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Memo of Transmittal

To: Jana Colombini, George Hughes


From: Kyle Trambley
Date: November 27, 2016
Subject: Proposal to Amend Cal Polys Skateboard Regulations
Attached to this document is a recommendation report to amend the skateboarding regulations at
Cal Poly. The purpose behind this report is to allow students the opportunity to skateboard on
campus.
Recommendations:
There are two possible solutions and each is analyzed and evaluated throughout the report.
Below are the recommendations:
Allow electric skateboards to be ridden on campus.
Allow all skateboards to be ridden on campus with required safety waver.
Methods
Multiple methods of research were conducted to make an informed and educated decision.
Below are my primary sources:
Personal Interview with Jana Colombini
Online Survey of Cal Poly Students
Below are my Secondary Sources:
Mustang News Article
Fortune Article
National Survey for amount of people skateboarding in the US
Cal Poly Skateboarding Regulations
UC Santa Barbara Skateboarding Regulations
California Electrically Motorized Skateboard vehicle law
Findings
The Results section of the document reports on the information gained from each research
method. The Conclusion section analyzes each of the two solutions based off of the
information gained from the research sources.
Final Recommendation
The solution I chose for allowing skateboards on campus while still providing safety for students
is to allow electric skateboards due to their working brakes.
Thank you for time and consideration for this recommendation report. I appreciate the
opportunity to provide the information needed to make a change. Please contact me if you have
further questions.

Prepared for:
Jana Colombini ASI President
And
George Hughes UPD Chief

Proposal to Amend Cal Polys Skateboard Regulations

Prepared by Kyle Trambley


Submitted November 27, 2016

Table of Contents
Introduction ________________________________________________________
Purpose

Background
Organization

4
4
4
4

Methods
________________________________________________________
Primary
Interview

Survey

Secondary
News Articles
Survey

Rules & Regulations


Laws

Results
________________________________________________________
Primary
Interview

Survey

Secondary
News Articles
Survey

Rules & Regulations


Laws

Conclusions ________________________________________________________

10

Recommendations

__________________________________________________

10

________________________________________________________

10

Figures Cited ________________________________________________________

11

References

5
5
5
5
5
6

6
7
8
9
9
9

Table of Figures
Figure 1: Skateboard Participation Response

Figure 2: Skateboard Encouraged on Campus Response

Figure 2: Electric Skateboard on Campus Response

Introduction
Purpose:
Cal Poly has created regulations that ban the use of all skateboards on campus which severely
limits students choices for transportation from class to class [1]. The ability to use new
technology such as electric skateboards, which provide brakes and are street legal like the bikes,
is prohibited by the university under the current policies. These regulations are enforced by the
university police who will issue fines to those who decide to use skateboards as an alternative
form of transportation [1]. According to a survey I conducted through Facebook, 65% of students
surveyed are strongly in support of having skateboarding allowed on campus. From the same
survey, a staggering 75% of students feel the same way about having electric skateboards on
campus [4].
I have been an avid skateboarder since middle school and this love for skateboarding has stayed
with me up to the present day. It has even influenced me to purchase an electric skateboard, one
that is propelled with electric motors and has functioning brakes. However, even with this new
technology, the oppressive policies still take effect and students like me will be fined. I plan to
address Cal Polys student government and the University Police to take action towards changing
the skateboarding policy to either allow electric skateboards, or all skateboards to be ridden on
campus.
Background:
According to the University Police Department Commander, Lori Hashim, back in 2009, the ban
came from the 70s and early 80s when skateboarding became more prevalent. Skateboarders
during that time allegedly caused thousands of dollars in damage, and Cal Poly would get sued
after accidents [2]. The skateboarding regulations put in place by Cal Poly University ban the use
of all skateboards, which include normal skateboards, motorized skateboards, roller skates, roller
blades, coasters, or similar devices [1].
What differentiates electric skateboards from normal skateboards, or gas powered motorized
skateboards, is the small and powerful electric motors. These motors not only propel the user up
hills, but also allow the user to brake using regenerative braking, like Tesla cars [8]. According
to the regulations, violators of the Presidents order regarding skateboarding on the university
property will be subject to citations, fines, and discipline, While a first offense only gets a
person a verbal warning, the second includes a citation costing the offender a fine of $138 or
hours of their time at a diversion seminar, which simply reiterates the laws prohibiting
skateboarding on campus. A third offense brings with it a mandatory fine, which increases to
$180, and then $360, for each additional offense [2].
Organization:
This report is comprised of primary and secondary methods of research, the results of each
method, the comparison of my two solutions using the analysis gained from each method, and
finally a recommendation will be picked from the following:

Allow electric skateboards to be ridden on campus


Allow all skateboards to be ridden on campus with required safety waver

Methods
The following methods of research consist of primary sources - an interview and a survey - I
conducted and secondary sources - news articles, surveys, school regulations, and laws - I found
through the internet.
Primary Methods
Interview
Jana Colombini
Jana is the current ASI president at Cal Poly. She helped answer my questions regarding the
current state of the skateboarding regulations at Cal Poly and helped me decide upon the best
solutions to fix them.

