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Autodesk Architectural Desktop

Getting Started and New Features Guide


(including International Extensions)

18503-010000-5023A

June, 2001

Copyright 2001 Autodesk, Inc.


All Rights Reserved

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1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Contents

Chapter 1

Introduction 1
Fundamentals of Autodesk Architectural Desktop, Release 3 2
Complete Project Work Flow Management 2
Integration with AutoCAD 2002 3
Multiple Document Environment (MDE) 3
Shortcut Menus 4
Object Properties Window 6
Quick Select 7
3D Orbit Viewing 8
Layout Tabs 9
Partial Open and Partial Load 11
In-Place Reference Editing 11
Tracking Objects 12
AutoCAD DesignCenter 12
Managing Autodesk Architectural Desktop Content in AutoCAD
DesignCenter 15
Where to Begin 17
Beginning Users 17
Experienced Users 17
Finding Help 18
Online Documentation 18
Training Courseware 19
Contacting Autodesk 19
Sales Information 19
Customer Satisfaction 20
Technical Support 20
Feedback 20

Contents

Chapter 2

Getting Started with Architectural Desktop 21


Working with Autodesk Architectural Desktop, Release 3.3 22
Viewing the Autodesk Architectural Desktop Installation Guide 22
Opening Architectural Desktop 23
Using Architectural Desktop Templates 23
Getting Started with a Project 24
Creating a Drawing 25
Creating Walls, Doors, and Windows 27
Adding Design Content 35
Viewing your Project 38
Using the Layout Tabs 38
Working with Layer Keys and Layer Key Styles 39
Grip Editing Your Drawing Objects 40
Editing Doors with Grips 40
Editing Windows with Grips 42
Adding Annotations and Schedules 43
Adding Annotation Symbols 43
Working with Schedules 46
Plotting Your Drawing 49
Summary 49

Chapter 3

Templates 51
Using Autodesk Architectural Desktop, Release 3.3 Templates 52
Opening the Template 53
Starting a Drawing with an Architectural Desktop Template 58
Whats in the Templates 59
Using the Layout Tabs 60
Conceptual Design Layout Tabs 61
Work Layout Tabs 62
Plot Layout Tabs 63
Model Tab 65
Customizing Templates 66

Chapter 4

New Features 67
New Features in Autodesk Architectural Desktop, Release 3.3 68
Expanding the Building Model 69
Curtain Walls 69
Window Assemblies 71
Roof and Floor Slabs 72
Structural Members 75
AEC Polygon 76
Enhanced Building Model Objects 77
Stairs 77

Contents

Railings 79
Walls 80
Windows 82
Section and Elevation Objects 83
Elevation Labels 84
Spaces 85
Layer Keying 86
Scheduling 86
Chases, Ducts and Floor Openings 87
User Interface Improvements 87
Style Manager 87
Display Manager 88
Other Enhancements 89
Pushpin Dialog Boxes 89
Add Selected (Draw By Example) and Insert Object Feature 90
Explode AEC Objects 92
Publish to Autodesk Architectural Studio 92
International Features 93
Area Calculation 93
AEC Dimensions 95
Live Sections 96

Chapter 5

Display System 99
Understanding the Display System 100
Display Representations 100
Display Sets 103
Display Configurations 104
How It All Works Together 107
Changing the Display of an AEC Object in a Viewport 108
Getting Started with the Display Manager 110
Displaying the Display Manager 111
Moving and Resizing the Display Manager 111
Viewing Display Systems in the Display Manager 112
Viewing Drawing Information in the Display Manager 113
Viewing the Display Representations 113
Viewing the Display Sets 115
Viewing the Display Configurations 117
Previewing an AEC Object Types Representation 119
Previewing an AEC Object Types Representation within a Display Set
120
Previewing an AEC Object Types Default Properties 120
Creating and Editing Display Systems 121
Working with Display Representations 121
Working with Display Sets 125

Contents

Working with Display Configurations 128


Purging Display Systems 132
Purging Display Representations 132
Purging Display Sets 132
Purging Display Configurations 133
Setting Display Systems in a Drawing 134
Setting the Default Display Representations of AEC Objects 134
Setting the Default Display Configuration 136
Setting the Display Configurations in Viewports 136
Copying Display Systems Between Drawings 137
Importing Display Sets 137
Importing Display Configurations 138
Exporting Display Sets 139
Exporting Display Configurations 139
Working with Display Systems on the Web 140
Downloading Display Systems from the Web 141
Sending Display Systems by Email 141
Sending the Display System in a Drawing 142
Troubleshooting the Display System 142
Why isnt my entity displayed? 143
Why isnt my display system updating? 143

Chapter 6

European Plan Views 145


Working with the European Plan Views 146
Accessing European Plan Views 146
Changing the Plan 1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of Objects 147
Plan 1-100 148
Doors 149
Windows 150
Openings 151
Stairs 153
Mass Elements 156
Mass Group 157
Plan 1-50 159
Doors 159
Windows 162
Openings 164
Stairs 166
Mass Element 169
Mass Group 170

Chapter 7

Model Explorer and Viewers 173


Using Model Explorer 174

Contents

Using Display Commands 175


Using Mass Commands 176
Viewing Entities on a Nonvisible Layer 181
Maintaining Zoom Percentage and Position of an Object 181
Object Viewer 181
Floating Viewer 183
Changing the Entity Display 184
Changing the AutoCAD Properties of an Object 185
Changing the Display Properties of an Object 185

Chapter 8

Mass Elements 187


Creating Mass Elements 188
Adding Mass Elements 189
Editing Mass Elements 200
Changing Mass Elements Using Grips 200
Changing Mass Element Properties 205

Chapter 9

Mass Groups 211


Mass Groups 212
Creating a Mass Group 212
Changing Mass Group Properties 216

Chapter 10

Space Planning 221


Interior Space Planning 222
Creating Spaces 222
Creating a Space 223
Creating a Space with a Ceiling Boundary 223
Creating a Space with a Floor Boundary 224
Creating a Space with a Set Area 224
Creating a Space with a Set Length 225
Creating a Space with a Set Width 226
Changing the Drag Point of a Space 226
Converting Polylines to Spaces 227
Generating Spaces from Walls 228
Generating Spaces from Walls, Lines, Arcs, Polylines, and Circles 228
Generating Spaces from All Linework 229
Updating Generated Spaces 230
Modifying Spaces 231
Editing Spaces 231
Changing the Properties of a Space 235
Space Styles 238
Creating Space Styles 238

Contents

Editing Space Styles 240


Viewing Information About Spaces 247
Creating a Space Report 248

Chapter 11

Space Boundaries 251


Space Boundaries 252
Creating a Space Boundary 253
Creating Space Boundaries 255
Converting Objects to Boundaries 255
Attaching Spaces to a Space Boundary 257
Merging Boundaries 258
Splitting Space Boundaries 258
Adding Boundary Edges 258
Editing Boundary Edges 259
Removing Boundary Edges 259
Anchoring Objects to Boundaries 259
Releasing Objects from Space Boundaries 260
Converting Space Boundaries to Walls 260
Editing Space Boundaries 261
Modifying a Space Boundary 261
Changing the Space Boundary Properties 262

Chapter 12

Slice Floorplates 269


Creating Floorplates 270
Generating a Slice 270
Setting the Slice Elevation 271
Converting a Slice to a Polyline 271
Attaching Objects to a Slice 271
Detaching Objects from a Slice 272
Modifying Slice Properties 272
Changing the Notes, Descriptions, or Reference Files for a Slice 273
Changing the Slice Location Properties 273

Chapter 13

Design Content 275


Using Design Content 276
AutoCAD DesignCenter Custom View 277
Changing the Design Content Menu 278
Adding AutoCAD Architectural Desktop Content 278
Adding Metric Content 279
Adding Bathroom Fittings Content 279
Adding Domestic Furniture Content 280
Adding Electrical Services Content 280

Contents

Adding Kitchen Fittings Content 281


Adding Office Furniture Content 282
Adding Pipe and Duct Content 282
Adding Site Content 283
Adding Metric D A CH Content 284
Adding DIN Symbols 284
Adding PlanzV 90 Symbols 285
Adding SIA Symbols 285
Adding Office Symbols 286
Adding Site Symbols 287
Adding Furniture Symbols 288
Adding Imperial Content 288
Adding Appliance Content 289
Adding Casework Content 289
Adding Ceiling Fixture Content 290
Adding Electrical Fixture Content 291
Adding Equipment Content 292
Adding Furniture Content 292
Adding Plumbing Content 293
Adding Site Content 294
Adding CSI Imperial Content 294
Adding Division 1 General Requirements Content 295
Adding Division 2 Site Construction Content 295
Adding Division 10 Specialties Content 296
Adding Division 11 Equipment Content 297
Adding Division 12 Furnishing Content 297
Adding Division 13 Special Construction Content 298
Adding Division 14 Conveying Systems Content 298
Adding Division 15 Mechanical Content 299
Adding Division 16 Electrical Content 300
Fixture Layout Overview 300
Placing Fixture Layout Content 302

Chapter 14

Walls 305
Creating Walls 306
Creating Straight Walls 307
Creating Curved Walls 309
Creating a Combination of Straight and Curved Walls 311
Modifying Walls 312
Changing Style of an Existing Wall 312
Changing the Wall Base Height 313
Changing the Wall Width 313
Changing the Wall Justification 313
Matching the Characteristics of an Existing Wall 314

Contents

Adding a Window to a Wall 314


Adding an Opening to a Wall 315
Adding a Door to a Wall 315
Adding an Assembly to a Wall 315
Changing Wall Properties 316
Attaching Notes and Files to a Wall 316
Changing the Wall Style Properties 317
Changing the Wall Dimension Properties 317
Changing the Wall Cleanup Properties 318
Troubleshooting Wall Cleanups 324
Changing the Roof Line and Floor Line of a Wall 327
Adding a Gable to the Roof Line of a Wall 328
Adding a Step to the Roof Line or Floor Line of a Wall 328
Changing Vertices in the Roof Line or Floor Line of a Wall 329
Reversing the Roof Line or Floor Line of a Wall 331
Setting Wall Style Overrides 332
Adding Wall Modifiers Manually 333
Removing Wall Modifiers Manually 335
Managing Wall 3D Modifiers 336
Changing the Wall Location Properties 338
Wall Entity Display Properties 339
Managing the Layer, Color, and Linetype for Wall Components 339
Managing the Hatching for Wall Components 340
Managing the Cut Plane Display Information 341
Managing Other Wall Display Information 342
Wall Styles 343
Creating New Wall Styles 343
Purging a Wall Style 345
Importing a Wall Style 346
Exporting a Wall Style to a New Drawing 346
Exporting Wall Styles to an Existing Drawing 347
Changing Wall Style Properties 348
Attaching Notes and Files to a Wall Style 348
Setting the Wall Style Default Properties 349
Changing the Wall Style Endcaps Properties 350
Adding a Component to a Wall Style 351
Removing a Component from a Wall Style 352
Changing the Wall Style Display Properties 353
Wall Component Index 354
Setting the Hatch Pattern for a Wall Style 355
Wall Cleanup Definitions 356
Creating a Wall Cleanup Group Definition 356
Editing a Wall Cleanup Group Definition 357
Purging a Wall Cleanup Group Definition 358
Importing Wall Cleanup Group Definitions 358

10

Contents

Exporting Wall Cleanup Group Definitions to a New Drawing 359


Exporting Wall Cleanup Group Definitions to an Existing Drawing 360
Assigning a Wall Cleanup Group to New Walls 361
Assigning a Different Wall Cleanup Group Definition to Existing Walls
362
Editing Walls 362
Converting Lines to Walls 362
Adding Wall Modifiers Automatically 363
Removing Wall Modifiers 364
Converting a Polyline to a Wall Modifier 365
Creating and Editing Wall Modifier Styles 366
Creating and Editing Endcap Styles 372
Overriding an Endcap Style 379
Merging Walls 379
Removing a Merged Wall 380
Changing the Roof Line of a Wall 381
Changing the Floor Line of the Wall 381
Adding an Interference Condition 382
Removing an Interference Condition 383
Sweeping a Profile 383
Changing the Sweep Profile Miter Angles 384
Adding an Object to the Wall 384
Subtracting an Object from a Wall 385
Replacing the Wall with an Object 386
Joining Walls 387
Reversing Wall Start/End 387
Anchoring an Object to a Wall 388
Detaching Objects from a Wall 388
Setting the Anchored End of an Object 388
Dimensioning a Single Wall 389
Dimensioning Multiple Walls 389

Chapter 15

Curtain Walls 395


Curtain Walls 396
Creating Curtain Walls 403
Creating a Straight Curtain Wall 403
Creating a Curved Curtain Wall 405
Creating a Curtain Wall that References a Curve 407
Converting a Layout Grid to a Curtain Wall 409
Creating a Curtain Wall with a Custom Grid 411
Converting a Wall to a Curtain Wall 413
Working with Nested Grids in Curtain Walls 414
Working with Curtain Wall Styles 419
Creating Element Definitions for a Curtain Wall Style 419

