar * ()I
the Troy pound, or the ^a'ojy part of the avoirdupois

Gr.

The

"

pound.*
Scrvpulus vel Scrupulum.
.).
to twenty grains troy.
Drachma, a drachm, equal
3.

A scruple, equal

to three scruples;
eighth part of an ounce measure.
I'm- in, an ounce troy; or, in liquids, the
3.
sixteenth pari of a wine pint, or the twentieth part
of the imperial pint.
or, in liquids, the

* Iu Ireland, an alteration was made in the weights used in


medicine by the Dublin Pharmacopoeia of 1850, lie avoirdupois
pound and ounce being substituted for tbe Troy weights of those
denominations, and tbe ounce being divided into 8 drachms, the
drachm into S scruples, and the scruple into 18 '12 grains, so that
the Irish medical weights from that time until the introduction
of the British Phsrinacopoeiu have been as follows:
I
ponnd lb =16 on noes=7.000 grains.
on nee 8=8 drachms=4S7 5 gt
1 drachm 3=3 scruples=54. 68 grains.
=1S.22 grains.
1 scruple i)
11*
t

126

SYMBOLS OB BIQNS UBID

ft.

O,
Fl.

in

PRESI RIPTIONS.

Libra, a pound Troy weight.


Octarius, a pint.
Fluid. Oeea as a prefix to certain

to distinguish them from weights;


initio ; and //.^., llu it! rtn-1, iim

Used as an affix
semiuncia;

Semis, half.

Ss.

as

and measures;

tlms

measu

//,-,.,

to

gss.,

//^/-/

weights

{Jss.,

semi-

drachma; 9ss., semtfferupulum.


The following arc the weights and measures,
with their symbols, as
Pharmacopoeia.

Q0W used

in the

British

WEIGHTS.
1

pound

ounce

grain

(i/..

ounces=7000
=137. a

gr.

lb

lG

grains.
grains.
grain.

MEASURES.

gallon
pint

fluid

ounce

drachm
minim
fluid

= pints
ounces
=20
=
drachms
drm.=60 minims
= minim ....
min.
C

fl.

fluid

oz.

8 fluid

fl.

viij.
fl.

oz. xx.

fl.

drs. viij.

min.
min.

lx.
j.

It will be observed that with the exception "I


the symbols for the grain weight, and the gallon
and pint measures, all the other symbols are
altered.
The avoirdupois pound is represented by
the symbol lb., which is distinguished from thai
representing the Troy pound (ft) bj the absence
The differof the bar passing aero-- the letters.
ence in this Case is but slight, and In some instances
in written prescriptions

it

may

be scarcely percep-

would be obvious.
As the old symbols have been used in all pre-

tible,

but in the other cases

scriptions written

before

it

the

publication of the

ANCIENT CHEMICAL SYMBOLS.

127

British Pharmacopoeia, and as many medical men


will probably continue to use them, 'it has not been

thought necessary to make any extensive change


symbols used in previous editions of tins
work.
Where the symbols fb, g, 3, and J} are
used it will be understood that they refer to the
Apothecaries' weight founded upon the Trey pound
anc! ounce, the weights of the British Pharmacopoeia
being indicated by the -symbols used in that work.
In the second and third part of this work, containing abbreviated and unabbreviated prescriptions, the terms used for representing the medicines ordered in such prescriptions, as well as the
symbols representing the quantities, are not in
many instances those of the British Pharmacopoeia,
the object originally contemplated having been to
introduce the various terms and symbols which at
different times have been employed in extemporais prescriptions.
n
In some instances, however,
the names of medicines have been altered in accordance with those now recognized by the highest
medical authority, the old names having acquired
a different meaning, as in the case of Hy&rargyri
chloridum, formerly applied to calomel, but now
representing corrosive sublimate.
in the

Ancient Chemical Symbols.

Many

of the hieroglyphics painted on the show


bottles in the druggists' windows are without meanThose
ing, being the invention of the painter.
which are intelligible are, for the most part, the
characters formerly used to designate the seven
anciently known metals, and which are the same
as those employed by the astrologers to represent
the planets.

128

ANCIENT CHEMICAL SYMBOLS.

sign . (a Maltese
indicative of acrimony, indicated bj the
sharp points surrounding it.
The astrological symbols employed by chemists
the ancient metals aptly express the
t, represent

To these must be added the

cross),

properties, real or Fancied, of the substances they


to designate.
Gold, formerly called Sol, was represented by a
imcircle 0, which represented its perfection, its
mutability, its density (for a sphere contains the
greatest amount of matter under the smallest sur-

were intended

and its simplicity; for the equality of the


a circle represents the equality of the parts
and homogeneous nature of gold.
Silver, termed Diana or Luna, was characterized
by, C because il was thought to be half gold, whose
inward pari turned outward makes pure gold.
Neither gold nor silver was supposed to oontain
anything acrid or corrosive.
Quicksilver, called Mercury, was represented by
for
$ (a symbol compounded of the hieroglyphic
gold, silver, and acrimony), indicating that it- real
nature or inmost part was pure gold, but that its
bop, face, or superficies, appeared like silver, whilst
there lurked beneath something acrid and corrosive.
Remove from it the appearance of silver, and its
sharp corrosive quality, and you have pure gold

face),

radii of

[aurum vivum).
Copper, termed Venus, was indicated by 9- S 1"'Wing that this metal was, for the most part, gold
combined with acridity. Remove the latter and
you have real gold. Copper wants the silver face
of mercury.
that
Iron, called Mars, was represented by rf,
is, gold with acridity, for iron was thought to con-

ON THE CONSTRUCTION OF PRESCRIPTIONS.

129

principally of gold profoundly concealed in it


by a very evident acrimony, which, however, is
only half thai contained in mercury and copper,
and, therefore, is represented by a kind of barbed
point inclined to the right, a portion only of the
sign expressive of acridity, and farther significative
of the use of this metal in the service of the God of
sist

War.
Tin,

termed Jupiter, was represented by %, init was one half silver, the other half

dicating that
acridity.
Liail

was called Saturn, "not only," says Four" because thej Buppose this metal to be oldest,
ami, as it were, the father of all the others, but
also because it was considered as very cold because
the property of absorbing, and apparently destroying, almost all the metals was attributed to lead
in the same manner as fabulous history affirms that
Saturn, the father of the gods, devoured his children."
[ts symbol was 1?
indicating that it was
nearly all corrosive, but with some resemblance of
en >\

silver.

CHAPTER

IX.

OX THE GRAMMATICAL ^INSTRUCTION OF PRESCRIPTION-.


It has

been thought advisable to devote one


chapter to a lew remarks on the grammatical construction of prescriptions.
The Rules of Syntax,
with illustrations drawn from prescriptions, will
lie first given, and to these will he appended a
grammatical explanation of a few prescriptions.

ON THE CONSTRUCTION OF PRESCRIPTIONS.

130

I.

Those rule-

Tin: ui lis ok sv \r \\.

ui"

syntax which require

to In' noticed

number. Thej maj be conleniently arranged under the two heads ol ( 'oncorda
and Gov* rnment.
here, are thirty-two in

a.
1.

2.

Of Concords. The Concords are four.*


Of an \iljivti\i\ &c. with a Substantive.
Ola Verb with a Nominative.
Of a Relative with an Antecedent.
Of a Substantive with a Substantive.

3.
4.
L'li/,

Adjectives, participles, and pronouns, agree


tin' substantive
in gender, number and

I.

with

as

Qrana

Cochleare

'/"".

amplum.

svmendus. Qu&qut node.


Cataplasmn calidum.
Rule
in

2. A personal
erb agrees with
number ami person as
\

Haustus
laneum.

nominative

iis

fir, pi-.

'l\i

Mittatur

emplastrum.
l-\,ii mi/iir

Rule

Pannum

3.

The

before

it

Admoveatur
sanguis.
Vricetur corpus.
( 'olluantur fauces.

'apiat ceger.

gingival.

infinitive

mood

lias

an

accusative

as

Repetatur venwsectio quotidie ml tertiam

quartam vicem
[Note.
The noun

plural) follows constet, Imt precedes the


nitive ih ficere.]
* Some grammarians
iiitivi> with

of oue Miti-t
8) not beint;

make
a

vel

nici constet viresprius defia


vires (of the accusative

only three concords

oilier signifying tin:

".

infi-

tbe agreement

same thing Rule


(

being called apposition


However, for the reason assigned by Mr. Grant (Instioj I. <iii, Grammar, p. 172), I have adopted it as a primary
coucord.
cord, bui

RULES OF SYNTAX.
Rule

The

I.

131

relative qui, quae, quod, agrees with

the antecedent

gender, number, and person;

in

as

Divide in pilulas sex,

pro
|

Here quarum

Note.

quarum sumat unam

re natd.
is

the relative, and agrees


in gender, num-

with the antecedent pilulas


ber,

and person.]

5. If no nominative come between the relative


and the verb, the relative shall be the nominative

Rule

to the verb

as

Fimil pilules duodecim, quce sumendce sunt ut


antea.

But

if a nominative come between the reand the verb, the relative shall be of that
ease which the verb or noun following, or the

Rule

6.

lative

preposition going before, uses to govern; as


Fiat haustus, cui, tempore capiendi, adde, &c.
Here the nominative [tu, understood)
[Note.
conies between the relative (cm?) and the
verb (adde): hence the relative is put in the
dative case, being governed by the verb

adde.

Two or more substantives

singular, coupled
conjunction, generally have a verb,
adjective, or relative plural: as

Ruh

7.

together by

Haustus

rl

pilula

sumantur

tribus horis.

8. One substantive agrees with another, signifying the same thing, in ease: as
Recipe, Potassce tartratis (vulgd Tartari solu-

Rul(

llilis)

[Note.

II

Ill-ill

HI

Potassce tartras and Tartarum solubile

ON THE CONSTRUCTION OF PRE8( RIPTI0N8.

132

being terms signifying the same thing, they


are pul in the

Bame

1.

MENT.
Of Nouns.

2.

or Verbs.

:;.

<

;.

<

<<>\

If

case.
|

i.'N

words indeclinable.
A owns.

One substantive governs another

Huh'.).

signify-

ing a different thing, in the genitive; as


Magnitude* nucis moschatce.
Uncia magnesice.
Hord somni.
Uncice quinque sanguinis.
The substance governed maj govern
[Note.
another, signifying a different thing; as,
Drachma sodce* carbonatis.]

Huh- 10. An adjective, in the neuter gender, without a Bubstance expressed, is followed by a genitive: the adjectives thus used are generally BUCb
nil\ quantity
as
Plus ciih-is.
Ex pauxillo alicujus liquoris.
I'u nl ul a ni spiritus. Extantillo hvjusliquoris
-

11. Opus and usus, denoting necessity, convenience, or expediency, are followed by the ab-

Rule

lative of the thing

Quando

Huh

wanted; as
opus sit.

alvi ductione

Adjectives signifying de-ire, knowledge,


tear, &c, and the contraries to these,
require a genii \\ e ease as
Ad ulrum officii immemorem excitandum.
12.

memory,

Sodn

is generally said to be derived from the Arable, bat


Soda is derived from the German word,
Sod or Sodt,/oam or scam bulling up to tho surface. "
Good's Nosology.

Dr. Q
I in-.

RULES OF SYNTAX

133

Rule 13. Partitives and words


.diced partitively
comparatives, superlatives, interrogatives, and
Borne numerals, govern the genitive plural; as
/ im pilularum.
[Note.
Unus, when used as a numeral, takes
de, or e, or ex, alter it, and seldom the genitive plural.
Hence una ex pilulis would be
]

preferable to una pilularum.]


rbs.

l'i

verb signifying actively governs the


accusative; as
Capiat cochRecipe unciam (vel drachmam).

Rule

14.

Miite sanguinem.

leare.

Sumatunam

\pi-

lulam].
L5. Verbs of giving, taking away, composing,
&c, and many verbs compounded with ad, in,
ah, prce, sub, govern an accusative and dative,

Rule

if

the verb be active; if passive, a dative only.


Da infantulo laetenti cochleare minimum aquae
Admoveantur regioni renum hirumenthol.
Capiat cochleaHa duo in landines sex.
guoribus, prcecipuedi bus purgationi deditis.
Si prima- vencesectioni non cedat morbus, &c.

Huh-

L6.

'/or,

and some ether words, govern the

ablative; as
I'lal nr

sequenti.

Utatur

pediluvio.

Vtatur

ceger equitatione.

Rule

17.

One verb governs another

in the infini-

tive; as
(
'aput tonderi debet.

Rule

18.

Participles, gerunds,

the case of their


12

own

and supines, govern

verbs; as

I;

RIPTIONS.

ON THE CONSTR1 CTIOK

it ili

in.

dosin.
Fiat

Avgendo minuendove quantiUnimentum, cervici et scapulis

infricandum. Instillando tinciurce opi guttat

Huh

Natus, editus,

19.

creatus,

and some

othei

ablative case, and of


times with a preposition as
Nata humoris detractio ab emplastro canthaparticiples, require an

llllS.

Rule 20. The gerund in di


tives or adjectives

is

governed by substan-

as

Tempore cmnandi.

Tempore capiendi.

Rule2l. Gerunds governing the accusative maj


be elegantly turned into the participles in dus,
which agre with their substantives in gender,
number, and case; as

mpescendum.

.1,/

Ad

alvum

tandam.

On

the Construction

of Circumstances.

Circumstances are five: Cause, Manner, Instrument, Place, and Time; and thej are common to
the verbs and nouns.
Rule 22. The cause, manner, and instrument, are
put in the ablative; as
Pleno Int. More solita. Eodem modo. Manu
calida.
Ope penicilli.
Curetur pars exuU
in unguenlo sabince.
Alvo hisce medir
''.
cam*
Tgne leni.
i

Rule 23. Nouns signifying part of time, and answering to the question quando (when?) arc put
iu the ablative

Omni

node.

as
Sexlis horis.

Tempore matutino.

RULES OF SYNTAX.

135

But nouns signifying duration of time,


and answering to the question quamdiu (how

Rule 21.

Long?), arc generally put in the accusative, t lie


prepositions per, ad, in, intra, inter, being frequently expressed as
Per horam.
Per tres nodes.
Inter nodern.
;

Rule 25. A substantive and a participle, whose


case depends upon no other word, are put in the
ablath e absolute as
Urgente tussi.
Vase priils agitato.
Peractd
Vurantefivxu cruento. Fluxu
effi rvesa ntid.
;

eessante.

Finita effervescentid.

Of
Rule

2C>.

per, pone,

as

Ad

Prepositions.

The prepositions

ad, apud, ante, inter,


secundum, &c, govern the accusative

uncias decern.

Adversum

Rule

'11

pro,

The

prepositions

a,

ab,

Inter

renes.

rum- aurem.
scapulas.
Infra
Prope cartilaginem thyroideam.
rum,

de,

cubitos.

e,

or ex,

&c, govern the ablative; as

Cum

cochlearibus tribus.
largo vulnere.
De novo.

brachio.

Ex

Some

prepositions govern either the abthus, in signifying in,


governs the ablative: when it signifies into, an
Sub, super, and sonic others, also
accusative.
as
gOA em either cast
/// urethram.
Bis in die. In partes excoriatas.
Sal, aiinm.
Super alutam.
i

3,

lative or the accusative;

Hale 29. Verbs compounded with

a,

ab, ad, con,

de,

ex, in,

e,

mi CONSTRUCTION OP

cn

13G

PRESCRIPTIONS.

sometimes repeal the same preposi-

with their case oul of composition, and


thai elegantly as
Detrananiur de hypochondrio dextro sanguinis

tions,

uncicB dea

in.

Of

Conjunctions.

The conjunctions
and some others, couple
0.

et,

ac,

atque, out,

like cases

vel,

and moods;

as

Duabus

Post singulas sedes


vel tribus horis.
Admoveliqvidas vel singulas vomitiones.
aniur parti qffectas hirudines sex, et jjio re
mill} repetantur.

Huh

31. The following conjunctions are generally


found governing a subjunctive m
1:
ut, .si, m\

dome. &c.
1/

/in/

Donee

as

Donee alvus responderit.


supervenerit.
Si vigilice
Si tussis increbuerit.

haustu8.

oomitus

anxerint.

ill

Huh

Adverbs.

Some adverbs

time,

and

Quantum

suffi-

of quantity,
place, govern the genitive; as
32.

Quod

satis est sacchari albi.

dot aquae.
II.

GRAMMATICAL

EXPLANATION

01

PRESCRIPTIONS.

It will be sufficient, perhaps, to present the stu-

dent with

grammatical explanation of two

scriptions.

No.
(1)
(2)

Ferri Carbonatis

Khei Pulveris

I.

Jjiss.

gr. xv.

pre-

EXPLANATION of PRESCRIPTIONS.
Anthemidis gtt. v.
Conserve Rosse quantum
Olei

(3)
(4)

massula

in pilulas viginti

aeger tres octavis


(1)

137

dividenda,

sufficiat

ut

fiat

quarum eumat

In iris.

Recipe, verb active, imp. mood, 2d pers. sing".


agreeing with Tu understood (Rule 2); from
Recipio, ere, cepi, ceptum, 3d conj. act.
Governs an accusative. (Rule 14.)

Drachmam,

noun

Drachma,
Recipe.

ce,

f.

subst.
1st

ace.

decl.

sing,
from
Governed by

(Rule 14.)

Cum, preposition. Governing an ablative

case.

(Rule 27.)
Semisse, subst. abl. case, from Semissis, is,
3d decl. Governed by cum. (Rule 27.)

f.

Carhonatis, subst, gen. sing, from Carbonas,


nils. f. 3d decl.
Governed by Drachmam.
(Rule 9.)
Ferri, subst. gen. sing, from Ferrum, i, n. 2d
Governed by Carbonatis. (Rule 9,
decl.

and
(2)

note.)

Recipe, understood.

Grana,

subst. ace.

decl.

Governed

pi.

from Gfranum, i, n. 2d
Recipe, understood.

by

(Rule 14.)
Qr/INDECIM, adj. imloclin.
l'i

lveris, subst. gen. sing from Pulvis,eris,m.

3d

decl.

Governed by Grana.

Riiei, subst. gen. sing, from


12*

(Rule

Rheum,

i,

9.)

n.

2d

138

OH THE CONSTRUCTION

Governed by

decl.

01

PRESCRIPTIONS.

(Rule

Pulveris.

9,

and

note.)
(3)

Recipe, understood.

GUTTAS,

Milist.

aCC.

Governed

decl.

(Rule

pi.

by

from

Outta, 03, f. ls<


Recipe,
understood.

I.)

Qi inque, adj. indeclin.


Oi.ei, subst. gen.

decl.

from Oleum, ei,


Rule

2d

a.

viiii'Mims, Bubst. gen. sing, from Anthemii


idis,
9,

(4)

sine.-,

k>verned by Outtas.

<

f.

and

3d decl.

Governed by

(Rule

Olei.

uote.

Recipe, understood.

Quantum, adverb.
Governing
case.
Rule 32.)

genitive

the

Sufficiat, verb impers. potent, mood, pres.


tense, from Sufficio, ere, feci, fectum, neut.
and acct. 3d conj.
CoN8ERv.fi, subst. gen. sing, from Conaerva,
f.

1st decl.

Governed by Quantum.

ce,

(Rule

32.)

Roe

v..

sing, from Rosa, cb,


Governed by Vonsertx. (Rule

subst. gen,

decl.

f.

1st

9,

and

note.)

Ut, conjunct.
(Rule 31.)

Governing a Bubjunc. mood.

lbsula, subst. num. case,

a, ce, f.

1-t. decl.

EXPLANATION OF PRESCRIPTIONS.

139

Fiat, verb, subj. mood, pres. tense, 3d person


singular, from Fio, fis, factus, sum vel fax,
lit (Rule 31), and
nominative case Massula.

Governed by

fieri, limit.

agreeing with
(Rule 2.)

its

Dividenda, particip. nom. case, fem. gend.


from Diviaendus, a, urn (a dividor, i, sits,
Agreeing with Massula.
pass. 3d conj.).
(Rule 1.)
In, preposition.

Governing an accusative

case.

(Rule 28.)
Pilolas, subst. acc. pi. from Pilula,
docl.
Governed by In. (Rule 28.)

as,

f.

1st

Viginti, adj. indecl.


relative pronoun, gen. pi. fern, from
Agreeing with its anteceQui, qua, quod.
(Rule
dent Pilulas in gender and number.
4 ) Governed in the gen. ease by Ties.
(Rules 6 and 13.)

Quarum,

JEger,
Tm:i;, adj. mas. gend. nom.
Agreeing with homo, understood *
asgrum.

(Rub'
*

Homo

is

of the
e

homo.
hi'

1.)

man

common

when

gender, and refers either to


female patient i- meant, we s

or

totally at a loss tor the etymology


Festus gives us ai at [at a/):

Pa tin grammarians an-

seger, eegra,

tegrum.
mi

hers, ai'iypos-, aixiapof {anigros,

The read
sense and sound
terms .-till more discrepant
perhaps, readily perceive the proper origin of ihi- term when he
ah,
is Arabic for
Turks
proni
by
the
dnds that ekrah,
"Bickness, aversion, nausea, horror, or shuddering.''
Eger and agrotus agree In denoting the
he objects to which they are applied, but differ in rein

ON rHE CONSTRUCTION OF PRESCRIPTIONS.

|H

verb, 3d pers. sing. imp. mood, From


Agreeing
ere, psi, phim, act. 3d conj.

Si u \t.

Sumo,

with homo, understood (Rule 2); governing


(Rule 14.)
an ace case.
Tres, adj. arc pi. fern, from Tres, tres, tria.
Agreeing with Pilulas, understood Rule ),
and which is governed by Sumat. (Rule II).
(

Horis, subst. abl. plural, from Hora, <>, f. Lsi


decl. signifying part of time, and, therefore,
put in tlic abl. case.
Rule 23.)
;

Octavis, adj. abl. plur. fem. from Octavus,


Rule 1.
inn.
Agreeing with horis.

",

No.
(1)

Pulv.

Scamm.

Jalapse gr.

(Jj

Calomelanos

(8)
(4)

II.

J}ss.

gr.

v.
iij.

M. Fiat pulvis purgans, exteniplu


pomi tosti Bumendus.
(1)

in

pulpfi

Recipe, as before.

SCRUPULUM, Subst. ace. sill";, from Scrupulus,


Governed by Recipe. (Rule
i, m. 2d decl.
14.)

Dimidium, adj. ace. sing, masc from Dimidius,


a, 7tm. Agreeingwith Scrupulvm. (Rulel).
Pulveris, subst. gen. sing, from Pulvis, eris,
m. 3d decl. Govern'- by Scrupulum. (Rule
1

sped

nature of those objects. The first, as a generic term,


pri '8W the
both mind and to body, while the lattel
body aloue." Hill's Synonymes of the Latin Lan-

to the

extends

to

di^eai-e of the

guor/?.

EXPLANATION OF PRESCRIPTIONS.

141

Scammoni.v:, subst. gen. sing, from Scammonia,


03,

9,

(2)

I'

1st decl.

Governed by Pulveris.

(Rule

and note.)

Recipe, understood, as before.

Grana,

subst. ace. pi. neut. from Gfranum, i,


Governed by Recipe, understood.

2d decl.
(Rule 14.)
n.

QuiNojoi:, adj. Indecl.

Pulveris, subst. <>;en. sing, from Pulvis, ens,


in. 3d decl.
Governed by Grana. (Rule 9).
Jalap.e, subst. gen. sing, from Jala/pa,
1st decl.

Governed by Pulveris.

as,

(Rule

I.

9,

and note.)
(3) Recipe, understood, as before.

Grana,

subst. ace. pi. from

Granum,
Governed by Recipe, (Rule

decl.

Tria, adj. ace.

pi.

n.

neut. gend. from Trcs,

Agreeing with Grana.

/rt':(.

i,

2d

14.)

(Rule

Ires,

1.)

Calomelanos, subst. genit. sing, from Calomelas, a word compounded of two Greek
words, hn'/iir [halos), good, and//&aj (melas),
black and declined like the masculine gender of the adjective uifaic (melas) thus: Norn
:

Gen. Calomelanos; Dat. CaloAce. Calomelana; Voc. Calomelas;


Abl.* Calomelane. Calomelanos is governed
Calomelas;

melaiii:

by Grana.
* There

(Rule
is

9.)

no ablative case in Greek.

14"2

(4)

ON THE CONSTRUCTION OP PRESCRIPTIONS.


Misce, verb, 2d pers. Bing. imper. mood, From
Act.
Misceo, Sre, ui, rhistum, and mixtum.
Agreeing with Tu, understood.
2d conj.
(Rule 2.)
Fiat, verb, imper. mood, from
.sum

vcl

/ui,

(Rule'

1'nlris.

Pulvis, Bubst.

Tin, fis,factus
Agreeing with

-J.)

iKnii. sing.

masc. gen. 3d decl.

part.

1.)

Scmendi
1)

neut.

num. sing. masc. Purga^s, lis,


Purgo, are.
Agreeing with Pulvis.

Purcans,
from
(Rule

fieri,

in

Sumor,

s,

part.

gender,
i,

Agreeing with Pulvis (Rule


From
number, ami case.

pass. 3d conj.

Extrmi'i.o, adverb.
In, prepos. governing an abl. case.

(Rule 28).

Pulpa, subst. abl. sing, from Pulpa,


decl.
Governed by in. (Rule 28.)

Pom i,

subst. gen. sing, from

decl.

Governed by Pulpa.

Pomum,
(Rule

OB, f.

1st

n.

2d

i,

9.)

Tosti, part. gen. sing. neut. gend. from Tosius,


a, urn (from Torreor,eri, 2d conj.)
Agreeing

with Pond.

(Rule

1.)

PRONUNCIATION 01 1'IIARMACEUTICAI., TERMS. 143

CHAPTER

X.

ON THE PRONUNCIATION OF PHARMACEUTICAL TERMS.


'The true pronunciation of the Latin language
being

lust,

the different nations of

The

substitute their own.

probably ap-

the aearast to it" (Zumpt).

Europe generally

Italian

marks on the pronunciation

(if

The

follow-

Latin pharma-

ceutical terms apply, therefore, to the English

of pronouncing

tliis

mode

language.

In the pronunciation of these, as of other terms,


our guides are threefold,

viz.:

certain established

rules, the authority of the poets,

and established

custom.

The

rules

may

be arranged under three heads,

viz.
1st.

Those relating to the pronunciation of letters.

2d. Those relating to the pronunciation of syllables.

3d.

Those relating

to

the length or quantity of

syllables.

Sect.

I.

Rules for the Pronunciation of Letters.

The following general

rules for. the pronunciation


of the letters of Latin words arc those usually followed by classical authorities of the present day.

Rule

1.

C and

G.

Cand

before a,

o, u,

and

PR0N1 NCIA1 KMi OP

\i:m LCE1

I'll

I'M,

ill: M

C is sounded
consonants, arc pronounced bard.
like K; as in Calumba, Copaiba, Cuprum, and
r,'
has a hard guttural Bound; as in Galbanum, Gossipium, Guaiacum, and Olycyrrhiza.
C and G before c, i, and //. arc, with us, genepronounced

rally

Citrus,

trio.

C sounds soft like S, as in


Cydonia, Cyanidum, and fy/,/-

soft.

pronounced like ./; as in Gentiana,


Gyrophora, Gypsum, Hydrargyrum,
, and Hydrogen.
before ce and as is boA as in Baccai, pronounced

ehum.

is

Gigartina,
r<

'

bak-se.
Observ. a. The student is to understand that
these rules, although most uinversally followed by
Classical authorities of the present day, are not
probably in accordance with the practice of the
ancient Romans. For it is Dearly certain that they

always pronounced Chard,

like

A',-

and

it

is

fur-

ther probable that C and G were pronounced by


them in the same manner; that is, like A'. For
arguments in favor of this opinion, the reader is
referred to Scheller's Latin Grammar, trans)

by G.Walker (1825).
Observ. ft. It is by no means uncommon
C and G pronounced hard before e and y in

to

hear

certain

words of reek origin. This pronunciation is sometimes adopted, from a fancied notion of its greater
correctness, founded on the fact that the words axe
dirived from the Greek, in which the corresponding
Thus occasionally
letters are pronounced hard.
we hear men of C msiderable classical attainments
pronounce the Cand G hard in the following words:
Cyanogen, Cyanidum, Hydrocyanicum, Hyoscyamu8, Hydrargyrum, Oxygen, and Hydrogen; as if
they were spelt kyanogen, kyanidum, hyoskyamus,
<

PRONUNCIATION OF LETTERS.

145

&c.
But such a mode of pronunciation always appears pedantic and affected. Moreover, if the principle be correct, it should be extended to all words,
Of both common and rare occurrence, derived from
the Greek, and is equally applicable to the English
as to the Latin language: and thus the words gene-

alogy and ami,,, m would he pronounced with the


g
hard. But what "would hecome of our langrj
says Walker, "if every word from the Greek and
Latin, that has </ in it, were 80 pronounced?"

Rule
like

('//
(hi.
is usually pronounced hard,
practice which is consonant, probably,
that of the Romans; as in Chenopodium

2.

K a

with

(ken), Chelidonium (kel), Mastiche (mastike). Chela

Chimaphila
(moskua &c.

(kela),

(ki),

Chondrus

(ko),

Moschus

i.

Observ.

a.

This rule

by pharmaceutists.

is

very frequently violated

Thus Chia

{e.g. Terebintliina
often erroneously pronounced as if written
tshia, whereas it should lie sounded as Kin.
Catechu* is often erroneously sounded as if written katetshoo, whereas the true pronunciation is
that of kateku or katequ; the e/m being pronounced
as ku or qn.
Observ. (}, Colehicum, following the same rule,
should he pronounced kolkekum hut it is more
frequently sounded koltchecum.
The former pro-

Chia)

is

* The word Catechu is said to be derived from Cate, the name


ami e/m, juice (B. .1 Murray, App. Medicam. vol. it).
aid of Professor 11 H. Wilson, I have endeavored, but
in vain. t<> verify this etymology. Professor Wilson suggi
ia derived from two .Malay words, (,'atthnnd Kuah; tlie
former signifying juice oh ained by boiling. the latter, juice by
exudation. The H o words put together would make something
like our word Catechu Gateh-kuah.

Wall the
I

13

16

i;,,ni

mi

iTIOH OF PB kRllACEl

II

IX

BRMS.

nunciation (kolkekum) is supported ool onh


analogy and the pronunciation of the Greek primi('"'./
\u,:,r), Imt also by the modern pronuncitive
ation of the name of the place {Colchis or Colchoa,
,1
kolkis or kolkos) where this plan! is
it
resaid to flourish abundantly, and ('nun which
In favor of the second pronunits name.
el
koltchekum), which is opposed to classical
authority, nothing can be urged bul vulgar custom
which, however, is now bo general among medical
men, that to deviate from it appears affected and
i

ii

pedantic.
j. The rule for pronouncing ch hard,
frequently deviated from in the case of
commemorative botanical names: thus RichardFor it is a
sonia is pronounced Ritshardsonia.
pule among botanists in naming plants after indi-

rv.

like k,

is

viduals, to preserve striotlj the orthography and


And though, it
pronunciation of the primitives.
be admitted, this practice leads to the Formation of word- foreign to both the genius and pronunciation of the Latin language, yel the practical

inconvenience
try

their

is

less

than

were permitted

own

national

the botanists of each


the names to suit
df pronouncing Latin

if

to alter

mode

words.
Observ. 6. The word Chiretta or Chirayta (applied to an Indian gentianaceous plant employed
in medicine as a tonic) is pronounced similar to
that is, with the '7/ soft, like
its Indian derivative,
for this accords with
tsh (as tshiretta, tshiraytaj

word in the Tamool, Dukbanie, Hindoostanie, and Bengalie langu


the pronunciation of the

Rule

3.

Cm, Cn,

Ct,

Gm, Gn, Mn, Tm,

Ps,

and

PRONUNCIATION OF LETTERS.
/'/.

when

the

first

they begin

word, are pronounced with


Onicu$ (nikus), Gnidia

:i

mute:

letter

as

(nidea), Pterocarpus (terokarpus),

(sikotrea

147

and Psychotria

).

Ui i.E i. T, 8, and C before ia, ie, it, io, in. ea,


and i'h, when the accent precedes, change their
sounds into sh and zh; as Aurantium (auransheum),
Amindinaeea (arundinashea), Erinaceus (erina-

sheus), Acacia (akashea); Artemisia (artemezhea),


Magnesia (magneshea), Cassia (cashya).
But, when the accent is on the first diphthongal
vowel, the preceding consunant presen es its

as

Aurantiacum (aurantiakum).

Obserc. This rule is nut always adhered to. Thus


Potassium is usually pronounced po-tas'-se-um,
not potasheum and Calcium, kal'-se-um, not kalsheuin. The letter
in the first, and c in the latter
word, are, of course, liable to receive the pronunciation indicated by sh.
;

,<?

Rule

5.

Sen sounds

1c;

as Schcenus (skenus).

beginning of a, word sounds


like '/, as Xericum (zerekum), Xeres (zerez), and
Xanthorrhosa (zanthorrea). But in other positions
it retains its own proper sound; as in Tarns, Borax,
Siyrax, Opoponax, &c.
I!i

u: 6.

at the

Rule 7. English classical writers pronounce the


Latin vowels, a, e, i, o, v, as they do the English
ones.
Ri i.e 8. Diphthongs are also pronounced as in
As ce and oe are pronounced like e, these
English.
diphthongs are called improper, because the sound

of the

first letter is lost.

[ONUNCIATION

PHARM

01

\ri

r'l

tCAL TERMS.

rv. A. diphthong is sometimes split or dividnd


two sv'lables, each of which is separately proWhen this is ilif case, the mark ("),
nounced.
called the diaeresis or dialysis, is placed over one
of the letters of the diphthong to indicate thai the
rowels are to be separated in pronunciation: the
words Aloe\ Benzoinum, and Cambogib'des are exam-

Obst

into

ples.