I emailed Parking Jana Colombini, Cal Polys current ASI president, at


asipresident@calpoly.edu to request an interview. I asked Jana the following questions:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Why is there no skateboarding allowed on campus?


How long has there been this policy?
What steps have you taken personally towards legalizing skateboards?
What has been the most challenging part in trying to legalize skateboards?
Would Having a brake and being considered a street legal Mode of transportation make
for a good case in getting electric skateboards legal to ride?
6. What are the steps towards getting a new policy approved?
7. I only see 2 routs here, what do you think would be the easiest to pass?
a. See electric skateboards with brakes legal to ride on campus equally like bikes?
b. See all skateboards legal to ride on campus but be required to wear all the safety
gear needed?
Survey
117 Cal Poly students responded to the following questionnaire on Facebook:
o Do you skateboard/longboard?
If yes, do you use it as a means of transportation?
o Would you like to see skateboards allowed on campus?
o Would you like to see electric skateboards on campus (these have brakes)?
o Would you be willing to sign a safety waver to ride a skateboard on
campus?
o Is there any other additional information about whether or not skateboards
should be allowed on campus. (optional)
There were enough responses to obtain an understanding of the opinions about skateboarding on
campus. In order to encourage a larger participation, the survey was kept short.
Secondary Methods
News Articles
"Cal Poly is too harsh on skateboarders by Matt Fountain

I found this news article from Mustang News published on April17, 2009.
Skate or Die: Are Electric Skateboards the best Rideable? by David Z. Morris
I found this news article from Fortune, the Fortune 500 magazine owned by Time,
published on January 8, 2016.
Survey
Participants in skateboarding U.S. 2006-2015
I found this survey on Statista, published in March of 2016.

Rules & Regulations


Parking regulations - parking & commuter options
Above is the current Cal Poly Rules and regulations for skateboarding on campus
property.
Bike/Skateboard rules and regulations
Above is the current UC Santa Barbara Rules and regulations for skateboarding on
campus property.
Laws
AB-604 Electrically Motorized Boards Approved by Governor Brown on October 11, 2015

Results
The interview and survey I conducted as primary sources provided a lot of information into what
is possible for changing the current regulations as well as what students think of skateboarding
on campus. My secondary sources gave insights into how the new regulations could be
structured, as well as provided very solid reasons for why skateboarding is a legitimate form of
transportation for students at Cal Poly.
Primary Methods
Interview
I sat down with Jana to answer the following questions [3]:
1. Why is there no skateboarding allowed on campus?
The school doesnt want to be liable for students getting hurt by riders, since
skateboards - not having brakes - and pedestrians dont mix well in heavily
dense areas. Plus, the sidewalks and other areas not being in the best of shape
puts the school at risk of being sued.
2. How long has this policy existed?
As far as I know, the regulations against skateboards has been around as long
as skateboards have been on this campus.
3. What steps have you taken personally towards legalizing skateboards?
Jana has personally talked to Chief Hews, the chief of University Police for
Cal Poly about the possibility of having skateboards on campus. In their
discussion, she brought up the possibility of having a skateboarding class
online that informs the skateboard users of what they are and are not allowed
to do on campus. At the end of the course the student would sign a waver
which would omit the campus from any lawsuits due to the person
skateboarding on campus and then provide the user with a skateboarding

4.

5.

6.

7.

license.
What has been the most challenging part in trying to legalize skateboards?
The most challenging part is solving the pedestrian and skateboard problem.
If there was a to guarantee the safety of pedestrians this would work, but as it
stands its already hard enough to deal with the bikes and pedestrians.
Would Having a brake and being considered a street legal Mode of transportation make
for a good case in getting electric skateboards legal to ride?
That is where I think we have leverage. Jana believes that if there is some
kind of brake on a transportation device, that is not a body part, it should be
legal to ride on campus. Especially if it is considered street legal by the state
of California.
What are the steps towards getting a new policy approved?
Have preliminary meeting with chief Hews to discuss the possibilities. If he
believes this is a feasible attempt, it is now a matter of drafting a proposal that
would be sent to President Armstrong for approval. From there, he would send
the proposal to the appropriate committees at Campus Administrative Policy
(CAP) for a change recommendation to the current regulations. Once this has
been completed, President Armstrong will have the final decision on whether
or not the new policy will be put in place.
I only see 2 routs here, what do you think would be the easiest to pass?
a. Having electric skateboards with brakes legal to ride on campus equally like
bikes?
This would definitely be the easiest to get passed since it is street legal and
has a functioning break that isnt a body part.
b. Having all skateboards legal to ride on campus but be required to wear all the
safety gear needed?
I would still like to eventually see all skateboards and other things like razor
scooters to be legal on campus and I think the best way to do that would be
the safety class and waver.