Contents

11

Defining Divisions for Curtain Wall Grids 421


Defining Infills for Curtain Wall Cells 432
Defining Curtain Wall Frames 438
Defining Curtain Wall Mullions 444
Assigning Definitions to Curtain Wall Elements 450
Modifying the Display of Curtain Walls 465
Setting Default Dimensions for a Curtain Wall Style 471
Attaching Notes and Files to a Curtain Wall Style 472
Managing Curtain Wall Styles 473
Modifying the Elements in a Curtain Wall 477
Overriding Cell and Edge Assignments in Curtain Walls 478
Using Edit in Place for Curtain Walls 483
Modifying Curtain Wall Styles 491
Modifying Curtain Walls 494
Changing the Base Height of a Curtain Wall 495
Selecting a Different Curtain Wall Style 495
Matching the Style or Base Height of an Existing Curtain Wall 496
Changing the Curtain Wall Dimensions 496
Changing the Roof Line and Floor Line of a Curtain Wall 497
Changing the Roof Line of a Curtain Wall 502
Changing the Floor Line of a Curtain Wall 503
Reversing Curtain Wall Start/End 504
Changing the Curtain Wall Location Properties 504
Adding an Interference Condition to a Curtain Wall 505
Cleaning up Curtain Wall Corners 506
Attaching Notes and Files to a Curtain Wall 508
Editing Objects Anchored in Curtain Walls 509
Changing the Orientation of an Object Anchored in a Curtain Wall 509
Changing the Alignment of an Object Anchored in a Curtain Wall 510
Changing the Offset of an Object Anchored in a Curtain Wall 510
Swapping Two Objects Anchored in a Curtain Wall 510
Releasing an Object Anchored in a Curtain Wall 511
Curtain Wall Units 511
Creating Curtain Wall Units 514
Creating a Curtain Wall Unit 514
Converting a Layout Grid to a Curtain Wall Unit 515
Creating a Curtain Wall Unit with a Custom Grid 516
Working with Curtain Wall Unit Styles 518
Creating Element Definitions for a Curtain Wall Unit Style 519
Defining Infills for Curtain Wall Unit Cells 525
Defining Curtain Wall Unit Frames 528
Defining Curtain Wall Unit Mullions 532
Assigning Definitions to Curtain Wall Unit Elements 537
Assigning Infills to Curtain Wall Unit Cells 538
Modifying the Display of Curtain Wall Units 547

12

Contents

Attaching Notes and Files to a Curtain Wall Unit Style 552


Managing Curtain Wall Unit Styles 553
Modifying the Elements in a Curtain Wall Unit 557
Overriding Cell and Edge Assignments for Curtain Wall Units 558
Using Edit in Place with Curtain Wall Units 562
Modifying Curtain Wall Unit Styles 570
Modifying Curtain Wall Units 571
Select a New Style for a Curtain Wall Unit 572
Changing the Dimensions of a Curtain Wall Unit 572
Setting a Miter Angle for a Curtain Wall Unit Adjacent to Another Object 573
Removing Curtain Wall Unit Overrides 574
Attaching Notes and Files to a Curtain Wall Unit 574
Changing the Location of a Freestanding Curtain Wall Unit 575
Modifying the Position of Anchored Curtain Wall Units 576

Chapter 16

Slabs 581
Creating Slabs 582
Creating a Slab 583
Creating Slabs Based on Walls 584
Creating a Slab Based on Multiple Walls 585
Creating a Slab from a Polyline 587
Modifying a Slab 588
Editing Slabs 589
Editing a Slab Edge 589
Trimming a Slab 590
Extending a Slab 591
Mitering Slabs by Intersection 593
Mitering Slabs Using Edges 593
Cutting a Slab 594
Adding a Vertex to a Slab 594
Deleting a Vertex from a Slab 595
Adding Holes to a Slab 595
Removing Holes from a Slab 597
Adding Objects to a Slab (Boolean) 598
Subtracting Objects from a Slab (Boolean) 598
Removing Objects from a Slab (Boolean) 599
Grip Editing Slabs 599
Object Snap (Osnap) Behavior for Slabs 600
Slab Properties 600
Attaching Notes and Files to a Slab 600
Changing the Slab Style or Applying a New Slab Style 601
Changing the Slab Dimensions 601
Changing the Slab Edge Properties 603

Contents

13

Changing the Location of the Slab 603


Working with Slab Styles 604
Creating New Slab Styles 604
Purging a Slab Style 606
Importing a Slab Style 606
Exporting a Slab Style to a New Drawing 607
Exporting Slab Styles to an Existing Drawing 608
Changing Slab Style Properties 609
Adding Notes and Files to Slab Styles 609
Changing the Slab Style Default Properties 610
Changing the Slab Style Design Rules Properties 611
Changing the Slab Style Display Properties 611
Slab Edges 612
Slab Edge Styles 613
Creating New Slab Edge Styles 614
Purging a Slab Edge Style 615
Importing a Slab Edge Style 615
Exporting a Slab Edge Style to a New Drawing 616
Exporting Slab Edge Styles to an Existing Drawing 617
Changing Slab Edge Style Properties 618

Chapter 17

Openings 623
Creating Openings 624
Creating an Opening in a Wall 624
Creating an Opening in a Space Boundary 626
Creating a Freestanding Opening 627
Changing an Existing Opening 628
Repositioning an Opening 628
Changing Opening Properties 629
Attaching Notes and Files to an Opening 629
Changing Opening Dimension Properties 630
Changing the Position of an Opening Along a Wall or Space Boundary
630
Changing the Position of an Opening Vertically in a Wall or Space
Boundary 631
Changing the Position of an Opening Within a Wall or Space Boundary
631
Changing the Orientation of an Opening to a Wall or Space Boundary
632
Changing an Opening Endcap Properties 632
Changing an Opening Location Properties 633
Changing an Opening Entity Display 634
Changing the Display of Openings 634
Adding Components to the Display of Openings 635

14

Contents

Editing Components in an Opening Display 636


Removing Components from an Opening Display 637
Turning Off the Display of Opening Components 638

Chapter 18

Doors 641
Creating Doors 642
Creating a Door in a Wall 643
Creating a Door in a Space Boundary 644
Creating a Freestanding Door 645
Editing Doors 645
Changing the Style of an Existing Door 645
Changing the Door Size 646
Changing the Door Width 646
Changing the Door Height 646
Changing the Door Rise 647
Changing the Door Leaf 647
Changing the Door Opening Percentage 647
Moving a Door Along a Wall 647
Moving a Door Within a Wall 648
Flipping the Hinge of a Door 649
Flipping the Swing of a Door 649
Changing the Door Swing Opening 649
Changing Door Styles 650
Creating a Door Style 650
Creating a Door Style from an Existing Style 651
Editing a Door Style 651
Purging a Door Style 652
Importing Door Styles 652
Exporting Door Styles to a New Drawing 653
Exporting Door Styles to an Existing Drawing 654
Door Style Properties 655
Attaching Notes and Files to a Door Style 655
Changing the Door Style Dimensions Properties 656
Changing the Door Style Design Rules Properties 657
Changing the Standard Sizes of Door Styles 658
Changing the Door Style Display Properties 659
Changing the Entity Display of Doors 660
Changing the Display of Doors 660
Adding Components to the Display of Doors 660
Editing Components in the Display of Doors 662
Removing Components in the Display of Doors 663
Disabling the Display of Components in the Display of Doors 664
Displaying the Door Swing as Straight 664
Overriding the Opening Percentage for a Door 665

Contents

15

Changing the Door Threshold 665


Changing Door Properties 666
Attaching Notes and Files to a Door 666
Changing the Door Style Properties 667
Changing the Door Dimension Properties 667
Changing the Position of the Door Horizontally along the Wall or
Space Boundary 668
Changing the Position of the Door Vertically in the Wall or Space
Boundary 669
Changing the Position of the Door within the Wall or Space Boundary
669
Changing the Orientation of the Door to the Wall or Space Boundary
670
Changing the Door Endcap Properties 671
Changing the Door Location Properties 671

Chapter 19

Windows 675
Creating Windows 676
Creating a Window in a Wall 678
Creating a Window in a Space Boundary 679
Creating a Freestanding Window 680
Editing Windows 680
Changing the Style of an Existing Window 680
Changing Window Size 681
Changing Window Width 681
Changing Window Height 681
Changing Window Vertical Alignment 682
Moving a Window Along a Wall 682
Moving a Window Within a Wall 682
Flipping the Hinge of a Window 683
Flipping the Swing of a Window 683
Changing the Window Swing Opening 683
Changing Window Properties 684
Attaching Notes and Files to a Window 684
Changing Window Style Properties 685
Changing Window Dimension Properties 685
Changing the Position of a Window Along a Wall or Space Boundary
686
Changing the Position of a Window Vertically in a Wall or Space
Boundary 686
Changing the Position of a Window Within a Wall or Space Boundary
687
Changing the Orientation of a Window to a Wall or Space Boundary
688

16

Contents

Changing Window Endcap Properties 689


Changing Window Location Properties 689
Window Styles 690
Creating New Window Styles 690
Purging a Window Style 692
Importing a Window Style 693
Exporting a Window Style to a New Drawing 694
Exporting Window Styles to an Existing Drawing 694
Changing Window Style Properties 695
Attaching Notes and Files to a Window Style 695
Changing Window Style Dimension Properties 696
Changing Window Style Design Rule Properties 697
Changing Standard Sizes for a Window Style 697
Changing Window Style Display Properties 698
Changing the Entity Display of Windows 699
Changing the Display of Windows 699
Adding Components to a Window Display 700
Editing Components in a Window Display 702
Removing Components in a Window Display 703
Turning Off the Display of Components in a Window Display 703
Overriding a Window Opening Percentage 704
Changing the Windowsill 704
Creating Window Muntins 705
Adding a Rectangular Pattern Muntin 706
Adding a Diamond Pattern Muntin 709
Adding a Starburst Pattern Muntin 711
Adding a Sunburst Pattern Muntin 713
Adding a Gothic Pattern Muntin 716
Editing a Window Muntins Block 718
Removing a Window Muntins Block 719
Turning Off the Display of Window Muntins 719

Chapter 20

Window Assemblies 723


Window Assemblies 724
Creating Window Assemblies 727
Creating a Window Assembly 728
Converting a Layout Grid to a Window Assembly 729
Creating a Window Assembly with a Custom Grid 731
Working with Nested Grids in Window Assemblies 733
Working with Window Assembly Styles 736
Creating Element Definitions for a Window Assembly Style 736
Defining Divisions for Window Assembly Grids 737
Defining Infills for Window Assembly Cells 743
Defining Window Assembly Frames 747

Contents

17

Defining Window Assembly Mullions 751


Assigning Definitions to Window Assembly Elements 755
Assigning Divisions to a Window Assembly Grid 756
Assigning Infills to Window Assembly Cells 756
Assigning Definitions to Window Assembly Frames 762
Assigning Definitions to the Mullions of a Window Assembly 764
Modifying the Display of Window Assemblies 767
Setting Default Dimensions for a Window Assembly Style 772
Attaching Notes and Files to a Window Assembly Style 772
Managing Window Assembly Styles 773
Modifying the Elements in a Window Assembly 778
Overriding Cell and Edge Assignments in Window Assemblies 779
Using Edit in Place with Window Assemblies 783
Modifying Window Assembly Styles 790
Modifying Window Assemblies 792
Changing the Style of an Existing Window Assembly 793
Matching the Properties of an Existing Window Assembly 793
Changing the Window Assembly Width 794
Changing Window Assembly Height 794
Changing Window Assembly Vertical Alignment 794
Changing the Window Assembly Dimensions 795
Changing the Window Assembly Shape 795
Changing the Location of a Freestanding Window Assembly 796
Adding an Interference Condition to a Window Assembly 797
Cleaning up Window Assembly Corners 797
Attaching Notes and Files to a Window Assembly 799
Editing Objects Anchored in Window Assemblies 799

Chapter 21

Structural Members 805


Working with Structural Members 806
Using the Structural Member Catalog 806
Displaying the Structural Member Catalog 808
Locating Shapes in the Structural Member Catalog 808
Opening a Catalog File in the Structural Member Catalog 809
Creating a Style from a Shape in the Structural Member Catalog 810
Locating a Structural Member in the Structural Member Catalog from a
Member in a Drawing 811
Creating Structural Members 811
Creating a Column 812
Creating a Brace 816
Creating a Beam 818
Creating a Structural Member by Converting Lines, Arcs, or Polylines
819
Modifying Structural Members 821