The word

<

'ephaelis [e.g.

often pronounced as
over one of the vowels.
is

Cephaelis ipecacuanha)

the diaeresis were placed


This, however, is an error.

if

lis true pronunciation is the same as it' the word


were written Cephcelis (thai is, sef-H'-lis. The
mologyof the word Cephaelis (from /.,</>/,, a head,
i

because the flowers are disposed in heads) clearly


It
proves this.
would be more correctly spelled
Cephalis.

Sect. II.

Rules for

the

Pronunciation of Syllables,

or for the Recent.

English

classical

authorities,

in

pronouncing

Latin syllables or words, follow the usage of their


own language; thai is. thej pn
wwn- as a word
similarly spelled would be pronounced in English.
This custom undoubtedly leads to a pronunciation
quite at variance with thai of the ft
an
In pronouncing words of more than one syllable,
a particular strength or force of the voice is laid
on one syllable to distinguish it from the others.
This is calh-d the uncut, or sometimes the principal
accent.
In writing, this mark (') is employi
designate th,e accented syllable; us in the word
.)/.

n'tha.

mger polysyllables have another

PRONUNCIATION OF SYLLABI
accent, railed secondary.

Thus

the

((I

compound

rd

Her rocyan"idum has two accents,the


principal
one (denoted by the double accentual mark,
thus")
and the secondary one (indicated by the
single accentual mark, thus').

The following are the rules of Latin accentuation


as usually followed

\>\

English orthoepists

Rule 9. Dissyllables, or words of two syllabi


whether Greek or Latin, whatever he the quantity
the original, have, in English pronunciation,
the
first syllable; asa'pis,
bac'ca, eal'cis
garlus, liquor, &c.
Observ. In the English language, dissylables accented on the first syllable, usually have that
syllable long.
Hence, because Latin dissyllables are
i"

accenton the

accented on the

first syllable, this

syllable is usuand thus we say U'quor,


instead of llq'uor, making the first syllable
long;
or nearly so; while the genitive case of this

pronounced long:

ally

word

pronounced

is

lltfuoris.

with the first syllable short, as


(See Mr. Pickbourn's observations,
Grant's Institutes of Latin Grammar, n.

quoted in
339-430, 2d ed.)
I;

or

'

'

'

more

10. In polysyllables, or words with three


syllables, the accent is on the penultimate

that syllable

long.
The following are examace'tas, aceta/tis, achille'a, aconl''tum, conl'um, carbona'tis, sina'pis, sulphure'tum.
if

lie

ples:ace'tum,

Observ. See pp. L51-153 for the rules which apply to the words achillea, conium, and acetas, which
are sometimes accented, though erroneously, on
the antepenultimate.

Rum

11.

In polysyllables, or words with three


13*

L50 PRON

NCI kTION OF

I'll

ai;m

\(

El

[CAI

rKl

more syllables, the acoenl is on the antepenultimate if the penultimate be short. The Following
ac'flruB, at'rOpa, cam'pbOra, cbiare examples:

or

mas. en Vina, in 'j


m. el /ml mil,
cyanldum, bro'mldum, io'dldum, melliflca.
maph'ila, ear

'I

>.

We

Observ.

ii

ill

frequently hear this rule

\i

ami the words erroneously pronounced thus atro'pa,


campho'ra, chlorVdum, &c.
walker has thus expressed in English \>
preceding rules:
Word\

By]

1,1

Mum

of

two

Mr

have

lint if this

Musi on

111.

By]

's long, and lasi bnl one,


accent upon that, or do
syllable be bort, the stress

thai
tin

tiio last init

two

Rules relating
bles

<>r

Its

In

force

expre

Quantity of Sylla-

/!/<

Vowels.

Greek or Latin words, the Enalways retain tin' Greek ami Latin
ntities, but follow the analogy of their own
language: ro that syllables which, in Latin, are
long, are frequently pronounced short, ami. vice
versa.
The same holds good with respect to Greek
words which are pronounced as coming to us through
In pronouncing

glish do not

tie

The following

Latin.

are

;1

few illustrate

ampli
liquor

lapis
crocus-

niger

.....
......
.....
.....
.....

is

pronounced by the English liquor


lapis

itus

lllium

mil its

lilium

LENGTH OR QUANTITY OF SYLLABLES.

151

Attempts have been occasionally made to introduce the practice of pronouncing Latin and Greek
words according to the Latin and Greek quantities
but without

Ri

i.e

much

success.

A rowel

12.

before another (or, which i^.


the Bame thin-, before an /, followed
by a. vowel,
or before a diphthong) is short: as in abies,
allium,
absinthium, oleum, lutgus,mezerum,purpureus,&c.
Observ. To this rule numerous exceptions exisl
hut the only ,-lass of exceptions requiring
notice
here i^ thai of words of Greek origin.
;

Words which in Greek are written with ei before


vowel, and in Latin with e or i, have the
e or
lODg; as in centaurg'a and centauri'um (icevTavpela
a

an ''

'
'

I-

achille'a (axlMeioc)

and conVum

(kAveiov).

The word conium

often erroneously pronounced


with the accent on the antepenultimate and the i
short, thus co'nium; and in Loudon's Dictionary
oj

Plants

is

directed to be so pronounced,
on
1 presume, that it follows the
general ruleof a vowel being short before another \
owel,
anil also, perhaps, because the Greek accent is
on
the first syllable.
Hut, as it is derived from the
Greek word kLvuov, and as its i has been substituted for the u of the primitive, itobviously belongs
to the class of exceptions just alluded to,
and, therefore, should be pronounced with the i Ion-, as above
directed: thus
COni'um.
it

is

the assumption,

Rule

"A

vowel before two consonants is


always deemed long [by position], though pronounced with the short sound ol the English vowel,
as

the
"la,

13.

penultimate of anten'nee [of argen'tum,


calum'ba, &c.] unless the two consonants
;

,,\i \,

are

mute ami

rowel

may
,

a- in

LTIOM OF

',

l v

for

M.

ICI ill'

TERMS.

then the previous

liquid,'

Bhort,

hriiiii."

\km

I'll

and
Bequently unaocented,
Smart's Walker Remodelled^ p.
i

WW.
I.
Ki
Diphthongs are long both in Latin and
Greek words; as in jleuiculum, althcea, ami hasma1,1:

toxylum.
Observ. Prce in
before a vowel as
;

composition
in

/-<

is

usually short

ustus.

"

IJri.i: I"). In words of two syllables with but one


consonant in tin' middle, whatever be the quantity
of the vowel, in the first syllable in Greek or Latin,
it
English pronunciation;
is always made long in
as in s'deps, a'pis, d/rum, bi/rax, brB'mu
J&'no, p/ a us, iii'ilix, sd'po, ami so'da.

Hi

words of three syllables, with the


ami with but urn' consonant

In

It!.

i.i:

accent on the

first,

after

syllable,

the

first

the

first

syllable

is

pro-

short, let the Greek or Latin quantity be


will as in nr'oriis, dl'oe, dm/ylum, senega.

nounced

what

it

Observ The words acorns and amylum areoften,


but erroneously, pr
meed aco'rus and amy'lum,
Tims we frequently hear persons talk of using the
decoctum amy'li as an en&'ma!
The pronunciation
should be, am'yli and en'ema.]
j

Rule

IT.

A number of Latinized polysyllables,

terminating in dum or idum, employed in modern


chemistry and pharmacy, make their penultin
Bhort, like the Latin adjectives in idvs [idus, o,
a in j: bence their accent is on the antepenultimate

as

ox'y dum,

chlo'ridum,

io'didum,

bro'midum,

and cyan' idum.

Rule
nating

So
Latinized polysyllables, termietum, employed in modern chemistry

18.
in


LENGTH OR QUANTITY OF SYLLABLES.
and pharmacy, make

their penultimate

the penultimate of polysyllabic


supines

153
like

metum;

assulphuretum, carburBtum, and phospkuretum.


R' u 19. Another class of
Latinized names introduced into modern chemistry is that
which includes the words used to designate the
oxysalts.
Lhey are the nouns* of the third declension,
and

terminate in either is or as [ite or ate in


English)a,8carbo'nas, phos'phas, nVtras, suVphas,

arsSn'-

and nr's, nis.


Both dissyllables and trisyllables lengthen
the
"."''"in,". it, and the accent
then falls on the penulios, in das,

timate; &s-~$ul'phas,suVphatis; ni'tras,


nitra'tis;
arsen ias,arst nWtis; io'das, ioda'tis;
andar'sem's
arsenVtis,
Observ. The word acetas is sometimes
pronounced
with the penultimate short, and consequently
with
the accent on the antepenultimate;

But

as
at/Has.
as the penultimate in the primitive
[acetum)

long, the penultimate of the derivative


[acetas)
should be long also [ace'tas).
is

Rule

20.

Compound words have

the

samequan-

tity as

the simple words of which they are compounded; as perox'pdum, bichlo'ridum, binWdidum, ferrocyan'idum, sesquicar'bonas, and bi-

suVphas.
In the

tnese

French Codex, and generally in Continental works


as in the terms enrbonas sodicus
I.
Edinburgh and Dublin Pharmade neuter; as in the phrases carbm
uma.oiferrisulphasexsiccatum. In the London Pharma-

words are made masculine;

and orients potassicus.

copeia, on the contrary, they are made feminine; as in


ata.
If it be admitted thai these words
lengthen the increment, they then come under Lilly's
second
special role, thai " nouns increasing long in
the geni
'
[f we are to be guided by the standard of classical

authority, the Lond

lollege

is

certainly correel "

Remarks ontheNom nclature of the New London Pharma,

'

PROSODIAC

\.L

VOCABULARY

WORDS EMPLOYED IN MATERIA MEDICA AND PHARMACY,


ft'MSs, abl'Btla./. in thephrase
abietit, Hi" latter \\ ord
is often, i>iii erroneously, pro-

nounced

Icue

agS.i
i

>i

;"ii;

;"i

'i

li

-,

T>'

i,

al'bus, a, um.
al'cOhol. "h-.
alexa mil

um.

i,

urn

abrOI

I'll

'

rfiioi'.

ali-ili'lll'liun.

i.

ai/nVfllOl".

M.f.
.

;i

'

uin.

."
I

IK.

IU8,

or n.*

//i

?!.

l)TOS.

m.

abifi'tis,

ii

in

es.

.i

;i,

Um.

n.

.iAiii;.

."'-:
I

'

ac&'tnm,

//

ftchille'H vel ttchlllas'a,

aclduin,

ale, n.

./.

n.

I.

am.

i.

Is,
1

a niiiiMH

acOniii'na,

it.

.'

I'.imni,

n.

i.

a/jL/jito-

ammo'nlum,

i.

ut of

a/copov,
tin'

In

;i

ro-

plant aicopOT.

ami ''in am,


amyg'd&la,

n.

i.

aiuo/iov.

/<

se.

and /, usually
amyg'd&lus,

m.

i.

an almond

./',

seru'RO. inis. /.
as'ther,

getbl'5pts, Wis. f. aifli67Tt?, 1609,

(i

m. aiOiOip,

ilio

whereas

In

11

to uerj/

and

anchu'sa, 83./. ayxovaa.

bhirkmoor.

* In

6jto5,

im a, an-

am'yrie,

swering
BpiS.

French Codex tlif word alcohol la made masculine,


tbe old Edinburgh Pharmacopoeia it was considered

ami salt preparat,


materes, and coagulat."

tartre, alcaly,

"And combust

Chauceb, The Chanones Yemannes

Tale.

PROSODIACAL VOCABULARY,
andi'ra,

name

The

x. f.

Brazilian

{Marcgraav.

of a tree

87)

,i

>

aodrSpo^gon. m. avyp,
and mayutv,
on!
uemu'ne, es,
a.vep.u>vri.
une'ilmm, i. n avyfiov.
ang&llna, ic.f.
angasiu'ra, 93. /
Angostura
(Spanish), uai rawness
from
angUStUS, narrow.
<i

5'ma,
1

ani'sum,

e.

QU
ij'i

I'u.., a,

nm

//..

;i

'mini,
.-,.,

n.

i.

i.

aruj60'os

aVarum,

ascle pias, adis./. acKAvjjrio?.


5p8 'agus, i. n

.unid'oUis,

.<

n.

assalue'tida,

:i

se

o.tt6kvvov.

i.

se.

:i

f
PromapitTos,
;

and

A Malabar

" ord

a bunch

/.

('In

uTp07TOS.

e'na,

88

rth

'''..''
i.

a;.

n. a, priv

"

'i

baUa

in''.

w>j, life

/.

balaus'tlum,

''./.

n.

e.

azo'tum,

0}

ii.

ani amna'lis,
au'rum, i. n

bac'ca,

arg&mo'ne, es, /
mi.] //.
LSs, ari'&l is, m.
,i

auran'tium,

itaph'ylos
0Ta<l>vAii,

m. a.<rTpdya\o<;

avella'na

am,

/.

arcbangSllua,

are'ca,

i,

85.

/.

!ni.-, a,
is,

se

us,

a'triplex,

n.

i.

'

a'pis, is./,

Called after Dr.

Aspld'Iam, i. n. a<77ris, acrTricSos.


asple'nlam, i. n. aan-Af/i'ios.

i.

a'plum,
n.
pQc'ynum, i. n.

am,

a,

avOtfiCs,
tfi

a'qua,

apoi'.

.,

Ass Gray.

avui&vva..

J avriSoros,
antimonia'lis, e

autlmon'ium,*

(see page 153)


aptreviKov.

s&niu'sus, a, mil.
(seep. 1
art&mls'ia, ./. apTepiaia.
artucar'pu-, ./
From apros,
bl ad; and ttapitos, fruit.

idis /.

am,

m.
am.

i.

arundlna'ceus,

;i
,

bumis,

am.

a.

atis

uni.

ano'dyna, iiTum.n.pl,

nil,

n.

i.

aii'iii'ius, a,

>i

is,

atis. n.

'
i

./'.

155

ar'nlca, se./.

1.

ii

II.

se.

/.

bal'samdd3u"dron. n
fia,\<rapou, bill in ; and OsrSpor. a

arisiOlOchla, se/.
ala, se /

bal'xamum,

armeui'acus, a, am,
armora'cla, so. /.

barbaden'sis, e

i.

n.

/3dAo-ap.oc,

Las Barbados

'
It is said thai
Basil Valentine first tried the effects of antimonial medicines upon the monks of his convent, on whom they
'Hi such
lolence thai be was induced to distinguish the
mineral from which those medicines had been extracted by the
name of antimoine (i.e. hostile to monks).

acted w

156

[ROSODl

(Portuguese),

\<

W.

bearded

the

MM

70C

bu'chu.

names

biiku. African
ba'i

nn,

and

pipus heavy
heavy;

li,

'rum,

rl

ij/"/, jjik W.

basilicas,

inn. iir

tun

a,

for tb<'

plant.
tut

iv

loug,

fSaoiAucot,

/TJI/"/.

lAuir.

belladon'

donna

11a

/air

(Italian),

(Spanish),
Cac'l

tadty

~.

It

cad 'in
aed

benzo'ious

i,li>

nut

am.

a,

//is,

ii

ii

I.

phony bin; from


twice
words,
twice or doable as In ihe
com pounds bicarbonas, biniodidum, bichloridum, binn
&c.
For the pro'

KOLKTOf.

III

in

pii'l

Ill

am

ii,

Dam,

152),

icu8,

beuzo'i

Like

I-,

koAo

in

I.

'ins,

bese terms, see


mas, iodidum, Sc,
i

nam,
(German

KaAdf,
/ / urn,

/',

ii

ml

rpi irw,

caluin'ba,
cal'clum,

'"

f,
n.

ii

cal x, cal'cis. f.

Wismuth

n.

i.

llll

'

IMlr

III

utAlT7)?.

bun pi n'd m, te. /


Ainu- Bonplu
i

botanist.
bo'r&M, litis/

blanci

Named

after

er, tris,

ii

(see p

i'

bovi'uns,
:

brS'mas,

a,

am.

83.

f.

atis.

a,

br.Vini linn,

bro minium, ii

o'siS,

I'

iiii^

in'i'ki.

Ij'llll.

a,

am.

,'i-

.'!'

nut.

l:

inn.

I'll

Kanrjiopd.

a,

caooabl'nus,

a,

am
.

/3pwpo9, a

bnj'micus,

can'd

Dr. Boswell
ril'lns, a, am.

Prom

ii.

ir.'

ae
ii-,

.'i

bo'rax,

bo

m'pb&ra,

(see

L53)

am

in,
i'S 'lii,

n
n.

/.

st\

i.

//

ij8.

Kaf 0api<;.

xaifiixdv.

carbO'nas,

alls

/'

From/3pa>jzof,

stink
bru'cia, a?. /.
Derived from
the name of a Scotch traveller, James Bruce.

carburS'tuin, i n.
cardftmi'ne, - / Kap&afun).
jULCtffLOl',

II.

PROSODIACAL VOCABULARY.

157

cfi'rica, se.f.

ch&lidSnlum,

'"/
car'th&mus, i. m.
ca'rai.
Altered from carum.
ca'rum, i. n.

chenopOdlum, i.
a goose; and

caryophylla'tus,
caiyipliyl'lum,

a,
i.

am.
n.,

clove.

m.,

clove

Kapv6<t>v AAoi>.

caryophyl'lus,

i.

tree.
;e.

ca'sSum,

n.

i.

x. f.
cas'tor, oris,

castor'eum,

Kaa-ruip, opos.

n.

i.

'Sue, a, inn.

um

purge;

ad Ka/mfo, fruit.

caute'rium,

it

n.

The diminuf.
cebada (Spanish), barcentauii'um,
ce'pa,

'I

.i

se

p.u>p.ov.

rissam'pHos.

poetic uarae,

derived from Cer'bSrus,

t.

m.,

ooc'cttl

m.
i.

is

ii,,

Diminutive of

,n.

From

./'.

codei'a,

kokkos

col'chicum,

n.

(?).

f. kwShlo..
i.
re.
(see
KOiXxiKOV.
colco'i bar.
colly'rium,
n

cSrtls'sa, :t\f. Kijpvoaa.


i.

KAvirrrjp.

ft.

coccus
00 V

fernal regions.
brum, i. n.

in,

m.

i.

cocciu'eus, a, um.
COC'CUS, i. III. KOKKOS.

l/w three-headed dog in tin in-

'\ II-,

ivy; and

'seep. 158J

'm.

ta,

/ao-o-6?,

a vine.

clys'tor, eris.

n.

cSra'tus, a, um.
cer'bSra, se.f.

um.

'i

cla'vus,

as, i./.
i.

a,

ii

cit'ricus. a, urn.
cit'rious, a, um.
cit'rus, i.f. xirpov.

/.
vel cephffilis./.
''/
se.

cfira'tuin,

xpwi'.

(see chloriui-

ft.

i.

ci'tras, atls. /.

/.
i
n.

lis

in

lil

an7rtAo9,
;e

From

am.

ciacho'aa, a'. /,
cinoab'Sri, indecl. n., and cinnab'aris, is./. Ki.vva.fio.pi.
cinn&md'mum, i. n. kiwo.-

l> .'/

ceataurO'a,

x 7)""^
a

TroSds,

ni m, i, n. From x^wpo?.
pale green
a, ,'c.
bOcO
f.
cli'ili'.lrus, i. m.
X V &P '>.
clcho'rlam, i. ft. kIx^plov.
'

'ma, atis. Kaxa7rAao-fio.


cats pti'tla .y.
cat'echu, indecl. (see p. 14j).
oathar'i ious. a,
cathartocar'pus, i. m. KaBaipio,

x'ii'i

chlro'nla, t^f.

u m).
chlorina'tus,

n.

nov<;,

cblm&phlla. x.f From xci/ua,


winti r; and </nA<(cu, 1 love.
cht'os,
/. x l 5.
cbiret'ta, x.

chlo'rldam,

/.

x*kl&6v<.ov.

foot.

clil'iis, a,

cascarll'la,

i.

p.

145).

cetra'rla,

se.

c818cyn'this, idis.

/.

cb&l'ybs, ch&l'ybis.

cb&rnseme'lum,

n.

i.

x^M"'-

p.y\Xov.

che'lSB,

cOI&pbo'nia,
0(5

arum.
14

pi. f.

KokoKw0l<;,

iSos.

xv^v-

u'.i

i,

ai.

commii'nis,

se.

f. Ko\o<piavia.

f. KoKvria.
e.

PROSOD] ICAL
conl'nm,

(see p.

n.

i.

cu'u in m.

151),

not

Kiai

./

fero,

cui nil. i.

in

H-,
di.

thi

ii.

///.

finis
kotvKt), a In. a.
1 sii

<J..lCl,l,

1111(1

'

pronounoed diaoh'-ylon,

From 6Io?,
dian'thus, i. m.
divine; ami oii-Oos, aJUiwer.

mil

dlcte m'nus,
m,
digit a'lls, la /,
i

onis,/. KpoTuv.
as./ Kopjitfia.

dios'ma,
e/yd

.'(

.'L'

uir/j..(,

s,

7,i.

i,

nil a.

i,

From

n.

dormenli

cnspa'ria, as./.
From
or crupa, .-..iiiii
American

names,
cyanldns, a, am. Fromtcvavos,
a &/ue xub&lance.

cyanog&nlam,

Suiprnxa,

om
Qermao
i

of a

nist.

dalci mft'ra
i .

as,

f.

/,

/.

blw f and

Kiiaco;,

u ,'Aai'a, /fte o/tt)C

>/((C.

cydd'ula, ./.,

//ic

quince

tree.

tcvSuvia.
i.

7*.,

</ie

quince.

cymi'unm,

n. kviiIvov.
and cynos'n.
b&tOS, i. 771 KVPOufZaToi'
cynan'chum, i. n. From <eiW,
i.

cynoe'b&ton,

i.

a dog;

ingle.

In
gl'&phas,

i.

('Ii'it'cr'iii,

indecl. n.

elate'rlum,

KV&UtVtOV.

kki'6?,

From

f.

name

the

From
n.
-yeyyaw, /

um.

a,

SB.

6ios, di-

Kvn-po?.

/.

SB.

From

smrll.
OoAi^ot.

.mil

domen'tlcus,
n.

i.

sig-

more oorrectlj d
From Bid, through; and x"Y?>

i,

'nam,
cu'pnim,

li

lint

in.

CIlCUl'l.ilH,

dott

i.vor-

aally
icpi o

0|

..i

"1.

'tag, a,

6eA</nVioi'.

um.

In in
a prefix to the de

From

/.

Froin

creaeo'too

;i,

Bit,

nlflea thai

inn.

"M. mi.

I.

From

chemical compounds

-end.

CM y

datn'ra,

KO/tt

I)

I.

indecl.

('..I'lin.

decoe'tum, i. n.
delphi'nlum, i. n.

him

a,

HIM,

Kvntipos.
kvtkto?; andoyti-

in.

(iMIl'lll-

KopdWiov.

coral'llnm, i
Ins,

cypS'rus,
cyttsus, i.

daph'ne,

From copaiba, and

bear.

MY.

.-inn.

mi. of the
i

OC IB1

The Brazilian

m f
ii.

and

dy\(a, I

eAa<f>o?.

77i.

i.

eAarijpioi' (sc.

4>dpnaK0l>).

Slectu&'rium,
M'.'-mi,

i.

n.

indecl.
eras, a, um.
antie. m.

en'&ma,

PROSODIACAL VOCABULARY.
ergo'ta, x.f.
e /.
erina'ceus, a,
1

errhi'num,

um.

i.

se

n. epplvov.

gargaris'nm,

/.

gelatl'na, se. /.
gSnls'ia, se /.

a'tns, a, am.
eucalj p'tus, i.

Prom

e$,

l in
KaAvirroi, I cover
(as wi'h a lid),
I

euge'nia, te ./'.
eaphSr'bia, se. /.
The plant
w Men yields euphorbium.

euphor'bium,

n.
europse'ue, a, urn.
'sua,

fa'ba,

se,

evc/)op/3ioi/.

um.

.1,

'luin,

i.

i.

n.

gentla'na, se./
gla'ber, bra. brum.
glvc'iT'iia, se /.
From yAwcu's
vel y\vKepos, sweet.

glycyrrhi'za,

gratl'Ola, se f.
:i
re'ulens, utis.
gaaia'cum, i. n.
gum'rai, indecl. n.
.i

te

/.

bebradenMron,
Hebrew; ajid

m.

bri.

fi'cus, fn vel

hSd'Sra,

hi,

helo'nias.

i.

um.

n.

i.

i.

m.

From

/.

>j/xc<ri/s,

frumen'tum,

i,

half; and Stcrpos,

:i

i.

m.

hl'era,

SB

gal'bauam,

/.

7)1.

i.

epp.o-

n. x a ^P^ v VDel gallpi 'a, se ./".


i

A
his aame, derived from

Gali])on,s, the French appellation of the Caribs.


gal'la, iu. /.

se

hiru'do,

ini.s.

hor'deum,

i.

/.
n.

hyber'nus, a, um.
in drar'gy'rum, i. n. vSpdpyvpos.
\i\

a,

8dKTv\0S.
n.

i. ?n
full'go, Inis /.

From

he'par, atis n.
hepal leas, a, um.
hiTiiinilac'i v Ins,

Aos,

;/;.

i.

bond.
n.

I'm 'lis. ,.

"s

i.

lii'iiiiilrs'iiini,

foe'num,

t/Spaio?,

Sdi/Spor, a In,

marsh.

florenti'nns, a,
D08, IliVns
iiluin,

From

a'../'.

helli'b'orus,

if.

t'i'lix, Icis. f.
lis'tiila. ae /.

'

-yui/ioy.

bsematox'ylon, i. n. From aTp.a,


ill odd; and v'Kov, wood.

fuu'gus,

n.

i.

&/
<

n.

''

ferru'go, mi's. /.
i' r'l'iiin, i.
n.
I'
r'ula se ./'.

Ill 111 Tl'l

/. y\vKvpp<.a.

se.

um.

us, a.

gra'num,

gyp'sum,

f.

atis. n.

m.f.

fee'cfila,

159

gal'lious, a, um.
galll'na, se f.
gal'lus, i

'dras, atis (see

i>.

153)

hydrio'das, atis (see p. 153)


hydrochlo'ras, atis (see p. lo.'S).
hydrochlo'ri' us, a, um.

hydrocyanlcns,

a,

hydrogenlum,

n.

i.

um.

From

iiSwp,

water; and yewdui, I beget.


bydrosal'phas, atis (see p 153).

PROSODl \r

L60
urns,

pi

m.

fll

laud a'num, I. Comraonlj


d laud'llnum.

Prom

/.

nin.

langs'dorf,

ioum, i 71.
hyssO'pas, i. m.

oc

voaicvanos.

in.

i.

\l.

WtY.

\r.ri,

Smith America,

./ Prom Janlpdba,

janl'pha,

71.

remedyi and ^ayeiv,

,j

/.

/.

lia n r ord.
i(lat'r6pha),

Iciilis'cns,

/.

m.
Prom \>
leon'todon,
lion; a nil &Soifc, tooth.
m
Bnis,
IVcben,
n.
lig'nam,
i

as,

/.

.I'uoicoAAa.

'h

ii

in,

71.

a merlcan word.
1'lex, vi

ii

I'ta,

in,,

i.

impu/rns,

a,

a,

liquldara'bai

.ii.

lobe'lla,

/.

ai

m.

a, inn.

From

n.

i.

n.
ni'lia,

i'i'IIs,

IwJtjs,

IllpVnns,

colored.

10'dldum,

m.

i.

AiGupyGpos.

I.

m.

ris.

[nffl'slo, Bnls. /.

In'tJ luis, i.
In'ulfl
iu.liu'nuii.

tree.

llthar'gyrnm,

am.

am

:i,

lemon

the

a.,

m.

inn

Infecto'rluR, a,

I>io/i

./'.

[i

ii,

i.

SB.

I/Kiiiii.

i'ris is i7'/ idia.


.lis

/.

ly

to.

am.

iiiii

am.

c6pSdTum,

lyth'rum,

/.

771.

i.

i.

goine, a Brazilian word.

to.

i.

i.

i.

\.

n.

\vKorrofiiov.

n.

Prom

\v8pov,

am.

ialan'dicns, a,

lyt'la, 89./.

kali, lndecl n.
ki'uo. lndecl

ma'ci

kram<

raa'cls,

macldls.

'"

./

TO., Ail

lach'iyiiiH,

..

ii

eph'alus,

fiaxpos,

lactnca'riom,
ITl'iI

ii

ijj

I&'inlam.

i.

i.

a.

uin.

and

n.
Mill.

i.

lony

.'in-, a,

i.

am.

71.
I

i ill

n<xyVT\<;.

PROSODIACAL VOCABULARY.
magD'la,

md'rum,

re../'.

on,

i.

rao'rus.

maitno'lla, m. f.

majSra'na, se
malague'ta, se

From Malaname

f.

mucu'na,

mal'va,

myris'tica,

/'.

:c.

mangane'sium,
man'na, se. f.

ma

mar'mor,

my rox'ylon,
myr'tUS,

napel'lugj

in,

meco'oicus, a, um. ixyikwvikos.


mScd'nine, indecl. From ixtikwv,
" poppys wt>vu>v, opium.

Dicotl&'na,
ni'ger, gra,

black
I

ni'lnno,

lo, 5uls.

in-

pe'Aaf,

tlir

/.

From

/nrji-jj,

millep'S la, as. f.


mindsre'rus, i. m.
1
1

'

in

i.

grum.

n.

virpov.

nnx. nucis /.
uymplue'a, se. /.

oc'ulus,

m.

i.

S3

/.

51'Sa, se./

n From vt>pos,

oblongifoTius, a., um.


obova/tus, a, um.

the moon} ami di'flot, ajlower.


mercfiri&'lis, lis. ./'.
'inn, el. /'

ol'riim,

n.

i.

olib'&Qum,
61'i'va,

i.

n.

./'

83.

o'puim, i n. From
opSbal'sftmum, i. n.
Juice}

n.

which yields

um.

is

or'chis,

Mica, x.f.

From
mor'phla, m. /
pheus, the god of sleep.

otto?,

juice.

From oiro?.
acis /.
anil Trapag, the plant
...

ini'nor, us.
jni'iius, a.

i.

fxeka^TroSiov.

m.

'mum, i. n. From iirjvr],


moon; aad <nripp.a, seed.

men'tha, m f.
mSnyanth'es.

se.

uo'bilis. e

From

AeiiKo?, whiti

ii'h'ns, a,

y-vpov,

wood.

ni'tras, ruis (see p. 153).


ni'trlcus, a, um.

um.

mSlamp5d1um.
lorl

From

iikov,

m,

\.

nephrS'dlum,
a kidney

us, a,

From
<nripy.a,

/.

be, es /.
iiialiira'na, ;c.

medicinaVlis, e
mel, mel'lis n.
op laleu'ca, se ./'.

n.

i.

perfume} and

oris. n.

111.1'ri*.

um.

a,
./'.

seed.

a,

mai-rul/ium, i. n.
mars, tnar'tis. m,
.

f.

myrosper'mum, i. n.
jnu'poi', perfume ; aud

um.
marllan'dlcus, a, um.
mns,

myrr'tia,

153)

um.

a.

se.

royris'tleus,

f.
n.

i.

ran'ta, te./.

iiimi -ii'i

/. (see p

filis

muriatlcus,

mandrSg'ora,

./'.

;u

mu'iias,

;i

as

the Portuguese
for
country in Africa.
mi i.it'ium, i. n.
guetti

161

a mulberry.

/., a mulberry tree.


moschS/tus, a. um.
moschif'6rU8, a, um.
mos'chus, i. m.
mucil&'go, inis. /.

n.
u in.

i.

i.

Mor-

or'nus, i. f.
Os'tr&a, SB./.

14*

it.

vellos.f. opx'si
n.

in,

liU

DIAI

tormentllla,

I.

/.
i"
prefix
the
of oertaln chemical
It
oompounda
signifies that
the baae La trebled,
tiiand'ras, >, am.

l:i

I.

\m
am.

Bra, 'in in.


vi'iiiiin.

'

vi'tex,

it.

i.

"M-is

/.

/.
I'Olnm, i. ii.
\
leas, m, am.
vulga'i
\ [ti

am.

trir.iiia'tus, a.

tuber,

ge
1

trltVcam, i.
IrocbU'cus,

<"'

resicatO'iluB, a,

/.

<ii on
Prom TofiKof,
a /loison; ami SivS(m\

u'lha,

lll'llllls,

/i.

m.

/.

ur'sus,
urtl'ca,

tbam,

n.

i.

oiae,
UB'tus, a, am.
u'vn, '. y.

tnssll'S

valerlft'ua, ./.
vanil'ls
rer&'tria, a. ./'.
in,

zln'cam,

i.

n.

Alton

'i

am.

n
'lis. n.

n.

i.

mi.

ii,

$iyy!f}tpis.

zygophyl'lum.i. n. Proi
a j/o/.r,- and $vAAov,
i

ve'rus, a, uiu.

PART

II.

ABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

CHAPTER
TERMS USED

1. Detrah.
2.

Fiat, v.

3. Opus

I.

l\ BLOOD-LETTING, ETC.

e brach. Bang, ad gx. statim.

s.

est

ut fluant sang, gv.

venam

Ad

4.
r
).

'5

cub. secare, ut sang;, fluat

ad |x.

recidiv. prascavend. detrah, sang. p.

Extrah.

sang, pleno rivo, ad

,|vj.

r.

n.

quampri-

lniim.

6.Emitte
7.
8.

sang. ^xvj. saltern, vel ad deliquium.