Survey
Out of the 117 students who participated in the survey, 45% of students skateboard while 55%
do not. Of those who do skateboard, 47% use it as a form of transportation on and off campus.
Of all the participants, 65% would like skateboards to be allowed on campus and 75% would like
electric skateboards allowed on campus. Finally, 67% of participants would be willing to sign a
safety waver to skateboard on campus. The most concerning factor for those who dont want
normal skateboards on campus is the fact that they dont have brakes and these individuals dont
feel safe as pedestrians with the hilly terrain of Cal Poly [4].

Do you skateboard/Longboard?

NO
55%
YES
45%

Figure 1: Skateboard
Participation Response [4]

Would you like to see skateboards allowed on


campus?

NO
35%

YES
65%

Figure 2:
Skateboard
Encouraged
on Campus
Response [4]

Figure 3:
Electric
Skateboard
on Campus
Response [4]

Would you like to see electric skateboards on


campus?
NO
25%

YES
75%

Secondary Methods
News Articles
"Cal Poly is too harsh on skateboarders by Matt Fountain
I used this article to provide background info on when and why the ban came about as well as
information on the citations that UPD would give out to those caught violating the skateboarding
law. This article is the only concrete source that provided hard quantitative data on the citations
such as the progression from a verbal warning, then a $138 fine, followed by a $180 fine, and
finally a $360 fine. The article also provided many reasons why skateboarding could be a good
substitute to cycling. First, skateboards are cheaper and require less time and money to maintain.
Second, since they are smaller and easy to carry into class, it means they are less likely to be
stolen or damaged by other students. Third, skateboards are typically slower and louder than
bicycles allowing you to hear them coming from blocks away. And finally, being hit by a person
on a bike would likely cause more damage than by a person on a skateboard [2].
Skate or Die: Are Electric Skateboards the best Rideable? by David Z. Morris
I used this article to provide info on the portability of electric skateboards compared to other
ridables and the safety of these electric skateboards as well. According to Nate Appel, a creator
of one type of electric longboard, due to the size, it is much easier to just hop on a bus or train
with a skateboard and when it comes to lugging something up and down train station or office
stairs, a small 14 pound skateboard is nothing compared to bulkier bikes or other ridables. Appel
goes on to say that those who have reviewed the electric skateboard say the electric board is safer
than standard boards. I think that a lot of that comes from the fact that the board has a
brake [8].
Survey
This survey looks at the amount of people who have participated in skateboarding from 2006 to
2015. I focused on the the data from the most recent years 2011 to 2015 as they present an
increase in the amount of people skateboarding from 5.83 million to 6.44 million participants.
This data shows there are more people who are taking up skateboarding in the recent years [5].

Rules & Regulations


Cal Poly Rules
According to the regulation, any form of skateboarding is prohibited on campus. Any violators
of the Presidents order regarding skateboarding on university property will be subject to citation
and/or discipline as provided by Title 5 of the California Code of Regulations, Sections 41301
41304. The only problem is finding concrete numbers on what citations will be given out since
Title 5 and sections mentioned above do not provide any information on the subject. I was forced
to turn to another method of research to provide information. Sections 21.1 Regulation and 21.2
Violations will be subject to change in the end of this recommendation report [1].
UC Santa Barbara Rules
Santa Barbara has allowed skateboards on campus for years without any major implications for
students or the school. In the regulations, Santa Barbara has laid out all the rules necessary for
skateboards, bikes, and pedestrians to coexist on one campus. Such rules include how fast and
where to skateboard, as well as what to yield for and the appropriate use of the skateboard as a
mode of transportation, rather than a toy for tricks. Many of these regulations will serve as a
good starting point for policy reforms for the current Cal Poly regulations [6].
Laws
The bill AB-604 on Electrically motorized skateboards was passed by Governor Jerry Brown in
2015. This new law states that Electrically Motorized skateboards will be treated as vehicles of
transportation and no longer defined as a motorized skateboard. Which means they are now
their own form of vehicle, in the same class as bicycles and are allowed to be ridden on a
highway, bikeway, or any other public bicycle path, sidewalk, or trail. The law goes on to
provide the safety measures for those who operate this vehicle, which will play a roll in shaping
the possible reforms to the current Cal Poly regulations [7].