18

Contents

Attaching Notes, Descriptions, or Reference Files to a Structural Member 822


Changing the Style of a Structural Member 822
Changing the Dimensions of a Structural Member 823
Using Trim Planes to Modify Structural Members 825
Changing the Location of a Structural Member 828
Modifying the Display of Structural Members 829
Changing the Display of a Structural Member 831
Setting the Hatch Pattern for a Structural Member 832
Managing the Cut Plane Display Information 833
Adding Custom Graphics as a Display Component of a Structural Member 834
Changing the Structural Member Style Properties 835
Attaching Style Notes, Descriptions, or Reference Files to a Structural
Member Style 835
Using the Design Rules to Create Custom Structural Member Styles 837
Accessing the Design Rules of a Structural Member 837
Changing the Shape of a Structural Member 839
Adding a Shape to a Structural Member 840
Creating a Single Component Structural Member 841
Creating a Multi-Component Structural Member 843
Creating a Multi-Component Structural Member Using Multiple Segments 845
Creating Custom Shapes for Structural Members 852
Creating a Custom Shape for a Structural Member 853
Copying a Custom Shape 854
Editing a Custom Shape 855
Purging Custom Shapes 855
Working with Structural Member Styles in the Style Manager 856
Creating a New Structural Member Style 857
Creating a New Structural Member Style from an Existing Style 857
Purging a Structural Member Style 858
Importing a Structural Member Style 859
Exporting a Structural Member Style to a New Drawing 860
Exporting Structural Member Styles to an Existing Drawing 860

Chapter 22

Roofs 863
Creating Roofs 864
Creating a Single Slope Roof 864
Creating a Double Slope Roof 865
Creating a Gable Roof 865
Creating a Roof from a Polyline 866
Creating a Roof from Walls 867
Modifying Roofs 868

Contents

19

Changing an Existing Roof 868


Changing the Roof Edges and Faces 868
Changing Roof Properties 869
Attaching Notes and Files to a Roof 869
Changing the Roof Dimension Properties 870
Changing the Roof Location Properties 871
Roof Slabs 872
Creating Roof Slabs 873
Creating a Roof Slab 875
Creating Roof Slabs from an Existing Roof 878
Creating Roof Slabs Based on Walls 879
Creating a Flat Roof Slab Based on Multiple Walls 880
Creating a Roof Slab from a Polyline 882
Modifying a Roof Slab 884
Editing Roof Slabs 885
Editing a Roof Slab Edge 885
Trimming a Roof Slab 885
Extending a Roof Slab 887
Mitering Roof Slabs by Intersection 888
Mitering Roof Slabs Using Edges 890
Cutting a Roof Slab 892
Adding a Vertex to a Roof Slab 892
Deleting a Vertex from a Roof Slab 893
Adding Holes to a Roof Slab 894
Removing Holes from a Roof Slab 896
Adding Objects to a Roof Slab (Boolean) 896
Subtracting Objects from a Roof Slab (Boolean) 897
Removing Objects from a Roof Slab (Boolean) 898
Creating a Dormer in a Roof Slab 898
Grip Editing Roof Slabs 900
Object Snap (Osnap) Behavior for Roof Slabs 901
Roof Slab Properties 901
Attaching Notes and Files to a Roof Slab 901
Changing the Roof Slab Style or Applying a New Roof Slab Style 902
Changing the Roof Slab Dimensions 903
Changing the Roof Slab Edge Properties 904
Changing the Location of the Roof Slab 905
Working with Roof Slab Styles 905
Creating New Roof Slab Styles 906
Purging a Roof Slab Style 907
Importing a Roof Slab Style 908
Exporting a Roof Slab Style to a New Drawing 909
Exporting Roof Slab Styles to an Existing Drawing 909
Changing Roof Slab Style Properties 910
Adding Notes and Files to Roof Slab Styles 910

20

Contents

Changing the Roof Slab Style Default Properties 911


Changing the Roof Slab Style Design Rules Properties 912
Changing the Roof Slab Style Display Properties 913
Roof Slab Edges 914
Roof Slab Edge Styles 916
Creating New Roof Slab Edge Styles 916
Purging a Roof Slab Edge Style 918
Importing a Roof Slab Edge Style 918
Exporting a Roof Slab Edge Style to a New Drawing 919
Exporting Roof Slab Edge Styles to an Existing Drawing 920
Changing Roof Slab Edge Style Properties 921
Adding Notes and Files to Roof Slab Edge Styles 921
Changing the Roof Slab Edge Style Default Properties 922
Changing the Roof Slab Edge Style Design Rules Properties 923

Chapter 23

Stairs 927
Creating Stairs 928
Creating Straight Stairs 928
Creating U-shaped Stairs 929
Creating Multi-landing Stairs 931
Creating Spiral Stairs 934
Modifying Stairs 936
Changing an Existing Stair 936
Changing an Existing Stair Using Grips 937
Changing the Side of a Stair 937
Changing the Shape of a Flight 942
Changing the Shape of a Landing 944
Changing the Shape of a Spiral Stair to a Circle Using Grips 944
Changing the Shape of a Spiral Stair to an Arc Using Grips 945
Changing Stair Properties 946
Attaching Notes and Files to a Stair 946
Changing Stair Style Properties 946
Changing Stair Dimension Properties 947
Changing Stair Floor Setting Properties 948
Changing Flight Length Limits 949
Changing Stair Interference Properties 950
Changing U-shaped Stair Properties 951
Changing Spiral Shape Stair Properties 952
Changing Flight Dimension Properties 953
Changing Landing Dimension Properties 954
Changing Landing Extension Properties 955
Changing Stair Location Properties 956
Changing Stair Styles 957
Creating New Stair Styles 958

Contents

21

Editing a Stair Style 960


Purging a Stair Style 967
Importing Stair Styles 968
Exporting Stair Styles to a New Drawing 969
Exporting Stair Styles to an Existing Drawing 969
Changing the Size of Landing Components 970

Chapter 24

Railings 973
Creating Railings 974
Creating a Railing Attached to a Stair 974
Creating a Railing Attached to a Stair Flight 975
Creating a Freestanding Railing 976
Converting a Polyline to a Railing 977
Modifying Railings 978
Changing an Existing Railing 978
Adding a Post to a Railing 979
Removing a Post from a Railing 979
Redistributing Posts on a Railing 980
Hiding Posts 981
Showing Hidden Posts 981
Reversing the Direction of the Railing 982
Anchoring an Existing Railing to a Stair 982
Custom Railing Blocks and Profiles 983
Adding Custom Blocks to Railings 984
Editing Custom Blocks in a Railing Display 986
Removing Custom Blocks in the Display of Railings 988
Disabling Custom Blocks in the Display of Railings 989
Adding Custom Profiles to Railings 989
Editing Custom Profiles in a Railing Display 992
Removing Custom Profiles in the Display of Railings 994
Turning Off Custom Profiles in the Display of Railings 994
Changing Railing Properties 995
Attaching Notes and Files to a Railing 995
Changing the Style of a Railing 996
Changing Upper Rail Location Properties 996
Changing Bottom Rail Properties 998
Changing Post Location Properties 999
Changing the Properties of Railing Extensions at Floor Levels 1000
Changing the Properties of Railing Extensions at Landings 1001
Changing Railing Anchor Properties 1001
Changing Railing Location Properties 1002
Changing Railing Styles 1003
Creating a Railing Style 1003
Editing a Railing Style 1004

22

Contents

Creating a Railing Style from an Existing Style 1004


Purging a Railing Style 1005
Importing Railing Styles 1006
Exporting Railing Styles to a New Drawing 1007
Exporting Railing Styles to an Existing Drawing 1007
Changing Railing Style Properties 1008
Attaching Notes and Files to a Railing Style 1008
Changing Railing Style Upper Rail Location Properties 1009
Changing Railing Style Bottom Rail Location Properties 1011
Changing Railing Style Post Location Properties 1012
Changing Railing Style Components Properties 1013
Changing Railing Style Extensions Properties 1014
Changing Railing Style Display Properties 1016

Chapter 25

Grids 1019
Column Grids 1020
Creating a Rectangular Column Grid 1020
Creating a Radial Column Grid 1021
Creating a Rectangular Column Grid Dynamically 1022
Creating a Radial Column Grid Dynamically 1023
Labeling a Column Grid 1023
Extending Column Grid Lines beyond the Grid Boundary or Limits
1025
Dimensioning Column Grids 1025
Modifying Column Grids 1026
Changing Existing Rectangular Column Grids 1026
Changing Existing Radial Column Grids 1026
Attaching a Clipping Boundary to a Column Grid 1026
Adding a Hole to a Column Grid 1027
Removing a Hole from a Column Grid 1027
Changing the Column Grid Properties 1027
Attaching Notes and Files to a Column Grid 1028
Changing the Overall Size of a Column Grid 1028
Changing the Width of a Column Grid 1029
Changing the Depth of a Column Grid 1029
Changing the Column Grid X-Spacing Properties 1030
Changing the Column Grid Y-Spacing Properties 1030
Changing the Radial Column Grid Angle Dimension Properties 1031
Changing the Radial Column Grid Angle Properties 1031
Changing the Column Grid Location Properties 1032
Ceiling Grids 1033
Creating a Ceiling Grid with a Clipping Boundary 1033
Creating a Freestanding Ceiling Grid 1034
Creating a Ceiling Grid by Specifying the Size Dynamically 1035

Contents

23

Changing the Existing Ceiling Grids 1035


Attaching a Clipping Boundary to a Ceiling Grid 1036
Adding a Hole to a Ceiling Grid 1036
Removing a Hole from a Ceiling Grid 1037
Changing the Ceiling Grid Properties 1037
Attaching Notes and Files to a Ceiling Grid 1038
Changing the Overall Size of a Ceiling Grid 1038
Changing the Ceiling Grid Location Properties 1041

Chapter 26

Annotation 1045
Changing the Drawing Scale 1046
Setting the Drawing Scale 1046
Documentation Symbols 1047
Revision Clouds 1047
Chases, Ducts and Floor Openings 1048
Break Marks 1049
Detail Marks 1050
Elevation Marks 1053
Leaders 1057
Miscellaneous Symbols 1059
Section Marks 1060
Title Marks 1061

Chapter 27

AEC Dimensions 1063


Dimension Types and Uses 1064
Automatic AEC Dimensions 1064
Manual AEC Dimensions 1065
AutoCAD Dimensions 1065
The Contents of AEC Dimensions 1067
AEC Dimension Contents 1067
Predefined AEC Dimension Styles 1069
Setting AEC Dimension Preferences 1070
Creating AEC Dimensions 1073
Creating Automatic AEC Dimensions 1073
Creating Manual AEC Dimensions 1074
Creating AEC Dimensions from AutoCAD Dimensions 1076
Special Case: Copying Properties of AEC Dimensions to AutoCAD Dimensions 1078
Adding dimension points 1079
Removing Dimension Points 1080
Removing Dimension Points 1080
Restoring Automatic Dimension Points 1082
Attaching Objects to Dimensions 1083

24

Contents

Detaching Objects from Dimensions 1084


Editing AEC Dimensions 1085
Editing AEC Dimension Properties 1086
Moving Dimension Texts 1088
Working with Dimension Styles 1089
AEC Dimension Styles and AutoCAD Dimension Styles 1089
Creating AutoCAD Dimension Styles 1089
Creating AEC Dimension Styles 1091
Creating New AEC Dimension Styles 1091
Purging an AEC Dimension Style 1093
Importing an AEC Dimension Style 1093
Exporting an AEC Dimension Style to a New Drawing 1094
Exporting AEC Dimension Styles to an Existing Drawing 1095
Changing AEC Dimension Style Properties 1096
The AEC Dimension Display Wizard 1097
Attaching Notes and Files to an AEC Dimension Style 1099
Changing the AEC Dimension Style Chains Properties 1099
Changing the AEC Dimension Style Display Properties 1100
Q and A for Working with AEC Dimensions 1108

Chapter 28

Dimension Labels 1113


Working with Dimension Labels 1114
Standard Dimension Labels 1115
Standard Door/Window/Opening Labels 1115
Standard Stair Label 1116
Setting Dimension Label Preferences 1117
Setting Prefixes for Dimension Labels 1118
Adding Dimension Labels 1118
Modifying Dimension Labels 1119
Editing Dimension Label Properties 1120
Dimension Label Behavior 1123
Creating User-Defined Dimension Labels 1125
Adding Attributes 1125
Creating a Block 1128
Creating a Multi-View Block 1129
Adding the Dimension Label to the AutoCAD DesignCenter 1130

Chapter 29

Elevation Labels 1133


Working with Elevation Labels 1134
Adding Elevation Labels 1135
Modifying Elevation Labels 1136
Editing Elevation Label Properties 1137
Creating User-Defined Elevation Labels 1140

Contents

25

Creating a Graphic Symbol 1140


Adding Attributes 1141
Creating a Block 1142
Creating a Multi-View Block 1142
Adding the Elevation Label to the AutoCAD DesignCenter 1143