Dimove. sang, per saltum, ad gx.


Detrah. ex arteria temp. sang.

vel ultra.

.^vj.

quam-

primum.

9.Mitt.
<h<\\rr

10.
ralis.
1

1.

12.

sang. iUicd ex largo vuln. ad gx. vel


ssger palescat vel languescat.

Repot, sang, detractio,


gene Iterum
ad
animi.
Sanguis eodem modo, quo ante, iterum mitut localis et

tiat v. s.

tendus

est

ero ad gxvj.

13. Pertund. vena


5*xx. vel
14.

defect,

brach. et detrah. sang, ad

usque ut liquerit animus.

Kepet.

v.

s.

ad tres alias

vices,

ad eandem

ABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

1GG

quantit., tribus diebus sequent.,


respirandi difficult suad.

qnando dolor

15.
Die sequente celebretur iterum
eandein qua antea quantit.

17.

s.

ad

quamprimum;

16.wMitt. sang, e brachio ad xij.


ac postea ex vena jugul. ad 3viij.

18.

v.

et

Sang, denuo mittend. ad tantum.


Mitt. sang, de novo, repet. ad anion
Extrah. sang, brachio; eodem die post
5*x.

est,

fere

et

deliq.
19.

et

aliquot horns, vel die sequenti, duabus horis post


leve prandium, cap. pulv. emetic

20.
Si primae vengesect. non cedat morbus, turn
repet.
et nonduni cessante, ad duas alias vices
celebret., interpos. semper die uno.
;

Necnon admov. cucurbit, ferro nucha?


22. Statim abrad.
applic. cucurb. omenta? nuchas.
23. Accommod. cucurb. cum ferro sub aurem
mitt. sang, ad
24. Admov. cucurb. cum
parti tho21.

c.

cap. mitt. sang, ad 3*xij.

capill. et

lateris affecti, et

5"iv.

scarificat.

racis dolen. p.
25.

Semel

r. n.,

in

utrinque hirud.

et exsug. sang,

septimana,

ad ^viij.

applic.

temporibus

iij.

27. Admov. hirud.


sing.
capit.
28. Applic. jugul. hirud.

26.
Ilirud. xxiv. statim lumb.-admov., et quando
remota? sunt, cataplasnia emoll. applic.
iij.

iv.

applic. empl. lyttae.

tern, si adsit dolor

et post flux. sang,

FORMS FOR BLISTERS, ETC.

167

30. Applic. adversum renes, hirud.


vel
cucurbit, cruent. ut extrah. sang. 5
31. Convulsione redeunte, baud
detrah.
sang, per cucurbit,
32. Si dolor
ad
mitt. sang. 5XX.
33. Sanguisug.
fronti impon.
34. Admov. cucurbit, sicca regioni hepat.
29.
Detrah. ex ischio affecto, et part, adjacent.
ope cucurbit, cum scarificat. sang. 5VJ.
xij.

xij.

aliter,

iij.

perstit.

latus,

e lirach.

iij.

CHAPTER

II.

FORMS FOR BLISTERS, ETC.

Adhibe emplast. canthar. tumori in ala dexper spatium xij. hor. vel donee in vesic. manifesto epidermis elata sit.
35.

trfi,

36.
satis

37.

Applic. abdom. emplast.


super alufam
latam extens.
Admov. parti thoracis super, emplast.
lyttse

lytta?,

et post vesicat. applic. cerat. sabin. ut ulcus perpet.


fiat.

Fluxu cessante

Admove
tern, part, guttur.
Admov.
38.

39.

ad

utat. sequent.

Cerat. Sabin.
Unguent. Lyttae p.

vesicat.

as.

tela vesicatoria (ad

exemplar) ex-

capiti raso ungent. canthar.

usque

ABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

168

thyroid, utrinque,
Admov. prope
sericum
admov.
Abrad.
femor. super, emplast.
42. Applic. prope
insperg.
pulv.
super quod
43.
valde urgeat dyspnoea, applic. emplast.
ulcus perpet. ope unguent, sabin.
gss
R Emplast. Galban
cartilag.

40.

emplast.

lyttsa.

toti capit.

capill., et

41.

vesic.

articul.

lytt.

est.

lytt.

3J.

Si

lyttse, et fiat

co.

44.

Resin.
Jjij
M. Fiat emplast. super, alutam extendend. quo
pedes invol. post pediluv.
.

vel suris extern, emImpon. nuch.


impon. qua
46. Emplast.
Admov. pannus
ampl.
acre,
48. Adhib. emplast. epispas.
inter scapul.
R Lytt. pulv. tenuissim.
3J
capit.

45.

plast. lyttae.

dolet.

lyttae collo

vesicat. lateri sinist.

47.

satis

in

49.

et

trit.

Camph. Pulv.
CerjB flavae
Sevi ppt. aa,

3j

3J

9ij
Adip. ppt
._
Cera, SevoetAdipesimulliquefact. paulo antequam
concresc. Lytt. et Camphor, inspei-g., atque omnia
misce ut fiat emplast. epispast. regioni jecor. applic.
.

res postulav.
52.

Nata humor, detract, ab. emplast!

50.
Admov. charta vesicat.
pars exulcer. unguent, sabin.
51.

lyttae, si

promov.

Emplast.

cubit,

Curet.

occipiti.

ij.

vesicat. brach.

quamprimum impon.

intern,

infra

FORMS FOR MIXTURES, ETC.

169

fluxus postea
vesicat genu,
Admov.
ope unguen. sabin.
excor. impon., ut natus
Cerat.
promov.
humor ab emplast.
Qss
R Pulv. Euphorb.
53.

taffeta

et

elieiat.

54.

lytt. part,

lyttre

55.

Cerat. Sabin.

oj

Emplast. Thuris
Jss
Simul bene contrit. sit emplast. scuto pectoris.
56
Fiat fontic. ex parte vesicat. ope unguent,
.

57. R

sabin.

Ammon.

Hyclrochl.

3J

Saponis duri
3Jij
3ss
Emplast. Plumbi
Emplast. et sapon. simul liqua, et paulo antequam
concresc, immisce salem in pulv. tenuem tritum.
Extens. super alutam, parti affectae quamprimum
.

applic. et p.

58.

circumcirca
59.
lyttos

n. repet.

r.

Caput

tonderi debet, et emplast. vesicat.

tegi.

Applic.

regioni

singul.

parvum (magnitud. nummi

CHAPTER

renum, emplast.
semicoronse).

III.

FORMS FOR MIXTURES, ETC.

GO. R Vin.

Aloe's

....

Infus. Senn.

Magnes. Sulph.

^ij

5| 8S
^iv_

M. IIujus capiat j. hora 7ma matut. et circiter


horam x. partem reliq. sumat si opus fuerit.
:

15

ABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

170
61.

Liquor. Amnion. Acet.


Vin. Antimon.

3'iiiss

31

gij
Cardam. co.
iv
Aq. Menth. pip.
Fiat mist, cujus 51J. omni horse quadrante calide

Tinct.

sorb, durante frig.

62. R
Detur

Tinct. Valer

sylvest.

Amygd.

Mist.

Syrup.

64.

magn.

Scill.

Rad. Valer.

....
....
.

Tinct. Opii
unciat. sumatur, tussi

Inf. Gent. co.

Magn. Sulph.
Cap. cochl.
quotidie.
65.

Inf.

sub forma theas parati.

63. R
Quod

oz.

f^j. subinde, e cochl.

iij.

Liq.

magna

Amm.

admodum

giv
^iiij

gtt. xl

ingravesc.

oz. 6

oz. 1

post jentac. et post prand.

Acet.

Aq. Menth.

ij

virid.

giiiss

3\]

Syr. Croci

Mther. Nitr.
31J
magn. secund. horis sumant. durante

Spirit.

M. Cochl. ij.
febre; soepius vel rarius pro impet.
absente febre Pulv, Cinchon. ut ante.

66. R

ratioue:

Fol. Rosee

oz. 1

Aq. fervent.

oz. 8

Stent per horam


albi, aa. q.

s.

colat.

et

adde Succi Limon. Sacch.

ad gratain acerbit. dulced.

....

Antim. Potassio-Tart.
gr. vj
Aq. punie
^iv
Syr. Rhoead
3J
M. Capiat cochl. minim, subinde, ad nauseam vel
vomitum promov.
67.

FORMS FOR MIXTURES, ETC.

68. R

Sod. Subcarb.
Cryst. Tart

171

....

jiiss
^iij

Aq. purse
viij
Stent in lagen. bene obtur. per triduum, et deinde
sit in prompt, pro potu cathart.

69. R

Sodse Bicarb.
Ferri Sulph.

....
....

Magn. Subcarb.
Aq. purae
Acidi Sulph.

5J
gr. nj

3J

fsjx

dil.

Oss

Infund. primum lagen. aq. dein immit. salina et


denique acid, sulph. illico obturet. lagena, et in
loco frigid, servetur.
70.

Sumat
71.

Decoct. Lichen.
.
aeger pocul. omni bihorio.

Magnes. Carb.
Aq. Menth. sat.
Tinct, Opii

Sumat

M.
72.

cochl.

Capiat

ij.

dum

Oj

3J

vj
3J

flatus infest.

cochl. ij. ampl. Aq. Menth. pip.


singult. et nisus ad vomit, cessav.

omni hora, donee

73. R

Tinct. Digit

jiij

Acidi Hydrocyan.

M.

Hujus

frigid, dosin
tric. ferre

74.

xx

gtt.

cap. gutt. xx. ter die, ox cyath. aq.

sensim augend, prout caput aut ven-

queat.

....

Magnes. Carbon.
Pulv. Rhei
Aq. Aneth

,5)

gr.

xv

|iss

M. Fiat julep, cujus unum cochl. minim, infant.


lacten. de'tur, secundis horis: phiala agitata.

172

ABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

75.

Mist. Amnion.
Tinct. Opii

M. Capiat cochl. ij. magn.


horam si tussis accrev.

gvj

3)
statim; iterentur post
.

76. R Dec. Hord


01. Olivse

?x
.

'

ij

Mucilag. Acaciae
oi
Tore oleum cum mucilag. donee probe coiverint,
turn sensim adde decoct, ut fiat enema.
Interdum
add. liceat
77.

Magn. Sulph.

gj

llss

j.

Sp. Amnion, arom.


Tinct. Assafoet.
Syr. Croci
.

Aq. Cinnam.
M. Exhibe cochl. parvum

gss

5j
ter quaterve de die, vel
eaepius, urgente convuls. vel spasm.
.

78.

Inf.

....

Krameriae

Tinct. Opii

Fiat mist, cujus sumant. cochl.

iij.

gvj
gj

magn.

post.

singul. deject, liquid.

79. R

Sod. Sulph

....

Phosph.
Syr. Iiham.
Aq. Menth. pip.
.

M.
ij.

Sumat

2j

g vj

^iv

gj. statim, et repetat. dosis post boras

nisi alvus prius


80'.

gi ss

respond.

Tinct. Hyoscyam.
Pot. Acet
Syr. Croci
.

~i ss
'~\

Aq. Anisi
Fiat mist, cujus sumant. cochl.
bis terve in die, vel ut opus sit.
.

ij.

vel

iij.

~jj

g vj
minim.

FORMS FOR MIXTURES, ETC.

81. R

Ipecac. Rad. Pulv.


Pot. Bitart
Aq. fervent

Macera per horani

17:

3 iss

3.1

f^iiiss

integr., dein cola et adjice

f|ss
Syr
^
Detur |ss. vel cochl. ampl. omni semihora,
proritav.
vomit,
donee

M.

82. R

Tinct. Opii
Mist. Cret

M.

Cap. cochl. ij.


donee leniat. dolor.

....

S\j

83. R

.?iv
Decoct. Aloes comp.
iss
'
.
Sodae Sulph.
Cochl. ij. ampl. intermissionis tempore sumant.
ut purgatio ex toto cessav. ante accessum
.

M.
ita

3J

magn. omni quadrante horae,

paroxysm.

84. R

Soda? Potassio-Tart.

Aq. Menth. sat.


M. Cap. cochl. ij. ampla omni
promovend.
.

85. R Plumbi
Aq.

Acet,

.?ij

3j

ad sedes

bihorio,

gr. iv

destill

3 nj
Syrup. Papav.
M. Cap. cochl. ampl. mane quotidie; repetat,
ahq.
dosis ad iij. vices, et dcinde cap. seger haust.
purgant.
.

8G. R Magn.

Sulph.
Acidi Sulph. dil.

Aq. Menth. pip.


Syr. Rhoead

giss

3iss

vj

IIujus mist, sumant. cochl. iv. omn.


horis, donee venter rite solut. fuerit.

M.

3'J,

tnbus

ABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

174

87. R
M.

Inf. Senn
Magn. Sulph.
Cap. quarta quaque

R
M. Cap.

gj
.

Aq. puras
ij. magn.

3ss

die.

Tinct. Yaler
Sp. Amra. foet.

coch.

_.

gij
.

in langur.

^ij

lij

pnecipue diebus

purgat. dedit.

88. R

Mist. Amygd.
.
Tinct. Opii
.
M. Cap. cochl. magn. ij. quarta
tussis increb.
.

89.

Antim. Tart.

gvj

.^ss

quaque hora,

....
....

gr.

si

iij

Sennoe
,^iij
Aq. Piment.
S IV
M. Repet. cochl. ij. ampl. omni semihora, donee
superven. vomit, vel alvus dejec.
Inf.

90. R

Tinct. Jalap
Pot. Sulphat

,^iv

Jss

Aq. Menth
gvj
M. Sum. cochl. majora ij. omni quadrante hora\
donee alv. copiose respond.

91. R

Cetrar. Island.

Aq.

Coque ad

frigid

oz. 1

Oj

Sxij., stet ut geletur, et utat a3ger gelat.

ad libitum.

92. R

Lact. Vac
Oj
Sinap. Sem. contus.
oz. 1
.
Coq. simul, donee pars cas. in coag. abier., dcinde
colet. serum, et hujus sumat. cyath. subinde.
.

FORMS FOR MIXTURES, ETC.


93.

Aq. Menth.
cochl.
in febr. intermitt.
94.

....

Liq. Amnion. Acet.


Tinct. Opii

M. Capiat

Inf.

ij.

175

sat.

giv
^ss
gvj

invadente paroxysm, caloris

Sennas

Sumat primo, omni quadr.

fl.

oz. 6

horae, cochl. dein as-

sumpt. vices protrah. ad horam,

et ultra

pro suc-

cessu.

95.
fl. oz. 6
R Dec. Aloes comp.
Cap. oeger cochl. iij. ampl. p. r. n. postea augend,
minuendove quant, prout sedes pauciores pluresve
promov.
.

96.

Cret. praep
Tinct. Opii

Aq. Cinnam.

....
....

3j
.^ss

vj

M. et agitand. phial, dentur cochl. ij. secunda


quaque hora, serius vel citius ut res postulet, dum
vex. ventr. torm. vel vom.

97.
R Vin. Ipecac
Fiat haust. statim sumend.
R Mist. Amygd.
Tinct. Opii
M. Cap. cochl. ij. ampl. sub finem vomit.
.

98. R

Tinct. Rhei
Tinct. Gentian.

Aq. I'iment
Syr. Croci

oz. 1

fl.

oz. 6

fl.

dr. 1

% ss

|j

....

Fiat mist, cujus sum. aeger cochl.


nausea vel lang.

dolor, flatu,

fl.

ij.

iv
gj

urg. ventr.

ABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

176

99.B

M.

....
....

Tinct. Opii
Tinct. Cardamom.
Syr. Croci

Aq. Cinnam
ij. max.

Capiat cochl.

gss
Jss
iv

Svj
post. sing, vomit, vel

sedes liquid.

100. R Dec. Cinchon.


Acidi Sulph.
Syr. Auraut.

Hujus

dil.

gvj

,3j

ss

mist, cochl. iv. horis

duabus

interposit.

sumant. ad. sudat. diminuen.

101. R

Tinct. Opii
Confect. Aromat.
.

Aq. Menth.

pip.

^ss
j

3vj

Fiat mist, cujus sumant. cochl. iij. magn. post


unamquamque sed. moll, phiala prius concuss.
102.

Sp. Amnion, arom.


.
Tinct. Castor.
Sp. Lavand

Aq. Piment.

Fiat mist, cujus


et deliq.

103. R

Inf.

Sennae

sjiij

gij

jij. p. r. n.

Jj

3.)

ingerant. contra lang.

....

fl.oz.6

fl. dr. 6
Tinct. Jalap
M. Sumant. cochl. iij. ampla, singulis horis, ad
plenam alvi solutionem.

104.

Perst.

in

usu mist, cathari. donee alvus

ter

quaterve plene respond.

105. R

Mist.

Ammon.

Cap. seger cochl. magn. bis in


bovini; contra rauced.

vj
ex poculo jusc.

die,

FORMS FOR MIXTURES, ETC.

106. R

Tinct, Scillse

177

.~.i

Mucilag. Acac.
5.)
Tinct. Opii
3J
M. Fiat mist, de qua subinde cap. gj. guttatim,
ad gulam emolliend. et exspuit. promovend.
.

107.

gij

iv

Amnion. Sesquicarb.
Tinct. Card
Syr. Rhcead.

Aq. Menth. pip.


Fiat mist, de qua cap. cochl.
.

j.

3J
,5J

larg. si pustul.

evanesc.
108.

.
Liq. Ammon. Acet.
Ar in. Antim. Potassio-Tart.

Aq. Menth.

sat.

,j

3J

%iv

Syr. Croci
3J
..
Fiat mist, de qua coch. larg. j. secundis vel tertiis
horis exhib., saepius rariusve prout feb. vehement.
vel mit. fuerit.
.

109. R

_.

Tinct. Assafoet.

sjij

Ammon.

3 SS

Carb.

giv

Aq. Puleg

Fiat mist, de qua cap. cochl. j. vel cochl.


lang. vel sudor, frigid, vel. frig, paroxysm.

110. R

Potass. Bitart.
01.

siti

5J

.5 ij

._

Oij

Limon

gtt.

Sacch. purif.
Aquae bullientis

M.

ij.

in

xv

Usurpet. pro potu commun. ubi aeger intensa


vexat.

111. R Pulv. Jalap.

.3.)

gr. xx
Zingib.
.
Magn. Sulph.
o.j
,$yj
Aq. purse
M. Cochl. j. sing, horis exhibeat. quaque vice
phial, agitand. ut permisceatur pulv.
.

....
.

ABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

178

112. R

^iss

Cart. Cinch

Magn. Sulphat.
Aq. purae
.

5'j
Oij

Coque per sextam part, horse in vase leviter clauso,


et liquor, adhuc calent. cola sub finem adde Syrup.
Tenia, vel quarts quaque hora. cyath.
Absinth.
;

ij

j.

exhib. intermissionis temp.

113. R

inf. Chirett.

Magn. Sulph.

ter in die, longe

M. Usurp, ad ij. bis vel


et max me jejun. ventric.
114. R Decoct. Hord.

|yj
5>j
a

pasta

Nitr. purif.

Duabus

M.

vel

Oss
3ss

tribus

exhib.

horarum

vie.

interv.

115.

Sp. Amnion, arom.


Liq. Amnion. Acet.
Tinct. Opii

3)3
3 lv

si

Aq. Piment.
et divid. in haust. iv. quorum j. usui p. potest.
puis, languescat vel. pustul. subsid.

M.
si

116. R

Tinct, Opii
Syr. Croci
Tinct. Cardamom.

3j

Aq. Cinnam.

M.

Cochl.

j.

exhib. dosisque iteretur, prout urg

morb.

117.R

Liq. Ammon. Acet. (P. L.)


Tinct. Opii
Vin. Antim. Potassio-Tart.
.

Aq. Menth.

M.

et in

iij.

sat.

vel iv. dos. divide,

quarum

horio in insult, remiss, sumend.

omni

bi-

FORMS FOR MIXTURES, ETC.

179

118. R Vin. Colch

....

Tinct. Jalap.

M.

Inf. Sen.
Ista dos. in ij. part, dividi potest,

mane,
119.

alt.

j.

sumend.

120. R Decoct. Cinch.


Tinct.

Myrrh.

Acid. Hydrochl.
ad grat. acerb, reddend.
Tinct. Sennas
Tinct. Jalap.

'

?
| ss

3jj

3'ij

q. s .

Aq. Piment.
gij
Cap. dimid. stat. et semihora elaps. quod,
.

M.

quarum

either, cochl. min. urgent, flatu in Aq.

pip.

121. R

zj'

3'ij

sero exhib.

Menth.

3 ij

reliq. est.

122.

Pretermit,

mist, salin.

123.
Cap. Tinct. Opii gtt. xxx. hora somni, et
repet. omni 3tia hora perst. dol. et spasm.

124. R
M. Cap.

Tinct. Castor.
Tinct. Serpent.

Aq. Piment.
cochl. modicum,

125. R

zij

gij

4tis horis, aggredient. feb.

Sennae
Magn. Sulph.
M. Ex hac mist, primo die cochl.
et sic deinceps propinent,

126. R

Inf.

leni

Rad. concis.
igne in Aquae Font.

Sassaf.

Coque

fiat

j., alt.

Sarsap. Rad.
Zingib. Rad. contus. aa

consumpt. ut

zij

giv
3J
die duo.

^ss

^j
Oiv., ad dimid.
decoct, cujus bibat f^viij. modice

tepefac. post bolum, et


phores. ciend.

mane

repet. in lec'to ad dia-

ABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

180

127. R Acidi Sulph.

dil.

.^ss

Syr. Rhoead.
ij
.
.
gij
Tinct. Card
Fiat mist, cujus sum. cochl. min. sext. horis, in
quovis vehic. grat.
.

128.

Sp. Amnion, arom.


Tinct. Card.
.
Tinct. Castor.

Aq. Puleg
Sum. oppriment. lang.

129. R

3j
sjij

,"j

5iv
cochl. ampl.

Tinct. Castor.
Tinct. Myrrh, aa
Mist. Amygd.
Syr Croci
.

ij.

5jj

vj

gj

cochl. iv. ampl. mane, merid. et hma


somni, ad biduum vcl triduum; quo elaps. et uno
tantum die interject, sum. potion, emet. sequent,

M.

Sum.

mane, superbibend.

Flor.

Inf.

Anthem,

q.

s.

130.

M.

Vin. Ipecac.
Antim. Potassio-Tart.
.

ad

cum

vomit iones quater aut quinquies proritand.


debito regimine.

oz. 1

fl.

gr.

gss
gse

ij

et fiat potio.

131. R Sodae Tart


Tinct. Rhei
Syr. coram.

Aq. Piment.

afij

gvj

Fiat mist, cujus cap. seger coclil.


hihorio donee alvus purgetur.

iij.

magn. omni

132. R Aq. pluv

gij

Antim. Potassio-Tart.
gr. iij
Solve; hujus danda sunt cochl. ij. medioc. sing,
horse quadrant, donee vomitus sequatur.
.

FORMS FOR MIXTURES, ETC.


133.

Sennae

181

E vj

Tinct. Sennae

^ss

Magn. Sulph.

Inf.

Fiat mist, cujus cap. aeger cochl.


in hora, donee adsit catharsis.

ij.

magn.

bis terve

134. R Catech

gss
#

Aq. pur

Coque ad S vj-

^xij

stent donee faeces subsid. liquoris,


part, limpid, eaute effund.
;

135. R

Decoct. Aloes
Sodae Sulph.
Fiat mist, cujus sum. aeger cochl.
quaque hora, donee ample purg.

136. R Acid.
Aq.

Nitric, dil.

fl.

oz. ss

ordin. secunda

ij.

destill

Syr. Aurant.
Fiat mist, quotidie sumend. ope tubuli
titis haust.
.

5J
^xij
l_iss

vitrei,

par-

Sennae pro dos. ex

137.
Cap. aeger ^ss. Inf.
cyath. parv. Decoct. Hord.

138_

oz.6

Cap. aeger cyath. vinos, parv.

Inf. Gentian,

secunda quaque hora.

139. R Magn. Carb.


Pulv. Rhei

3J

vj
Aq. Piment.
Sumant, cochl. iij. magn. post unamquamque
.

M.

ss

sed. moll, vitro prius concusso.

140.R

Sodae et Potas. Tart.

Aq. Cinnam.
duabus vicibus sumend.
.

Fiat

sol.
16

.
.

.5yj
.

|ij

ABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

182

141. R

Quass

Inf.

vj

Magn. Sulph.
de qu& cap. seger cochl.

Fiat mist,
in die.

142. R

j.

Jj

ampl. bis terve

....

Tinct. Opii

Mucilag. Acac.

gj

vj
Sp. either. Nitr.
gij
.
M. Bibat cochl. iij. subinde, urgent, strangur. aut
in Jang.
143.

Repet. mist.

p.

r.

n. si

opus

ad voru.

erit,

sedand.

144. R

Tinct. Opii

Papav
Aq. Menth
M. Sum. ^j. omni semihora, donee
Syr.

145.

Tinct.

Hyoscyam.

Tinct. Castor.

Syr. Ehoead.

Aq. pur.
Sum. ^ij. omni hora,
.

M.

146

si

^ij

|vj
dolor mitescat.
.

^ij

gij

3j

iv

non dormiat.

Magn. Subcarb.

Tinct. Gentian.

5 SS
^iij

3jv
iv
M. Cap. aeger, acid, infestant., cochl. ampl. j. vel
alt. ex poculo jus. bovini.
Syr. Aurant.

Aq. Piment.

147. R Ras. Corn. Cerv.

Aq
Coque ad
alb. quod

oct.

ij.,

Ij

Oiv
dein liquori colato adde Sacch.

satis est, et

ad

us. serv.

FORMS FOR DRAUGHTS, ETC.

148. R

Inf. Senn.se

Sodas Sulph.
Syr. Rhamni.

183

gvj
^ss

3U

Detur imprimis

^j. et interpos. tribus


vel quatuor hor. cochlear, exhib. si fuerit opus, et
post ij. alias horas repet. dos. si alvus antea non

Fiat mist.

mov.

CHAPTER

IV.

FORMS FOR DRAUGHTS, ETC.

149. R Magn. Sulph.


Sennae

Inf.

M.

Syr. Rhamni
Fiat haust. in jus.

calid.

partitis

3y
%}
3J

vicibus

sumend.

150. R

Inf. Gentian.

Tinct.

Cardamom.

3J

Fiat haust. quern aeger sum. tribus ante prand.


horis.

gj
151. R Inf. Sennae
Sum. p. r. n. postea augend, minuend, quant, prout
.

sedes pauc. pluresve prom.

152. R

Sp. ^Ether. Nitr.


Liq. Ammon. Acet.
.

xx

gtt.

fl.

dr. 1

fl.

oz. 1

Aq. Menth

Fiat mist, salin. cujus cap. cochl. parv. omni hora,

cursu noct.

153. R

Pot. Carb
Aq. dest
Aq. Cinnam.

.
Syr.
m
Fiat haust. cui temp, capiend. adde Succi
.

M.

Bj

3s
3U

Limon. recent,

cochl.

magn.

j. et

in efferv. sum.

ABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

184

154.

M. ut

fiat

Antim. Potassio-Tart.
Aq. pur
haust. statim sumend. et

non antea ventriculus emet.


alvus non laxata fuerit.
si

ij.,

5.i

rep. post horas


rejecerit, vel si

.
Tinct. Lavand. co.
Mist. Camph.
M. et fiat haust. sexta quaque hora
aderit vel spasma vel pulsus languor.

155.

156.

Perst.
in

gr. ss

.fij

sumend.

si

usu haust. nocturn. heri praescript.

in

promptu, haust. cum Vin. Colch.


3J., hora somni sumend. si redintegraverit malum
arthritic, vel involverint vigilioe inter noctem.
157.

158.
Opii,

Sit

Rep. porrd haust. inter noctem cum Tinct.

si vigiliae

involverint, vel increbuerit tussis.

159. R Acid.

Nitric, dil.
Sp. iEther. Nitr.
Tinct. Hyoscyam.

gss

giij

gij

Aq. pur
Syr. q.

Oij

s.

ad acorem compescend. et gust, conciliand. Sum.


quotidie instarpotus, etbibat quantum sitisexigat.

Sum. aegrotus omni mane,


projent.
161. Cap. a3ger haust. cathart.

160.

si possit,

3 viij.

lact. asin.

proxima luce
nav. conscend.; et si post navigation, vom. superven.
bibat aeger spiritus alicujus ^aululum aq. commixt.
162.

Pulv. Rad. Ipecac.


Antim. Potassio-Tart.

Aq.

destill.

gr.

gr. j

51^

Fiat haust. hora noma matutina sumend. Vomitu supervenient, bibat aeger, vicibus repctitis,
Inf. Anthem, aliquot cyath.
Vomitu finito, cap.

M.

pulv. sudorif.

FORMS FOR DRAUGHTS, ETC.

185

Sennee .
^iss
.
Pot. Tart
| ss
Tinct. Cinnam. co.
f^ij
.
his fiat haust. suinnio mane deglutiend.
Rep.

163.

Inf.

Ex

idem

tertio

quoque

die.

....

Tinct. Opii
gtt. xx
164.
f^j
Syr. cujusvis
.
.
fgj
Mist. Camph.
.
.
M. Cap. agger haustul. hujusmodi, singulis noctibus, hora solita.
.

165. R

Tinct. Castor.
Sp. iEther. Nitric.
Pot. Nitrat

gtt.

gtt.

gr. vj

Aq. Piment.
M. Fiat haust. in promptu habend.
febris paroxysm, sumend.
.

Sum.

166.

Sulph.

dil.

aeger

x
xv

omni mane guttas

j
et urgent.

ix.

Acid.

ex jure vitulino.

167.
R Samb. cort. interior, manip. j
Incoquatur in Aq. Oij. ad Oj. Decoct, hujus alt.
medietas mane, alt. sero quotidie, assumatur, donee
geger convalesc.

168.
Sum. Tinct. Opii guttas xx. in vehiculo
calido convenient.

169. R Pulv. Rad.


Aq. Menth
M. Fiat haust. emet.
tepefact. vomitio

170.

Fiat haust.
potand.

Ipecac.

9j
|j

Potione copiosfi pur. aq.

bene provocetur.

Gentian, co.
Potas. Brom.

Inf.

mane

et

^j

gr. v

hora quarta pomeridiana

ABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

186

171. R

01. Ricini

gj

Pot. Carb

gr. vj

Aq. Piment.
Fiat secund. art. mist, pro

sumend.

172. R

Tinct. Opii
Syr. Croci

Aq. Menth.

M.

fiatque haust.

173. R

Tinct.

somno

....
.

virid.

et fiat

gtt.

xv

^i
5J

deficient, bibend.

Myrrh.

Sp. iEther. Nitr.


Syr. Tolut

M.

5.j

quamprimum

dosi

j.

Aq. Piment.
mist, do qua cap.

gss
3j
Sj

si

^j.

,5ij

vel languores vel

horrores conting.
174.

Cap. Acid. Sulph.dil. guttas

sufficientes

ad moderatam aciditatem

x.,

vel

numero

in sing, seli-

bris decoct, hord.

175.

Sequent, auror. sum.

satis sit

quantum

01. Ricini

ad alvum solvend.

176.
Sum. geger Vin. Antim. guttas xx. quarta,
quinta vel sexta quaque hora, nausea, non tamen

excitand.

177. R Cupri Sulph.


Aq. Menth. sat.
Syrupi simpl.
Fiat haust. quando

tum

est

178.

venenum

gr. v

3,j

3J
in ventriculum recep.

'

sumend.

Bibat Inf. Sem. Lini ad

lib.

FORMS FOR DRAUGHTS, ETC.


179.

Rad. Sarsap.
Cort. Ulmi.

187

^ij

ss

Aq. pur

Coque ad

Oij

Oiss., cola et sign, decoct,

quod cap. ut

ante.

180. R

Inf.

Quass.

gj

Tinct. Gentian.
.
.
3J
Fiat haust. mane iterumque hora ante pran

M.

dium, stomacho vacuo, sumend.

181. R

....

Tinct. Opii

Aq. Menth. sat.


Syr. Aurant.

gtt.

Sj

3J

xv

M.

Fiat haust. hora, somni, vel vespert. vel ser,


nocte sumend.

182. R

Pot. Carb
Syr. Croci

9j
.

Aq. Menth.

M.
in

Fiat haust.

impetu ipso

183. R

cum

efferv.

pip.

succi limon. cochl.

3J
3j

j.

ampl.

sumend.

Jss
.
Sennae co.
%\
Magn. Sulph.
3U
M. Fiat haust. secundis horis sumend. donee alv.
plene solut. sit. Mitte tales iv.
Tinct. Jalap.

Inf.

184.

Contin. haust. nuperrime praescrip.

185. R

gj
Liq. Ammon. Acet. (P.L.)
3 SS
Sp. iEther. Nitr.
gtt. xv
Tinct. Opii
3ij
Aq. pur.
M. Fiat haust. quarta quaque hora capiend. Ut
effectus sudorif. augeatur, adde sing, haust. Antim.
.

....
....
.

Potassio-Tart. gr.

\.

ABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

188

186. R

Tinct. Castor.

^ss

gtt.

Sp. Amnion, arom.

gtt.

Aq. Piment.

3.)

Serpent.

x
xv

M.

Fiat haust. si vigilia increb. aut dolor capitis


rcdintegr. sumend.

mane

187.
Perdomito symptomate,
dies paucul. contin. usus haust.

Contin.
189. Cochl.

188.

et scro

haust. effervescent., sicut

ad

jamjam

paratum.

j. Tinct. Lavand. comp. per se propinari possit, bis vel ter durant. paroxysm, hora
dimidia vel iutcgra interpos.

190.

Decoct. Sarsap. co.


.
Potas. Iod.
pocul. (^iv.) bis terve indies.
.

Sumat

Oj (f^xx)

9j

....