Conclusion
Having 45% of students, in my survey alone, who skateboard at Cal Poly, it demonstrates that
students want skateboarding on campus [4]. New regulations should be written, especially after
our governor of California passed a law that allows electrically motorized skateboards to be
ridden on the streets and highways of California [7]. Cal Poly needs to restructure its
skateboarding regulations using the two solutions I am comparing, allowing electric skateboards
or allowing all skatebaords.
The first solution I propose take place is to allow electric skateboards on campus. Being that they
have functioning brakes, are street legal, and are zero emissions, electric skateboards are an ideal
vehicle of transportation. Not to mention the mileage of electric skateboards are enough to get
students from class to class and even to their homes off campus while still being extremely
portable.
However, electric skateboards do have a negative side similar to that of bikes on campus today.
Sometimes pedestrians and bikes dont mix well and accidents occur, this may happen with

electric skateboards. Although, being street legal vehicles, any form of accident would make the
rider or pedestrian accountable and Cal Poly, with new regulations, would not be liable for any
accidents on campus [6].
The second solution I propose take place is to allow all skateboards on campus. There are plenty
of schools in the United States that allow skateboarding on campus regulated by school rules. Cal
Poly, with the right regulations of their own could make the campus skateboard friendly by
regulating where and when skateboards could be ridden. 67% of students surveyed are even
willing to sign a safety waver which would prevent the school from being liable for any
accidents that occur on campus [4]. Cal Poly could even require a skateboard safety class to
provide students with an appropriate education into how skateboards should be ridden on
campus.
However, there are major downsides to regular skateboards. First, they dont have any brakes,
which causes a safety hazard when mixing with pedestrians and the hilly terrain of Cal Poly.
Second, normal skateboards can cause damage to Cal Poly Property if misused, such as doing
tricks like grinding a curb or rail. Again, with the right regulations, these problems should be
minimized.
In conclusion, the first solution allowing only electric skateboards is the best decision for the
school and the students.

Recommendation
Based on my research, I recommend Cal Poly adopt new regulations to allow electrically
motorized skateboards to be ridden on campus in order to provide students with the opportunity
to choose skateboarding as a form of transportation, while still maintaining safety on campus.
The next steps should be drafting an amendment to the Cal Poly regulations and proposing this to
the University Police Chief and President Armstrong. From there the CAP committee will
approve or deny the changes to the current policies and in the end, President Armstrong will
have the final say in passing the new regulations [3]. Its time to start broadening the acceptance
of alternative forms of transportation, especially with todays technology.

References
[1] Parking regulations - parking & commuter options," in Cal Poly, 2016. [Online]. Available:
https://afd.calpoly.edu/parking/regulations#21. Accessed: Nov. 13, 2016.
[2] M. Fountain, "Cal Poly is too harsh on skateboarders," in Mustang News, 2009. [Online].
Available: http://mustangnews.net/cal-poly-is-too-harsh-on-skateboarders/. Accessed:
Nov. 13, 2016.
[3] J. Colombini, "Cal Poly Skateboard Legalization," Nov. 10, 2016. Interview
[4] K. Trambley, Should Skateboarding be Allowed on Campus, Survey. _ November 2016

[5] "Participants in skateboarding U.S. 2006-2015 | statistic," in Statista, 2016. [Online].


Available: https://www.statista.com/statistics/191308/participants-in-skateboarding-inthe-us-since-2006/. Accessed: Nov. 13, 2016.
[6] "Bike/Skateboard rules and regulations," in UC Santa Barbara Police Department, 2012.
[Online]. Available: https://www.police.ucsb.edu/resources/bikeskateboard-rules-andregulations. Accessed: Nov. 14, 2016.
[7] "AB-604 Electrically motorized boards," in California Legislative Information, 2015.
[Online]. Available:
https://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billTextClient.xhtml?bill_id=201520160AB604.
Accessed: Nov. 25, 2016.
[8] D. Z. Morris, "Are electric skateboards the best Rideable?," in Fortune, 2016.
[Online]. Available: http://fortune.com/2016/01/08/electric-skateboards-hoverboards/.
Accessed: Nov. 25, 2016.

Figures Referenced
[4] Figure 1. Skateboard Participation Response, Survey. 27 November 2016.
[4] Figure 2. Skateboard Encouraged on Campus Response, Survey. 27 November2016.
[4] Figure 2. Electric Skateboard on Campus Response, Survey. 27 November2016.