Chapter 30

Areas 1145
Working with Areas 1146
Work Order 1147
Creating Areas 1149
Creating New Areas 1149
Creating Areas from Objects 1153
Examples for Creating Areas 1157
Creating User-Defined Area Tags 1160
Editing Areas 1164
Grip Editing Areas 1165
Changing Area Properties 1165
Area Operations 1169
Joining Areas Together 1170
Creating Holes in Areas 1171
Creating Areas from the Intersection of Other Areas 1172
Vertices 1173
Trimming Areas 1174
Dividing Areas 1175
Removing Rings from Areas 1175
Reversing Area Rings 1176
Reversing Area Profiles 1177
Creating Polylines from Areas 1177
Attaching Areas to Area Groups 1178
Detaching Areas from Area Groups 1180
Area Styles 1181
Creating New Area Styles 1182
Purging Area Styles 1184
Importing Area Styles 1184
Exporting Area Styles to a New Drawing 1185
Exporting Area Styles to an Existing Drawing 1186
Changing Area Style Properties 1187
Attaching Notes and Files to an Area Style 1187
Changing the Area Style Layer/Color/Linetype Properties 1188
Changing the Area Style Hatching Properties 1189
Calculation Modifier Styles 1190
Creating New Calculation Modifier Styles 1190
Editing Calculation Modifier Styles 1192
Importing Calculation Modifier Styles 1196

26

Contents

Exporting Calculation Modifier Styles 1197


Purging Calculation Modifier Styles 1198
Attaching Calculation Modifier Styles to Areas 1199
Area Decomposition 1200
Display the Area Decomposition 1201
Area Decomposition Settings 1202

Chapter 31

Area Groups 1209


Working with Area Groups 1210
Creating Area Groups 1211
Creating a New Area Group 1212
Creating New Area Groups from a Group Template 1212
Attaching Area Groups to Other Groups 1214
Detaching Area Groups from Other Groups 1215
Editing Area Groups 1216
Changing Area Group Properties 1216
Creating an Area Group Layout 1223
Creating Polylines from Area Groups 1224
Area Group Styles 1225
Creating New Area Group Styles 1226
Editing Area Group Styles 1227
Changing Area Group Style Properties 1228
Importing Area Group Styles 1233
Exporting Area Group Styles 1234
Purging Area Group Styles 1236
Area Name Definitions 1236
Creating New Area Name Definitions 1237
Editing Area Name Definitions 1239
Importing Area Name Definitions 1241
Exporting Area Name Definitions 1242
Purging Area Name Definitions 1244
Area Group Templates 1245
Creating New Area Group Templates 1245
Editing Area Group Templates 1247
Importing Area Group Templates 1251
Exporting Area Group Templates 1252
Purging Area Group Templates 1254

Chapter 32

Area Evaluation 1257


Working with the Area Evaluation 1258
Preparing the Area Evaluation 1258
Selecting Areas 1258
Evaluation Content 1260

Contents

27

Image Display Properties 1264


Data Format Style Properties 1265
Setting the Default Templates 1267
Creating the Area Evaluation Document 1268
Creating an XLS Evaluation Document 1268
Creating a TXT Evaluation Document 1269
Creating XLT Templates 1269

Chapter 33

Schedules 1273
Creating Schedules in Autodesk Architectural Desktop 1274
Adding Schedule Tags 1278
Displaying Schedule Data When You Insert a Tag 1279
Adding Door and Window Tags 1280
Adding Object Tags 1280
Adding Room and Finish Tags 1281
Adding Wall Tags 1282
Anchoring a Tag to an Object 1283
Releasing an Anchored Tag 1283
Viewing the Relationship Between Schedule Tags and Objects 1284
Creating Custom Tags 1284
Using Schedule Data 1287
Attaching Schedule Data 1288
Editing Schedule Data 1288
Attaching Schedule Data to Object Styles and Definitions 1289
Browsing Existing Property Data 1290
Browsing Existing Property Set Definition Data 1291
Renumbering Existing Schedule Data 1292
Property Set Definitions 1292
Creating a New Property Set Definition 1293
Creating a Property Set Definition from an Existing Property Set Definition 1293
Defining What the Property Set Definition Applies To 1294
Editing a Property Set Definition 1295
Adding an Automatic Property 1297
Removing Property Set Definitions 1298
Merging Property Set Definitions 1299
Understanding Some Automatic Properties 1299
Attaching Notes or Files to a Property Set 1303
Purging Property Set Definitions 1304
Importing Property Set Definitions 1305
Exporting Property Set Definitions to an Existing Drawing 1306
Exporting Property Set Definitions to a New Drawing 1307
Data Format Styles 1308
Creating a Data Format Style 1308

28

Contents

Creating a Data Format Style from an Existing Data Format Style 1309
Attaching Notes or Files to a Data Format Style 1309
Editing a Data Format Style 1310
Purging Data Format Styles 1313
Importing Data Format Styles 1313
Exporting Data Format Styles to an Existing Drawing 1315
Exporting Data Format Styles to a New Drawing 1316
Schedule Tables 1316
Adding a Schedule Table 1317
Updating a Schedule Table 1318
Exporting Schedule Table Information 1319
Exporting Schedule Tables 1319
Schedule Table Styles 1320
Creating a Schedule Table Style 1320
Creating a Schedule Table Style from an Existing Schedule Table Style
1320
Attaching Notes and Files to a Schedule Table Style 1321
Changing the Schedule Table Style Default Format 1322
Defining What the Schedule Table Applies to 1323
Adding Schedule Table Style Columns 1324
Adding a Heading to a Schedule Table 1326
Editing Schedule Table Style Columns 1327
Deleting Schedule Table Style Columns 1328
Setting the Schedule Table Style Sorting 1328
Overriding Schedule Table Title Formats 1329
Editing the Schedule Table Style Display Properties 1330
Purging Schedule Table Styles 1331
Importing Schedule Table Styles 1332
Exporting Schedule Table Styles to an Existing Drawing 1333
Exporting Schedule Table Styles to a New Drawing 1334
Editing Table Cells 1335
Editing Schedule Tables 1335
Schedule Table Properties 1336
Attaching Notes and Files to a Schedule Table 1336
Changing the Style of the Schedule Table 1337
Changing the Schedule Table Settings 1337
Changing the Location of a Schedule Table 1337
Schedule Table Selection 1338
Adding Objects to a Schedule Table 1338
Removing Objects from a Schedule Table 1338
Reselecting the Objects to Be Included in a Schedule Table 1339
Showing Objects that are in a Schedule Table 1339

Contents

29

Chapter 34

Elevations 1343
Creating 2D and 3D Elevations 1344
Drawing and Changing Elevation Lines 1344
Drawing an Elevation Line and Mark 1346
Changing Elevation Line Properties 1347
Changing the Elevation Mark Attributes 1351
Creating and Changing 2D Elevations 1351
Creating a New 2D Elevation 1352
Changing the Display of Graphic Subdivisions 1354
Updating an Existing 2D Elevation 1354
Changing the 2D Elevation Properties 1356
Working with 2D Elevation Styles 1358
Creating New 2D Elevation Styles 1358
Purging a 2D Elevation Style 1360
Importing a 2D Elevation Style 1361
Exporting a 2D Elevation Style to a New Drawing 1362
Exporting 2D Elevation Styles to an Existing Drawing 1362
Changing 2D Elevation Style Properties 1363
Changing the 2D Elevation Style Notes, Descriptions, or Reference Files
1364
Changing the 2D Elevation Style Display Components 1365
Changing the 2D Elevation Style Design Rule Properties 1366
Changing the 2D Elevation Style Display Properties 1368
Editing and Merging Linework in 2D Elevations 1369
Editing Linework in 2D Elevations 1370
Merging Linework into 2D Elevations 1371
Saving Linework Changes to a 2D Elevation 1371
Creating and Changing 3D Elevations 1372
Creating a New 3D Elevation 1373
Updating an Existing 3D Elevation 1374
Changing the 3D Elevation Properties 1375
Changing the Display of Graphic Subdivisions in a 3D Elevation 1377

Chapter 35

Sections 1379
Creating 2D and 3D Sections 1380
Drawing and Changing Section Lines 1380
Drawing a Section Line and Mark 1382
Changing Section Line Properties 1384
Changing the Section Mark Attributes 1388
Creating and Changing 2D Sections 1389
Creating a New 2D Section 1389
Changing the Display of Graphic Subdivisions in a 2D Section 1391
Updating an Existing 2D Section 1392
Reversing an Existing Section 1393

30

Contents

Changing the 2D Section Properties 1394


Working with 2D Section Styles 1395
Creating New 2D Section Styles 1396
Purging a 2D Section Style 1397
Importing a 2D Section Style 1398
Exporting a 2D Section Style to a New Drawing 1399
Exporting 2D Section Styles to an Existing Drawing 1400
Changing 2D Section Style Properties 1401
Changing the 2D Section Style Notes, Descriptions, or Reference Files
1401
Changing the 2D Section Style Display Components 1402
Changing the 2D Section Style Design Rule Properties 1403
Changing the 2D Section Style Display Properties 1405
Editing and Merging Linework in 2D Sections 1406
Editing Linework in 2D Sections 1407
Merging Linework into 2D Sections 1408
Saving Linework Changes to a 2D Section 1409
Creating and Changing 3D Sections 1410
Creating a New 3D Section 1410
Updating an Existing 3D Section 1411
Changing the 3D Section Properties 1413
Changing the Display of Graphic Subdivisions in a 3D Section 1414

Chapter 36

Live Sections 1417


Working with Live Sections 1418
Creating a Section Line and Mark 1418
Changing Section Line Properties 1420
Attaching Notes and Files to a Section Mark 1420
Changing the Dimensions of a Section 1420
Creating Graphic Subdivisions in a Section 1422
Changing the Section Line Location Properties 1423
Generating a Live Section 1423
Changing the Display Properties of a Live Section 1426
Changing Layer/Color/Linetype Display Properties 1427
Changing Hatch Display Properties 1428
Walls: Applying Display Properties from Another Display Configuration 1429
Adding and Removing Objects from Live Sections 1430
Adding and Removing Objects from a Single Live Section 1430
Adding and Removing Objects from Multiple Live Sections 1431

Chapter 37

Cameras 1433
Working with Cameras 1434

Contents

31

Inserting a Camera into a Drawing 1434


Changing the Camera View Using Grips 1435
Modifying an Existing Camera 1436
Associating Cameras with Viewports 1436
Setting the Viewport to the Camera View 1437
Changing the View of the Camera 1437
Creating a Video Dry Run with a Camera 1438
Creating a Video with a Camera 1439
Changing the Camera Properties 1440
Attaching Notes and Files to a Camera 1440
Changing the Camera Name and Zoom Length 1441
Changing the Camera Location Properties 1441

Chapter 38

AEC Options 1445


Modifying the Architectural Desktop Environment 1446
Changing the AEC Editor Settings 1447
Changing the AEC Drawing Defaults 1448
Changing the AEC Performance Settings 1450
Changing the AEC Stair Defaults Settings 1451
Setting the General Stair Defaults 1451
Setting Stair Code Limits Defaults 1452
Setting Flight Height Limits Defaults 1452
Setting U-shaped (Landing) Stair Defaults 1453
Setting the Stair Interference Defaults 1455
Changing the AEC Content Settings 1456
Changing the AEC Dimension Settings 1457
General Settings 1457
AEC Dimension Settings 1458
Elevation Label Settings 1458
Dimension Label Settings 1459
Changing the Settings 1459

Chapter 39

Drawing Setup 1461


Setting up Your Drawing 1462
Setting the Drawing Units 1462
Setting the Drawing Scale 1464
Selecting Layer Standards and Layer Key Styles 1466
Setting or Changing the Default Display Representations of AEC Objects 1468

Chapter 40

Layer Management 1469


Managing Layers in Autodesk Architectural Desktop 1470

32

Contents

Getting Started with the Layer Manager 1472


Displaying the Layer Manager 1472
Moving and Resizing the Layer Manager 1472
Working with Individual Layers in the Layer Manager 1473
Working with Layer Standards 1476
Layer Standards Included with the Layer Manager 1477
Creating New Layer Standards 1485
Creating New Layer Standards from Existing Layer Standards 1486
Editing Layer Standard Definitions 1487
Purging Layer Standards 1490
Importing Layer Standards 1490
Exporting Layer Standards to New Drawings 1491
Exporting Layer Standards to Existing Drawings 1491
Layer Keying 1492
Layer Key Styles 1493
Default Layer Keys 1501
Layer Key Values 1506
Using Layer Key Overrides 1506
Remapping Object Layers 1508
Remapping Objects to Different Layers 1509
Restoring Objects to Default Layer Key Layers 1509
Working with Layer Groups 1510
Creating Layer Groups 1510
Creating User-Defined Groups 1511
Creating Filter Groups 1511
Manually Adding Layers to Layer Groups 1517
Changing Existing Layer Groups 1518
Working with Layer Snapshots 1520
Creating Snapshots of All Drawing Layers 1521
Creating Snapshots of Layer Groups 1521
Editing Layer Snapshots 1522
Deleting Layer Snapshots 1522
Restoring Layer Snapshots 1522
Importing Layer Snapshots 1523
Exporting Layer Snapshots 1523