191. R

Tinct. Opii
Mist. Cret
Fiat haust. navem ingressur.

192. R Magn. Sulph.


Acid. Sulph.
Syr. Rhoead.

dil.

gtt.

xx

sumend.
.

gj

gtt.

,^j

Aq. Menth. pip.


lj
Fiat haust. eras primo mane sumend. et rep.
tertiis vel quartis horis, ad alvum solvend.
.

M.

193. R

Mist. Cret
gj
Syr. Croci
.

3\j
M. Fiat haust. quarta quaque hora sumend. donee
paroxysmi non discrucient, instilland. alt. vicibus,
si diairhooa adfuerit, Tinct. Opii guttas ij. vel iij.
.

189

FORMS FOR DRAUGHTS, ETC.

194. R

Tinct.

Calumb.

3$

Acid. Sulph. dilut.

Aq. Cinnam,

gtt.

xv

3J

3>j
Syr. Rhoead.
Fiat haust. quarta quaque hora sumend. et
tempore usfis adde sing., si opus fuerit, ad praecavend. diarrhceam, Tinct. Opii gtt. iij.
.

M.

195. R

3 iij

Inf. Digital

Gentian,

co.

jv

Syr. Croci
3j
M. Fiat haust. vj. Sum. j. 6tis horis, per spatium
nycthemeri si vires permit.
.

196. R

Inf.

Calumb.

^iss

gr. v
Potass. Hydriod.
.
3'.i
Syr. Aurant.
M. Fiat haust. meridie et hora quinta pomeridiana
sumend. per septim, integram, vel ulterius si opus
.

fuerit.

197. R

Bals. Copaib.

Mist Acac
Liq. Pot
Syr. Aurant.
Aq. dest.

M.

Capiat cochl.

198. R

ij.

vel

3J

3V

.)

3ss
.

iij.

Bals. Copaib.
.
Liq. Pot.

Aq. dest.
Coque per quadrant,

..

ss
3ivss

quart, horis.
.

part, ij
part, nj

part, vij

hora?, et tunc

adde

part, j
Sp. JEther. Nitr.
Stet per horas ij. vel iij.
Capiat fcger, liquoris limpid, supernat., cochl. med.
.

j.

ter die.

ABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

190

199. R

Bals. Copaib.

....

Vitell.j. Ovi

Sacch. puri

gss
5)

His bene subactis terend. adde paulatim Aq. Menth.


virid. jfvj. ut fiat emulsio.

200. R Calomel

....

gr.

iij

Conf. Opiat.
gr. vj
M. ft. bol. statim sumend.
Vesp. nisi prius bis saltern dejec. alv. cap.
01. Ricin. ss. vel q. s. ad alv. solvend.
Alv. hisce medicain. libere solut. incip. sum. haust.
sequent.
Liq. Amm. Acet.
;fss
.

Aq. Cinnam.
Vini Antim.

201.

non

%i
.

M.

Syr. Pap. alb. 3J.

Feb. die

gtt.

xv

Ft. haust.

xxiij.

Repet.

remedia olim (penult.) proescrip.

noviss. instit.

Si alv. adstrict. fuerit

magnes.

vitriol,

augeat. ut

alv. satis solut. fuerit.


Mart. xj m0 .

202. R

Inf.

Senn. giss.

Mannac

^ss.
Tinct. Jalap. j.
j.

hora 3 tia quaque, donee

M. Cap.

cocb. larg.

sed. tres vtl

quatuor

procur.

Lin.

Ammon.

sjvj

Ung. Hydr. fort. 3J.


M. Ft. linim.
eery; et scapul. omni noct. et mane, manu calid.
assidue applicand., superimpon. pann. Ian. eodem
imbut. Et post operat. Mist. Senn. ad usum Mist.
Antim. in prompt, confug.
Nov. xxiv t0
.

FORMS FOR POWDERS, PILLS, ETC.


203.

Guaiac. lign. ras.


Sassafras Rad.

Aq.

191

,?j

,?ss

destill

ft>ij

Coq. igne leni ad Ibj. sub fin. coction. addr.


Glycyrrh. Rad. cont. gij. et cola; cujus cap.
coch. iij. ampl. ter quotidie.
Oct. x.

CHAPTER

V.

FORMS FOR POWDERS, PILLS, ETC.

lectum ituro,

204.
Prosit forsan dare aegro,
Pulv. Hydrarg. subchlor. gr. v.

205. R

Coccinell
9j
Sodii Chlorid.
3y
Fiat pulv. Detur cochl. dimid. pro dos. tem-

M.

pore matutin.

206. R Pulv.

Jalap.

M.

Hydrarg. subchlor.
Dent. gr. xij. ad xxiv., quando

opus

sit.

207. R Magn. Carb.


Foenic.

3y

JJss

alvi ductione

|bs

Sem.

Sacch. purif. aa,


3j
Terant. in pulv. Dos. quantum cultri apice capi
.

potest, ssepius in die.

208.

Hydrarg. subchlor.

3J

Conf. Ros. quantum satis sit. Contunde


Sumatur j. bis
in mass, et divide in pil. xxx.
indies, ut cieatur ptyalismus modicus.

ABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

192
209.

Augeatur dos. Pulv. Jacob,

210. R Hydrarg. Oxyd.

rubr.
Opii tertiam grani part.

Caryoph. 01.
Fiat

pil.

horfi sornni per

211 R

ad

ver.

gr. vj.

gr. j

gtt. j

hebdom. sumend.

Myrrh. Gum. Resin.

^ss
Sacch. pari
^ss
Tere simul in pulv. Dos. 3j. ter quaterve indies,
e quovis liquore idoneo.
.

212. R Pulv. Opii

pil.

gr.

....

Capsic. Sem. contrit.


Lauri Bacc.
Fiat pulv. dividend, in iij.

213.

Ext. Glycyrrh.
gr.
ij. nocte sumend. ad vicem secund.
.

Fiant

M.
quarum prima

iij

viij

gr. vj
,9ij

part aequales;

portio sumatur, incipient, primore


rigore; secunda, postridie eidem hora; tertia ver6

tertio die.

214. R
P.

r.

n.

Conf. Opii
.
si diarrhoea permaneat.
.

215. R

Extr. Colocynth. co.


Hydrarg. subchlor.
Fiat massa in pil. xij. dividend.

Cap.
sex,

gj

gj

gr. xij

sum.

summo mane iij.

non

etpostea

ij., si

alvus, horis

satis dejecerit.

216. R

Pulv. Rhei
Hydrarg. subchlor.
Syr. AlthsBSB q.

fiat bolus,

s.

ij.

vel

iij.

J}j

gr. v

ut

hora somni sumend.

petend. ad.

et alt.

noctibus re-

vices.

217. R Extr. Cicut


Fiant pil. xv. in pulv. cicut. involvend.
chartacea pyxide.

3s S
Mitte in

FORMS FOR POWDERS, PILLS, ETC.

218. R

Extr. Colocynth.
Pulv. Scam.
.

Hydrarg. subchlor.

M.

Fiant

pil.

xij.,

quarum

cap.

j.

193
Jss
9j
gr. xij

nocte, quoties

alvus fuerit justo adstrictior.

219. R Ext. Elat


Colocynth. co.
01. essent.

In

pil.

mane

confidant, eras
perendino.

Menth.

mane

pip.

gr. ss
gr. v

gutt. j

deglutiend. iterumque

Ad

220.
alicujus

nauseam supprimend. bibat aeger


paululum aqua commixt.

sp.

221.
R Cort. Cinch. Pulv. gr. xv. ad ^ij
Cap. e cyath. vini generosissimi horae quadrantis ad
boras iv., intervallo, ita ut aeger sum. 3yj. ad minim.,
inter ij. paroxysm.

222. R

Extr. Elat
gr. ij
Sacch. purif.
3J
Opt. terant. simul, dein in pulv. viij. aequales dividant., quorum cap. aeger j. omni horae quadrante,
.

donee adsit catharsis.


223.

Accip. vespere

Jalap. Pulv.
gr. xv
Hydrarg. subchlor.
gr. v
Conterant. in molem syrupo simpl. ut fingantur
globuli iij. aequales.
.

224.

Sodae Carb. exsicc.


Sap. dur
01.

Junip

^j

$iv
gtt.

xx

Syr. Zingib. q. s. ut
fiat massa, in pilulas xxx. dividend., quibus cap.
iij. indies, contra calculos renum.
J
17

ABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

194

225. R Pulv. Jalap.

Hydrarg. Bubchlor.

M.

et in pulv. xij. divide,

necesse

sit

quorum

cap.

Jij
gr.

vel

ij.

xxiv
ut

iij.

ad sedes.

226. R

Pot. Sulphat.
In semipoc. aq. tepid, solut.,
Digital,

B;j.
guttis xx. Tine.
.

cum

sumend.

227. R Pulv. Oinch.


Sit. pulv.,

secundis horis, in cyath.

jj

absente

lactis,

paroxysmo, sumeud.
228.

Suraant. Pulv. Calumb.

gr. x. sing, auror.

ex pulte.

229. R Pulv.

Nitr. Pot,
Pot. Sulpliat.

iifi

gr. xv.

Fiat pulv., in promptu habend., et urgent, parox-

ysmo sumend.

230. R Pulv. Jalap.


Scammon,

5)

9.i

Hydrarg. subchlor.

gr.

xx

Syr. simpi. q. s.
ut fiat massa, in pil. xx. dividend e quibue capiant.
ij. ad alvum officii immemorem excitand.

231. R

Pot. Nitr

gr.

Sacch. alb.
Mucilag. Acac.
.

trochisc. xij. distribuend.,

q. s.

quorum

ut

.
fiat

xx

,^ij

massa, in

detineatur sub

j.

linguam, donee liquesc.

232. R Querc. Cort


Anthem. Flor.
Tere simul in pulv.,
apyrexia, sumend.

alt.

3ss
exsicc.

vel tertiis horis, durant

FORMS FOR POWDERS, PILLS, ETC.


233.

Zinci Sulph.
Aci- P ur

c
bumatur
sit,

augend, dos.

234. R Ext. Cannab. Ind.


Vespere ante somnum sumend.
235. R

Extr. Colocynth.

Sumat

pil. xij.

gr- xij
fiij

tertia pars, ter die,


et si ferat ventriculus.

Fiant

195

j.

sextis horis,

si

opus

gr. v

3J

donee com-

mode purgetur.
236.

Pulv. Ipecac.
gr. xxv
Antim. Potassio-Tart.
gr. j
Fiat pulv. emet.
ex pauxillo alicujus liquoris
idonei hauriatur, et vom. mot. superbibant. cyathi
aliquot inf. anthem, tepidi.
.

237. R Pulv. Cinch.


.
gftj
Divide in partes xij. Capiat j. secunda vel tertia
quaque hora, ex cyatlio parvo lact. vaccin. recent,
absente febre.
.

238. R

Conf. Hosse
.
.
gr. x
Hydrarg. subchlor.
.
gr. vj
Fiat bolus, hora somni qualibet nocte sumend.;
mane sequent, post quintam vel sextain assumptionem, bibat potionem purgant. comm.
.

239 R
Fiant.

cum Myrrh.
3J
qua? obruantur pulv. glycyrrhiz.

Pil. Aloe's

pil. xij.,

240. R Pulv.

Digital.

Glycyrrhiz.
Irnec quant, dividend
.

M. In

pulv. iij.
fiat exactissima.

241. R
Fiant
horas

pil.
iij.,

Extr. Papav.
ij.,

si

quarum

vomitus

cap.

j.

gr.

iij

gr.

xx

est.

Partitio

gr.

statim, et alt. post

perstiterit.

ABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

196

Ferri Scsquiox.
gvj
partes divid., quarum j. ter de die exhibend.
et per plures dies continuand.
242.

In

vj.

243. R

Pil.

Hydrarg.

Fiant pil. ij.


Devoret segerj.

l>is

in die, bora

gr.

decima

et

bora

secundri.

....

244. R Pulv. Scammon.


Ilhei.

Hydrarg. subchlorid.
gr. iv
Fiat pulv. purg. extemplo in pulpa pomi tosti
.

M.

^j
gr. x

sumend.

Dentur Rad. Ipecac, pulv. subtilissimum


diebus.
246. Sumantur
Rad.
pulv.
245.

in

tritae gr. iij. vol v. diluculo, sing, vel alt.

Filicis

in

tritae ij.

cyatho Aq. Menth. primo diluculo.


Elapsis duabus horis, devjretur bolus ex Hy-

vel

iij.

drarg.
vel x.

Submur. gr. v. vel vj. et CambogisB gr. vii'j.


assumpto subinde haustulo Inf. These virid.

247. R

Ferri Sulpb.
Assafcet

gss
^ij

cum Mucilag.
dividendam

Acac. tantillo subige in massam,


in pil. sing. gr. iv. pendentes.

248. R Antim.

Potassio-Tart.

gr. vi

Pulv. Fol. Digit.


gr. x
Conf. Rosae q. s. ut bat massa in pilulas xx. dividenda.
Initio sumat reger pil. j. pro dosi, mane ac nocte,
postea ij. dein iij. et denique augeatur dosis quan.

tum

fieri

potest.

249. R Extr. Gentian.

Fiat bolus; detur jejuno stomacho.

gr.

FORMS FOR POWDERS, PILLS, ETC.

197

3j
250. R Pulv. Aloes
ss
Myrrh
M. Cap. gr. x. ter die. Dosis sensim augenda est,
.

donee

3j. in die

sumatur.

Sum. quantum cuspide


sacch. vel
Pulv. Rhei, in cochl.
252. Sum. aeger
Pulv. Cinch,
ysmum ingredient.
253. R Hydrarg. Binox.

cultri capi potest,

251.

lactis

5j.

Conf. Rosae q.

in melle.

ante parox-

gr. xij

s.

ut fiant pil. xij. Sumatoeger pil. ter in die, donee


dentes vacillare incipiant.
Dosis ab initio a pil. j. ad ij. vel iij., semper
dosin augendo.

254. R

Pulv. Cinch.
.
3J
gr. xx
Zingib.
M. Sum. ocger ante tempus redeuntis paroxysmi,
ter in septimana, huncce pulv. pro dosi.
.

255.

Sum.

fegra, in lecto composita, pil. Opii,

superbibendo Hordei Aq. calid.

256. R Gum. Ammon.

.^ss

Pulv. Rhei
Bj
q. s. ut
Syr. simpl
fiant pil. xx.
Cap., per duas noctes, iv., et intermittat tertiam
noctem et sic pergat donee totum sumpserit.
;

257.

Antim. Sesquiox.
Nitrat. Pot

9.j

3)

3 SS
Pulv. Ipecac, co.
et fiat pulv. tenuiss. in_ yij. partes
rcquales separand., quarum j. sing, horis ingeratur.
.

Misceantur,

258. Rep. pulv. hesterno


modo sumantur.

ciue
n

17*

die prasscript. eodem-


ABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

198

259. B

Cret. prsep

5j

Pulv. Ipecac.

M. et fiat pulv. in chartul. ij.


quarum cap. j. horis octavis;

gr. vj

sequaliter dividend.,

temporibus

et

inter-

mediis, si pulsus sit creber et fortis, bib. cochl.


mist. seq.

260. R Extr. Colocynth.


Pulv. Scammon.
M. Fiant nil. xx., quarum
decubitus

R
261. R

ij.

ij.

gj

gss
deglutiantur hora
.

diluculd ut infra,
Inf.

Sennas

3j

Hydrarg. subchlor.

gr. xij

Conf. Rosoe

q.

ut fiant pil. xij., quarum sum. j. post ccenam


et pomeridie sum. baust. purg.

262. R

s.

mane

Zinci Sulph.
^ss
.
gr. xv
Pulv. Ipecac.
Finita vomitorii
Fiat pulv. emet. statim sumend.
operatione, cap. subinde cochl. ij. mist. purg.

263. R Pulv.

Digital.

Acac

gr. ss

9j

Fiat pulv. 4tis horis sumend., oegra interim conquiescente et caput immotum tenente.

gr. x
Hydrarg. c. Creta
T}ss
Pulv. Tragacanth.
Fiat pulv. statim sumend., et exhibeatur sequenti

264.

luce portio purg.

265. R

comm.

Pulv. Pot. Sulphat.

Rhei
M. Fiat pulv. in pulmento vel
vinos, sumend.
.

7>\

9j

in poc. seri lact.

FORMS FOR POWDERS,

PILLS, ETC.

266. R Pulv. Cinch.


Cinnam.

199

gij

3J

M. Fiant pulv. xij., quorum cap. unum quarta


quaque hora, superbibeudo vini cujuslibet haust.
incipiend. immediate post paroxysm., interdicto
enematum usu.

interim
267.

Fiant

Hyoscyam.
quarum sumatur j. pro

Extr.

pil. xij.,

3J
re nata, sub

lang. vel singult.

268.

M.

Sodas Potassio-Tart.

Cret. prgep
Fiat pulv. in jus. avenac. tenuissimo

269. R

Pil.

Fiant

pil. xxiv.,

mane

ac nocte.

270.

Aloes c. Myrrh.
quibusingerantur

Hydrarg. Subm.

iij.

iss

gss

sumend.
jij

uaaquaque
.

gr. iv

Sacch.
gr. vj
Pulv. Antim. Co.
gr. ij
Conterant.
Sum. vespere in Gelatina Ribesiorum.
.

271. R

Zinci Sulph.
Conf. Cynobasti
xx. fingend., quoe deaurand. sunt.
.

ad

pil.

9j

q. s.

272.
Cret. prsep
9j
Fiat pulv. vel, addend. Syr. Zingib., bolus, ad
alvum contrahend., mane sumend.

273. R

Pil.

Hydrarg.

Divide in ij. partes; sum.


mediam noctem.

j.

9ss

statim, alteram circa

Pulv. Ipecac.
274.
Fiat pulv. emet., more solito sumend.
emetici peracta, cap. Pulv. Rhei 9j.
.

Bj
Operatione
.

ABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

200

275.B Pulv. Calumb.

SJ

gr. xx
Zingib.
omnia, quae dividant. in vj. dos. sequales, per
dies continuos mane sumend. fcribus boris ante

M.
vj.

pastum.

276. R

01. Croton.

Pulv. Glycyrrhizae

gtt. xviij

q.

s.

ut fiant pil. xxxvj., quarum exhibeantur ij. hora


decubitus, quandoque alv. nimis solida fucrit, et
augeatur seu minuatur dos. pro ratione effet.

....
....

gr.j
Pulv. Opii
gr. iv
Conf. Rosse
Fiat bolus vesp. si perst. diarrhoea vel adsint torm.
intcstin. capiend.
277.

li

278. R
Seorsim

ij.

Jalap. Rad. pulv.


j
Pot. Bitart
3y
Dosis a 3ss. ad ^vj. mane.
permisce.
.

279R

Hxtr. Gentian.
dividend. Dosis j. vel.
statim post cibum.

In

pil. lx.

CHAPTER

ij.

nocte

3V
maneque

VI.

FORMS FOR LINCTUSES, ETC.

280. R

01.

Tereb

Mel. despum.

M.

oM
.

5J

fiat linct,

Dosis cochl. parv., nocte et mane,


eujusvis potQs tenuoris tepefact.

cum

....

281. R Conf. Senn*


Sum. ad nucis juglandis magnitud.

liaustu

iv

FORMS FOR L1NCTUSES, ETC.

282. R

201

gij
Conf. Rosse
Tinct. Opii
gj
Acid. Sulph. dil. .
3ss
Fiat electuarium, exacte invicem miscend.

283. R

jij

gvj

3j

giij

Conf. Rosae can.


Syr. Aurant.
01.

Amygd.

M. et fiat linct., in olla fictili


284. R Oxymel. Scill.
Syr. Papav

mittend.
.

3yj

Pulv. Tragac. co.


linct., cujus lambat
.

M.

Fiat
subinde.

a?ger

pauxillum

Resin. Guaiac.
,5J
Conf. Rosse
%}
Syr. Aurant.
q. s.
ut fiat electuarium, de quo cap. quant, nucis moschatoa majoris, bis indies.
285.

....

286. R

gij
Conf. Rosae
.
Acid. Sulph. dil.
3J
linct.
cap. quant, castaneae bis in die.
.

M. et fiat
287. R

^iv
Conf. Sennse
Pulv. Pot. Bitart.
Jss
M. et fiat electuarium. Cap. quant, nucis avellan.
vel. mosch. subinde, vel ter in die paulo ante
.

prandium.

288. R

Pulv. Cinch.
j
giij
Serpent.
Syr. simpl. q. s. ut fiat electuarium,
quod dccedente paroxysm, totum capere debet
seger, ante access, feb. sequentem.
.

289. R Conf. Sennas


Fiat linct. sumend. subinde lambendo.
in narthecio.

3J

Mittatur

ABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

202

....

290. B Conf. Rosse


Alum. Pulv.
M. Impon. parvul. assiduo

,\i

33

linguae, ut

solutum

i T

oblinat et sic Lente deglutiatur.

291. R Pulv. Uvse

Ursi
.
gj
.
q. s.
Sjr. Aurant.
ut fiat electuarium, debitae spissitud. cujus mol.
nucis mosch. bis in die, paulatim delingat.
.

292. R Acet. Colch.

ij

Mel

giy
super leni foco, saepius agitando cochl. lign.
coque ad mellis spissitud. Hujus oxymellis sum.

M.

et

33ger cochl. parvul. ter die.

Menth.

vir. fol. recent.


giv
Sacch. purif.
,5 x
Fol. mortar, lapid. contunde, turn adjecto sacch.
iterum contunde, donee corp. sit j.

293.

p)iv
294. R Hujus Conf.
Fiat bolus, statim sumend. et 3tiis horis repetend.
urgente segritudine ventriculi.
.

CHAPTER

VII.

FORMS FOR EXTERNAL APPLICATIONS, ETC.

295. R Mic. Pan


Liq. Plumbi

ftj

Diacet. dil.

q. s.

ut madescat panis.
296.

Conii Fol. exsicc.


.
5J
aq. Oiiss. ad iij. et cola, panni lanei hocce
calido madefact., deinde expressi, parti

Coque ex
decoct,
affecta}

imponantur

et saepius renoventur.

FORMS FOR EXTERNAL APPLICATIONS, ETC. 203


297.

Vespere utatur pediluv. tepido.

298. R Ung. Hydrarg.

fort.

gj

Hujua ung. affricetur gj. femoribus inter, ante


focum sing. noct. donee ptyalismus cieatur.

299.
Fricetur corpus, hora decubitus, aut lana
vel strigile.

300. R Pyreth. Rad.

contrit.

Mastiches
.
aa 3j
Fiant lege artis, ad ignem, masticatoriaduo; teneat
aeger saepius in ore, et manducet hujusinodi medicament, expuatque salivam.
.

301.
Suffiet aeger fauces ejus cum vapore ex
Acid. Sulph. 5ss. cui primum adiunctae fuerint
Chi. Sod. sij.
302.

Picis liquid.

....

Sulphur. Sublim.

9 er

304.

Inhaletur

5iss

^ss
<W

01. Olivse

Cer. alb
M. Fiat liniment,
nudos bis quotidie.

vapor

flav

Lento igne liquefac, ut

303. R

flat

ung.

gj
gij

quocum

illinantur partes de-

pulmonibus

zEther.

Sulph.

ter quotidie.

305. R Dauci Rad


aptam

C(Kiuc in aq. ad

q. s.

mollitiem, in pulp, deinde

contunde.

306.
R Liq. Plumbi Acet. dil. Oj. Lintea
quadruplicata, hocce liquore frigido madefacta,
partibus inflam. applic. et saepius renov.

ABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

204

307. R Magn. Sulph.


Jur. Aven

....

01. Olivae

|j

Oss
ss.vel

Butyri quant, juglandis.

Misce pro enemate statim

in iciend.
j

308.
Exscindatur pars morsa, et postea applicctur vulneri Pot. Fus.

309. R

Pulv. Asari
Veratr.
.
.
aa 3j
Glycyrrbiz.
gij
M. Fiat pulv. cujus aliquantillum naribus insuffletur ante decubitum, ad sternut. excitand.
.

310.
Inungatur hypochondrio sinistro 9j. Ung.
Hydrarg. fort. 11a bora ante meridiem et 4ta post
meridiem indies.
311.

Lap. Calami n.

Eo conspergantur partes
deligatione.

312.

M.

Hujus

Liq. Potassae

Aq.

destill.

liq.

tepid,

adfectae,

^j

sub qualibet

....
....

gj

gvj

quantum cavo capi potest,


in aurem aegram supinatam,

quotidie bis injiciatur,


ac detineatur per aliquot minuta, dein aure prima
rursus emittatur.

....

Oxyd. Zinci
313.
Fiat pulv. inclusus sindonc rara excutiatur super
parte excoriata, prius detersa.

315. Admov. parti

314.
R Cret. prsep
In partes excoriatas ex gossipio asperge.

imbuta.

adfectEe spong,

^j

aqua

calida

FORMS FOR EXTERNAL APPLICATIONS,


316.

205

ETC.

Vesica suilla, aq. calida ad dimid. repleta


admoveatur lateri doleuti firmetur ligiimine, turn
super ponatur sacculus arena oalidissima plenus,
;

qui frigescens iterum calefiat, aut ei mux substituContinuentur haec donee


atur alius jam calefact.
dolor, remis.
;'1T.

Sp.

Cataplasma

calid.

prius

irrorat.

Camph. applicetur cum pannis

tantillo
laneis parti

adfect. et vesica suilla oleo madefacta dctineatur


renov. quolibet trihorio.

318.

Admoveatur
cum panno

affect,

calidum

cataplasma

parti

linteo quadruplic.

....

319.R Ung. Hydrarg.


llesin.

M.

Nitric.

Oxyd.

aa ^ss

Fiat ung. quo leniter inungatur locus adfect.


ac dcin tegatur emplast. plumbi, super alut. extens.

Hydrarg. subchlor.
Adip. Suillge
Super pann. lint, extende,

320.

M.

3j

lj

et cuti affect, ap-

plica.

321.

Hauriatur

vap.

calid.

ope infundib. in

fauces.

322. R Pulv.

Opii

M.

3ss

Ung. Cetacei
oj
Hujus pauxillo inungatur locus
Fiat ung.
.

umbilici subinde; aut magnit. dimid. juglandis


nucis, putamine decerpto, eidem loco ad ponatur.

323. R Linim. Sap


Liq. Ammon.
Tinct. Opii

j
.

M. In languore aut paroxysmo

^iv
3j

hysterico illinatur
naribus, temporibus etc. hujus linim paululum.
18

ABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

206

324. R Hydrarg. Chlor.

Acid. lydroehl.
Aq. Rosas
M. Tantillo hujus liq. lavent.
partes infest.
.

gr.

gss

3*

mane

et

325. R Pulp. Coloc


01. Olivar.

vespere

M. etcoque leni igne donee pulpa torqaeri videatur;


dein massam adhuc calent. cola, et cum ea illinatur
abdom. et prsecipue umbil. regie
326.
R Zinci Oxyd.
J5J
Aq. Rosse
g viij
M. Fiat collyrium, quo concusso imbutum lint,
quadruplicate imponatur oculo adfecto.

....
....

327. R Ung. Hydrarg.

Nitrat. .
gj
^ss
Cerat. Sapon.
.
M. Ilujus tantillo illinantur palpebral omni vespere, cuhitum ituro ope plumse mollis.
.

328. R

Tinct. Canthar.
|ss
Linim. Saflon.
giss
M. Fiat linim. quo partes adfectae perfricandae
sunt, et postea tcgantur lanula.

329. R Camph
01. Amygd.
M.

zj
.

....

ct instilla gutt. iv. auri p. r. n.

330. R Extr. Opii


Tinct. Castor

M.

et

nocte

applicetur paululum

cum

331.

auri

gr.x
3J

aflVctaj

omni

gossipio.

Linim. Sapon.
Tinct. Opii
.

M.

Fiat linim.
applicand.

cum panno

3J
laneo faucibus extern.
.

FORMS FOR EXTERNAL APPLICATIONS, ETC.

332. R

01.

Amygd

Camph.
M. pro linim. quocum tangantur
.

207

gj
3j

papillae ter qua-

terve in die.

333.B

Acid. Sulph.
Sol.

Alum.

dil.

gj

co.

Aq. pur.

commisc. Indatur nari ex qua,


turunda ex lint, raso, humect, hoc.

Btillat,

relinqucnd.

334.

Coque

in

illic

Flor.

Aq.

per dies

3ss
3TJ
sanguis
liq.

et

ij.

Samb

ft)ij

ibiv.

Foveant. eo decoct, saepius in

die, caput, facies>

oculi, aliaeque part, erysipel. tentatse.

335. R

Decoct. Hord.
Magn. Sulph.
Fiat enema, urgente tenesmo, injiciend.

33G. R

Tinct, Lyttse
Liq. Amnion.

Ibss

gij

giv
3j.

Linim. Sapon.
3'j
M. Fiat linim. quo guttur et postera pars colli
perfricanda sunt, donee vesicae appareant, dein
desist, per diem et applica Ung. Cetacei.
.

337._R

Farin.Lini

Aq.

bull. q.

.By

s.

at fiat cataplasm, admov. calide loco adfecto renov.


quater de die; cum arescat tantillo butyri insuls.
;

emol.
338.

Admov.

si fieri possit,

lintea aq. frigida madefact. vel,


glacies raso capiti.

ABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

208

339__R

Mic. Tunis

....

Tinct. LyttSB
Decoct. Papav. q.

ft$
o'.i

s.

Applica hoc ad cutem per


cataplasma.
im
inflammati
horse dimid. aut tamdiu donee
et rubor partia
satis magnam excitat. dolor fervid

ut

fiat

tumen. testentur.

340. ft Calamin. Pulv.

|j

o ss

Cret. praep

Intra linteum consutum


renovando eimul ac maduerit.

applicetur,

Fiat pulv.

341.R
M.

et fiat

....

gf-v
Pulv. Opii
Saponis
5)
suppositorium, post alvum exoneratam
.

applicand.

342._Foveant. gingiv. Aq.

343. R

....
....
calidii.

Rosre
Acid. Sulph. dil.
Colluantur fauces hoc gargarism.
Infi

M.

344. R

01. Olivae

5)'.)

3j

3J.

H'.l
Potassse
M. Fiat linim. hujus pauxillo oblinatur abdom.
bis terve quotidie.

Li<(.

....

345.R Magn. Sulph.


Tinct. Opii

3J

Fiat enema.

rosa

Injic.

hora somni

ad tree vices, dein repet.


quart, vicem, si opus sit.

34G.R Ung. Hydrarg.


Cetacei

tertifi

qu&que

noct.

noctibua usque ad

alt.

Nitr.
.

|ss

"

Hujus ung. pauxillum, ope penicilli


oculo affecto applic. nocte et mane.

M.

ixv

g**-

Jusc

5'
camel.,

FORMS FOR EXTERNAL APPLICATIONS, ETC.

347. R Alum
M.

209

9j

Cret. prasp
3j
diligentissime, ut fiat pulv., cujus inspergatur

pauxillum super mamillas

p. r. n.

348.
Admoveatur Extr. Belladon. supercilio et
regioni supraorbit. vespere.
349.

gr. ij
Ilydrarg. subchlor.
.
Sacc. alb.
.
9j
Fiat pulv., cujus parum infletur, ope calami, in
.

oculum

affect,

350. R
Ooque

semel vel bis in

die.

....

Rad. Dauci

ibj

aq. font. q. s. et per setaceum trajice


cui adde ss. adipis, ut fiat cataplasma

in

pulpam,

calide adhibend.

opus
injiciatur

352. Fiat setaceum ad med. brach.


353. Foveantur artus cum decoct. Anthem.

351.
Vespere appropinq.,
cljsma heri prescript.

354. R

Conii Fol

Aq.
Colatura
affect,

lecto

sit

ferv.

si

sit,

....

pro fotu, qui

cum pannis

gy
Ibij

laneis parti

admov. mane horis duabus, antequam e


et nocte post decubitum, donee

assurgat,

symptoma penitus

355. R

evanuerit.

Tinct. Opii

....

Linim. Sapon.
%]
Fiat linim. cum quo bene fricentur tempora
.

et

detons. caput.
356.

Inhalet

calid. cui

sing. noct. in lecto

tempore usus adde cochl.

rect.
18*

ij.

vaporem Aq.
min. ^Ether.

ABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

210

357.
Explor. vesica urinar. ope catheteris, ct
extrahatui arina.

358.Colluantur oa
cum Tinct. Myrrh, gtt.

gingiv. bis terve in die


xx. in aq. tepid, cyatho.

et

359. R Hydrarg. Oxyd.

cin.
9j. vel
gsa
Bisulphuret.
Fiat pulv. pro fumigatione faucibua intern, omni
nocte more solito adhibend.
.

360. Fiat

font, crure infra vel

supra genu.

Instituat. paracentesis abdom. et cduc. aq.


sing. noct. Ung.
362. Affricetur parti
361.

affect,

Hydrarg. fort, magnit. fabse equinse, deinde appficetur cataplaama ex Liq. Plumbi Acet. dil., Mica
Pania et Farina Lini.

363. B Argent.
Aq.

Nitrat.

destill

9J.
svj

Fiat mist, et cum hac illinantur part, affect. Bing.


noct. lima somni prius deters. ; vel linteum in efidein
madefiat et per totam noctem geatetur.
364.

Utatur balneo, ad

grad. nonagesim. calc-

facto, his in septim.

365. R

Fel.
01.

M.

Bov
Amygd.

|ij
.

o s8

Fiant guttse acoust. bis die applicand.

366.

Utatur aeger

equit. subinde,

Mittatur arm.
308. R Zinci Sulph.
367.

si fieri

possit.

list.

Aq. pur.

M.

-7)'}
|vj
.