Chapter 41

Style Manager 1525


Managing Styles in Autodesk Architectural Desktop 1526
Getting Started with the Style Manager 1527
Displaying the Style Manager 1529
Moving the Style Manager 1530
Sorting Styles in the Style Manager 1530
Sorting Styles by Drawing 1532
Sorting Styles by Style Type 1533

Contents

33

Switching Between Drawing and Style Sorted Styles 1534


Viewing Styles in the Style Manager 1534
Viewing All the Styles in a Drawing 1534
Viewing All the Styles of One Style Type in a Drawing 1535
Viewing Styles of One Style Type Across Multiple Drawings 1536
Filtering Styles 1536
Previewing a Style 1537
Viewing a Style Description 1537
Working with Drawings and Templates in the Style Manager 1538
Viewing Drawing Information 1539
Starting a New Drawing or Template in the Style Manager 1540
Opening an Existing Drawing or Template in the Style Manager 1540
Dragging an Existing Drawing into the Style Manager from Windows
Explorer 1541
Closing Drawings and Templates in the Style Manager 1541
Creating and Editing Styles in the Style Manager 1542
Creating a New Style in the Style Manager 1542
Creating a Style by Copying an Existing Style 1543
Creating New Definitions in the Style Manager from Existing Geometry
1544
Renaming a Style in the Style Manager 1544
Editing a Style in the Style Manager 1545
Copying Styles Between Drawings in the Style Manager 1545
Dragging All the Styles of One Style Type in a Drawing to Another
Drawing 1546
Dragging Individual Styles from One Drawing to Another Drawing
1547
Copying All the Styles of One Style Type to Another Drawing 1549
Copying Individual Styles from One Drawing to Another Drawing 1550
Working with Styles on the Web 1551
Purging Styles in the Style Manager 1552
Purging All Styles from a Drawing 1552
Purging All Styles of One Style Type from a Drawing 1553
Purging Individual Styles from a Drawing 1554
Sending Styles By Email In the Style Manager 1555
Sending All the Styles in a Drawing 1555
Sending All the Styles of One Type in a Drawing 1556
Sending Individual Styles 1557

Chapter 42

Layout Tools 1559


Using Layout Tools 1560
Layout Curves 1560
Adding Layout Curves 1560
Changing the Properties of Layout Curves 1562

34

Contents

Adding Nodes to Layout Curves 1564


Removing Nodes from Layout Curves 1565
Changing the Spacing Mode of Layout Curves 1565
Switching Layout Curves 1567
Changing the Display of Layout Curves 1567
Layout Grids 1568
Adding Radial Layout Grids 1568
Changing Radial Layout Grids 1569
Changing the Properties of Radial Layout Grids 1569
Adding Rectangular Layout Grids 1571
Changing Rectangular Layout Grids 1571
Changing the Properties of Rectangular Layout Grids 1572
Adding Grid Lines to Layout Grids 1573
Removing Grid Lines from Layout Grids 1574
Changing the Spacing Mode of Layout Grids 1574
Changing the Display of Layout Grids 1576
Attaching Clipping Profiles 1576
Layout Volumes 1578
Adding Layout Volumes 1578
Changing Layout Volumes 1579
Changing the Properties of Layout Volumes 1579
Adding Grid Lines to Layout Volumes 1582
Removing Grid Lines from Layout Volumes 1583
Changing the Spacing Mode of Layout Volumes 1584
Changing the Display of Layout Volumes 1585

Chapter 43

Anchors 1589
Working with Anchors 1590
Working with Curve Anchors 1591
Working with Leader Anchors 1594
Working with Node Anchors 1597
Working with Cell Anchors 1600
Working with Volume Anchors 1603
Releasing and Positioning Anchored Objects 1605
Releasing Anchored Objects 1606
Positioning Anchored Objects 1606

Chapter 44

AEC Content 1611


Creating AEC Content 1612
Creating a New AEC Block 1612
Creating a New AEC Drawing 1615
Creating a New AEC Multi-View Block 1616
Creating a New AEC Masking Block 1617

Contents

35

Creating a New AEC Custom Command 1618

Chapter 45

Multi-View Blocks 1621


Defining Multi-View Blocks 1622
Creating View Blocks 1622
Creating a New Multi-View Block Definition 1624
Creating a New Multi-View Block from an Existing Multi-View Block
1626
Adding a Multi-View Block 1627
Changing Multi-View Block General Properties 1628
Changing View Block Properties 1629
Purging Multi-View Blocks 1630
Importing Multi-View Blocks 1630
Exporting Multi-View Blocks to an Existing Drawing 1632
Exporting Multi-View Blocks to a New Drawing 1633
Modifying Multi-View Blocks 1633
Multi-View Block Reference Properties 1634
Attaching Notes and Files to a Multi-View Block 1634
Changing Multi-View Block Style Properties 1635
Changing Multi-View Block Dimension Properties 1635
Changing Multi-View Block Offset Properties 1636
Changing Multi-View Block Attribute Properties 1636
Changing Multi-View Block Anchor Properties 1637
Changing Multi-View Block Location Properties 1637

Chapter 46

Mask Blocks 1641


Working with Mask Blocks 1642
Creating Mask Block Definitions 1643
Creating a Mask Block Definition from a Polyline 1643
Creating a Mask Block Definition from an Existing Mask Block Definition 1644
Purging Mask Block Definitions 1645
Importing Mask Block Definitions 1645
Exporting Mask Block Definitions to a New Drawing 1646
Exporting Mask Block Definitions to an Existing Drawing 1647
Attaching Notes or Files to a Mask Block Definition 1648
Adding a Mask Block 1649
Masking an AEC Object 1650
Detaching an Object from a Mask Block 1651
Modifying a Mask Block 1651
Changing Mask Block Properties 1651
Attaching Notes or Files to a Mask Block 1652
Changing Mask Block Style Properties 1652

36

Contents

Changing Mask Block Dimension Properties 1653


Changing Mask Block Location Properties 1653

Chapter 47

Profiles 1655
Working with Profiles 1656
Inserting a Profile as a Polyline 1657
Creating Profiles 1657
Creating a Profile from a Polyline 1657
Redefining an Existing Profile from an AEC Profile in the Drawing 1658
Create a Profile from an Existing Profile 1659
Attaching Notes or Files to a Profile 1659
Purging Profiles 1660
Importing Profiles 1661
Exporting a Profile to a New Drawing 1662
Exporting a Profile to an Existing Drawing 1662

Chapter 48

AEC Polygons 1665


Working with AEC Polygons 1666
Creating AEC Polygons 1667
Creating a New AEC Polygon 1668
Creating an AEC Polygon by Converting a Polyline 1669
Modifying AEC Polygons 1670
Editing an Existing AEC Polygon Using Grips 1671
Changing the Style of an Existing AEC Polygon 1671
Attaching Notes, Descriptions, or Reference Files to an AEC Polygon
1672
Changing the Location of an AEC Polygon 1672
Editing AEC Polygon Geometry 1673
Working with AEC Polygon Styles 1680
Creating New AEC Polygon Styles 1681
Purging an AEC Polygon Style 1682
Importing an AEC Polygon Style 1683
Exporting an AEC Polygon Style to a New Drawing 1684
Exporting AEC Polygon Styles to an Existing Drawing 1685
Changing AEC Polygon Style Properties 1686
Changing the AEC Polygon Style Notes, Descriptions, or Reference Files
1686
Changing the Width and Justification of the AEC Polygon Edges 1687
Changing the AEC Polygon Style Display Properties 1687
Rendering the Exact Colors of an AEC Polygon by Defeating Lighting and
Shading Effects 1690

Contents

37

Chapter 49

AEC Utilities 1693


Using Utilities 1694
Notes 1694
Quick Slice 1695
Referencing AEC Objects 1696
Adding a Reference to an Object 1696
Attaching Notes or Files to an Entity Reference 1697
Changing the Location Properties of an Entity Reference 1697
Changing the Insertion Point of a Reference Object 1698
Attaching an Object to an Existing Reference 1699
Hidden Line Projection 1699
AEC Object Explode 1700
Using AEC Object Explode 1701
Viewport Layer Mapping 1704
Working With External References (Xrefs) 1705

Chapter 50

IFC 1707
Industry Foundation Class 1708
IFC Command List 1710

Chapter 51

Publish to Autodesk Architectural Studio 1711


Working with Autodesk Architectural Studio 1712
Publishing Layouts to Autodesk Architectural Studio 1712

Glossary 1715
Index 1723

38

Contents

Introduction

In this chapter, you can learn about basic concepts of

In this chapter

Autodesk Architectural Desktop, Release 3 and about

Fundamentals of Autodesk

the integration of AutoCAD 2002 features with


Autodesk Architectural Desktop. You can also learn
about various ways to find help from online documentation and training courseware.

Architectural Desktop
Integration with

AutoCAD 2002
Where to begin
Finding help
Contacting Autodesk

Fundamentals of Autodesk Architectural


Desktop, Release 3
Autodesk Architectural Desktop, Release 3 combines AutoCAD 2002 drafting tools with architectural objects. Using an object-oriented approach, individual building objects relate intelligently with one another in a way that
was not possible in a traditional CAD environment. Objects maintain data
across a building life cycle and perform more functions without the need to
reconstruct them. Objects in Architectural Desktop perform consistently and
work automatically with traditional AutoCAD commands and Microsoft
Windows-based navigation features. The integration of AEC objects and
AutoCAD drafting commands meets your project design requirements from
schematic conceptual models through detailed construction documents.

Complete Project Work Flow Management


When you use Architectural Desktop resources, you can transition between
major phases in your design process by reusing information from each
project stage to the next. Architectural Desktop assures that it is a smooth
process. After you complete a basic, conceptual design, you are ready to start
work on design development and documentation. The following brief
descriptions summarize the principal stages in developing, refining, and generating drawings for a building project. As you progress through each stage,
Architectural Desktop features ensure that your work flow is continuous.

Conceptual Design
In the initial design phase, you can assemble Architectural Desktop mass
elements as simple architectural shapes to form an exterior model of your
building project. You can also lay out interior areas by arranging general
spaces as you would in a bubble diagram. You can manipulate and consolidate three-dimensional mass elements into massing studies.
Later in this phase, you can create building footprints from the massing
study by slicing floorplates, and you can begin defining the structure by converting space boundaries into walls. At the completion of the conceptual
design phase, you have developed a workable schematic floor plan.

Design Development
As you refine the building project, you can add more detailed information to
the schematic design. Use the features in Architectural Desktop to continue
developing the design of the building project by organizing, defining, and

Chapter 1

Introduction

assigning specific styles and attributes to building components.

Construction Documents
After you have fully developed the building design, you can annotate your
drawings with reference marks, notes, and dimensions. You can also add tags
or labels associated with objects. Information from the objects and tags can
be extracted, sorted, and compiled into schedules, reports, tables, and inventories for comprehensive and accurate construction documentation.

Integration with AutoCAD 2002


Autodesk Architectural Desktop, Release 3 shares the innovative tools in
AutoCAD 2002 and provides features that improve your work environment.
The following topics give quick summaries of features that Architectural
Desktop uses in conjunction with AutoCAD 2002. At the end of each description, you are directed to related topics where you can find more information.

Multiple Document Environment (MDE)


Autodesk Architectural Desktop incorporates the multiple document environment of AutoCAD 2002. This important feature means that you can work
on more than one drawing at a time without opening multiple sessions of
AutoCAD. To view two or more drawings, you can tile them in the drawing
area or you can switch between open drawings by pressing CTRL+TAB. You can
also employ Windows Explorer navigation and editing features to transfer
AEC objects between open drawings.
When you copy and paste or drag AEC objects from one drawing to another,
their properties remain intact. The transferred objects also carry anchor,
style, and display properties with them. If one object is associated with
another object, then that object is also copied to the new location. You can
place an object at the same location as in the original drawing, or you can
specify a new location. Each object assumes the view of the drawing into
which it is copied or dragged. For example, if the original drawing is in isometric view, when you copy an object from that drawing into a drawing in
plan view, the object is displayed in plan view in the new drawing. The following illustration shows a fire extinguisher in isometric view after it has
been dragged into a drawing in plan view.

Integration with AutoCAD 2002

Architectural Desktop AEC object in multiple document environment

For more information, see Working with Multiple Drawings in the online
AutoCAD 2002 Users Guide.

Shortcut Menus
Autodesk Architectural Desktop has integrated a number of commands into
standard AutoCAD shortcut menus. Shortcut menus are displayed at the
cursor location after you right-click the pointing device.
Shortcut menus are context sensitive; they provide you with the most common command options used in the given situation. You can display the
shortcut menu by right-clicking anywhere in the drawing area. The shortcut
menu options depend on the cursor location and other conditions, such as
whether an object is selected or a command is in progress. The menu is
organized with general editing commands at the top, object-specific editing
commands in the middle, and filtering and object property commands at the
bottom. For example, when you select a wall and right-click, the following
shortcut menu is displayed with wall editing commands.

Chapter 1

Introduction

Architectural Desktop object editing shortcut menu

When you work with AEC objects, you can display a default shortcut menu
with Design options. The following illustration shows the menu that is displayed by right-clicking in the drawing area.

Integration with AutoCAD 2002

Architectural Desktop Design shortcut menu


Architectural Desktop default shortcut menu with design options

For more information, see Using Shortcut Menus in the online AutoCAD
2002 Users Guide.

Object Properties Window


Autodesk Architectural Desktop keeps track of all information during a drawing session. When you want to know certain details about an individual
object or a selection of objects, such as current settings, Architectural
Desktop uses the object property management features in AutoCAD 2002.
You can access the Properties window, a common one stop location where
you can manage object properties quickly without having to use commands.
In the Properties window, you can query and modify a complete set of objectspecific properties.
To access the Properties window, select one or more objects, right-click, and
choose Properties from the shortcut menu. You can leave the Properties window open and dock it anywhere on the screen while you work.

TIP To open and close the Properties window quickly, press CTRL+1.
The Properties window lists the current settings for all object properties, and
you can view them alphabetically or by category. To change a property, select
it from the list and make changes by selecting or entering a new value. You

Chapter 1

Introduction

can change general properties, such as color, layer, linetype, or you can
change AEC-specific properties, such as a wall style, wall dimensions, and
location in the drawing.
Additionally, the Properties window contains the Quick Select option, a set
of filtering criteria, that helps you to sort through properties in the selected
object or the entire drawing based on settings such as layer, color, linetype,
or style. For more information, see Quick Select on page 7.

Architectural Desktop Properties dialog box

For more information about the Properties window, see Using the Properties
Window in the online AutoCAD 2002 Users Guide.

Quick Select
Autodesk Architectural Desktop shares the editing functions of the Quick
Select option in AutoCAD 2002. Quick Select is a sorting filter that you can
use to separate selected objects or all objects in a drawing by a property (such
as layer) or by object type. For example, you can select all the objects on a

Integration with AutoCAD 2002

particular layer in a drawing without selecting any other objects, or you can
select all objects except those on the particular layer.
To access the Quick Select dialog box, click Quick Select
window or right-click selected objects.

in the Properties

Architectural Desktop Quick Select dialog box

For more information, see Filtering Selection Sets in the online AutoCAD
2002 Users Guide.

3D Orbit Viewing
Autodesk Architectural Desktop integrates the 3D orbit navigation capabilities in AutoCAD 2002 into the Object Viewer, Floating Viewer, and Model
Explorer. When you use these viewing windows, you can use the dynamic
features of the 3DORBIT command to manipulate the viewpoint for an
object or an entire model by clicking and dragging the pointing device to
different points around a circular perimeter. In the viewing windows, you
can also right-click to display a shortcut menu with various viewing options.
For more information about the viewing windows, see Using Model
Explorer in the online Autodesk Architectural Desktop Users Guide.

Chapter 1

Introduction

3D orbit view displays an arcball, which is a circle divided into four quadrants by smaller circles. When 3DORBIT is active, the point, or target, that
you are viewing in the window remains stationary. The center of the arcball
serves as the target point. The point from which you are viewing, or the camera location, moves around the target. For more information, see Interactive
Viewing in 3D in the online AutoCAD 2002 Users Guide.
The following illustration is an example of using 3D orbit view in Object
Viewer.

Architectural Desktop Object Viewer

Layout Tabs
Autodesk Architectural Desktop incorporates the layout tab options in
AutoCAD 2002. You can switch easily between model space, where you
spend most of your time creating and editing drawings, and other layout tabs
that contain pre-configured layouts of various page setups. You can use layout tabs for constructing your building as well as for plotting.

NOTE To become familiar with working with layout tabs in Autodesk


Architectural Desktop, it is recommended that you use one of the templates pro-

Integration with AutoCAD 2002

vided with the program. For more information, see Using Architectural Desktop
Templates on page 23.
When you choose a layout tab for the first time, you see a rectangular outline
of a sheet of paper that replicates the paper size configured for printing or
plotting. The margins displayed within the paper indicate the printable area,
as shown in the following illustration. To fill the screen with the paper, you
can double click to one side of the sheet to change to paper space and do a
zoom extents.

Architectural Desktop Aec Arch template

NOTE You can control the page display; for example, whether you want
margins and either a paper or shadow background. Access the Options dialog
box by choosing Options from the Tools menu. Specify the changes in the
Layout Elements section on the Display tab.
Using layout tabs is an advantage when you have more than one named
layout in your project. After you right-click a layout tab, you can do the
following:

10

Chapter 1

Introduction

Create multiple layouts, each representing an individual sheet of paper in


a drawing project to be printed or plotted.
Save and name a layout setup, and then apply it to the current layout or
to another layout before plotting.
Add each named layout to the layout tabs at the bottom of the drawing
area.
Insert a layout from another template.
Move and copy layout tabs.
Delete a layout tab.
Specify layout and plot device settings through Page Setup.

NOTE You cannot move or copy the Model tab.


In each layout tab, you can have mixed display configurations, or various
views of one drawing, in floating viewports (either rectangular or nonrectangular) that you can arrange on the sheet to form a layout design. After
youve created floating viewports in a page layout, you can apply different
scales to each view within the viewport, specify different visibility for layers,
and change linetype scales in the viewport.
For more information about working in paper space, switching between
model and paper space, and creating a layout arrangement, see Creating a
Layout to Plot in the online AutoCAD 2002 Users Guide.

Partial Open and Partial Load


Autodesk Architectural Desktop incorporates the Partial Open and Partial
Load options in AutoCAD 2002. These options are beneficial when you work
frequently with large drawings. Instead of opening those drawings fully, you
can open and insert into a current drawing only the view and layers that you
want to work with.
All objects, such as layers, views, blocks, dimension and text styles, viewports, and layouts, are available in the partially opened drawing, but you can
only edit and work with what you load into the drawing file. For more information, see Using Partial Open and Partial Load in the online AutoCAD
2002 Users Guide.

In-Place Reference Editing


Large drawings customarily contain one or more external references as well
as multiple block references. Since Autodesk Architectural Desktop shares the
Edit Reference (REFEDIT) option of AutoCAD 2002, you can edit those refer-

Integration with AutoCAD 2002

11

ences in place rather than having to open the original drawing to make your
changes.
You can edit part of an external reference by selecting the objects you want
to change. They are then extracted and inserted into the current drawing.
After you have modified the objects, you can save them back to update the
external reference.
Within the current drawing, you can edit a block definition by displaying
and changing it. You no longer have to explode the block first. You can then
save the changes back to the block definition. For more information, see
Editing References in Place in the online AutoCAD 2002 Users Guide.

Tracking Objects
AutoTrack helps you draw objects at specific angles (polar tracking) or in
specific relationships to other objects (object snap tracking). Temporary
alignment paths help you create objects at precise positions and angles.

Using polar tracking

You can turn AutoTrack on and off by clicking Polar and Otrack on the status
bar. Object-snap tracking works in conjunction with object snaps. You must
specify settings for object snaps before you can track from an object snap
point; the AutoSnap aperture settings control how close you must be to the
alignment path before the path is displayed. For more information, see
Using AutoTrack in the online AutoCAD 2002 Users Guide.

AutoCAD DesignCenter
With AutoCAD DesignCenter, you can reuse information such as drawings,
blocks, or external references without having to leave the current drawing to
access them. You can now transfer information, including layer definitions,
linetypes, layouts, text and dimension styles, or custom drawing content, by
dragging it into an open drawing from files, network drives, or Internet locations. You can also use right-click shortcut menus for managing, inserting,
copying, and opening drawings.

12

Chapter 1

Introduction

TIP To quickly open and close AutoCAD DesignCenter, press CTRL+2.


The AutoCAD DesignCenter window is made up of four panes:

the navigation pane, or tree view, is a hierarchical listing of drawing files


or content folders
the content pane, or palette, shows drawing file content or custom
content
the preview pane
the description pane

There are three viewing structures for displaying sources of drawing content
in the AutoCAD DesignCenter tree view: Desktop, Open Drawings, and Custom.

Desktop
When you click
on the AutoCAD DesignCenter toolbar, the Desktop tree
view lists your local directory and network drives. If you click the plus sign
next to a drawing name, you can view drawing contents by category:
blocks, layers, linetypes, and so on. Also included in the drawing content are
styles for AEC objects, such as walls, doors, windows, stairs, and spaces,
unique to Architectural Desktop.
You can open a drawing by right-clicking the drawing name on the palette
and choosing Open in Window, or you can insert content from the drawing
by dragging it from the palette directly into the open drawing displayed in
the drawing area. For example, you can drag a layer definition or a wall style
from one drawing to another. No longer do you have to import styles; you
can insert, attach, or copy and paste the definitions into the current drawing.

Open Drawings
If you click
on the AutoCAD DesignCenter toolbar, the Open Drawings
tree view lists only the drawings that are currently open. You can view the
categories of content in an open drawing by clicking the plus sign next to
the drawing name. You can copy the content on the palette from one open
drawing to another. Content displayed in Open Drawings view includes
Autodesk Architectural Desktop styles such as those for walls, doors, windows, stairs, and spaces.

Integration with AutoCAD 2002

13

Custom
If you click
on the AutoCAD DesignCenter toolbar, the Custom tree view
displays folders containing custom content files that are unique to Autodesk
Architectural Desktop.
Click the plus sign

next to Architectural Desktop, and choose Imperial or

Metric. Click again next to the category of AEC content. Double-click a


specific folder to display various files in the palette. From the palette, you can
insert content directly into any open drawing. For example, you can select
Toilets under Plumbing and then choose Tank-Quiet Flush, as shown in the
following illustration.

AutoCAD DesignCenter

14

Chapter 1

Introduction

For more information about using AutoCAD DesignCenter, see Managing


Content with AutoCAD DesignCenter in the online AutoCAD 2002 Users
Guide.

Managing Autodesk Architectural Desktop


Content in AutoCAD DesignCenter
The Architectural Desktop folder in the Custom tree view lists content such
as building design and documentation symbols. Navigation features in
Custom view are the same as in Desktop view. For more information, see
Using Design Content in the online Autodesk Architectural Desktop Users
Guide.

Preview and Description Panes


After you open the Architectural Desktop folder and select a content category, you can select a symbol in the palette. To display a graphical icon of
each symbol, click

in the toolbar and choose Large Icons. To display

a larger, dynamic image of the symbol, click


in the toolbar to open the
Preview pane. For AEC content, the Preview pane corresponds to the standard Object Viewer and has the same dynamic viewing capabilities, including 3D orbit view. In the Preview pane, you can also right-click to display a
shortcut menu with viewing options, as shown in the following illustration.

Architectural Desktop Preview pane shortcut menu in DesignCenter

To display text that explains the selected AEC content in more detail, open
the Description pane by clicking

For more information, see AutoCAD DesignCenter Custom View in the


online Autodesk Architectural Desktop Users Guide.

Integration with AutoCAD 2002

15

Adding AEC Content to Drawings


To add AEC content to drawings, first select the category you want in the
Architectural Desktop folder in the Custom tree view to display the content
in the palette. There are various ways to transfer content from the palette to
a target drawing.
You can double-click the content in the palette to open the Add Multi-View
Blocks dialog box in which you can specify changes to the object before you
insert it. You can specify scale and rotation values in the dialog boxes or on
the command line. Similarly, when you right-click the content in the palette,
you can choose Insert from the shortcut menu to display the Add Multi-View
Blocks dialog box. When you insert content from the palette into a drawing,
it is placed on a specific layer based on a layer key style.

NOTE When you double-click or right-click content, it inserts only Design content into your drawing. To insert other types of content, double-click or rightclick the content and enter commands on the command line.
You can also insert content from the palette by clicking the object and dragging it into the drawing area. When you release the button on the pointing
device, the object is inserted at the cursor location. For more information, see
Using Design Content in the online Autodesk Architectural Desktop Users
Guide.

TIP Do not release the button until you see the image of the symbol.
You can access Autodesk Architectural Desktop content quickly from the
Design and Documentation menus. The availability of specific categories
depends on whether you selected Imperial or Metric as your default unit type
during installation. If you selected Imperial, either Autodesk Architectural
Desktop or CSI MasterFormatTM can be used as the organization tool. For
more information about CSI MasterFormat, see Adding CSI Imperial Content and Adding Imperial Content in the online Autodesk Architectural
Desktop Users Guide.
If the AutoCAD DesignCenter window takes up too much room in the
drawing area, you can do one of the following:

Move the window by changing it from docked to floating.