Fiat inject. <pia3 ex syph. eburn. in urethram


injiciatur mane et nocte.

FORMS FOR EXTERNAL APPLICATIONS, ETC.


369.

Liq.

Amnion. Acet.

Amm.

Hydrochl.

3.j

.^ij

Ai|

211

fti

nocte cubitura ituro tumoribus applicand.


Mitte tbij. cum directione propria.
Fiat

lotio,

370.

Fiat fonticulus purul.

ope Pot.
371.

Caute

penicilli,

tangantur clavi Acid. Sulpli. ope


dein tegantur Emplast. Plumbi.

372. R Ung.

Cetacei
Pulv. Opii
Fiat ung. cujus paululum p.
gente ani prurigine.
.

373.

ad med. brachium,

fus.

Linim. Camp.

r.

9ss

ur 7

iss

,^ss
Tinct. Canth.
Fiat linim. quocum fricetur pars afi'ecta ter
.

M.

|j

n. applicetur,

quaterve indies.

....
....

3.j
374. R Nicotian*
Oj
Aq. comm.
Coque per sext. part, horse et cola; adde liquori
5ij
Sod* Sulph.
Solve et fiat enema statim injiciend. contra insult.
.

apoplect. vel affectus soporosos adhibend.

375.
cend.

Mitte Emplast.

'376. Adhib.

Galb. super alutam indu"

lav. frigid, vel tepid, prout segro

gratius erit.

Capilli radant. et caput postea panniculo


377.
lotione frigida imbut. circumdet.

ABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

212

378. R Hydrarg.
Ac],

Chlor.

gr. x

.^

pur

Hoc liquore, ter de die, injiciatur ulcus ope


Biph.; post sing, inject, materia relinq. intra,
-it. per dimidium horse, chins, omn. apertur.,

M.

leniter ulcus ut
per omn. sinus et meatus propell.

tumque externe prem.

liq.

eject,

379.R Dec. Mai. comp.


Ft.

Jan.

(c. Foenic. Scmin. cont. 3


enem. statim tepide injiciend.

vj.

|xiv

PART

III.

UNABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS, WITH LITERAL


TRANSLATIONS;
FORMING

A KEY TO PART

CHAPTER

II.

I.

FORMS FOR BLOOD-LETTING.

from
2.

the

arm

Fiat

to

Opus

ten ounces.

venaesectio, ut fluant sanguinis unciae


Let venesection be performed, that five

quinque.
ounces of blood
3.

brachid sanguis ad uncias


i!
Let blood be immediately drawn

Detrahatur

1.

decern statim.

est

may flotv.
venam cubiti

secare, ut sanguis

ad uncias decern. It is necessary to cut a


mat/ flow to ten ounces.
v< in of the arm, that blood
4.
Ad recidivura praecavendum, detrahatur
To prevent a relapse, lei
sanguis pro re nata.
blood be occasionally drawn.
Extrahatur sanguis pleno rivo, ad uncias sex,
5.

fiuat

quampriinum. Let blood be taken away as soon as


possible, in a full stream, to six ounces.

vel

Emitte sanguinis uncias sexdecim saltern,


ad deliquium. Take away at least sixteen ounces

of

blood, or to fainting.

6.

UNABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

214

7._Dimove Banguinem,
decern vel

ouna

or mor<

be

leaps,

to

ten

8.Detrahantur
uncise sex,

per saltum, ad un<

Remove blood by

ultra.

ex arteriS ternporali sanguinis


Let six ounces of blood

quamprimum.

drawn as soon as

possible

from

the

temporal

artery.

9._Mittatur sanguis illicd ex largo vulnere ad


vel donee seger palescat vel lanLet blood be immediately taken from a
guescat.

uncia

large wound (i.e. orifice) to ten on mis, or until the


patient becomes pale or Jain/.
10.

Repotatur sanguinis detractio,

generalis.
'/,

11.

Let

the

blood-letting,

and

be repeated.

Itcrumnatvenocsectioaddefectionemanimi.

Let venesection be again


12.

ct localis et

both local

performed

to fainting.

Sanguis oodem modo, quo ante, iterummit-

Blood is to
tendus est, verd ad uneias sexdenas.
be again drawn, in the same manner as before, but
to sixteen

ounces.

13. Pertundatur vena

brachii,

et

detrahatur

sanguis ad uneias viginti, vel usque ut liquerit


animus. Let a vein of the arm be opened literally.
bored or beat through], and blond be drawn to
twenty ounces, or to fainting.
[

14.

Repetatur vensesectio ad

tres alias vices ad

tribus diebus sequentibus


quando dolor et respirandi difficultas suadeant.
Let venesection be repeated to the same quantity,
following days, when
other linns, on

eandem quantitatem,

the

pain and

dijjicvlfij

of breathing requin

it.

FORMS FOR BLOOD-LETTING.

215

15. Die sequenti celebretur iterum vensesectio


ad eandem qua antea quantitatem. On the following day lei venesection be again
performed,
same quantity as before.

to the

1(3. Mittatur sanguis e brachio ad uncias duo-

decun quamprimum, ac postea ex vena jugulari ad


uncias octo.
Let blood be taken from the arm to
twelve ounces as soon as possible, and afterwards

from

the jugular vein to eight ounces.

17. Sanguis denud mittendus


decern tan tain.
ounces only.

Blood

is to be

est ad uncias
again taken to ten

18.
Mittatur sanguis de novo, et repetatur ad
aninn fere deliquium. Let blood be again taken
away, and the operation) repeated almost 'to fainting.
(

19.-Extrahatur sanguis

e brachio; eteodemdie
post aliquot horas, vel die sequenti duabus horis
post leve prandium, capiat pulverem emeticum.
Let blood be drawn from the arm; and on the same
day, after [i.e. at the expiration of] a few hours,
or on the following dag, two hours after a light din-

ner,

let

20.

the -patient take

an emetic powder.

Si primae venaescctioni

non cedat morbus,

turn repetatur; et nondum cessante, ad duas alias


vices celebretur, interposito semper die uno.
If
the disease should not yield to the first bldod-letting,
then let it be repealed; and not giving way, [i.e.
if the disease do not then yield], let it [the bloodletting] be again performed twice, one day always

in binning [i.e. between the blood-letting^.

21Necnon admoveanturcucurbitulascum ferro


nuchas capitis; mittatur sanguis ad uncias duodena. Also let the cupping-glasses, with the scari-

UNABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

216
ficator,
hi,

od

applied to the nape of the neck, and


taken away to ten minces.

lii

in

let

22. - Statim abradatur capillitium, et applicentur


Letthehair [of the
cucurbitulse cruentse undue.
be immediately shaved off, and the bloody
cupping-glasses [i.e. the cupping-glasses with the
scarificator] be applied to the nape of the neck.

Accommodentur cucurbitulae cum

ferro Bub
sanguis ad uncias
quatuor.
Let the cupping-glasses with the scarificator be applied under the ear of the affected side,
and let the blood be drawn to four ounces.
2',].

aurem

lateris affecti, et mittatur

24.
Admoveantur cucurbitulae cum scarificatione parti thoracis dolenti pro re uata, et exsu-

gatur sanguis ad uncias octo.


Let the cuppingglasses with the scarificator be occasionally applied
to the painful part of the cheat, and blood be drawn
to eight ounces.

25. Semel in septimana, applicentur temporibus


utrinque hirudines tres.
Once a week let threi
leeches be applied to both temples.
26.

Hirudines

admoveantur

et

viginti

quatuor statim lumbis


sunt, cataplasma

quando remotae

emolliens applicetur.
Let twenty-four leeches be
immediately applied to the loins, and when they are
wed, Id an emollient poultice be applied.
27.

Admoveantur

poribus,

applied
28.

si

to

hirudines tres singulis temLet three leeches be

adsit dolor capitis.

each temple, if there be pain of the head.

Applicentur

jugulo hirudines quator, et


post fluxuin sanguinis applicetur emplastrum lyttse.
Let four leeches be applied to the fore part of the
neck, and after the jinx of blood i.e. token the bleeding has ceased] let a blister be applied.
|

FORMS FOR BLOOD-LETTING.

217

29.
Detrahantur ex ischio affecto, et partibus
adjacentibus, ope cucurbitularum cum scarificatione, sanguinis uncise sex.
Let six ounces of
blood be drawn from the affected ischium and adjacent parts by means of the cupping-glasses with
scarification.

30.
Applicentur adversum renes hirudines duodecim vol cucurbituloe cruentaa, ut extrahantur
sanguinis unciae duodecim. Let twelve leeches, or
the bloody cupping-glasses [i.e. the cupping-glasses
with the scarificator], be applied opposite the kid-

neys, that twelve ounces

Convulsione

of blood may

be extracted.

redeunte, haud aliter, detrahatur sanguis per cucurbitulas tres. If the convulsion should return, not otherwise, let blood be
drawn by three cupping-glasses.
31.

32.
Si dolor perstiterit ad latus, mittantur sanguinis unciae viginti e brachio. If the pain should
continue at the side, let twenty ounces of blood be
taken from the arm.

34. Admoveatur

33.
Sanguisugae tres fronti imponantur.
three leeches be applied to the forehead.

Let

cucurbitula sicca regioni heLet a dry cupping-glass [i.e. the cuppingglass without the scarificator] be applied to the
region of the liver.
patis.


UNABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

218

CHAPTER

II.

FORMS FOR BUSTERS, ETC.

35.
Adhibe emplastrum cantharidia tumori in
ala dextrfi, per spatium duodecim horarum, vel

donee

in

vesicam manifesto epidermis elata

sit.

Apply a plaster of cantharides to the in hut in the.


right arm-pit, for the space of twelve hours, or until
the cuticle is manifestly raised into

blister.

Applicetur

abdomini emplastrum lyttae


super alutam satis latum extensum. Let a plaster
of cantharides, spread on leather sufficiently large,
36.

be applied to the belly.

37.
Admoveatur parti thoracis supcriori emplastrum lyttae, et postvesicationem applicetur ceratum
Fluxu cessante
sabinse, ut ulcus perpetuum fiat.

utatur sequenti:
Recipe, Cerati Sabinae,

Unguenti Lyttae, partes ajquales.


Let a plaster of cantharides be applied to the upper
part of the chest; and after vesication, let savin
cerate be applied, that a permanent ulcer may be
produced.
The discharge ceasing [i. e. when the
discharge ceases], let the patient use the following.

38.
Admoveatur tela vesicatoria (ad exemplar)
externae parti gutturis.
Let a blistering cloth {according to pattern) be applied to the external part

of

the throat.

39.

Admoveatur capiti raso unguentum cantha-

usque ad vesicationem. Let the ointment of


cantharides be applied to the shaven head, until
vesication {is produced).
ridis,

FORMS FOR BLISTERS, ETC.

219

40.
Admoveatur prope cartilaginem thyroideam
utrinque, emplastrum lyttae. Let a plaster ofcantharides be applied on each side near the thyroid
cartilage.

41.
Abradatur capillitium et admoveatur toti
Let the hair [of the head)
capiti sericum vesicans.
be shaved off, and a blistering taffeta applied to the

whole head.

42.
Applicetur prope articulum femoris superiorem emplastrum lyttae, super quod drachma
Let a plaster of
pulveris lyttae inspergenda est.
cantharides, /> which a drachm ofthepowder of
cantharides has been sprinkled, be applied near the

upper joint of

the thigh.

urgeant dyspnoea, applicetur emplastrum lytt, et fiat ulcus perpetuum ope un43.

Si valde

guent! sabinse.
If the difficulty of breathing be
vcn/ troublesome, let a plaster of cantharides be ap-

and let a permanent ulcer be produced by


means of sarin ointment.
44 Recipe, Emplastri Galbani compositi, unciam dimidiam.

plied,

Resinse, uncias duas.


Fiat emplastrum super alutam extendendum, quo pedes involvantur post pediluvium. Mix.
Let a plaster be made to be spread upon leather, in
whi.h i.e. in the plaster] the feet are to be wrapped

Misce.

of the foot-bath.
Imponatur nuchae capitis, vel suris externis,
emplastrum lyttffl. Let a plaster of cantharides be

after the use


45.

applied
e.

to

the.napeofthe neck, or to the external [1.


part of the calves {of the legs).

the superficial]

46. Emplastrum

lyttae

collo

imponatur qua

220

UNABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

dolet.

Let a plaster of caniharides be applied

the neck, where

of

ii

is

in

pain

[i.e. the

to

painful part

the neck],

47.

Admoveatur

nistra.

pannus vesicatorius Iateri siLet a blistering cloth be applied hi the l< ft

Utile.

48.

Adhibeatur emplastrum epispasticum,

amplum

et acre,

satis

inter scapulae.

plaster, sufficiently large


ftn a the shoulders.

and

Let <> blistering


acrid, be applied be-

49.

Recipe, Lyttarum

in

pulverem tenuissimum

tritarum, drachmam
Camphoric Pulveris, drachmam
Cerse flavae
Sevi prseparati, ana, drachmam

Adipis prseparati, scrupulos duos


Cera, sevo et adipe simul liquefactis, paulo antequam concrescant Lyttaa et Camphoram insperge,
atque omnia misce ut fiat emplastrum epispasticum
regioni jecoris applicandum.
The wax, suet, and
lard being melted together, sprinkle the caniharides

and camphor upon them a short time before they


and mix them altogether, that a blistering
plaster may be made, to be applied to the region
of
concrete,

the liver.

50. Admoveatur

charta

vesicatoria

occipiti.

Curetur pars exulcerata unguento sabinse.


a blistering paper be applied to the
occiput.

Let
Let

the Mistered part be dressed with sarin


ointment.

51. Nata humoris

detractio ab empl astro lvttae,


res poetulaverit, promoveatur.
//' it
should be
required, Ut the discharge of fluid, produced
by the
plaster of caniharides, be promoted.
_

si

FORMS FOR BLISTERS, ETC.

221

Emplastra duo vesicatoria brachiis internis


52.
Let two
infra cubitus quamprimum imponantur.
blisters be immediately applied to the inner part of
the arms below the elbows.

Admoveatur taffeta vesicatoria genu, et


53.
Let
fluxus postea eliciatur ope unguenti sabinae.
a blistering taffeta be applied to the knee, and afterwards let a discharge be excited by means of savin
ointment.

Ceratum

lyttse partibus excoriatis irnponanatus humor ab emplastro lyttae promoveLet the cerate of cantharides be applied to
atur.
the excoriated part, that the fluid produced by the
blister may be promoted.

54.

tur, ut

55.

Recipe,

Pulveris Euphorbii, scrupulum di-

njidium
Cerati Sabinae, unciam
Emplastri Thuris, unciam

dimi-

diam
Simul bene contritis sit emplastrum scuto pectoris.
Having well incorporated them, let a plaster bemade
for the defence of the breast.

56

Fiat fonticulus ex parte vesicatorii ope unLet an issue [i.e. discharge] be


guenti sabinae.
"made from the place of the blister [i. e. from the
blistered part] by means of savin ointment.
57.
Recipe, Ammonias Hydrochloratis, drach-

mam
Saponis duri, drachmas duas.
Emplastri Plumbi, unciam dimi-

diam
Emplastrum et saponem simul liqua, et paulo antequam concrescant immisce salein in pulverem
Extensum super alutam, parti
tenuem tritum.

UNABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

222

affecta quamprimum applicetur, et pro re nata repetatur.


Melt tin plaster and soap together, and
a little while before they harden, admix the soli
rubbed into a fine powder. Let it [i. e. the mixture]
1

be spread on
the

part

58.

and immediately applied


and repeated occasionally.

leather,

affected,

Caput

to

tonderi debet et emplastro resica-

tegi.
The head ought to be
and covered round about with a blistering

circumcirca

torio

shaved,
plaster.

59.
Applicetur regioni singulorum rcnuin emplastrum Lyttse parvum (magnitudinis minimi semicoronoe).
Let a small plaster of cantharides [of
the size of a half crown piece) be applied to the
,

region of each of the kidneys.

CHAPTER

III.

FORMS FOR MIXTURES, ETC.


60.

Recipe,

Vini Aloes, drachmas duas


Infusi Sennas, unciam cum semisse
Magnesias
Sulphatis,
drachmas

quatuor
Misce.

IIujus capiat unciam bora Beptima matutinft: et circiter horam decimam, partem reliquam
sumat. si opus fuerit.
Mix. Ofthislet the patient
take an ounce at seven o'clock in the morning, and
the

remainder at

ten o'clock, if there be occasion.

223

FORMS FOR MIXTURES, ETC.


Gl.

Recipe,

Liquoris

Acetatis,
Ammoniae
tres cum semisse

drachmas

Vim

Antimoniale drachmas duas

Tincturae

Cardamomi

compositae,

drachmas duas
Aqu?e Menthae piperitae, uncias
quatuor
Fiat mistura, cujus unciae duae omni horae quadLet a
rante calide sorbeantur, durante frigore.
mixture be made, of which let two ounces be taken
warm every quarter of an hour during the chilliness.

02. Recipe,

Tincturae Valerianae, uncias duas


e cochleare magno,

Detur fluidrachma una subinde,

Radicis Valeriana) sylvestris, sub forma theae


Let a fluidrachm be given now and then in
a tablespoonful of the infusion of the wild valerian,
prepared in the form of tea.
Infus'i

parati.

63.

uncias quatuor
Recipe, Misturae Amygdalae,
drachmas

Syrupi

Scillce,

tics

Tincturae Opii, guttas quadraginta


quod unciatim sumatur, tussi admodum ingraveLet litis !>< taken, ounce by ounce [i.e. in
scente.
ounce doses], when the cough is very troublesome.
Infuei Gentianoe compositi, uncias
sex
Magnesias Sulphatis, unciam
Capiat cochlearia tria magna post jentaculum et
post prandium quotidie. Let the patient take daily
three tablespoonfuls after breakfast and dinner.

64.Recipe,

65.

Recipe,

Liquoris

Ammoniae

Acetatis,

drachmas duas
Aquoa Menthae viridis, uncias

cum

semisse

tres

UNABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

224

Syrupi Crooi, drachmas duas


Spiritfts iEtheris Nitrosi, draoh-

mas duas
Cochlearia duo magna Becundis horis sumantur, durante febre, saepius vel rarius pro impetus ratione: et abseute febre Pnlv. Cinchon. nt
ante.
Let two tablespoonfuls be taken every
Mix.
two linn,* during the fever, more or less frequ-enUy,
according /<> the violence ofthefU i. e. the aguejit]
and, when the fever is absent, [1st] the powder of
cinchona [be taken] as before.
Misce.

Recipe,

Foliorum Rosas, unciam


Aquae ferventis, uncias octo
Stent per boram colaturae adde Succi Limonum,
Sacchari albi, ana, quantum sufficit, ad gratam
acerbitatem dulcedinemque. Let them stand during
an hour; to the strained [liqusr] add a sufficient
quantity of lemon juice and white sugar to give on
66.

agreeable acidity
67.

and

sweetness.

Recipe, Antimonii Potassio-Tartratis, grana


sex

Aquae

puras, drachmas quatuor


Syrupi Rhceados, draebmam

Misce.

Capiat cochleare

minimum

subinde, ad
Mix.
Let
the patient take a smalt [i. e. tea] spoonful from
time to time, to promote nausea or vomiting.

nauseam

68.

vol

vomitum promovendum.

Recipe,

Sodae

Subcarbonatis,

drachmas

duas cum semisse


Crystallorum Tartari, drachmas
tres

Aquae

purae, uncias octo


Stent in lagena bene obturata, per triduum, et
deinde sit in promptu pro potu cathartico.
Let

FORMS FOR MIXTURES, ETC.


them xhtml in a
<i

ml then

stoppered for three days,


a cathartic drink.

be in readiness for

Recipe,

09.

bottle well

225

Sodas Bicavbonatis, drachmas duas


Ferri Sulphatis, grana tria
Magnesia? Subcarbonatis, drach-

mam
puras, octarium dimidium
Acidi Sulphurici diluti, fluidrachmas decern
Infundatur primum lagense aqua, dein immittantur
Salina et denique Acidum Sulphuricum illico obturetur lagena, ct in loco frigido servetur. First
let the water be poured into the bottle, then let the
salts be put in, and lastly, the sulphuric acid; let
the bottle be immediately stoppered, and kept in a

Aqna?

cool place.

70.

Recipe, Decocti Lichen

Sumat
take a
71.

is,

poculum omni

octarium
Let the patient

bihorio.
cupful every two hours.

soger

Recipe,

Magnesia? Carbonatis, drachmam

Aqua? Mentha?

sativa?, uncias sex


Tinetura? Opii, drachmam
Misce. Sumat cochlearia duo dum flatus infestat.
Mix. Let the patient take two spoonfuls when flatulence is troublesome.

72.

Capiat cochlearia duo ampla Aqua? Mentha?


omni hora, donee singultus

et nisus ad
Let the patient take tico
cessaverint.
tablespoonfuls ofpeppermint water every hour, until
the hiccup and attempts to vomit shall have ceased.

piperita?,

Tomitum

Recipe,

Tinetura? Digitalis, drachmas tres


Acidi Hydrocyanici, guttaa viginti
IIujus capiat guttas viginti ter die, ex
Misce.
cyatbo aqua? frigida?, dosin sensim augendo, prout
73.

226

UNABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

Let the patient


caput ant ventriculus ferro queat.
take twenty drops of this mixture three linn's a day
in a glass of cold water, the dost to be gradually
increased according as the head or the stomach can
bear it.

Recipe,

Magnesias Carbonatis, drachmam


Pulveria Ilhei, grana quindecim
Aquas A.nethi, unciatn cum Bemisse
Misce. Fiat julepum, cujus unum cochleare minimum infantum lactenti detur secundis horis, pbiala
agitata.
Let a julep be made, of which let
Mix.
one teaspoon /'ii/ be given to the sucking infant every
two hours, the bottle being shaken.
7-1.

Recipe,

Misturae Ammoniac!, uncias sex


Tincturae Opii, drachmam
Misce. Capiat cochlearia duo magna statim; iterentur post horam si tussis accreverit. Let the patient take two tablespoonfds immediately ; let them be
repeated in an hour if the cough should increase.
75.

Recipe,

Decocti Hordei, uncias decern


Olei Olivae, uncias duas
Mucilaginis Acaeiae, unciam
Tere oleum cum mucilagine donee probe coiverent,
turn sensim adde decoctum, ut fiat enema.
Interdum addere liceat Magnesiae Sulphatis unciam.
Rub the oil with the mucilage until they are w< It
combined, then gradually add the decoction, that an
76.

enema may be made. Sometimes we may add an


ounce of sulphate of magnesia.
77.

Recipe,

Ammoniae
drachmam

Spiritus

Aromatici,

Tincturae Assafcetidae, unciam

di-

midiam
Syrupi Croci, unciam dimidiam
Aquae Cinnamomi, unciam

227

FORMS FOR MIXTURES, ETC.

Exhibe cochleare parvum ter quaterve de


vel siepius, urgente convulsione vel spasmo.
Mix. Give a teaspoonful three or jour times a day,
or oftener, if the convulsion or spasm should be

Miscc.
die,

troublesome.

Recipe,

Infusi Kramerise, uncias sex


Tincturae Opii, drachmam
Fiat mistura, cujus sumantur cochlearia fcria magna
Let a mixture
pust singulus dejectiones liquidas.
be made, of which let three tablespoonfuls be taken
78.

after every liquid evacuation.


79.

Recipe,

Sodae Sulphatis, unciam


misse
Sodae Phosphatis, unciam

cum

se-

Syrupi Rhamni, drachmas quatuor


Aquaj Menthae piperitae, uncias sex
Sumat unciam statim, et repefcatur dosis

Misce.
post horas duas nisi alvus prius respondent. Mix.
Let the patient take two tablespoonfuls immediately,
and let the dose be repeated in two hours, unless the
bowel be previously relieved.

Recipe,

80.

Tincturae Hyoscyami, drachmam


cum semisse
Potassae Acetatis, drachmas quatuor

Syrupi Croci, drachmas duas


Aqua) Anisi, uncias sex
Fiat mistura, cujus sumantur cochlearia duo
fcria

minima

bis tcrve in die, vel ut

opus

sit.

vel

Let

be made, of which let two or three teaspoonfuls be taken twice or thrice a day, or as there

a mixture

may

be occasion.

UNABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTION-.

228

Ipecacuanhas

81. Recipe,

Radicis Pulveris,
semisse

drachmam cum

Potassse Bitartratis, drachmam


ferventis, nuiduncias trcs

Aquse

cum

semisse

Macera per horam integrum, dcin

cola ct adjice

Syrupi, fluidunciam dimidiam


Pctur semiuncia vel cochleare amplum
Misce.
omni semihora, donee vomitum proritaverit. Macerate during an hour, then strain, and add half an
of syrup. Mix. Let half an ounce, or a tablespoonful, be given every half hour, until it shall
have produced vomiting.

Recipe,

Tincturae Opii, drachmam


Misturae Crette, uncias sex
Capiat cochlearia duo magna omni quadMiace.
Mix.
Let the
rante hor83 donee leniatur dolor.
patient take two tablespoonfuls every quarter of an
82.

hour unhl
83.

the

pain

Recipe,

is

alleviated.

Aloes
quatuor

Decocti

uncias

compositi,

Sodas Sulphatis, unciam

cum

se-

misse
Misce. Cochlearia duo ampla intermissionis tempore sumantur, ita ut purgatio ex toto cessaverit
anteaceessum paroxysmi. Mix. Let two tablespoon-

of intermission, so that the


purgation shall have ceased before the accession of
the paroxysm.

j'uts be taken in the time

84.

Recipe,

Sodoe

Potassio-Tartratis,

uncias

duas

Aquas Mentha? sativas, uncias octo


Misce. Capiat cochlearia duo ampla omni bih'orio,
ad sedes promovendas. Mix. Let the patient take
two tablespoonfuls every two hours to promote stools.

229

FORMS FOR MIXTURES, ETC.

quatuor
85 Recipe, Plumbi Acetatis, grana
Aquae destillatae, uncias quatuor
Syrupi Papaveris, drachmas tres
quotidie;
Capiat cochleare ampin m mane
Misce
deinde capiat aeger
repetatur dosis ad tres vices, et
Mix. Let the patient

haustumaliquempurgantem.

the morning;
take one iablespoonful daily in
times, and then
dose be repeated three other
patient lake some purging draught.

86.Recipe, Magnesias

Sulphatis,

seinissem
Acidi Sulphuric! diluti,
cum semisse

Aquae

Menthae

let

the

let

the

unciam

et

drachmam

piperita?,

uncias

sex

Syrupi Rhoeados, drachmas duas


quaHuius niisturae sumantur cochlearia
Misce
donee venter rite solutus
tuor omnibus tribus horis,
Mix Of this mixture let two tablespoonfuls
fiierit

hours, until the belly shall have


be taken every three

been thoroughly opened.

87 Recipe, Infusi Senna?, unciam


Magnesias Sulphatis, semiunciam
quarta quaque die. Mix. Let the
Capiat
Misce.
every fourth day.
{it)
take
patient
drachmas duas
Recipe, Tincture Valerianae
Spiritus

Ammoniae foetidi, drachmas

duas

Aquas purge, uncias duas


languorCapiat cochlearia magna duo in
purgatione ded.tis. Mix.
ibus, prsecipue diebus
two tablespoonfulsm languor,
let the patient take
appropriated to the purgation.
especially on the days
l

Misce.

20

UNABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

230

Recipe,

88.

Misturae Amygdalae, uncias sex

f incturse

Opii,

semidiachmam

Misee. Capiat cochlearia magna duo quarta quaque


hora, si tussis increbuerit.
Mix. Let the patient
take tin tablespoonfuls every fourth hour if the cough
should occur frequently.
i

89.

Recipe,

Antimonii Tartarati grana

tria

Infusi Sennas, uncias tres

Aquae Pimentae, uncias quatuor


Misce. Rcpetantur cochlearia duo anipla omni
Bemihora, donee supervenerit vomitus vel alvus
dejecerit.
Mix. Let two tablespoonfuls he repeated
every hull' hour until vomiting comes on, or until the
bowel shall have acted,
90.

Recipe,

Tincturae Jalapao, drachmas quatuor


Potasses Sulpbatis, unciam dimi-

diam
Aquae Menthae, uncias sex
Sumat cochlearia major a duo omni quad-

Misce.
rante horse, donee alvus copiose respondent. Mix.
Let the patient take two tablespoonfuls every quarter
of an hour, until the bowel -shall have acted sufficiently.

91.

Recipe,

Cetrariae Islandica,

Aquae

frigidae,

unciam

octarium

!oque ad uncias duodenas; stet ut <;eletur, etutatur


aeger gelatina ad libitum.
Boil to twelve ounces:
let it stand that it may congeal, and let the patient
use the jelly at pleasure.
I

92.

Recipe,

Lactis Vaccini, octarium


Sin a pis
Seminum contusorum,

unciam
Coquantur simul, donee pars casearia

in

coagulum

FORMS FOR MIXTURES, ETC.

231

deinde coletur serum, et hujus sumatur


cyathus subinde. Let them, be boiled together, until
the caseous part [caseum or curd] be changed into
a coagulum [i. e. be coagulated] ; then l<:l I he whey
be strained, and a wineglassful of it be taken now
abierit,

and

then.

93.

Recipe,

Liquoris

Ammonia?

Acetatis,

drachmas quatuor
Tincturae Opii,

drachmam

dimi-

diam
Aquae Mentha?

sativae, uncias sex


Misce. Capiat cochlearia duo, invadente paroxysmo
Let the pacaloris, in fcbribus intermittentibus.
tient take two tablespoonfuls (hiring the paroxysm

of heat
94.

(i.e. the hot stage) in intermittent fevers.

Recipe, Infusi Sennae, fluiduncias sex

Sumat primo, omni quadrante horse, cochleare;


dcin assumptionis vices protrahantur ad horam,
et ultra pro successu. Let the patient take, at first,
one spoonful every quarter of an hour; then let the
time of taking be protracted to an hour, and afterwards according to the effect.
95.

Recipe, Decocti Aloes compositi, fluiduncias

sex
Capiat aeger cochlearia tria ampla pro re nata;
postea augendo minuendove quantitatem prout
Let the pasedes pauciores pluresve promoverit.
tient take three tablespoonJuts occasionally; afterwards increasing or diminishing the quantity, according as it may hare excited fewer or more stools.
96.

Recipe,

Cretae praeparatae, drachmam


Tincturae Opii, drachmam dimidiam

Aquae Cinnamomi, uncias sex


Misce, et agitando phialam, dentur cochlearia duo

UNABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

232

secunda quique hora, series vel citius ut res postulet, <luiii vcxant ventriculi tormina vel vomitua.
Mix, and, shaking the phial, let two tablespoonfids
be given 'very second hour, later or sooner, as circumstances may require, as long as the gripings or

vomitings /rouble.

97.
Recipe, Vim Ipecacuanhae, fluidunciam
Let a draught be
Fiat baustu8 statim sumendus.
made, to be. taken immediately.
Recipe, Mistime Amygdalae, fluiduncias sex
Tincturse Opii fluiddrachmam
Misce. Capiat cochlearia duo ampla sub finem
Let the patient take two tablespoonfuls
vomitionis.
towards the end of the vomiting.
98.

Recipe,

Tincturse Rhei, unciam


Gentianae, semiunciam
Aquae Pimentae, uncias quatuor

Syrupi Croci, unciam


Fiat inistura, cujus sumat aeger cochlearia duo,
urgentc ventriculi dolore, flatu, nausea vel languore.
Let a mixture be made, of which let the 'patient take two tablespoonfuls, the pain of the stomach,
flatulence, nausea, or languor, being troublesome.
99.

Recipe, Tincturae Opii, drachmam dimidiam


Cardamomi, uuciaui

dimi-

diam
Syrupi Croci, drachmas quatuor
Aquas Cinnamomi, uncias sex
Misce. Capiat cochlearia duo maxima post singulas
vomitiones vel sedes tiquidas. Mix. Let the patient
take two tablespoonfuls after each vomiting or liquid
stool.

233

FORMS FOR MIXTURES, ETC.


100.

Recipe,

Decocti Cinchonae, uncias sex


Acidi Sulphuricidiluti, drachmam

unam
Syrupi Aurantiovum, unciam

di-

midiam
IIujus misturae, cochlearia quatuor, horis
sumantur, ad sudationes diminuendas. Mix. Of this mixture, let four tablespoonfuls be taken every two hours, to diminish sweatinf).

Misce.

duabas

101.

interpositis,

Recipe,

Tincturae Opii,

drachmam

dimi-

diam
Confectionis

aromaticae,

drach-

mam
Aquae Menthae

piperitae

uncias

sex
Fiat mistura, cujus sumantur cochlearia tria magna
post unamquamque sedem mollem, phiala prius
concusa. Let a mixture be made, of which let three
tablespoonfids betaken after every liquid evacuation,
the phial being first shaken.

102. Recipe,

Ammonioe
drachmam

Spiritus

aromatici,

Tincturae Castorei, drachmas tres


Spiritas Lavandulae, drachmas

duas

Aquas Pimentae, unciam


Fiat mistura, cujus drachmae duae, pro re nata,

in-

gerantur, contra languorera et deliquium. Let a


mixture be made, of which let two drachms (i. e. two
teaspoonfuls) be taken occasionally, against languor

and fainting.
103.Recipe,

Infusi Sennae, fluiduncias sex


Tincturae Jalapae, fiuiddrachmas

sex
20*

UNABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

234
Misce.
horis, ad

Sumantur coehlearia tria ampla, singulis


plenam alvi solutionem. Let three table-

spoonfuls be taken ever;/ hoar,


evacuation of the bowel.

to

produce copious

104.
Perstet in usu misturae catharticsa, donee
alvus tor quaterve plene respondent. Let (he patient continue in the use of the cathartic mixture,
until the bowel shall have acted freely three or four
times.