Turn the tree view off to make the window smaller. You can use the Up
button

16

Chapter 1

to navigate the Content tree.

Introduction

Close the window before inserting the object into the drawing (press
CTRL+2.)

Creating New Content


If you need to set up custom content in a drawing, you can create new content or change existing content. Use the Create AEC Content wizard or a
script file to create new content. It can be a block, a multi-view block, an
entire drawing, masking blocks (a block that masks, or hides, parts of other
objects), or a custom command. For more information, see Creating AEC
Content in the online Autodesk Architectural Desktop Users Guide.

Where to Begin
After you have installed Autodesk Architectural Desktop, you can begin
drawing according to your level of experience, whether you are a skilled user
who is upgrading from a previous version or a user who is new to Autodesk
products.

Beginning Users
If you are a new user of Autodesk Architectural Desktop you can begin by
reading Working with Autodesk Architectural Desktop, Release 3.3 on page
22 to help you start using Architectural Desktop. The section takes you stepby-step through a simple design so that you become comfortable working
with basic AEC building objects, and you can experience the exciting
Architectural Desktop tools.
For additional training, you can complete some of the procedures in the tutorials. Tutorials are exercises designed to take you through practical applications. They are located on the Autodesk Learning Assistance CD. If you are new
to AutoCAD 2002, it is important to begin with AutoCAD tutorials or
AutoCAD Learning Assistance and to refer often to the online AutoCAD
2002 Users Guide.

Experienced Users
If you are upgrading from a previous version of Architectural Desktop, see
New Features on page 67 to read about the new features and improvements. Additionally, refer to the online AutoCAD 2002 Users Guide to find
out about important innovations in AutoCAD drawing tools.

Where to Begin

17

Finding Help
There are various available resources to help you learn about Autodesk
Architectural Desktop, Release 3 and AutoCAD 2002.

Online Documentation
The following online manuals help you learn more about both Autodesk
Architectural Desktop, Release 3 and AutoCAD 2002.

Documentation

Description

Autodesk Architectural Desktop,


Release 3 Installation Guide

Explains how to install and configure


Autodesk Architectural Desktop,
Release 3.

Autodesk Architectural Desktop,


Release 3 Users Guide

Explains Autodesk Architectural Desktop


concepts and provides step-by-step
procedures. Includes a glossary with
definitions of Autodesk Architectural
Desktop terms.

AutoCAD 2002 Users Guide

Provides conceptual and overview


material with step-by-step procedures
for AutoCAD 2002.

The advantage of online manuals is that it presents information quickly


while you are in a drawing session. Although online Help topics provide
some conceptual and overview material, their main purpose is to help you
get a task done efficiently. Therefore, the Architectural Desktop online Help
emphasizes step-by-step procedures relevant to command selection. It also
incorporates visual examples and links to more information.

TIP To open online Help in Architectural Desktop instantly, while a command


is running, press F1.
Additionally, online tutorials are an excellent way to become familiar with
Autodesk Architectural Desktop. You can use the tutorials to learn program
concepts, and you can keep the tutorial window open in the drawing area
while you perform the steps.

18

Chapter 1

Introduction

To access online Help

From the Help menu, choose Architectural Desktop Help or AutoCAD


2002 Help.
When the Help window is displayed, browse Contents to locate the information you need, or look up index entries to pinpoint specific topics.

To access online tutorials


1 Insert the AutoCAD Learning Assistance or the Autodesk Architectural
Desktop Learning Assistance CD into your CD-ROM drive.
The Autodesk Learning Assistance dialog box is displayed.
2 Click Run to display all tutorial content but not install it, or click Install
to install the tutorial content so it can be viewed again later.
3 Accept the defaults to complete the installation process for the tutorial
content.
If you installed the tutorial content so it can be viewed again later, an
Autodesk Learning Assistance icon appears on your desktopclick this icon
to start Autodesk Learning Assistance and access the tutorials.

Training Courseware
AutodeskArchitectural Desktop Official Training Courseware (AOTC) is the
Autodesk-endorsed courseware for instructor-led training. To register for a
training course using this courseware, contact an Authorized Autodesk
Training Center (ATC), an Authorized Autodesk reseller, or Autodesk System
Center (ASC). You can find a list of these organizations on the Autodesk
Technical Assistance Web site, http://www.autodesk.com/support.

Contacting Autodesk
Autodesk, Inc.
11 McInnis Parkway
San Rafael, CA 94903 USA
Phone: 415-507-5000
Web site: http://www.autodesk.com

Sales Information
To purchase additional Autodesk software, contact your local reseller. For the
name of the authorized reseller nearest you, call 1-800-964-6432 or access the

Contacting Autodesk

19

Resellers and Training Centers web site, http://www.autodesk.com/resellers/


index.htm.

Customer Satisfaction
Phone: 1-800-538-6401
FAX: 603-621-3387
Web Site: http://www.autodesk.com/feedback/

Technical Support
If you have technical questions about the products, you should contact your
local reseller or check the frequently asked questions (Technical Solutions &
FAQS) section and Discussion Groups on the web site for Architectural
Desktop at http://www.autodesk.com/archdesktop. News groups are another
good source of information. You can look through the questions that have
already been posted, or you can post your own questions.

Feedback
Let us know what you think! If you have a suggestion for product enhancement or a compliment, or a complaint, or if you think you have found a bug,
then wed like to know about it.
To make comments and find additional information, visit our Web site at
http://www.autodesk.com/archdesktop.

20

Chapter 1

Introduction

Getting Started with


Architectural Desktop

The information in this chapter introduces new users of

In this chapter

Autodesk Architectural Desktop, Release 3 to some

Working with Architectural

Desktop

fundamental features of the software.


The design, documentation, and construction of a
building is complex. Architectural Desktop integrates
the flexibility you need to begin a project at any point.
You can begin with a conceptual massing model or

Getting started with projects


Viewing your project
Grip editing drawing objects
Adding annotations and

schedules
Plotting

move directly to laying out walls and developing a floor


plan. You decide what makes sense in terms of the scope
and design objectives of your project.
This chapter explains some fundamental principles and
commands of Architectural Desktop. It also enables you
to quickly and easily get underway with a design project
and find references that you need along the way to additional in-depth information in the online Autodesk
Architectural Desktop, Release 3 Users Guide or the online
AutoCAD 2002 Users Guide.

21

Working with Autodesk Architectural


Desktop, Release 3.3
Autodesk Architectural Desktop, Release 3.3 provides complete project work
flow management. Using the Architectural Desktop object-oriented
approach to working with architectural objects, individual building
components relate intelligently with one another. This allows you to
transition without interruption between major phases in your design
process.

Viewing the Autodesk Architectural Desktop


Installation Guide
When you start Autodesk Architectural Desktop for the first time, you may
need to authorize the software. The Authorization Wizard is displayed when
you need to authorize the software. For authorization information, see the
online Autodesk Architectural Desktop Installation Guide.
You can find installation information prior to installing Architectural
Desktop from a file on the CD in the CD-ROM drive. On your desktop, select
My Computer to open and read the installation information. There are files
for individual and network users.
This information is also available in the first dialog box of the installation
sequence.
To read the Architectural Desktop installation information before beginning
the installation process
1 Open My Computer on your desktop.
2 Insert the Architectural Desktop CD into the CD-ROM drive.
3 When the Installation Wizard opens, click Cancel.
4 In the My Computer dialog box, right-click the CD-ROM drive, and
choose Open.
5 Double-click igviewer.exe to open the Installation Guide Viewer.
6 Select the installation type and file format, then choose View.

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Opening Architectural Desktop


The first time you start Architectural Desktop, the Autodesk Architectural
Desktop, Release 3 Today window is displayed. The Today window is
displayed every time you start Architectural Desktop unless you turn it off.
The Today window replaces the traditional AutoCAD startup options. You
can access drawings, the Autodesk Point A design portal, and a bulletin board
from the Today window. For more information about the Today window,
Autodesk Point A, and defaulting to the traditional startup, see To Start
AutoCAD in the online AutoCAD 2002 Users Guide.

NOTE Slow Internet connections may slow the performance of My Drawings


in the Today Window.

Using Architectural Desktop Templates


The templates included serve as a guide to the recommended use of model
and paper space in Architectural Desktop and represent different ways to
work on and plot your project at different stages in the design process.
Templates are preset with the drawing units, drawing scale, annotation plot
size, and layer standards that you would use in a typical project. Sets of object
styles and display controls, specific to working with objects in Architectural
Desktop, are included in the template as well.
Use one of the basic Autodesk Architectural Desktop templates to create your
drawings until you are familiar with the program. These templates include
the fundamental settings and layout tabs to get you started. There are a number of country-specific templates available. If, for example, you want to start
with a German template, use the Aec Arch (metric d a ch).dwt.
If you do not find a template for your specific country, you can look at the
existing templates and customize one according to your needs, or create a
new template.
There are additional templates to use for drawing and plotting. Autodesk
Architectural Desktop templates are installed by default in the folder,
\Program Files\Autodesk Architectural Desktop\Template.

Working with Autodesk Architectural Desktop, Release 3.3

23

Getting Started with a Project


Welcome to the latest release of Autodesk Architectural Desktop. This section
takes you step-by-step through a simple design so you can become comfortable working with basic AEC building objects and see in action some of the
exciting tools. Architectural Desktop is designed to help you produce complete building projects quickly, efficiently, and accurately.
Included in this section is information about:

Creating walls, doors, and windows


Adding design content
Using the layout tabs
Working with layer keying
Editing doors and windows with grips
Adding annotation symbols
Adding schedule tables

For the sake of simplicity, we present these steps using a very basic design.
After creating walls, doors, and windows and adding design content, you can
look at your building in different views as represented by the display configurations in the layout tabs.
After an introduction to layer keys, this section guides you through the
special editing abilities available to you in Architectural Desktop. You can
learn how to make quick changes to your door and window objects using
grips.
Annotations to a drawing are essential to producing clear, well-organized
information in your construction documents. Dimensioning walls, adding
door and window tags, section lines, and leaders can be done simply and
cleanly. Generating a section from the section line is one of the truly exciting
features. Adding these annotations in your simple design acquaints you with
some of the many annotation options.
You can add and edit schedule tables in Architectural Desktop in a fraction
of the time that schedules have taken in the past. Following the steps of compiling a door or window schedule gives you a sense of the powerful schedule
table commands.
The following illustration shows the design you are creating.

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Completed design

Creating a Drawing
NOTE The following example project is meant as a general introduction into
the capabilities of the latest release of Architectural Desktop. It does not contain
any country-specific content or settings.
If you are a new user of Autodesk Architectural Desktop, use a template when
you want to create drawings. After you are more familiar with the program,
you can use the other templates available from the template list or the Start
from Scratch option.
1 Start Autodesk Architectural Desktop.
2 In the Autodesk Architectural Desktop 3.0 Today window, select the Create Drawings tab under My Drawings.
3 From the select how to begin list, choose Template.
4 Select one of the country-specific templates, for example, Aec Arch
(metric d a ch).dwt.

Getting Started with a Project

25

When the template opens, your drawing contains a series of named layout
tabs at the bottom of your drawing.

Layout tabs

NOTE Depending on the country-specific template you have chosen, these


tabs can be different.
Each layout tab represents a different view used in the design and documentation process. For more information about layout tabs, see Using
the Layout Tabs in the online Autodesk Architectural Desktop Users Guide.
5 Click the Plan 1-100 DIN A1 tab at the bottom of your drawing in the
series of layout tab.
6 To look at the layer key style and layer standard set for this drawing, do
the following:

From the Desktop menu, choose Drawing Setup.


Select the Layering tab.
The layer key style and the layer standard for the current drawing
depends on the template you selected initially. For more information
about layer keys and layer key styles, see Working with Layer Keys and
Layer Key Styles in the online Autodesk Architectural Desktop Users
Guide.

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Click OK to exit the Drawing Setup dialog box.

Getting Started with Architectural Desktop

7 Save the drawing file.

Creating Walls, Doors, and Windows


When you create individual AEC building objects like walls, doors, and windows, you can see how the objects relate intelligently with one another. This
is one of the fundamental concepts of Architectural Desktop.

Creating Walls
You can create walls in a plan or isometric view. The wall object contains all
the geometry necessary to represent a wall in 2D and 3D views, including
edges and surfaces. For more information, see Creating Walls in the online
Autodesk Architectural Desktop Users Guide.
To create walls
1 In your drawing file, click the Plan 1-100 DIN A1 layout tab.
2 From the Design menu, choose Walls Add Wall.
3 In the Add Walls dialog box, select the wall type from the Style list.
4 Click Straight to set the wall to a straight segment, or click Curved to set
the wall to a curved segment.
5 Specify a start point for the wall.

NOTE You cannot undo the first point when creating a wall. If you started
the wall at the wrong point, either finish at least one segment or click Cancel
to close the dialog box and then start the wall again.
6 Specify another point to end this segment of the wall.