105.
Recipe, Misturae Ammoniaci, uncias sex
Capiat seger cochleare magnum bis in die, ex poculo
Let the 'patient
jusculi bovini, contra raucedinem.
take a tablespoonful twice a day, in a cup of beef
tea,

against hoarseness

10G.

Recipe,

Tincturae Scilbx*,

drachmam

Mucilaginis Acacise, unciam


Tincturae Opii, drachmam
Misce. Fiat mistura, <le qua subinde capiat drachmam unam guttatim, ad gulam emolliendam et
expuitionem promovendam. Mix. Let a mixture
be made, of which let the patient take one drachm
(i.e. a teaspoonful) by drops, to soften [relax or
lubricate) the throat, and to promote expectoration.
107.

Recipe,

Ammonias
drachmam

Sesquicarbonatis,

Tincturae Cardamomi, unciam


Syrupi
Rhocados, drachmas

duas

Aquas Menthae

piperitae, uncias

quatuor
Fiat mistura, de qua capiat cochleare unum largum
si pustulse evanescant.
Let a mixture be made, of
which let the patient take one tablespoonful if the
pustules disappear.

FORMS FOR MIXTURES, ETC.


108.

Recipe,

Liquoris

Ammonias

235
Acetatis, un-

ciain

Vini

Antimonii

tratis,

Potassio-Tar-

drachmam

Menthae sativaa,
quatuor
Syrupi Croci, drachmam

Aquse

uncias

Fiat mistura, de qua cochleare largum unum secundis vel tertiis horis exhibeatur, saepius rariusve
prout febris vehementior vel mitior fuerit. Let a
mixture be made, of which let one tablespoonfid be
taken every second or third hour; more frequentty
or rarely, according as the fever may have been more
or less violent.
109.

Recipe,

Tincturae Assafoetidae, drachmas

duas

Ammonias

Carbonatis,

drachmam

dimidiam
Aquas Pulegii uncias quatuor
Fiat mistura, de qua capiat cochleare unum vol
cochlearia duo in languonbus, vel sudorilms frigiLet a mixture be
dis, vel frigoris paroxysmis.
made, of which let the patient take one or two tablespoonfuls in languors, or in cold sweats, or in

paroxysms of

cold (as the cold stage

of intermit'

tents).

110.

Recipe,

Potassae Bitartratis, unciam


Olei Limonis, guttas quindecim
Sacchari purificati, uncias duas

Aquas

bullientis, octarios

duos

Usurpetur pro potu communi ubi asger inMisce.


tense siti vexatur.
Mix. Let it be -used for a common driu/,- when the patient is troubled with intense
thirst.

UNABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

236

Recipe,

Pulveris Jalapse, drachmam


Pulveris Zingiberis, gran a viginti
Magnesias Sulphatis, unciam
Aquae purse, uncias sex
Cochleare unum singulis horis exhibeatur,
Misce.
quaque vice phialam agitando, ut permisceatur
Mi.r. Let one tablespoonfvl In- given every
pulvis.
hour, the bottle being shaken each time, that llnpoicder may be thorough!]/ mixed [with the liquid],
111.

Recipe,

Corticis Cinchonae, sesquiunciam


Magnesia) Sulphatis, uncias duas
Aquae puras, octarios duos
Coque per sextam partem horae in vase leviter
clauso. et liquorem adhuc calentem cola: sub finem
adde Syrupi Absinthii uncias duas. Tcrlia vel

112.

quarta quaque hora cyathus unus exhibeatur, intermissionis tempore.


Boil, for the sixth 'part <f

an hour,

in a, lightly covered vessel, and strain the


liquor while hot: towards the end of the boiling add

two ounces of syrup of wormwood. Let our cupful


lie given every third or fourth hour, at the time of
the intermission.

113.

Recipe,

Infusi Chirettae, uncias sex


Magnesias Sulphatis, uncias duas

Misce. Usurpetur ad uncias duas bis vel ter in


longe k pastu et maxime jejuno ventriculo.
Mix. Let it be used to [the extent of) four tablespoonfuls twice or three times a day, long befon
taking food, and especially when the stomach is
empty.
die,

114.

Recipe,

Decocti

Hordei, octarium dimi-

dium
Nitri purificati,

diam

drachmam

dimi-

FORMS FOR MIXTURES, ETC.

237

Duabus vel tribus exhibeatur vicibus duarum horarum intervallo. Mix. Let it be. given at
Misce.

two or three times


115.

in,

Recipe,

the .space

of two hours.

Ammonias

Spiritfts

aromatici,

drachmas duas
Liquoris
Ammonias Acetatis,
uncias quatuor
Tincturae Opii, drachmam
Aquae Pimentae, uncias quatuor
Misce. et divide in haustus quatuor, quorum unus
usurpari potest si pulsus languescat vel pustulae
subsiderint.
Mix, and divide into four draughts,
of which "if maybe taken if the pidse become feeble
or the pustules recede.
116.

Recipe,

Tincturae Opii,

drachmam

Syrupi Croci, drachmam


Tincturae Cardamomi, drachmas

duas
Aquas Cinnamomi, uncias sex
Misce.

Cochleare

unum

exhibeatur, dosisque

ite-

retur, prout urgeat morbus.


Mix. Let one tablespoonful be given, and the dose repeated, according
as the disease mag require [it]

117.

Recipe,

Liquoris
cias

Ammonias

Acetatis, un-

duas

Tincturae Opii, drachmam


Yini Antimonii Potassio-Tartratis,

drachmam
Menthas sativas, uncias
duas
Misce, et in tres vel quatuor doses divide, quarum
unaomni bihorio in insultuum remissione sumenda.
Mix, and divide into three or four doses, of which
one is to be taken every two hours in the remission

Aquas

of

the Jits.

UNABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

238

Recipe,

Vini Colcliici, drachmas duas


Tincturae Jalapae, drachm am
Ini'usi Sennae, uncias duas
Ista dosis in duas partes dividi potest,
Misce.
quarum una mane, altera serd exhibeatur. Mix.
This <lnxe man ,,r divided in/" two parts, of which
one part may be given in the morning, the other in
118.

the evening.

119.
in

TEtheris cochleare minimum, urgenteflatu,

Aqua Menthse

piperita?

sumendum.

spoonful of aether (is) to be taken


water when the flatus is troublesome.
120.

Recipe,

in

One

tea-

peppermint

Dccocti Cinchonas, uncias duas


Tiucturae Myrrhae, semiunciam

AcidiHydrochlorici, quantum sufTo give


ad gratam acerbitatem reddendum.
an agreeable acidity.
ficit

121.

Recipe,

Tincturse Sennas, unciam


Tincturae Jalapae, drachmas duas
Aquas Pimentse, uncias duas

Misce. Capiat dimidium Btatim, etsemihora elapsa,


est.
Mix. Let the patient take half
immediately, and in half an hour the remainder.

quod reliquum

122.
Praeterrnittatur mistura salina.
saline mixture be omitted.

Let the

123.
Capiat Tincturoc Opiiguttas triginta hora
somni, et repetantur omnia tortia hora, perstante
dolore et spasmo.
Lei the patient take thirty drops

of the tincture of opium nl bedtime, and let them be


repeated every third hour if the pain and spasm continue.

239

FORMS FOR MIXTURES, ETC.


124.

Recipe,

Tincturae Castorei, drachmas duas


Tincturae Serpentariae, drachmas

duas
Aquae Pimentae, uncias duas
Misce. Capiat cochleare modicum quartis horis,
aggrediente febre. Mix. Let the patient take a
moderate (i.e. a dessert) spoonful every four hours
when the fever is coming on.

Recipe,

Infusi Sennae, uncias quatuor.


Magnesiae Sulphatis, drachmam
Misce. Ex hac mistura, primo die cochleare unum,
Mix.
altero die duo, et sic deinceps propinentur.
Of this mixture let one spoonful be drunk the first
day, two the next day, and so henceforth.

125.

Recipe,

Sarsparilhe Radicis
Zingiberis Radicis contusae, ana,
unciam dimidiarn
Sassafras Radicis concisas, unciam
Coque leni igne in Aquae fontanae octariis quatuor,
ad dimidiam consumptionem, ut fiat decoctum,
cujus bibat fluiduncias octo modice tepef'acti post
bolum, et mane repetatur in lecto ad diaphoresin
Boil, with a gentle heat, in four pints of
ciendam.
sprint/ water, to half, that a decoction may be made,
of which let the patient drink eightfluidounces, made
126.

moderately warm, after the bolus, and let it (i. e. the


decoction) be repeated in the morning while in bed,
to promote diaphoresis.
127.

Recipe,

Acidi Sulphurici

diluti,

unciam

dimidiam
Sjrupi Rhoeados, drachmas duas
Tincturae Cardamomi, drachmas

duas
Fiat

mistura, cujus

sumat cochleare minimum,

UNABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

240

Let a mixsextis horis, in quovis vehiculo grato.


ture be made, of which let the patient take one tea-

spoonful every six hours, in any agreeable


128.

Recipe,

Spirits

Ammonia

vehicle.

aromatici,

irachmam
Tim-tune Cardamomi, drachmas
duas
Tincturae Castorei, drachmam
Aquae Pulegii, uncias quatuor
Sumat, opprimente languore, cochlearia ampladuo.
Let the patient take two tablespoonfuU when the
languor is oppressive.
120.

Recipe,

Tinctarae Castorei

Myrrhye,

ana,

drach-

mam
Misturoe Amygdalae, uneias sex
Syrupi Oroci, drachmam
Sumat cochlearia quatuor ampla mane,
Misce.
meridie, et hor& somni, ad biduum vel triduum;

quo elapso, et uno tantum die interjecto, sumat


potion em emeticam sequentem mane, superbibendo
Infusi Florum Anthemidis quantum sufficit ad
vomitiones quater aut quinquies proritandas, cum
Let the patient take four tabledebito regimine.
spoonfuls in Hie morning, at noon, and at bedtime,
for the space of two or three days; which having
elapsed, and one day only intervening, let the patient
take the following emetic potion in the morning,
drinking after it a sufficient quantity of the infu-

of chamomile flowers to produce vomiting four


or five times, with the accustomed regimen.

sion

130.

Recipe,

Misce, et

iiat

Vini Ipecacuanha', fluidunciam


Potaesio-Tartratis,
Antimonii
grana duo
potio. Mix, and let a potion be made.

FORMS FOR MIXTURES, ETC.


131.

Recipe,

241

Sodae tartarizatae semiunciam


Tincturae Rhei, unciam dimidiam

Syrupi communis, drachmas duas


Aquae Pimentae, uncias sex
Fiat mistura, cujus capiat aeger cochlearia tria
bihorio donee alvus purgetur.
Let a
mixture be maae, of which let the patient take three
tablespoonfuls every two hours until the boivels be
purged.
132.
Recipe, Aquae pulvialis, uncias duas
Antimonii
Potassio-Tartratis,

magna omni

grana

tria

Solve: hujus danda sunt cochlearia duo mediocria


singulis horse quadrantibus, donee vomitus spquatur. Dissolve: of this (solution) two middling-sized
(i. e. dessert) spoonfuls are to be given every quarter
of an hour, until vomiting ensues.

Recipe,

Infusi Sennas, uncias sex


Tincturae Sennas, semiunciam
Magnesias Sulphatis, unciam
Fiat mistura, cujus capiat aeger cochlearia duo
magna bis terve in bora, donee adsit catharsis.

133.

Let a mixture be made, of which let the patient take


two tablespoonfuls twice or thrice in an hour until
purging be present (i. e. come on).

Recipe,

Catechu, semiunciam
Aquas puras, uncias duodecim
Coque ad uncias sex stent donee fasces subsiderint:
Boil to
liquoris partem limpidam caute effunde.
six ounces: let them stand until the dregs subside:
carefully pour off the clear part of the liquor.
134.

Recipe,

Decocti Aloes, fluiduncias sex


Sodas Sulphatis, unciam dimidiam
Fiat mistura, cujus sumat aeger cochlearia duo
135.

21

UNABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

242

ordinaria secunda quaque hora, donee ample purLet a mixture be made, of which let the
gaverit.
patient lake two common spoonfuls every second
hour, until it (i. e. the medicine) skull have amply

purged.

Recipe,

Acidi Nitrici, dratjhmam


Aquae destillatae, uncias duodecim
Syrupi Aurantii, sesquiunciam
Fiat mistura, quotidie Rumenda, ope tubuli vitrei,
partitis haustibus.
Let a mixture be made, to be
taken daily in divided draughts by means of a glass
136.

tube.

137.
Capiat aeger unciaru dimidiam Infusi
Sennae pro dosi, ex cyatho parvo Decocti llordei.
Let the patient take half an ounce of the infusion of
fur n (lime, in a small cupful of barley water.

138.
Capiat asger cyathum vinosum parvum
Infusi Gentianae, secunda quaque hora.
Let the
patient take a sum// wineglassful of the infusion of
hour.
gentian every second

139.

Recipe,

Magnesias Carbonatis, semidrachniar.i

Pulveris Rbei, drachmam


Aqua? Pimentse, uncias sex
Misce.
Sumantur cochlearia tria magna post
unamquamque sedem mollem, vitro prius concusBO. Mix. Let three tablespoonfuls be taken after
inch liquid evacuation, the bottle being previously
ski i ken.

140.

Recipe,

Fiat solutio
tion be

Sodae

et

Potassie

Tartratis,

drachmas sex
Aquae Cinnamomi, uncias duas
dualms vicibua sumenda. Let a solu-

made,

to be

taken at twice.

FORMS FOR MIXTURES, ETC.

243

Recipe,

Infusi Quassia), uncias sex


Magnesias Sulphatis, unciam
Fiat mistura, de qua capiat aeger cochleare unum
amplum bis terve in die. Let a mixture be made,
of which let the patient take one tablespoonful twice
141.

or three times a day.


142.

Recipe,

Tincturas Opii, drachmam


Mucilaginis Acacias, uncias sex
Spiritus Athens Nitrici, drach-

mas duas
Bibat cochlearia tria subinde, urgente
Misce.
Mix. Let the patient
stranguria, aut in languore.
drink three spoonfuls when strangury is troublesome, or in languor.

Repetatur mistura pro re nata, si opus


ad vomitum sedandum. Let the mixture be

143.
erit,

repeated now and then, if there shall be occasion, to


allay vomiting.
144.

Recipe,

145.

Recipe,

Tincturas Opii, drachmam


Syrupi Papaveris, drachmas duas
Aquas Menthae, uncias sex
Misce. Sumat unciam oinni semihora, donee dolor
mitescat. Mix. Let the patient take one ounce every
hull' hour until the pain is appeased.
Tincturas Hyoseyami, drachmas

duas

Misce.

Sumat

Tincturas Castorei, drachmas duas


Syrupi Rhoeados, drachmam
Aquas puras, uncias quatuor
drachmas duas omni hora, si non
Let the patient take two drachms

dormiat Mix
every hour if he does not

sleep.

UNABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

24-4

14G.

Recipe,

Magnesia) Subcarbonatis, drachmam dimidiam


Tincturae Gentianae, drachmas
tres

Syrupi Aurantii, drachmas quatuor

Aquae Pimentae, uncias quatuor


Capiat seger, acido infestante, cochleare
vol alterum ex poculo jusculi bovini.
Mix. Let the patient take one or two tablespoonfuls,
in a cupful of beef tea, when troubled with acid (i.
e. acidity of the stomach).
Miece.

amplum unum

Recipe,

Rasurse Cornu Cervi, unciam


Aquae, octarios quatuor
Coque ad octarios duos, dein liquori colato adde
Sacchari albi quod satis est, et ad usum servetur.
147.

Boil

to

is

sufficient

the decoction) be

148.

add to the strained liquor as


of white sugar, and let it (i. e.
kept for use.

two pints, then

much as

Recipe,

Infusi Sennas, uncias sex


Sodae Sulphatis, unciam dimidiam

Syrupi Rhamni, drachmas duas


Fiat mistura.
Detur imprimis uncia una, et interpositis tribus vel quatuor lun-is, cochleare exhibeatur si fuerit opus, et post duas alias horas
repetatur dosis, si alvus antea uon moveatur. Let
a mixture be wade.
In the first place let an ounce
be given, and three or four hours having intervened,
let a spoonful be administered, if necessary; and
after two more hours let the dose be repeated, if the
be not previously mooed.

245

FORMS FOR DRAUGHTS, ETC.

CHAPTER

IV.

FORMS FOR DRAUGHTS, ETC.


149.

Recipe,

Magnesiae Sulphatis, drachmas


duas
Infusi Sennas,

unciam

Syrupi Rhamni, drachm am


Fiat haustus, in jusculo calido, partitis
Misce.
Mix. Let a draught be made,
vicibus, sumendus.
to be taken at different times in warm broth.

Recipe,

Infusi Gentianas, unciam


Tincturas Cardamomi, drachmam
Fiat haustus, quern asger sumat tribus ante prandium horis. Let a draught be made, tchich Id the
patient /"he three hours before dinner.

150.

151.
Recipe, Infusi Senna?, unciam
Sumatur prorenata, postea augenddo minuendove

quantitatem, prout sedes pauciores pluresve proLet it be taken occasionally; afterwards


moverit.
increasing or diminishing tin: quantity, according
as it shall have excited more or less stools.
152 Recipe, Spiritds iEtheris Nitrosi, guttas
viginti

Liquoris

Ammonias

fluiddrachmam
Aquas Menthas
unciam

Acetatis,

viridis,

fluid-

parvum
Fiat mistura salina, eujus capiat cochleare
omni hora cursu noctis. Let a saline mixture be
made, of which hi I he patient take a teaspoonful
night.
every hour in the course of the
J

21*

UNABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

246
153.

Recipe,

Potassae Carbonatis, scrupulum


Aquae destillatae, drachmas decern

Cinnamomi, drachmas duas


Syrupi, drachmam
Misce. Fiat haustus, cui, tempore capiendi, adde
Succi Limonis recentis cochleare magnum unum,
et in effervescentia sumatur.
Mix. Let a drain////
be made, to which, at the time of taking, add one
tablespoonful of lemon juice ; and let it be taken

during
154.

effervescence.

Recipe,

Antimonii Potassio-Tartratis, granum dimidium


Aqua? purse, unciam
Misce, ut fiat haustus station sumendus, etrepetatur
post horas duas si non antea ventriculus emeticum
rejecerit, vel si alvus non laxata fuerit.
Mix, that
a drain/// f may be made, to be taken immediately;
and let it be repeated after two hours if the stomach
shall iidI //are previously rejected the emetic, or if
the bowels shall not have been opened.

155.

Recipe,

Tincturae Lavandulae compositae,

drachmam
Misturae Camphorse, uncias duas
Misce, et fiat haustus, sexta quaque hora sumendus,
si aderit vel spasma vel pulsus
languor.
Mix, and
let a draught be made, to be taken
evert/ six hours,
if spasm or languor of pulse Represent.
156.
Perstet in usu haustus nocturni heri praescripti.
Continue the use of the night draught pre-

scribed yesterday.

157. Sit in promptu haustus cum Vini Colchici


drachma, horS somni sumendus, si redintegraverit

malum arthriticum, vel involverintvigilise inter


tern.

Let a draught with [containing) one drachm

FORMS FOR DRAUGHTS, ETC.

247

of wine of colchicum be in readiness, to be taken at


the hour of sleep (i.e. bedtime) if the arthritic pain
should have returned, or if the tvatchings should be
troublesome during the night.

158.
Repetatur porro haustus inter noctein cum
Tincturfi Opii, si vigilia) involverint, vel increbuerit
Moreover, let the draught with tincture of
tussis.
opium be repeated during the night if the tvatchings
should be troublesome, or if the cough should become
more frequent.
159.

Recipe,

Acidi Nitrici

diluti,

semiunciam

Spiritus ^Etheris Nitrici, drach-

mas

tres

Tincturae

Hyoscyanii, drachmas

duas

Aquae

purae, octarios duos

quantum

Syrupi,

sufficit

ad acorem compescendutn et gustum conciliandum.


Sumat quotidie instarpotus, et bibat quantum sitis
To moderate the acidity and please the
ezigat.
Let the patient take it daily, as a drink,
palate.
and let him take as much as thirst may require.

Sumat aegrotus omni mane, si possit, uncias


1G0.
octo lactis asini, pro jentaculo. Let the patient take
every morning, if he ran, eight ounces of asses' milk
for breakfast.

Capiat reger haustum catharticum proximal


navem conscendens et si post navigationem

161.

luce

vomitus supervenerit, bibat aeger spiritus alicujus


paululum aqua commixtum. Let the patient take
a purging drought the day before embarking ; and
if, after soiling, vomiting should come on, let him
drink a little of some (kind of) spirit, mixed with
water.

UNABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

248
162.

Recipe,

Pulveris

Radicis

Ipecacuanha?,

grana decern
Antimonii
Potassio-Tar

ratis,

granum
Aquae destillatae, fluidunciam cum
semisse
Fiat haustus, hora nona matutinfi sum enVomitu superveniente, bibat aager, vicibus
due.
repetitis, Infusi Anthemidis aliquot cyathos.
Vomitu finito, capiat pulverem sudoriticum. Mix.
Let a draught be made, to be taken at nine o'clock
in the morning.
When vomiting comes on, let the
patient drink, at different times, some wineglassfuls
of infusion of chamomile flowers ; vomiting being
finished, let the patient take a sudorific powder.
Misce.

163.

Recipe,

Infusi Sennse, sesunciam


Potassse Tartratis, semiunciam
Tinctura3 Cinnamomi compositae,

fluidrachmas duas

Ex

sunmio mane deglutiendus.


Repetatur idem tertio quoque die.
Of these let a
draught be made, to be taken the first thing in I Ik
morning. Let the same be repealed every third <l<nj.
his fiat haustus

164.

Recipe,

Tincturoe Opii, guttas viginti


Syrupi cujusvis, fluidrachniam
Misturao Camphorae, fluidunciam

Misce. Capiat eeger haustulum hujusmodi, singulis


noctibus, hora sulita.
Mix. Let //"' patient fake a
little draught of
tomed hour.

165.

Recipe,

this

kind every

night, at the accus-

Tincturse, Castorei, guttas decern


Spiritus ^Etheris Nitrici, guttas

quindecim
Potassa- Xitratis, orana sex

Aquae Pimentoe, unciam

FORMS FOR DRAUGHTS, ETC.

249

Misce. Fiat haustus in promptu habendus, et


urgente febris paroxysmo sumendus. Mix. Let a
draught be made, to be kept in readiness, and taken

when

paroxysm

the febrile

166.

Sumat

agger

Acidi Sulphuric]

is

troublesome.

omni mane guttas novem

ex jure vitulino. Let the


patient take nine drops of diluted sulphuric acid in
veal broth every morning.
diluti,

Recipe,

Sambuci Corticis interioris, manipulum unum


Incoquatur in aquae octariis duobus ad octariurn.
Decoeti hujus altera medietas mane, altera sero
167.

quotidie, assumatur, donee aeger convalescat.


Let
be boiled in two pints of water to one pint.
Let
half of fhis decoction be taken in Ilia morning, and
the remainder in lite evening, daily, zintil the patient
recovers.
it

168.
Sumat Tincturae Opii guttas viginti, in
vehieulo calido conveniente. Let the patient take
twenty drops of tincture of opium in a vehicle made
agreeably warm.

Recipe,

169.

Pulveris

Radicis

Ipecacuanhae,

scrupulum
Aqua? Menthae, unciam
Misce
fiat haustus emeticus.
Potionc copiosa
purge aquae tepefactae, vomitio bene provocetur.
Mix. Ijet an emetic draught be made. Let full
vomiting he produced by a copious draught of pure
tepid water.
;

170.

Recipe, InfusiGentianaecompositi, unciam


Potassii Bromidi, grana quinque

Fiat haustus,

mane

et

hora quarta pomeridiana

UNABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

250

potandus. Let a draught be made, to be taken in


the morning, and at four o'clock in the afternoon.
171.

Recipe,

Olei Ricini, unciam


Potassae Carbon atis, grana sex

Aquae Pimentse, unciam


secundum artem mistura pro una doei, quamprimum sumenda. Let a mixture be made accordFiat

ing

to art,

172.

for one dose

Recipe,

to be

taken immediately.

Tincturae Opii, guttas quindecim

Syrupi Croci, drachmam

Aquae Menthae

viridis,

unciam

Misce, fiatque haustus, somno deficiente bibendue.


Mix and let a draught be made, to be taken tohen
sleep is absent.

173.

Recipe,

Tincturae Myn-hae, unciam

diini-

diam
Spiritfts iEtheris

Nitrici, drach-

mam
Syrupi Tolutani, drachmam

Aquae Pimentae, uncias duas


Misce, et fiat mistura, de qua capiat unciam, si vel
languores vel horrores contingant. Mix, and let
a mixture be made, of which let the patient lake an
ounce, if either languors or shivering affect (the patient).

174.

Capiat Acidi

cern, vel

numero

Sulphurici diluti guttas de-

sufficientes

ad moderatam

acidi-

tatem, in singulis sclibris decocti hordei.


Let the
patient take in every halfpint of barley water, ten,
or a sufficient number of drops of diluted sulphuric
acid to (produce) moderate acidity.
175.

tum

Sequenti aurora, sumat Olei

satis sit

ad alvum solvendam.

Ricini quan-

On

the foil""'-

FORMS FOR DRAUGHTS, ETC.


ing morning,

of castor
176.

the patient take

let

oil to

251

sufficient quantity

open the bowel.

Sumat

aoger

Vini

Antimonialis

guttas
quaque hora, nausea non tameri excitanda. Let the patient take
tin nil/ drops of antimonial wine every fourth,
fifth,
or sixth hour: nausea, however, not to be excited.
m

viginti quarts,, quinta, vel sexta

177.

Ilecipe,

Cupri Sulphatis, grana decern

Aquae Menthas

sativae,

unciam

Syrupi simplicis, drachmam


Fiat haustus, quando venenum in ventriculum receptum est sumendus. Let a draught be made, to
be taken when poison has been received into the
stomach.

ITS.
Bibat Infusum Seminum Lini ad libitum.
Let the patient drink as much as he pleases of the

infusion of linseed.
179.

Recipe,

Radicis Sarsaparillae, uncias duas


Corticis Ulnii, semiunciani

Aquas puraa, octarios duos


Coque ad octarium cum semisse, cola, et signetur
decoctum, quod capiat ut ante. Boil to a pint and
a half, strain, and let it be called {on the direction)
the decor/ ion. which

180.

let

the patient take as before.

Recipe,

Infusi Quassiae, unciam


Tincturss Gentianae, drachmam
Misce.
Fiat haustus, mane iterumque hora ante
prandium, stomacho vacuo, sumendus. Mix. Let
a draught be made, to be taken in the morning, and
again an hour before dinner, when the stomach is

empty.
181.

Recipe,

Tincturaa Opii, guttas quindceim

Aqua' Mentha'

sativas,

unciam

Syrupi Aurantii, drachmam

UNABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

252

Fiat haustus, hora somni, vol vsspertina,


Misce.
Mix, Let a draught be
vel sera noctc sumendus.
made, to be taken at bedtime, in the evening, or late
at night.

Recipe,

182.

Potassse Carbonatis, scrupulum

Syrupi Croei, drachmam

Aqiuv Menthae

piperitss,

unciam

Misce. Fiat haustus, cum succi liinonum cochleare


uno amplo, in inipetu ipso effervescent i;r sumendus.
Mix. Let a draught be made, to be taken with one
tablespoonful of lemon juice, in the height of <j}'<rvescence.

183.

Recipe,

Tincturas Jalapas, semidracdimam


Infusi Sennas compositi, unciam
Magnesias Sulphatis, drachmas

duas
Misce.

Fiat haustus, secundis horis sumendus,


donee alvus plene soluta sit. Mitte tales quatuor.

Mix. Let a draught be made, to be taken every


second hour, until the bowels arefreelg opened. Send
four such (draughts).
184.
tus.

Continuetur haustus nuperrime prasscripLet the draught verg lately prescribed be con*

United.

185.

Recipe,

Licpioris

Ammonias

Acetatis, un-

ciam
Spiritus

iEtheris

Nitrici,

semi-

drachm am
Tincturas Opii, guttas quindecim
Aquas purse, drachmas duas
Misce. Fiat haustus, quarta quaque hora capiendus. Ut effectus sudorificus augeatur, adde singulis
haustibus Antimonii Potassio-Tartratis grani quartam partem. Mix. Let a draught be made, to be

FORMS FOR DRAUGHTS, ETC.

253

That the sudorific effect


may be increased, add to each draught a quarter of
a grain of the potassio-tartrate of antimony.
taken every fourth hour.

186.

Recipe, Tincturae Castorei, semidrachmam


Tincturge
Serpentarije,
guttas
decern
Spiritus Ammoniae aromatici, guttas quindecim
Aquae Pimentae, unciam

Misce.

Fiat haustus, si vigilia inci'ebuerit aut


dolor capitis redintegravent sumendus.
Mix. Let
a draught lie made, to be taken if the watching
should have increased, or the pain of the head shoidd
have returned.

187.
Perdomito symptomate,
dies pauculos, continuetur usus

mane, et sero, ad
haustuum. The
symptom being subdued, let the use of the draughts
be continued, morning and evening, for a few days.

188.
Continua haustum effervescentem sicut
jamjam paratum. Continue the effervescing draught,

as already prepared.

189.
Cochleare unum Tinctura) Lavandulse
compositae per se propinari possit, bis vel ter durante paroxysmo, hora dimidia vel integra interOne spoonful of the compound tincture of
posita.
lavender may be taken by itself twice or three times
(luring the paroxysm, half an hour or an hour being
interposed.

190.

Recipe,

Decocti

Sarsaparillae

compositi,

octarium (fluiduncias viginti)

Sumat poculum
22

Potassii Iodidi. sorupulum


(uncias quatuor) bis terve indies.

254

UNABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

Let the patient take


three times a day.
191.

Recipe,

192.

Recipe,

a cvpful [four ounces)

tivice

or

Tincturae Opii, guttas viginti


Misturae Cretae, unciam
Fiat haustus, navem ingressurus sumendus. Let
a draught be made, to be taken when about to embark.

Magnesia: Sulphatis, unciam


Acidi Sulphurici diluti, guttas
decern

Syrupi Rhooados, drachmam


Aquae Menthae piperitae, unciam
Misce. Fiat haustus, eras prime- mane sumendus,
et repetatur tertiis vel quartis horis, ad alvum solvendam. Mix. Let a draught be made, to be tah n
early to-morrow morning, and repeated every third
or fourth hour, to open the bowel.
193.

Misce.

Recipe,

Misturae Cretae, unciam


Syrupi Croci, drachmas duas
Fiat haustus, quarta quaque hora sumen-

dus, donee paroxysmi non discrucient, instillando


alternis vicibus, si diarrhoea adfuerit, Tincturae

Opii guttas duas vel tres.


Mix. Let a draught be
made, to be taken every fourth hour, until the paroxysms no longer distress {the patient) ; adding every
other time, if diarrhoea should be present, two or
three drop>s of tincture of opium.
194.

Recipe,

Tincturae

Calumbae,

drachmae

duas
Acidi

Misce.

Sulphurici

diluti,

guttas

quindecim
Aquae (Jinnamomi, unciam
Syrupi Rhoeados, drachmas duas
Fiat haustus, quarta quaque hora sumen-

FORMS FOR DRAUGHTS, ETC.

255

tempore usus, adde singulis, si opus fuerit,


ad praecavendam diarrhoeam, Tincturae Opii guttas
Mix. Let a draught be made, to be taken
tres.
every fourth hour; and at the time of using, add to
each draught, if necessary, to prevent diarrhoea,
three drops of tincture of opium.
<lus: et

195.

Recipe,

Infusi Digitalis, uncias tres

Gentianaecompositi, uncias

quatuor
Syrupi Croci, unciam
Miscc. Fiant haustus sex.
Sumat unam sextis
horis, per spatium nycthemeri, si vires permittant.
Let six draughts be made. Let the patient take one
/< ry six hours, for the space of one night and day
(i. e. twenty-four hours), if the strength permit.
i

19G.

Recipe,

Infusi Calumbas, sesquiunciam


grana
Potassae
ITydriodatis,

quinque
Syrupi Aurantii, drachmas duas
Misce. Fiat haustus, meridie et hora quinta pomeriiliana sumendus, per septimanam integram, vel
Mix. Juet a draught be
ulterius, si opus fuerit.
made, to be taken at noon and at five o'clock in the
afternoon, for one whole week, or longer, if necessary.

197.

Recipe,

Balsami Copaibas, drachmas tres


Mistarse Acaciae, drachmas sex
Liquoris

Potassse,

imam cum

drachmam

semisse
Syrupi Aurantii, unciam dimidiara
Aquas destillatae, uncias quatuor
cum semisse
Misce. Capiat cochleariaduo vel tria quartis horis.
Mix. Let the, patient take two or three tablespoon\fu Is
evi ry four hours.

256
198.

UNABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

Recipe,

Balsami Copaibse, partes duas


Liquoris Potassse, partes

tree

Aqua; destillatse, partes septem


Coque per quadrantem horse et tunc adde
Spiritus JEtheris Nitrici, partem
unam. Stet per horas duas vd
tres

Capiat asger, liquoris limpidi supernatantis, cochleare medium unum tcr die. Boil during a quarter
of an hour, and then add one part of spirit of nitric
ether.
Let [the mixture] stand for two or three
hour*.
Let the patient take, three limes a day, one
dessertspoonful of the limpid supernatant liquor.
199.

Recipe,

200.

Recipe,

Balsami Copaibae, unciam dimidiam


Vitellum unius Ovi
Sacchari puri, unciam
His bene subactis terendo, adde paulatim Aqua;
Mentha; viridis, uncias sex, ut fiat emulsio. To
these, well incorporated by rubbing, add gradually
six ounces of spearmint water, that an emulsion
may be made.
Calomelanos, grana

tria

Confectionis Opiatae, grana sex


bolus, statim sumendus. Vespere, nisi
prius bis saltern dejeceritalvus, capiat (aeger homo)
Olei Ricini unciam dimidiam (vel semiunciam), vel

Misce;

fiat

quantum

ad alvum Bolvendam.
Mix. L t
taken immediately.
Unless
the bowels shall have been twice previously evacuat d,
let the patient take in the
evening half an ounce, or
as much as may be sufficient,
of castor oil, to open
sufficiat,

a bolus be made,

to be

the bowels.

Alvo, hisce medicamentis, libere soluta, incipiat

257

FORMS FOR DRAUGHTS, ETC.

The bowels being


sumere haustum sequentem.
to
freely opened by these medicines, let him begin
'take the following draught:
Recipe, Liquoris Ammoniae Acetatis, semiunciam
Aquae Cinnamomi, unciam unam
Vini Antimonialis, guttas quindecim
Syrupi Papaveris

albi,

drachmam

haustus.
Februarii die vigesimo tertio.

Misce

fiat

201. Repetantur remedia olim (penultima)

prae-

non novissime instituta. Si alvus adstricta


magnesia vitriolata augeatur, ut alvus satis

seripta,
fuerit,

Let the remedies formerly (the last


soluta fuerit.
tunc but one) prescribed be repeated, not the last
ordered.
If the boicels be bound, let the vitriolatcd
increased, that they
(i. e. sulphate of) magnesia be

mag

be mfficimtty aliened.

Martis die undecimo.

202. Recipe,

Inf'usi

Sennas,

unciam cum semisse

(vel sesquiunciam)

Mannae, unciam dimidiam


Tincturaa Jalapoe, unciam

unam

Capiat (asger homo) cochleare largum


unum hora tertia quaque, donee sedes tres sn
a
quatuor procurantur. Mix. Let the patient tale
Misce.

or
tablespoonfill every- third hour, until three
stools are procured.

four

Recipe, Linimenti Ammoniae, drachmas sex


Unguenti Hydrargyri fcrtioris, drach-

mam unam
scapulis omni
Misce; fiat linimeutum, cervici et
applicandum;
nocte et mane, manu ealida, assidue

Bnperimponendo pannum laneum eodem imbutum.


usum
Et post operationem Misturaa Sennae, ad

258

UNABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

Mistura^ Antimonialis in promptu oonfugiat. Mix.


Let a liniment be made, to be assiduously applied
night and morning to the neck and shoulders with
the,

warm hand; afterwards applying a

woolen
moistened with the same (i. e. liniment). And
after the operation of the senna mixture, let him return to the use of the antimonial mixture, (which is
cloth

to be kept) in

Novembris
203.

readiness.
die vigesimo quarto.

Recipe,

Guaiaci Ligni

rasi,

unciam unam

Sassafras Radicis, unciam dimi-

diam
Aqua; destillatae,

Coque igDe

leni

libras dims
ad libram unam; sub fincm coctio-

nis addantur Glycyrrhizae Radicis eontusse drachmae duae, et cola: cujus capiat cochlearia tria
ampla tor quotidie. Boil, />,/ a gentle heat, to one

/annul

added

let

two drachms of bruised liquorice'root be

to, ear, I

this let the

the

end of the coction, una strain:


1

<</'

patient lake three tablespoonfuU three

times a day.
Octobris die dccimo.

CHAPTER

V.

FORMS FOR POWDERS, PILLS, ETC.

204.Prosit forsan dare augro, lectum ituro,


Pulveris Hydrargyri subchloridi grana quinque.
Perhaps it man
when about going
of mercury.

be beneficial
to bed, five

to

give the patient,

grains of subchloridi

259

FORMS FOR POWDERS, PILLS, ETC.

Recipe,

205.

Coccinellae, scrupuluin
Sodii Chloridii, drachmas

duas

Misce. Fiat pulvis. Detur cochleare dimidinm


pro dosi, tempore matutino, Mix. Let a powder
Let half a spoonful be given for a dose,
be made.

morning.

in the

Recipe,

206.

Pulveris Jalapae, drachmas duas


Hydrargyri subchloridi, semi-

drachm am
Dentur grana duodecim ad viginti et quaMix. Let
tuor, quando alvi ductione opus sit.
[from] twelve to twenty-four grains be given when

Misce.

there

may

207.

be occasion to open the bowel.

Recipe, Magnesias Carbonatis, semiunciam


Focniculi

Seminum

Sacchari purificati, ana, drachmam


Terantur in pulverem. Dosis quantum cultri apice
capi potest, scepius in die. Let them be rubbed into
The dose is as much as can be taken on
a powder.
\oint of a knife, frequently during the day.

208. Recipe, Hydrargyri

subchloridi,

drach-

mam
Confectionis Rosas,

quantum

satis

sit

Contunde in massam et divide "in pilulas triginta.


Sumatur una bis indies, ut cieatur ptyalismus moBeat them into a mass, and divide into
dicus.
Let one be taken twice a day, that
thirty pills.
moderate ptyalism
209.

creased to

be produced.

Pulveris Jacobi veri ad


Lei the dose of James's powder be insix grains.

Augeatur

grana sex.

may

dosis

UNABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

2G0

Recipe,

Hydrargyri Oxydi rubri, granum


partem
Caryophyllorum Olci, guttam
Fiat pilula, hora somni per hebdomadam sumenda.
Let a pill be made, to be taken at bedtime during
210.

Opii, tertiam grani

the week.

211.

Recipe,

Myrrhae Gummi-resinoe,
drachuiam

semi-

Sacchari puri, semiunciain


pulverem. Dositi, drachma una ter
quaterve indies, e quovia liquore idoneo.
Rub
them together into a powder. The dose is one drachm
three or Jour times a day, in, any proper liquid.

Tere simul

in

212.

Recipe,

213.

Recipe,

Pulveris Opii, grana fcria


Extracti GUyejrrhizse, grana octo
Fiant pilula' binae, nocte sumendae ad vicem Becundam. Let two pills be made, to be taken at night
for twice (i.e.) two nig/its.
Capsici

Seminum

contritorum,

grana Bex
Lauri Baccarum, scrupulos duos
Misce.
Fiat pulvis, dividendua in tree part's
aequales, quarum prima portio Bumatur incipi
primore rigore; secunda, postridie eadem hora;
tertia verd tertio die.
Mix. Let < powder be made,
to be divided into three equal /tarts,
of whirl, let the
first part be taken at the beginning of the first rigor,
the second at the same hour of the following day,
and the third on the third day.
214.

Recipe,

Confectionia

Opii,

scrupulum

unam
Pro re nata sumatur,
it

si

diarrhoea permaneat.

be taken occasionally if the diarrhoea remain.

Let

FORMS FOR POWDERS, PILLS, ETC.


215.

Recipe,

261

Extracti Colocynthidis compositi,

drachmam

Fiat massa, in

Hydrargyri subchloridi,
duodecim
pilulas duodecim dividenda.

grana

Let a
made, to be divided into twelve pills.
Capiat suinmo mane tres, et postea duas, si alvus,
horis sex, nun satis dejecerit.
Let the patient take
three early in the morning, and afterwards two, if

mass

lie

the bowel, in six hours, be not sufficiently evacuated.

216.

Recipe,

Pulveris Rhei, scrupulum

Hydrargyri
quinque

subchloridi,

grana

Syrupi Althaese, quantum

sufficit

ut fiat bolus, hora somni sumendus et alternis noctibus repetendus, ad duas vel tres vices.
That a
bolus may be made, to be taken at bedtime, and to be
repeated every oilier night, for tiro or three times.
217.

Recipe,

Extracti Cicutas,

semidrachmam

Fiant pilulas quindecim, in pulvere cicuta3 involMitte in chartacefi pyxide. Let fifteen
vendse.
pills lie made, to be rolled in hemlock potvder. Send
them in a paper box.
218.

Recipe,

Extracti

semi-

Colocynthidis,

drachmam
Pulveris Scammonii, scrupulum

Hydrargyri subchloridi, grana


duodecim
Fiant pilulae duodecim; quarum capiat

Misce.

unam

nocte, quoties alvus fuerit justo mlstrictior.

Mix. Let twelve pills be made, of which

let

one at night, as often as the bowel


confined than it ought to be.
tient /'ike

pamore

the
is

262
219.

UNABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

Recipe,

Extracti Elaterii,

granum

diini-

diam
Culocynthidis compositi,

grana quinque
Olei essentialis Mentha) piperita,
guttam imam
In pilulam oonficiantur eras mane deglutiendam,
iterumque mane perendino. Let them be made inl<>
a pill, to be taken to-morrow morning, and again
the morning after to-morrow.
220.

Ad

nauseam supprimendam, bibat aeger


paululum aqua commixtum. To

spiritfis alicujus

prevent nausea, let the patient take a


spirit mixed with water.
221.

Recipe,

little

of some

Corticis Cinchonge Pulveris, grana

quindecim ad drachmae duas


Capiat e cyatho vini generosissimi horse quadrantis
ad horas quatuor, intervallo, ita ut ajger sumat
drachmas sex ad minimum, inter duos paroxysmos.
Let the patient take it in a glass of the best [most
generous) wine, every quarter of an hour, for four
nours during the interval {of the 'paroxysms), so thai
the patient may take at least six drachms betir<< n
the paroxysms.
222.

Recipe,

Extracti Elaterii, grana duo


Sacchari purificati, drachmam
unani
Optime terantur simul, dein in pulveres octo
aequales dividantur, quorum capiat <x-ger unum
omni horae quadrante, donee adsit catharsis. Let
them in- irell rubbed together, tin,, divided nit" <i<jlit
equal powders, of which let the patient tah
every quarter of an hour until purging take />laee.

FORMS FOR POWDERS, PILLS, ETC.

263

Accipiat vespere

223.

Jalapae Pulveris, grana quindena

Hydrargyri subchloridi, grana quinque


in molem syrupo simplici, ut fiugantur

Conterantur

globuli terni aequales.

Let the patient take fifteen

grains of Jalap and five of Calomel in the evening.


Let them he rubbed into a mass with simple syrup,
that they

224.

may make

Recipe,

three equal globules {pills).

Sodoe Carbonatis exsiccatas drachlnain

imam

Saponis duri, scrupulos quatuor


Olei Juniperi, guttas vigiuti
Syrupi Zingiberis, quantum suffioit

ut fiat massa, in pilulas triginta dividenda, e quibus


That a
capiat tres indies, contra calculos renum.
mass may be made, to be divided into thirty pills, of
which let the pa I lent take three daily, against renal
calculi.

Recipe,

225.

Pulveris Jalapae, drachmas duas

Hydrargyri subchloridi, grana


vigiuti quatuor
Misce, et in pulveres duodecim divide, quorum
Mix,
capiat duos vel tres, ut necesse sit ad sedes.
and divide into twelve powders, of which let the patient take two or three, as may be necessary, for (i.
e. to

produce)

stools.

Recipe, Potassse Sulphatis, scrupulos duos

22G.

in semipoculo aquae bepidse solutus, cum guttis viginti Tincturse Digitalis sumendos. To be dissolved
in half a cupful of warm water, to be taken with
twenty drops of tincture of foxglove.

227.

Recipe,

Pulveris

unam

Cinchonge,

drachmam

UNABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

264

cyatho lactis, abscnte


it be a powder, to be
in a cup of milk, during the

Sit pulvis, secundis horis, in

paroxysmo, sumendus.

Let

taken every other /tour,


absence of the paroxysm.
228.

Sumantur

Pulveris Calumbae, grana deSingulis auroris ex pulte.


Let ten grains of
powder ofcalumba be taken every morning in gruel.
cern.

229.

Recipe,

Pulveris Nitratis Potassae


Potassae Sulphatis, ana,

grana quindecim
Fiat pulvis, in promptu habendus, et urgente paroxysmo sumendus. Let a powder be made, to he
had in readiness, and taken when the paroxysm is
troublesome.

230.

Recipe,

Pulveris Jalapoe,

drachmam

Scammonii,

scrupulurn

unum
Ilydrargyri

subchloridi,

grana

viginti

Syrupi simplicis, quantum sufncit


massa, in pilulas viginti dividenda, e quibus
capiantur binae, ad alvum officii immemorem exci-

ut

fiat

tandam.

That a mass may be made, to be divided


into twenty pills, of which let two be taken to excite
the bowels unmindful of their
(i. e. constipated
office

bowels).

231.

Recipe,

Potassae Nitratis, grana viginti

Sacchari albi, drachmas duae


Mucilaginis Acaciae, quantum

suf-

ficit

ut fiat massa, in trochiscos

duodecim distribuenda,

quorum anus detineatur sub linguam, donee

li-

265

FORMS FOR POWDERS, PILLS, ETC.

quescat To be divided into twelve lozenges, ofichich


let one be held under the tongue until it welts.
232.

Recipe,

Quercus Corticis, drachmam dimidiam


Anthem idis Florum exsiccatorum
scrupulum unum

Tere simul in pulvereni, alternis vel tertiis horis,


durante apyrexia, sumendum. Rub together into
hour
a powder, to be taken every second or third
during the intermission.
233.

Recipe,

Zinci Sulphatis, grana duodecim


purae, uncias tres

Aquae

Sumatur

tertia pars,

ter die,

augendo

dosin,

si

Let a third 'part


be taken three times a 'hi;/, increasing the dose if
necessary, and if the stomach ivill bear if.

opus

sit, et si

ferat ventriculus.

Recipe, Extracti Cannabis Indicae, grana


quinque
Vespere ante somnuin sumenda. To be taken in
23-i

the evening before sleep.

235. Recipe,

Extracti

Colocynthidis,

drach-

mam imam
Fiant pilulaj duodecim. Sumat unam, soxtis horis,
donee commodfe purgetur. Let twelve pills be made.
Let the patient take one every six hours, until sufficiently purged.
236.

Recipe,

Pulveris Ipecacuanhae, grana

vi-

quinque
Potassio-Tartratis,
Antimonii
ginti

granum unum
Fiat pulvus emeticus: ex pauxillo alicujus liquoris
idonei hauriatur, et vomitu motu, superbibantur
Let an
cyathi aliquot inf'usi anthemidie tepidi.


UNABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

266

emetic powder be

made:

let it

be taken in a

little

of

any proper liquor, and when vomiting comes on, let


some cupfuls of warm infusion of camomile flowers
/'<

drunk.

237. Recipe, Pulveris Cinchona), drachmas tres


Divide in partes duodecim [quarum] capiat imam,
aecunda vel tertia quaque horft, ex cvatlio parvo
lactis vaoyni recentis, absente febre.
Divide into
twelve equal parts, of which let the patient take one
every second or third hour, in a small cupful
of
fresh '-air's milk, during the absence of the fever.
238.

Recipe,

Confectionis Rosae, grana decern

Hydrargyrisubchloridi, grana ses


Fiat bolus, hora somni qualibet nocte samendas;
mane sequenti, post quintam vel sextam assump*
tionem, bibat potionem purgantem communera.
Let a bains be made, to be taken any night, at bedtime; on the morning following, after the
fifth or
sixth taking, let the patient lake a common purging draught.

239. Recipe,

Pilulae

Aloes

cum Myrrha,

drach-

m a in unam
Fiant piluloe duodecim, quae obruantur pulvere
glycyrrhizaa.
Let twelve pills be made, which are
to be rolled in

240.

powder of

liquorice.

Recipe, Pulveris Digitalis, grana tria


GlycyrrhizaB, grana
;

vi-

ginti

Misce

In pulveres tres hgec quantitas dividends


Partitio fiat exactisaima. Mix. This quantity
'* ,0 ''" divided into three powders.
Let the division
be very carefully made.
e.-t.

241.Recipe,

Extract] Papaveris, grana decern

FORMS FOR POWDERS, PILLS, ETC.

2G7

Fiant pilulte (lute, quarum capiat unam statim, et


alteram post horas tres si vomitus perstiterit. Let
two pills be made, of which let the patient take one
immediately, and the other after three hours, if the
vomiting continue.

242.
Recipe, Ferri Sesqnioxydi drachmas sex
In sex partes dividatur, quarum una ter de die exhibenda, et per plures dies continuanda. Let it
(i. e. the powder) be divided into six parts, one of
which is to be given three times a day, and continued
for several days.

243.
Recipe, Pilulas Hydrargyri, grana decern
Fiant pilulae duae. Let two pills be made.
Devoret aeger unam bis in die, hora decima et
hora secunda. Let the patient swallow one twice a
day, at ten o'clock and at two o'clock.

244.

Recipe,

Scammonii, scrupulum

Pulveris

unum
Rhei, grana decern
Hydrargyri subchloridi, grana
quatuor
Misce. Fiat pulvis purgans extemplo in pulpfi
pomi tosti sumendus. Mix. Let an opening powder
be made, to be taken immediately in the pulp of a
roasted apple.
245.

Dentur Radicis Ipecacuanhae in pulverem

Bubtilissimum

tritas

grana

tria vel

quinque

dilu-

Let three or five


culd, singulis vel alternis diebus.
i/ruins of ipecacuanha root, rubbed into a very fine
powder, be given at day-break, every, or every other
day.
24G.

Sumantur

drachmae duae vel


primo diluculo.

Filicis Radicis in
tres,

pulverem

tritse

cyatho Eequaa Menthae,

UNABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

268

Elapsis duabus horis, devoretur bolus ex Hydrargyri Bubmuriatis granis quinque vei si
cambogiaa granis octo vel decern; aesumpto subinde
haustulo iiif'usi these viridis.
Let two or Hirer d\rach ms offernroot, rubbed into
powder, be taken in a cupful of mint water, earh/ in
the morning [at day-break].
Tie,, hours having elapsed, let a bolus
composed
ofJive or six grains of submuriate of mercury, and
of eight or ten grains of gamboge, be swallowed; a
draught of infusion of green tea being taken now

and

then,

247.Recipe,

drachmam

Ferri Sulphatis,

dimi-

diam
AssafoetidaB, drachmas duas
<-um mucilaginis acacias fantillo subige
in massam
in pilulaa singulas grana
quatuor pendentes.
Rub with a little mucilage of acacia into

dmdendam
a mans,
ij I

to be

divided into pills, each weighing four

at its

248. Recipe,

Antimonii
Potassio-Tartratis,
grana quatuor
Pulveris
Foliorum
Digitalis,
grana decern
Confectionis

Rosae,

quantum

sufficit

ut

fiat

massa, in pilulaa viginti dividenda.

Initio

Bumat Kger pilulam unam, pro dosi, mane


ac nocte,
postea bines, dein tres, et denique
augeatur dosis,
quantum den potest. That a mass may be made,
'"

'"

ment,

amded
let

/'///'

into twenty pills.


At the commencethe patient take, morning and
night, one
a ose; afterwards, two, then three, and

lastly, let the

oorne.

dose be increased as

much

as can

FORMS FOR POWDERS, PILLS, ETC.

269

249.Recipe, Extracti Gentianae, grana decern.


Fiat bolus; detur jejuno stomacho. Let a pill be
made. Let it be given on an empty stomach.
250.Recipe, Pulveris

Aloes,

drachmam unam
drachmam di-

Myrrhae,

midiam
Capiat grana decern ter die. Dosis sensim
augenda est, donee drachma utia in die sumatur.
Mix. Let the patient take ten grains three times a
The dose is to be gradually increased until
day.
one drachm be taken during the day.

Misce.

251.
Sumat quantum cuspide cultri capi potest,
Pulveris Rhei, in cochleare lactis saccharati, vel in
melle.
Let the patient take as much powder of rhubarb as can be contained on the point of a knife, in
a spoonful of sugared milk or in honey.

252.
Sumat aeger drachmam unam Pulveris
Let
Cinchonas, ante paroxysmum ingredientem.
the patient take one drachm of powder of cinchona

bark before the approaching paroxysm.


253.

Recipe,

Hydrargyri Binoxydi, grana duodecim


Confectionis Rosas,

quantum

suf-

ficit

ut fiant pilulae duodecim. Sumat aeger pilulam ter


donee dentes vacillare incipiant. Dosis ab
initio a pilula una ad duas vel tres, semper dosin
augendo.
That twelve pills may be made. Let the
patient take one pill, three times a day, until the
The dose, at the beginning,
teeth begin to loosen.
is from one to two or three pills, always increasing
in die,

the dose.
23*

270

UNABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

254. Recipe, Pulveris

Cinchona?,

drachmam

unam
Zingiberis,grana decern
Misce.
Sumat seger ante tempus redeuntis paroxysmi, ter in septimanS huncce pulverem pro dosi.
Mix. Let the patient take this powder /or a dose,
before the time of the returning paroxysm, three
times a week.

255.
Sumat aegra, in lecto composita, pilulam
Opii, superbibendo hordei aquam calidam.
Let
the (female) patient take, when in bed,

opium, drinking afterwards


256.

Recipe,

Gummi

warm

pill

of

barley water.

Atnmoniaci,

drachmam

dimidiam
Pulveris Rbei, scrupulum unum
Syrupi simplici, quantum sufficit
ut fiant piluloe viginti.
Capiat per duas noctes,
quatuor, et intermittat fcertiam noctem; et sir pergat donee totum sumpserit. That twenty
pills may
lie made.
Let the patient take four for two nights,

and intermit the third night;


until the whole shall be taken.
257.

Recipe,

and, continue this

Antimonii Sesquioxydi scrupulum

unum
Nitratis Potassae,

drachmam unam

Pulveris Ipecacuanha? compositi,

drachmam dimidiam
Misceantur, et

fiat pulvis tenuissimus, in septem


partes sequales separandus, quarum una singulis
horis ingeratur.
Let them he mixed, and let a vt
ry
fine powder be made, to be divided into seven equal
parts, of which let one be taken every hour.

258. Repetantur

pulveres, hesterno die

preB-

271

FORMS FOR POWDERS, PILLS, ETC.


scripti,

eodeinque modo#imantur.

be repeated, prescribed yesterday,

Let the powders

and

let

them be

taken in the same manner.


259.

Recipe, Cretan praeparatae drachmam unam

Pulveris Ipecacuanhae, grana sex


Misce, et fiat pulvis, in chartulas duas aequaliter
dividendus, quarum capiat unam horis octavis; et
temporibus intermediis, si pulsus sit creber et forMix,
tis, bibat cochlearia duo misturae sequentis.
and let a 'powder he made, to be equally divided into
two poivders, of which let the patient take one every
eight hours; and in the intermediate time, if the
pulse be frequent and strong, let the patient take
two lublespoonfuls of the following mixture.
2G0.

Recipe,

Extracti Colocynthidis,drachinam

unam
Scammonii, drachmam
dimidiam

Pulveris

Misce, fiant pilulae viginti, quarum duae deglutiantur hora decubitus: diluculd, ut infra
Recipe, Infusi Sennae, unciam unam
Mix. Let twenty pills be made, of which let two be
taken at bedtime: early in the morning [at daybreak],
(let him take), as under (i. e. the following).
2G1.

Recipe,

Hydrargyri subchloridi,
duodecim
Confectionis Rosas,

grana

quantum

suf-

ficit

ut fiant pilulas duodecim, quarum sumat unam post


coenam: mane et pomeridie sumat haustum pur-

That twelve pills may be made, of which


(he patient take one after supper; let him take a
purging draught, morning and evening.
gantem.
let

UNABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

2(2
202.

Recipe,

Zinr-i

Sulpbatis, scrupulum dimi-

dium
Ipecacuanhae,

Pulveris

grana

quindecim
Finitfi
Fiat pulvis emeticus, statiin BUtnendus.
vomitorii operatione, capiat subinde cochlearia duo
mistime purgantis. Let an emetic powder be made,
The operation of the
to be taken immediately.
vomit being finished, let the pal lent take now and
then two spoonfuls of purging mixture.

2G3.

Recipe,

Pulveris Digitalis,

granum

dinii-

dium

Puh erisAcacise, scrupulum unum


Fiat pulvis, quartis horis sumendus, segra interim
conquiescente, et oaput immotem tenente.
Let a
powder be made, to be taken every four hours, tJu
{female) patient, in the meantime, being at rest, and
keeping her head unmoved.
264.

Recipe,

Hydrargyri cum Greta, grana

de-

cern

Pulveris Tragacanthae, scrupulum

dimidium
Fiat pulvis, statim sumendus, et exhiboatnr sequenti luce portio purgana communis.
Let apowder be made, to be taken immediately; and let a

common purging draught

be

given the following

morning.
265.

Recipe,

Pulveris

Potassae

Sulphatis,

draebmam unam
Misce.

Pulveris Rhei, scrupulum unuia


Fiat pulvis, in pulmento vel in poculo

eeri lactis rinosi,

sumendus.

Mix.

ade, to be taken in gruel, or in a

whey.

Lei a powder
cupfulof

FORMS FOR POWDERS, PILLS, ETC.


266.

Recipe,

273

Pulveris Cinchonas, uncias duas

Cinnamomi,

drachmam

ur.am
Misce. Fiant pulverea duodecim, quorum capiat
iimiiii
quarts quaque hora, Buperbibendo vini
cujuslibet haustum, incipiendo immediate post
interdicto intei-im enematum usu.
Let twelve powders be made, of which let one
be /iikra every four hours, drinking afterwards a
draught of some kind of wine, beginning immediately after the paroxysm; the use of the enemata

paroxysmum;
Mix.

being in the meantime omitted.

Recipe, Extracti Hyoscyami, drachmam.


2G7.
Fiant piluke duodecim, quarum sumatur una pro
re uata, sub languore vel singultu. Let twelve pills
be made, of which let one be taken occasionally during languor or hiccup.
268.

Recipe,

Sodae Potassio-Tartratis, sesqui-

drachmam
Cretae praeparataa, semidrachmam
Misce. Fiat pulvis in jusculo avenaceo tenuissimo
sumendus. Mix. Let a powder be made, to be taken

in very thin gruel.


269.Recipe, Pilulse Aloes

cum Myrrha,

drach-

mas duas
Fiant pilula viginti et quatuor, e quibus ingerantur

uuaquaque mane ac nocte. Let twenty-four


made, of which let three be taken every morning and night.

fcres,

pills be

270.

Recipe,

Hydrargyri Submuriatis, grana


quaterna
Sacchari, grana sena
Pulveris Antimonii Compositi,
grana bina

UNABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

274

Conterantur.
Sumat vespere in Gelatins RibewioLet them be rubbed together.
Let the patient
take it (i. e. the powder) in the evening, in currant
runi.

271.

Recipe,

Zinci Sulphatis, scrupulum uimni


Confectionis Cynosbati, quantum
sufficit

ad pilulas viginti fingendas, quse deaurandse sunt.

As much
are

to be

272.

form

as is sufficient to
gilded.

Recipe,

Cretae

twenty pills, which

praeparatae,

scrupulum

unum
Fiat pulvis, vel addendo syrupum zingiberie, bolus
ad alvuin contrahendam, mane sumendus.
Let a
powder be made, or by adding syrup of ginger, a
bolus, to be taken in the morning, to bind the bowel.

Recipe,

273.

Divide

Pilulae

Hydrargyri,

scrupulum

dimidium
duas partes; sumat unam

in
statim, alteram.
circa mediam noctem.
Divide into two parts; let
the patient take one immediately, the other about

midnight.
274.

Recipe, Pulveris Ipecacuanha;, scrupulum


unum

Fiat pulvis emeticus, more solito sumendus.


Operationc emetici peracta, capiat Pulveris Rliei scru-

pulum unum.

Let an emetic powder be made, to I"


taken in the usual manner.
The operation of the
emetic having ceased, let the pat i, nt take one set uplt

of powder of rhubarb.
2(5.

Recipe,

Pulveris

Calumbffi,

draclunam

unam
Pulveris Zingiberis, grana viginti
Misce omnia, quae dividantur in sex doses aequales,

FORMS FOR POWDERS, PILLS, ETC.

275

per sex dies continuos mane sumendas, tribus horis


ante pastum.
Mix them altogether, which let be
divided into six equal doses, to be taken in the morning three hours before taking food, for six successive
days.

276.

Kecipe,

Olei Crotonis, guttas octodecim


Pulveris Glycyrrhizae, quantum
suffieit

ut fiant pilulse sex et triginta, quarum exhibeantur


dua3 bora decubitus, quandoque alvus nimis solida
fuerit, et augeatur seu minuatur dosis pro ratione
eft'ectus.
As much us may lie sufficient that thirtysix pills mug be made, of which let lien be given at
bedtime, whenever stools are too solid (i. e. whenever
the bowels are too constipated); awl let the dose be
increased or diminished in proportion to the effect,

Recipe,

Pulveris Opii, granum unum


Confectionis Rosa grana quatuor
Fiat bolus vespere, si perstet diarrhoea, vel adsint
tormina intestinorum, capiendus. Make a bolus,
to be taken in the evening, if the diarrhoea continue,
or if there be griping of the bowels,

111

21*.

Kecipe,

Jalap* Radicis Pulveris, unciam

unam
Potassse Bitartratis, uncias duas
Seorsim duo permisce. Dosis a drachma dimidia
Mix the two together.
ad drachmas sex, mane.
The dose is from half a drachm to six drachms, in
the

morning.

27'*.

Recipe,

Extracti

Gentianoe,

drachmas

quinque
sexaginta dividendas. Dosis una vel
mancque statim post cibum. To be
<livii led in to sixty pills.
The dose (is) one or two,
night and morning, immediately after taking food.
in

pilulas

duae nocte

UNABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

276

CHAPTER

VI.

FORMS FOR LINCTUSES.


280.

Recipe, Olei Terebinthinaj, drachmas duas

Mellis despumati, unciam


Dosis cochleare parvum, oocte
et mane, cum haustu cujusvis potfis tenuioris tepeThe dose is a
facti.
Mix: let a linctus be made.
teaspoon/ul night and morning, with a draught of
(mi/ kind of weak warm drink.

Misce:

fiat

Recipe,

281.

Confectionis Senna), uncias quatuor


ad nucis juglandis magnitudinem. Let the

Sumat

patient take

282.

linctus.

it

to the size

Recipe,

of a

walnut,.

Confectionis Rosae, uncias duas


Tincturae Opii, dracbmam unam
Acidi Sulphuricidiluti, dracbmam

dimidiam
Fiat electuarium, exacte in vie em miscendo. Let
an electuary be made, In/ mixing them accurately
together.

283.

Recipe,

Confectionis Rosas caninae, drach-

mas duas
Syrupi Aurantii, drachmas sex
Olci Amygdalae, drachmam unam
Misce, et

and

let

fiat linctus, in olla fictili

mittendus.

Mix,

" linctus be made, to be sent in an carl hen,

pot.

284.

Recipe,

Oxymellis Scilhe, drachmas trefl


Syrupi Papaveris, drachmas sex
Pulveris Tragacanthae compositi,

drachmam unam

977
*"
'

FORMS FOR LINCTUSES.


Misce

lambat seger paxillum


Fiat linctus, cujus

and
Z the patient take (Oft) aGuaiaci,nowdrachmam
unam
then.

little

Kecipe, Resinse
285 -Recipe,
285.
uncl am umxm
Confectionis Ros
suihcit
Syrupi Aurantii, quantum
capiat
quo
de
t fiat electuarium,

J^tem

twice a day.
of a large nutmeg
Rosse uncias duas
Confectionis
-Recipe,
ttecip
286
2o.

size

AcidiSulphuricidiluti> drachmam

unam

Misce, et

cas ane^
linctus: capiat quantitatem
made: let the
Mix, and let a linctus be
a chesnut twice a day.
size

fiat

his in die.
patient take the

287. Recipe,

of

qua-

Confectionis Sennae, uncias


tuor
unPulveris Potassae Bitartratis,

ciam dimidiam
Capiat quantitatem
Misce et fiat electuarium.
velterm
nuS'afellanaa vel -oschatse subinde
Mix, and let an elecprandium.
ante
paulo
die
size of a
hmrvbe made Let the patient take the
three times a
fnuUr nutmeg now and then, or
day, a little before dinner.

Si

unam
Pulveris Cinchonoe, unciam
288
-Recipe,
zo
b
drachmas
-

Serpentanae,

Syrupi simplicis, quantum


paroxysmate
electuarium, quod decedente
ante accessum febns
g,
debet
capere
totum
an dec
.eastern As much as is sufficient fiat
patient
made, the whole of which the
sufficit

ut

fiat

%SXl*
24

UNABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

278
ought

In

take wht n the paroxysm is over,


of the succeeding one.

and

before

the attack

289.
Recipe, C'onfectionis Senna', unciam unam
Fiat Linctus, sumendiis subinde Lambendo.
Mittatur in narthecio. Leta lint-lux be made, I" I"' taken
ionally by licking. Let if be sent in a gallipot.

Recipe,

290.

Confectionis Rosae, unciam unam


Pulveris, drachmam

Aluminis

unam
Imponatur parvulum assiduo

Misce.

solutum

linguae, ut

oblinat et sic lente deglutiatur.


Mix.
Let <i little very frequently I"' placed <>n the tongue,
that, being dissolved there, H may diffuse itself [over
the tongue), and lints be slowly swallowed.
201.

ilii

Recipe,

Pulveris Uvoe Ursi, unciam unam


Syrupi Aurantii, quantum summit

electuarium, debitse spissitudinis, cuius


nucis moschatae, bis in die, paulatim delingat.
As much as may be sufficient that an electuary may be made, qftheproper thickness, of which
let the patient swallow gradually the size of a nutmeg twice a day.
ut

fiat

molem

202.

Recipe,

Aceti Colchici, uncias duaa


Mollis, uncias quatuor
Misce, et super leni foco, saepius agitando cochleare
ligneo, coque ad mellis spissitudinem.
Hujus oxymellis sumat a gfir cochleare parvulum tor die.
Mix, and boil over a slow fire, to the thickness of
honey, frequently stirring with a wooden spoon; of
this oxymel let tht 'patient take a teaspoonful three
times a day.

ETC. 279
FORMS FOR EXTERNAL APPLICATIONS,

recen093 Recipe, Menthse viridis Foliorum


tium, uncias quatuor
duoSacchari puriticati, uncias

decim
turn adjecto^sacFolia mortario lapido contunde,
donee corpus sit unum
charo, iterum contunde,
mortar then, the sugar
Beat the leaves in a stone

until they untie into a


being added, again beat,

mass.

Hujus

294._Recipe,

Confectionis,

scrupulos

quatuor
et tertiis horn repeFiat bolus, statim sumendus,
ventneuh. Let a bolus
tendus urgente segritudine
repeated
to be
to be taken immediately
sickness be troublesome.
eveTy third hour if the

Tmade,

CHAPTER

VII.

APPLICATIONS, ETC.
FORMS FOR EXTERNAL
oq*i
IJb

Recine,
Ke P Micse Panis, libram
Liquovis Plumln Diacetatis
'

quantum sufficit
As much as may

ut madescat panis.
rendered moist.
that the bread may be

diluti,

be sufficient,

Foliorum exsiccatorum,
uneiam
duobus cum semisse ad
Conue ex aquae octariia
hocce decocto
Conii

29G -Recipe,

!a

panni lane
delude express,, part, affec^e
Hon in iwv
s<pr>ius renoventur.

s duos, et cola:

madefketi,
,,,,.

UNABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

280

let ivoolen cloths, moistened in this decoction, and


then wrung out, be applied to the part affected, and
frequently renewed.

298. Recipe,

297.
Vespere utatur pediluvio tepido.
Let the
patient use the tepid foot-bath in the evening.

Hujus unguenti

Unguenti
unciam
affricetur

Hydrargyri

fortioris,

drachma una femoribus

internis ante focum singulis noctibus, douce ptyalismus cicatur. Let one drachm of this ointment
be rubbed into the inner part of the thighs every
night before the fire, until ptyalism be produced.

299.
Fricetur corpus, hora decubitus, aut lanti
vel strigile.
Let the body be rubbed, at bedtime,
with either a flannel or a brush.

Recipe,

Pyrethri Radicis contriti


Mastiches, ana, drachmam
Fiant lege artis, adignem, masticatoria duo tcneat
r saepius in ore, et manducet hujusmodi
medicamentum, expuatque salivam. Let two masticatories be made, according to the rides of art, by [the
aid of] heat: let the patient frequently hold a medicine of this hind in his mouth; let him chew it, and
300.

spit out the saliva.

301.
Suffiet reger fauces ejus cum vapore ex
Acidi Sulphurici uncia dimidia, cui primum ad-

juncts fuerint Chloridi Sodii uncire dii.e. Lit tin


patient fumigate his throat with vapor from half an
ounce of sulphuric acid, to which' should first be
added two ounces of chloride of sodium.
302.

Recipe,

Picis liquidae, sesquiunciam


Sulphuria sublimati, semiunciam

Cerse flavse, unciam

FORMS FOR EXTERNAL APPLICATIONS, ETC.

281

Lento igne liquefac, ut fiat unguentum. Melt by


gentle heat, thai an ointment may be made.

unciam
drachmas duas
Fiat linimentum, quocum illinantur partes

303. Recipe,

Olei Olivae,
Cera? albse,

Misce.
Mix. Let " liniment be
denudatic bis quotidie.
anointed
made, with which let the denuded parts be
twice a day.
304. Inhaletur pulmonibus JEtheris Sulphurici
Let the vapor of sulphuric
vapor ter quotidie.
aether be inhaled three times in a day.
305.

Coque

quantum
Recipe, Dauci Radieis,
mollitiem;
in

water
sistence, thru brat into a pulp.

deinde contunde.

Boil

in

306. Recipe, Liquoris Plumbi

sufficit

pulpam
a proper conin

aqua ad aptam

to

Acetatis diluti,

octarium
Lintea quadruplicata, hocce liquore frigido madeet saepius
facta, partibus inflammatia applicentur,
renoventu. Let linen, four times folded, and moistd with this cold liquid, be applied to the inflamed

em

parts,

and renewed frequently.

Recipe,

Magnesia? Sulphatis, unciam


Juris avenacei, octarium dimidium
Olei Olivse, semiunciam, vel
Butyri, vuantitatem juglandis
Misce pro enemate statim injiciendo. Mix for an
307.

enema

to be injected

immediately.

Exscindatur pars morsa, et postea appli308.


Let th bitten part be
cetur vulneri Potassa fusa.
applied to the
cut <it, and fused potash afterwards
wound.
24*

UNABRREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

282

Recipe,

309.

Pulveris Asari
Vcratri, ana, drachmam
Glycyrrhizae, drachmas

duas
Fiat pulvis, cujus aliquantillum naribus
insuffletur ante de'cubitum, ad sternutamentum exeitandum. Mix. Let a powder be made, of which
let a small portion be snuffled up the nostrils before
lying down (i. e. bedtime), to excite sneezing.

Misce.

310.
Inungatur hypochondrio sinistra scrupulus
Unguenti Hydrargyri fortioris, undecima bora ante
meridiem, et qnarta post meridiem indies. Lei "
scruple of the stronger mercurial ointment be rubbed
into the left hypochondrium at eleven o'clock in the
forenoon, and at four o'clock in the afternoon daily.
311.

Recipe, Lapidis Calaminaris, drachmam

Eo conspergantur

partes adfectae, sub qualibet


Let the affected parts be sprinkled
under any bandage.

deli gati one.

with

it,

Recipe,

Liquoris Potassac, drachmam


Aquas fontame, uncias sex
Misce. Hujus liquoris tepidi, quantum cavo capi
potest, quotidie bis injiciatur in aurem rcgram supinatam, ac detineatur per aliquot minuta, dein aure
prona rursus emittatur. Mix. Let as much of this
tepid liquor as can be taken by the hollow the concha
and meatus auditorius externum) be injected, twice a
day, into the diseased ear (placed upwards), and
let it be kept there for some minute*; then let it be
afterwards evacuated, the car being turned down312.

wards.

313.
Recipe, Zinci Oxydi, drachmam
Fiat pulvis, inclusussindonqrara; excutiatur super
parte excoriata, prius detersa.
Let a powder be

FORMS FOR EXTERNAL APPLICATIONS, ETC.

283

to be inclosed in fine linen; let it be sprinkled


over the excoriated part, first cleansed.

made,

314.
Recipe, Cretae praeparatse, unciam.
In partes excoriatas ex gossipio asperge. Sprinkle
it

from

cotton

on

the excoriated parts.

315.
Admoveatur parti adfectae spongiola aqua
Let a small sponge, welted with
calida imbuta.
warm water, be applied to the part affected.
316.

Vesica

repleta,

suilla,

admoveatur

aqua calida ad dimidium

lateri dolenti; firmetur liga-

mine, turn superponatur sacculus arena calidissima


plenus, qui frigescens iterum calefiat, aut ei mox
Continuentur
substituatur alius jam calefactus.
Let a pig's bladder,
haec donee dolor remiserit.
halffilled with warm water, be applied to the painI'ni side.
Let it be fastened on by a band ; then Id
a little l>mj, jill id toith very hot sand, be placed upon
it, [and) which cooling, is again to be made hot, or
let another already made hot be afterwards substiIjet this be continued until the pain
tuted for it.
shall have abated.

Cataplasma calidum, irroratum prius tanSpiritus Camphorse, applicetur cum pannis


laneis parti adfectfe, et vesica suilla oleo madefacta
detineatur; renovetur quolibet trihorio.
Let a hot
cataplasm, 'previously moistened with a little spirit
of camphor, be applied, by means of ivoolen cloths,
to the affected part, and let a pig's bladder, moistened with oil, be kept on (there) : let it be renewed
every third hour.
317.

tillo

Admoveatur

calidum cataplasma parti


litteo quadruplicate
Let a
hot cataplasm be applied to the part affected with
I inr n jbur times folded.
318.

affectae,

cum panno

UNABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTION".

284

Recipe,

Unguenti Hydrargyri NitricoOxydi


Unguenti Resinse, ana, semiunciam
Misce. Fiat unguentum, quo leniter inungatur
locus adfectus, ac dein tegatur Emplastro Plumbi,
super alutam extenso. Mix. Let an ointment be
made, with which let the affected place be slightly
anointed, and then covered with lead piaster, spread
upon leather.
230.
Recipe, Hydrargyri subchloridi, draoh310.

mam
Suilloc, unciam unam
Super panhum liriteum extenrie. et cuti
applica.
Mix. Spread [it\ upon leather,

Adipis

Misce.
affectae

and apply
321.

[it] to

the affected -skin.

Hauriatur vapor

in fauces.

calidus, ope infundibuli,


drawn into the fauces

Let hot vapor be

by means of a funnel.
322.
Recipe, Pulveris Opii, semidrachmam

Misce:

fiat

Unguenti Cetacei, unciam


unguentum. Hujus pauxillo inungatur

locus umbilici subinde; aut magnitudinis dimidia


juglandis nucis, putamine decerpto, eidem loco adII ith
Mix. Let an ointment be made
ponatur.
a little of this let the umbilical region be anointed
now and then: or let apiece half the size of a walnut without its shell be applied to thesame place.

323.

Recipe,

Linimenti Saponis, unciam


Liquoris Ammonias, drachmas

quatuor
Tincturae Opii, drachmam
Misce. Iu languore aul plroxysmo hysterico illinatur naribus, temporibus ct caateris, hujus lini-

FORMS FOR EXTERNAL APPLICATIONS, ETC.


menti paululum.
be rubbed on the

Mix. Let a

285

of this liniment
&c, in languor,

little

nostrils, temples,

or in the hysteric paroxysm.

Recipe,

324.

Hydrargyri Chloridi, grana decern


Acidi Hydrochlorici, semidrach-

mam
Aquas Rosas, uncias decern
Misce. Tantillo hujus liquoris laventur mane et
Mix. Let the infested
vespere, partes infestatas.
parts be washed, morning and evening, with a little

of

this liquor.

Recipe,

Pulpas Colocynthidis, drachmam


Olei Olivarum, unciaui
Misce, et coque leni igne, donee pulpa torqueri videatur; deiu massam adhuc calentera cola, et cum ea
illinatur abdomen, et prascipue umbilici regio.
Mix, and boil over a slow fire, until the pulp appears
to be crisp; then strain the mass while hot, and let
the abdomen, and especially the umbilical region, be
325.

anointed with

it.

Recipe,

Zinci Oxydi, drachmam


Aquas Rosas, uncias octo
Misce. Fiat collyrium, quo concusso imbutum linteurn quadruplicatum imponatur oculo adfecto.
Mix. Let a collyrium be made, with which, when
shaken up, quadruplicate linen is to be moistened

326.

and applied

to the affected eye.

Recipe,

Unguenti Hydrargyri Nitratis,


unciam
Cerati Saponis, unciam dimidiam
Misce.
Hujus tantillo illinantur palpebrae omni
Mix.
vespere, cubitum ituro, ope plumas mollis.
Let the eyelids be anointed, by means of a soft
feather, with a little of this, every evening, when the
patient is about to go to bed.
327.

UXABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

286
328.

Recipe,

Tincturae

Cantharidis,

unciam

dimidiam
Linimenti Saponis, sesquiunciam
Fiat linimentum, quo partes adfectae perfricandae sunt, et postea tegantur lanula.
Mix.
Let a liniment be math, with which the affected
parts are to be rubbed; and afterwards let /hem be
covered with flannel.
Misce.

329.

Recipe,

Camphorae drachmam
Olei Amygdalarum, unciam

Misce, et instilla guttas quatuor auri pro re nata.


let four drops fall into the

Mix, and occasionally


ear.

330.

Recipe,

Extracti Opii, grana decern


Tincturae Castorei, drachmam
Misce, et applicetur paululum auri affectae
nocte cum gossipio. Mix, and let a little be applied
with cotton to the affected ear every night.
i

331.

Recipe,

Linimenti Saponis, unciam

Tincturae Opii, drachmam


Fiat linimentum, cum panno laneo faucibus externis applicandum. Mix. Let a liniment
be made, to be applied with a woolen cloth la the
external fauces.

Misce.

332.

Recipe,

Olei Amygdalae,

unciam

Camphorae, drachmam
Misce pro linimento, quocum tangantur papillae ter
quaterve in die. Mix, far a liniment, with which
let the nipples be touched three or four linns a day.
333.

Recipe, Acidi Sulphurici

diluti,

drachmam

Aluminis compositae
semiunciam
Aquae purae, uncias sex
Solutionis

FORMS FOR EXTERNAL APPLICATIONS, ETC. 287


Probe commisceantur. Indatur nari ex qua sanguis stillat, turunda ex linteo raso, humectata hoc
liquore et rclinquenda illic per dies duos. Let them
Let a pellet of scraped linen [i.e.
be well mixed.
moistened with this liquor, be -placed in the
from winch the blood foios, and left there
for the space of two days.
lint],

nostril

Recipe, Florurn Sambuci,

libras duas
in Aquae libris quatuor.
Foveantur eo decocto, ssepius in die, caput, facies, oculi, aliaeque
partes erysipelate tentatas.
Let the head, face,
eyes, and other parts affected with erysipelas, be

334.

Coque

fomented with

this decoction frequently

during the

day.

Recipe,

Decocti Hordei, libram dimidiam


Magnesias Sulphatis, uncias duas
Fiat enema, urgente tcnesmo, injiciendum. Let an
enema be made, to be injected ivhen the tenesmus is
troublesome.
335.

336.

Recipe,

337.

Recipe,

Tincturaa Lyttae, drachmas quatuor


Liquoris Ammonias, unciam
Linimenti Saponis, drachmas duas
Misce; fiat linimentuin, quo guttur et postera pars
colli perfricanda sunt, donee vesicae appareant, dein
desiste per diem, et applica Unguentum Cetacei.
Mix. Let a liniment be made, with which the throat
and posterior pur/ of the neck are to be rubbed until
vesicles appear; then desist for a day, and apply
spermaceti ointment.
Farina? Lini, libram

bullientis, quantum sufficit


admovendum calide locoadfecto;
renovetur quater de die; cum areacat, tantillo bu-

Aquae

ut fiat cataplasma,

288

UNABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

tyri insulsi emolliatur.


That a cataplasm may be
made, to be applied hot to the part affected; let it be
renewed four times in the day; when it becomes dry,
let it be softened by a little fresh (i. e. unsalted)
butter.

338.
Admoveantur lintea aqua frigida madefacta, vel, si fieri possit, glacies, raso capiti.
Let
linen wetted ivith cold water, or, if
be applied to the shaven head.

it

can be dour,

ice,

339.

Recipe,

Micae Panis, duas libras


Tincturae Lyttae, uricias duas
Decocti Papaveris, quantum sufficit

cataplasma.
Applica hoc ad cutem per
horae dimidium, aut tamdiu donee infiammationem
satis magnam excitatam, dolor fervidus, et rubor
Apply this to the skin
partis tumentis testentur.
for half an hour, or at least until the intense pain
and redness of the swollen part show that sufficient
inflammation has been excited.
ut

fiat

340.

Recipe,

Calaminaris Pulveris, unciarn


Cretae praeparatoe,

semunciam

Intra linteum consutum applicetur,


renovando simul ac maduerit. Let a powder be
made. Let it be applied, sewed up in linen, and
renewed as soon as it becomes moist.
Fiat pulvis.

Recipe,

Pulveris Opii, grana quinque


Saponis, drachmam
Misce, et fiat suppositorium, post alvuni exoneratam applicandum. Mix, and let a suppository be
made, to be applied after the bowels have been evacu341.

ated.

Foveantur gingivae aqua calida.


be fomented with hot tvater.

342.

gums

Let the

FORMS FOR EXTERNAL APPLICATIONS, ETC.


343.

Recipe,

287

Infusi Rosae, uncias sex

AcidiSulphuricidiluti, drachmam
Misce. Colluantur fauces hoc gargarismate. Mix.
Let the fauces be washed with this gargle.

Recipe,

344.

Olei Olivae,

unciam

Liquoris Potassae, drachmas duas


Fiat linimentum hujus pauxillo oblinatur
abdomen bis terve quotidie. Mix. Let a liniment
be made, with a little of which let the abdomen be
anointed tivice or three times daily.

Misce.

345.

Recipe,

Magnesioe Sulphatis, unciam


Tinctures

Fiat enema.

Opii,

guttas

viginti

quinque
Jusculi. semilibram
Injiciatur hora somni tertia quaque

nocte, ad tres vices, dein repetatur alternis noc-tibus usque ad quartam vicem, si opus sit.
Let

an enema
night, for

be made.
Let it be injected every third
three times; then let it be repeated every
other night, until the fourth time, if necessary.

346.

Recipe,

Unguenti Hydrargyri Nitratis,


unciam dimidiam
Unguenti Cetacei, unciam

Misce. Hujus unguenti, pauxillum, ope penicilli


camelini, oculo afiecto applicetur nocte et mane.
Mix. Let a little of this ointment be applied to the
affected eye, by means of a camel' s-hair pencil, night

and morning.
347.- Recipe, Aluminis, scrupulum
Cretye prseparata?,

drachmam

Misce diligentissime, ut fiat pulvis, cujus inspergatur pauxillum super mamillas pro re nata. Mix
25

UNABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

.288

very care/all]/, that a poicder may be made, of which.


let a little be occasionally sprinkled upon the nipples.
348.

Admoveatur Extractum Belladonna? Buper-

cilio et

region i supra-orbitali veepere.

Let the ex-

of deadly nightshade be applied in the evening


the eyebrow and the supra-orbital region.

tract
to

349.

Recipe, Hydrargyri subchloridi, grana duo


Sacchai'i albi,

scrupulum

Fiat pulvis, cujus parum inflctur, ope calami, in


oculum affectum, semel vel bis in die. Let a powder be made, of which let a little be blown into the
affected eye, by means of a quill, once or twice in a
day.
350.

Recipe,

Radicis Dauci, libram

quanto sufficit, et per setapulpam, cui adde unciam dimidiam


adipis, ut fiat cataplasma, calide adhibendum.
Boil in a sufficient quantity of spring water, and
pass the pulp through a sieve, to which [i. e. the
pulp] add half an ounce of lard, that a cataplasm

Coque

in aquae fontanae

ceum

trajice

may

be made, to be applied hot.

351.
Vespere appropinquante, si opus sit, injiLet the clyster,
ciatur clysma heri prsescriptum.
prescribed yesterday, be injected the approaching (i.
e. next) evening, if necessary.

Let

353. Foveantur artus cum Decocto Anthemidis.

352.
Fiat setaceum ad medium brachium.
a seton be made in the middle of the arm.

Let the joints be fomented with decoction of chamomile flowers,


354.

Recipe,

Conii Foliorum, uncias duas

Aqua;

Colatum

sit

feiventis, librae dims

pro fotu, qui

cum pannis

laneis parti

FORMS FOR EXTERNAL APPLICATIONS, ETC.


iiffectie

289

admoveatur mane horis duabus antequam

e lecto assurgat, et nocte post

decubitum, donee

symptoma penitus evanuerit. Let it be strained


for a fomentation, which let be applied with woolen
cloths to the affected part for hoo hours in the morning before the patient gets vp, and at night after
going to bed, until the symptom shall have entirely

vanished.
355.

Recipe,

Tincturas Opii,

drachmam

Linimenti Saponis, unciam


Fiat linimentum, cum quo bene fricentur tempora
et detonsum caput.
Let a liniment be made, with
which let the temples and shaved head be well rubbed.

356.
Inhalet singulis noctibus, in lecto, vaporem
aquae calidae, cui, tempore usus, adde cochleariaduo
minima iEtheris rectificati. L,et the patient inhale
the vapor of warm water every night in bed, to which
[i. e. the water-], at the time of use, add two teaspoonfuls of rectified ether.

Exploretur vesica urinaria, ope catheteris,


extrahatur urina.
Let the urinary bladder be
explored by means of the catheter, and let the urine
357.

et

be

drawn
358.

off.

Colluantur

os et gingivae bis terve in die


Tincturas Myrrhae guttis viginti in aquae
tepidae cyatho.
Let the gums be washed twice or
thrice a day with twenty drops of tincture of myrrh,
in a cupful of warm water.

cum

359.

Recipe,

Hydrargyri Oxidi ciuerei, scrupulum, vel


Hydrargyri Bisulphureti, semi-

drachmam
Fiat pulvis pro fumigatione faucibus internis,

omni

UNABBREVIATED

290

1'RESCRI l'TIONS.

nocte more

be

made for

lie

used

evert/

solito, adhibendus.
Let a powder
fumigation to the internal fauces, to
night in the accustomed manner.

360.
Fiat fonticulus crure, infra vel supra genu.
Let an issue be made in the leg, below or above the
knee.

361.
Instituatur paracentesis abdominis et eduLet tapping of the belly be performed,
catur aqua.
and let the water be drawn off.

362.

Affricetur

parti affectas singulis noctibus

Unguenti Hydrargyri

fortioris,

magnitude

fabae

equina;; deinde applicetur cataplasma ex Liquore


Plumbi Acetatis dlluta, Mica Panis et Farina Lini.
Let the size of a horsebean of strong mercurial ointment be rubbed into the part affected every night;
then let a cataplasm of dilute solution of acetaU of
lead, with crumb of bread an// linseed meal, be applied.

Recipe,

Argenti Nitratis, scrupulum


Aquae destillatae, uncias sex
Fiat mistura, et cum hac illinantur partes affectae
singulis noctibus horl somni, prius detereae \ el linteum in eadem madefiat, et per totam noctem gestetur.
Let a mixture be made, and with this let the
parts affected, first cleansed, be anointed every night
at bedtime; or let linen be moistened with the same,
and worn during the whole night.
363.

Utatur

balneo, ad gradum Qonageeimum


L<-t the patient usi
septimanfi.
twice a week a water bath heated to ninety degrees.
364.

calefacto,

365.

bis in

Recipe,

Fellis Bovis, uncias

Olei

Misce.

dims

Amygdalarum, semiunciam

Fiant guttae acoustics, bis die applicandaa.

FORMS FOR EXTERNAL APPLICATIONS, ETC.

291

be
Mix. Let the acoustic (i. e. for the ear) drops
made, to be applied twice a day.

366.

Utatur

aeger equitatione subinde, si fieri


Let the patient use horse exercise now and

possit.

then, if possible.

Let an armed
fistula arruata.
pipe and bladder) be sent.

367. Mittatur
clyster-pipe

(i. e.

368. Recipe,

Zinci Sulphatis, scrupulum


Aquae purae, uncias sex

Fiat injectio, quae ex siphone eburneo in


urethram injiciatur mane et nocte. Mix. Let an
injection be made, which let be injected from an ivory
syringe into the urethra morning and night.

Misce.

369.

Recipe,

Liquoris
ci

Ammoniae

Acetatis, un-

am

Ammonias Hydrochloratis, drachmas duas


Aquse, libram
Fiat lotio, nocte, cubitum ituio, tumoribus appliMitte libras duas cum directione propria.
canda.
Let a lotion be made, to be applied to the tumors at
bedtime. Send two pounds, with a proper direction.

Fiat fonticulus purulentus ad medium


370.
Let an issue be
brachium, ope Potassre fusre.
made in the middle of the arm by means of fused

potash.

;>71.
Caute tangantur clavi Acido Sulphurico,
ope penicilli; dein tegantur Emplastro Plumbi.

Let the corns be cautiously touched with sulphuric


acid I'n means of a pencil, then let them be covered
over with lead plaster.
25*

UNABBREVIATED PRESCRIPTIONS.

292
372.

Recipe,

373.

Recipe,

Unguenti Cetacei, unciam unam


Pulveris Opii, scrupulum dimidium'
Fiat unguentum, cujus paululum pro re natfi apLet an ointment
plicetur, urgente ani prurigine.
be made, oj which let a little be occasionally applied
when itching of the anus is troublesome.
Linimenti Camphorac, sesquiunciam
Tincturse Cantbaridis, unciam

di-

midiam

quocum

Fiat linimentum,

Misce.

fricetur para

Mix. Let a liniment


the part affected be rubbed

affecta ter quaterve indies.

be made, with which let


three or four times in a day.

374.

Recipe,

Nicotianos,

drachmam

Aquae communis, octarium


Coque per sextam partem horse etcola; adde liquori
Sod;e Sulphatie, oncias duas
Solve, et fiat enema, statim injiciendum, contra
insultus apoplecticos vel affectus soporosoe adhi-

bendum.

Dissolve,

and

applied immediately,

to

let

be made, to be
used against apoplectic

an enema

lie

attacks or soporific affections.

375.

Mitte Emplastrum

inducendum.
upon leather.
376.

Galbani super alutam


plaster, spread

Send a galbanum

Adhibeatur

lavatio,

frigida

vel

tepida,

prout aegro gratius erit. Let either raid or />/>//


washing be used, according an it may be moreagreeable to the patient.

377.
Capilli radantur, et caput poetea panniculo
lotione frigida imbuto circumdetur.
Let the hair

FORMS FOR EXTERNAL APPLICATIONS, ETC.

293

[of the head] be shaved off, and afterwards let the


head be surrounded with a cloth moistened with the
cold lotion.

378. Recipe,

Hydrargyri

Bichloridi,

grana

decern

Aquae purae, uncias decern


Misce. Hoc liquore, ter de die, injiciatur ulcus,
ope siphonis; post singulas injectiones materia relinquatur intra ulcus, et coerceatur per dimidium
horae, clausis omnibus aperturis; tumque externe
prematur leniter ulcus, ut liquor ejectus per omnes
Mix. Let the ulcer
sinus et meatus propellatur.
be injected with this liquor three times in a day, by
means of a syringe: after each injection let the matIn- {liquid) be left within the ulcer, and let it be kept
therefor half an hour, all the apertures being shut;
and then let the ulcer be lightly pressed externally,
that the ejected liquor may be propelled through all
the sinuses

379.

and passages.

Recipe,

Decocti Malvae compositi (cum


Fceniculi Seminum contusorum
drachmis fcribus), uncias qua-

tuordecim
Let an
immediately injected warm.

Fiat enema, statim tepide injiciendum.

enema

be

made,

to be

INDEX
OF SOME OF THE PRINCIPAL SUBJECTS, TERMS, AND

EXPLANATORY NOTES.

PAGE.
Abbreviations

107
73
78

Abdomen
Accedo

MS

Accent
Accessio

Acetum
Achillea
Aconlt

Acorns
Acupunctura
Acna
Adhibeo

Adjuvaus

loa

Aqua.

Arena

54

149
108
150
35

Arens
Armadillo
Arrack

91

Accommodo

19
14J
-

38, 38
14, 19

Administro
Adraoveo

2
63
19

Aduro

81

iBsfer
Afficio

139
39
56
72
SS
119

Affusion

Ala

Alimeutum
Alkali

Allium
Aloe
Alvua

Animon
Amplitudo

Auiylum
Auagiaphe...'.

72

15,16
40
155
19
34
77
55, 94, 112

Accessu.s

PAGE.

Ancon
Animus
Anode
Antimony
Applico

Apprehendo
Apyrexia

19

90

Arsenla
Arteria

153
14, 71

Arteriotoma

Arthriticus
Asella

76
i

AseUus
Asperus
Atropa

m
71

150

Aura

38, 39

Auricula

Amis

"

71

Aurora

66

Avena

88

151
112, 148. 152
42, 47

Bacca

144
97

Bacillus

108

BaliDeum

61

Balneum

88, L52
1

Barba
K;i-i*

.
:

et seq.
31

295
PAGE.
53

PAGE.
Chirayta

Battery (electrical)

37

Chiretta

Bibo

63

Chloride of sodium

Baths

Bic

Bichloridum
Bin
Bini
Blister
Blood-letting, general
"
local
Body, parts of

Braclierium
Brachiale
Bracliium

HO

Chloridum

133
110
72
27
12
18
70
99

Chocolata
Cibus
Cingula
CinciAnus
Clavicula

42
72
88

Cochlear.
Cochleare

Brasium
Bread
Bronchus
Bronchiura
Bucca

89
71

>
)

Byne

88

Cacao

94

105
154
94
77, 87

42
31

72
54
47

Clibauum
Clysma
Cochlea

Cochlearium
Cochleatim

Cod

146

"1

j*

90
94
10?
145
42
70
40

oil

Coffea
Col

Colchicum
Collar

Csesaries

31

Calamus

99
109
34
102, 141
53
150
40
59

Calc.Chlor
Calidarium
Calomel
Calor

Camphora
Canalicus
Canttiarus
Capillitium
Oapillua

Carbonas
Carburetum
Cataplasma
Catechu
Catena

3^

\
)

5j

25
145
38
43

Catharsis.

Catheter

51

Cathode

40
148
93

Cepbaelis
Cerevisia

Crvjx
Cervices
Charta
Chest (of an Irishman)

\
1

70
9S
73

Collum

Columna

Coma
Commotio

31
39, 41

55
39
37
149

Concamerata
Coocuasio
Conductor

Conium

2
107
43
113
2
56
12
72
18

Constituens
Contractions

Coprophoria

Cornu
Corrigens

Coxicluvium
Cruor
Cubitus
Cucurbita
Cucurbitatio
Cucurbito
Cucurbitula

20

18
60
18

Cupa
Cupping

Cyanidum
Cyanogen
Cyathus

59

152
144
59

296
PAGE.
Declinatio
Defectio
Dejectio

78
15
40
15
148

Deliquiurn
Dissresis or dialysis

Diaphoresis
Diets
Director
Diseases, signs
Diuresis

40
87
,..
of.

Diureticus

Drops

Duo
Eccoproticus
Egelidus

71

Generalis
Gilding pills
Glutio

12
115
63

Grammatical construction
129
117
70

of prescriptions

Gummi

49

Guttur

46
56

Eggs

121
116
65
36

usdem

Eleotherium
Electricitas

Electrode
Electromagneticus
Electropunctura

Hairs

31

Hepar
Hirudo

74
21

Homo

139
109

Hydr
Hydragogum
Hydroc
Hypocaustum
Hypochondrium
Hypogastrium

45
108
55
-

39
73
79
5

Ictus
Ilia

1
>

40

Incrementum

51

Instar
Instruments,

Iuscriptio

Emraenagogues
Emplastruin

Gena

75

58
125
45
118
72

for

Drasticus

Ej

40
66

Gelidus

51

Doses

Drachms, signs

38

PAGE.

Galvanism

25, 27

Enema

152
52
26
50

Eutozoa
Epispatica

Errhinum
Exacerbatio

77

61

pharmaceu95

tical

Instruments, surgical
Insultus
Inunction
Iodas

99
79
29
153
152
32

Iodidum
Fa;x

Faeces

Fasciculus

Ferrocyauidum

Ferrum

%6
116

140,153
18,23

Festuca
Fonticulus

36
32

Food

87

Formula
Fortis
Frictio

Frigidarium

Issues

Jecur

Jugulum

74
\

Jugulus
Julapium

Julepum

Julepus

,ly)

119

93, 109

Kali

119

28, 29

54

Labrurn

Laconicum

55,70
54

INDEX.

PAGE.

PAQE.

Lambo
Language
Larynx

of prescriptions.

75
26
13

Pervigilium

__8

70

54

Lavatio
Lectus
Leeches
Leipothyrnia
Levis

297

9|
"J
1"
18

Phcenigmoi
Phlebotomia
Pillow of hops
Pilula Perpetua
Pinna
Plaga

58
69
71
22
25

Plasters

90
58

Polenta

J^
Lumbus
Liquor

,5
i

Portio

Potas

Potassium

1*7

Luteus.

73
lo1

. . .

1-43
Pronunciation
Prosodiacal Vocabulary ... 154
50
Ptarmicus
78
Ptyalismus
122
Pugillus
58
Pulvinar
42
Purging

Magnetism.
Magnitudo.

Mala

Malagma
Mane
Maneo
Mauipnlus

Prsescriptio

116,

151

Purpureus

Mastiche
Measures
Medicines, effects of

Kecepta

Merum

Kecetta
Recipe

Minutum
Moles

Richardsonia
Rivus

Kares
Nasus
Natna

Saltern

69

38
1S8

Netum
Nitras

101
26
70
65
67

Nomenclature

Norma
Nucha
Nudius

Nycthemerum

>

1,5,125
146

16
IS
12

Sanguis
Sanguisuga

21
39
16
21

Scabellus
Scalpellus
Scariticatio
Scintilla
Scintillula

60

43
38
152

Sedes

Ounces

Oxydnm

108,109
162

Paroxysmus

^8
25

Pastillum
Penicillum

Penicillus

Peroxydum

17

163

Sella

Senega
Sericum
Setaceus
Setous

Shaving
Signatura
Sinapismi
Sneezing

35

Scyphus

27
}

33

31
7
26

49

298
PAfiE.

Soda

132

Spoonful

60

Sternutamentum

50
42
55
54

Stools
Strigil

Sudatorium..
Suggestus
Sulphas

44
153

38
Sulph
153
Sulphuretum
120
Sum. more dicto
Sweating
49
Symbols, ancient chemical 127
15
Syncope
130
Syntax
Taffeta

Teeth
Tela

Temetum

26
23
27

92

Tempora

PAorc.
123

Tepidarium
Thermse

55
54
63
Translated prescriptions... 213

Time

Vehiculus..;

91
26

Vesicatorii
Vicis

58
75

Vigiliae

Vocabulary, Prosodiacal. 154


*.....
Vomiting
47
.

Weights

Worms

126
92
52

Xeres
Xericus

92
92

Wines