Getting Started with a Project

27

Drawing the first exterior wall segment

A marker shows on one side of the wall and indicates the direction the
wall is being drawn. It points from the starting point of the wall toward
the endpoint.
7 Continue placing wall segments to create an exterior shell.
When you select the beginning and ending points of the wall, notice how
the walls behave. For example, if you draw your walls continuously with
a left justification, the directional marker consistently remains to the left
of the wall from the insertion point. If you draw walls individually by
pressing ENTER between wall segments, then make sure you draw them in
the same direction to maintain the same justification.
8 Type C (Close) to close the series of walls by creating a wall segment from
the last point specified of the walls to the first point specified.
You can use the Ortho Close or Polyline Close options to finish the creation of an enclosed space. The following explains the options.

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Ortho Close: Closes the space by drawing two walls or space boundaries based on the direction you specify. The direction is extended until
it meets a line perpendicular to the initial edge of either the wall or
space boundary.
Polyline Close: Closes the wall by creating a wall segment from the
last point specified for the walls to the first point specified in this group
of walls.

Getting Started with Architectural Desktop

9 Click Close to end the command.

Drawing the remaining exterior wall segments

To create additional walls


1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Add Wall.
2 In the Add Walls dialog box, select a different wall type from the one you
used previously from the Style list.
3 Add two interior wall segments.

Getting Started with a Project

29

Drawing interior wall segments

Creating Doors
Doors created with Autodesk Architectural Desktop are AEC objects that
interact with walls and space boundaries. For example, if a wall is moved, the
door moves with it. If the door is moved, it stays within a wall.
You can change any value in the Add Doors dialog box while creating doors,
so you can place one type of door in one wall and then select a different door
style to place in another wall. You can also create custom doors, doors in
space boundaries, and freestanding doors. For more information, see Creating Doors in the online Autodesk Architectural Desktop Users Guide.
To create a door in a wall
1 From the Design menu, choose Doors Add Door.
2 In the Add Doors dialog box, select the door style from the Style list.
3 To specify the door size and vertical placement in the wall, do any of the
following:

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Select a size from the Size list.


Change the width and height to a custom size, if necessary.
Change the rise and leaf value for the selected style, if necessary.
Change the opening percentage of the door, if necessary.
Select Automatic Offset/Center, and type the necessary value.

Getting Started with Architectural Desktop

Automatic Offset/Center: For insertion of the door, Automatic


Offset/Center sets the distance between the edge of the opening and
the end of the wall segment, or it centers the door on the wall segment
when you place your cursor somewhere near the center of the wall
segment.

Change the vertical alignment of the door, if necessary.


Vertical Alignment: For insertion of the door, Vertical Alignment
controls how you place the door in the wall and how the door responds
to modifications in height. The Sill Height/Head Height option allows
you to determine the working point on the door. You can place the
working point at the sill or at the head. The Vertical Alignment value
determines the location of the working point vertically in the wall.
Modifications to the door height respects the working point. For
example, if you set the working point of the door to sill, the vertical
alignment to 0 m and the door height to 2.26 m, the height in the wall
where the top of the door is placed is 2.26 m. If you modify the height
of the door to 2.10 m, the door sill remains at 0 m, and the top of the
door becomes 2.10 m. The sill working point is maintained.

If you set the working point to the door head, the Vertical Alignment
value to 2.26 m and the door height to 2.26 m, the height in the wall
where the top of the door is placed is 2.26 m. If you modify the height of
this door to 2.10 m, the door head remains at 2.26 m and the door sill
becomes 0.16 m. The head working point is maintained.
4 Select a wall.
5 Specify an insertion point along the wall.

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31

Adding exterior double doors

6 Add two interior doors.

Adding interior single doors

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TIP You can also place doors in a wall by selecting the wall, right-clicking to
get the shortcut menu, choosing Insert Doors, and specifying the options in
the Add Door dialog box.

Creating Windows
Windows created with Autodesk Architectural Desktop are AEC objects that
interact with walls and space boundaries. After a window is placed in a wall,
the window is constrained to the wall and cannot move outside it. Windows
can also be anchored to specific locations in walls, so that when the wall
moves or changes size, the location of the window stays constant.
You can change any value in the Add Windows dialog box while creating
windows. You can place one type of window in one wall and then select a
different window style to place in another wall. You can also create a window
at any elevation or as a freestanding window having no affiliation with a wall
or space boundary. For more information, see Creating Windows. in the
online Autodesk Architectural Desktop, Release 3 Users Guide.
To create a window in a wall
1 From the Design menu, choose Windows Add Window.
2 In the Add Windows dialog box, select the window style from the Style
list.
3 To specify the window size and vertical placement in the wall, do any of
the following:

Select a size from the Size list.


Change the width and height to a custom size, if necessary.
Change the rise for the selected style, if applicable.
Select Automatic Offset/Center, and type the necessary value.
Automatic Offset/Center: For insertion of the window, Automatic
Offset/Center sets the distance between the edge of the opening and
the end of the wall segment, or it centers the window on the wall segment when you place your cursor somewhere near the center of the
wall segment.

Select Vertical Alignment and type the necessary value.


Vertical Alignment: For insertion of the window, Vertical Alignment controls how you place the window in the wall and how the window responds to modifications in height. The Sill Height/Head Height
option allows you to determine the working point on the window. You
can place the working point at the sill or at the head. The Vertical

Getting Started with a Project

33

Alignment value determines the location of the working point vertically in the wall.
Modifications to the window height respects the working point. For
example, if you set the working point of the window to sill, the vertical
alignment to 1 m and the window height to 1.01 m, the height in the
wall where the top of the window is placed is 2.01 m. If you modify the
height of the window to 0.8 m, the window sill remains at 1 m and the
top of the window becomes 1.81 m. The sill working point is maintained.
If you set the working point to the window head, the Vertical Alignment
value to 2.01 m and the window height to 1 m, the height in the wall
where the top of the window is placed is 2.01 m. If you modify the height
of this window to 0.8 m, the window head remains at 2.01 m and the windowsill becomes 1.21 m. The head working point is maintained.
4 Select the front wall.
5 Specify an insertion point near the left side of the wall, and then add
another window near the right side of the wall.

Adding front windows to the front wall

6 Add a window to the rear wall.

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Adding a window to the rear wall

TIP You can also place windows in a wall by selecting the wall, right-clicking
to get the shortcut menu, choosing Insert Windows, and specifying the
options in the Add Window dialog box.

Adding Design Content


You can place imperial and metric symbols in your project by dragging them
from AutoCAD DesignCenter into your drawing. Design content in Autodesk
Architectural Desktop is accessed through the Custom view in AutoCAD
DesignCenter.
Using the current display configuration, you can place design content in
your drawing and view them. For example, furniture symbols that are seen
in Plan 1-100 DIN A1 are not displayed in Plan 1-50 DIN A0. For more information, see Managing Content with AutoCAD DesignCenter in the online
AutoCAD 2002 Users Guide and Using Design Content in the online
Autodesk Architectural Desktop Users Guide.

NOTE You can place CSI Masterformat symbols through AutoCAD


DesignCenter. For these divisions to be displayed, the CSI Masterformat option
must have been selected during installation.

Getting Started with a Project

35

Adding Furniture Symbols to Your Drawing


Furniture symbols placed in your drawing provide a sense of context. In
Architectural Desktop they are represented as multi-view blocks. When you
place a furniture symbol in your drawing, you can look at it in a plan or
three-dimensional view.
To add a furniture symbol
1 From the Design menu, choose Design Content Furniture or on the
Design Content - Metric toolbar, click

2 In AutoCAD DesignCenter, select the furniture you want to use in your


drawing, such as chairs.
3 Click the specific furniture symbol to be used in the drawing from the palette of AutoCAD DesignCenter. After you select the furniture symbol, you
can see a preview of it when you select the Preview button in the task bar.

NOTE If you did a metric installation of Architectural Desktop instead of an


imperial installation, your design content will be organized with slightly different folder names. To add a piece of furniture to your drawing, click on
Domestic Furniture or Office Furniture.

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Viewing a chair in Design Center

TIP You can view the symbol in 2D and 3D, as well as in a shaded perspective view by right-clicking in the preview pane.
4 Drag the furniture symbol into your drawing from the palette, and then
release the button at the location for the block. The block is placed in your
drawing using the current display configuration.

Getting Started with a Project

37

If the button is released before the item is displayed in your drawing, the
block may not be placed correctly. If the block is displayed at the cursor,
it is placed at the point of release.

Adding a chair

NOTE If you double-click or right-click to place the block, an Insert option


is displayed to place the block.

Viewing your Project


To see how your building appears in different views, you can use the layout
tabs in your drawing file. The multiple layout tabs at the bottom of the
drawing area represent different ways to work on and plot your building
model at the various stages in the design process. The layout tabs from left to
right reflect the general sequence of work flow in a project.

Using the Layout Tabs


When you open a template, your drawing contains a series of named layout
tabs at the bottom of your drawing.

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Each layout tab is represented by different display configurations. These display configurations are view-dependent and act as a filtering device to allow
you to clearly see specific views of your building as you work on your model.
There is a display configuration attached to every viewport. For more information about working with display configurations, see Understanding the
Display System in the online Autodesk Architectural Desktop Users Guide.

Using the drawing you have completed, select the different layout tabs at
the bottom of the drawing to see how your building is represented by different display configurations.

Working with Layer Keys and Layer Key Styles


AEC objects are automatically placed on a layer in your drawing. Each layer
has an associated color, linetype, lineweight, and plot style. A layer key is a
map between the AEC object that you draw on screen and a defined layer.
When you create an object, the layer key that is associated with the object
automatically places that object on the layer to which the layer key is
mapped. Using layer keys to automatically place objects on predefined layers
is called layer keying.
Depending on your design needs, you might need to use different layer name
structures or assign different properties to layers within a layer standard.
With Autodesk Architectural Desktop, Release 3, you can create different sets
of layer keys based on layer standards, called layer key styles. Each layer key
style contains a set of layer keys for all the AEC objects and their layer
mappings. For more information, see Layer Key Styles in the online
Autodesk Architectural Desktop Users Guide.
For example, a wall object is assigned to the layer key WALL. If you use the
Generic Architectural Desktop layer key style that is based on the Generic
Architectural Desktop layer standard, the WALL layer key maps to the layer
A_Walls. The generic Architectural Desktop layer standard contains three
descriptive fields: Discipline, Contents 1 and Contents 2. In the Generic
Architectural Desktop layer standard definition, the Discipline field contains
A (for Architect) and the Contents 1 field contains Walls. These values determine the A_Walls layer name that the object is placed on. If you override the
information in these fields within the current layer key style, for example, by
replacing A in the Discipline field with E (for Electrical Planning), then the
next wall that you draw is placed on the E_Walls layer.

You can use layer standards to establish individual, project, or office layering conventions. A layer standard contains predefined layer names and
a set of rules that determine the names of new layers created within that

Viewing your Project

39

particular layer standard. For more information, see Working with Layer
Standards in the online Autodesk Architectural Desktop Users Guide.

Viewing the Current Layer Standard


To view the current layer standard
1 From the Desktop menu, choose Drawing Setup.
2 In the Drawing Setup dialog box, click the Layering tab.
3 The current layer standard is displayed.
The current Layer Key Style is also displayed.
4 Click OK to exit.

Grip Editing Your Drawing Objects


In Autodesk Architectural Desktop, each object contains specific grips for
stretching, rotating, and moving. Grips are small boxes displayed at various
points on a selected object that can be used as handles to edit the object.
You can select one or more grips and right-click to display a shortcut menu
with grip-editing options.
When you want to modify more than one object at a time, be sure to select
all grips on all the objects. Hold down SHIFT while selecting the grips. For
example, several objects can be moved together.

NOTE The Enable Grips option in the Options dialog box must be selected.
From the Tools menu, choose Options. It is recommended that you specify different colors for selected grips and unselected grips.

Editing Doors with Grips


You can use grip edits to move a door, change the door swing, or change the
door hinge. For more information about modifying doors, see Editing
Doors in the online Autodesk Architectural Desktop Users Guide.
To flip the door swing and door hinge using grips
1 Click one of the layout tabs.
2 Select the door to edit.
The four grips that are associated with the door are displayed.
3 Click the grip that occurs along the door leaf.

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4 To flip the door hinge, move the cursor to the opposite side, and click.
5 Press ESC to clear the grips.

Flipping a door hinge with grips

6 Select the door to edit, and then click the grip that occurs along the door
leaf.
7 To flip the swing of the door, move your cursor to the opposite side of the
wall, and click.
8 Press ESC to clear the grips.

Flipping a door swing with grips

Grip Editing Your Drawing Objects

41

To modify the style, size, opening percent, or vertical alignment of a door


with the shortcut menu
1 Select the door to be modified, right click, and choose Door Modify from
the shortcut menu.
2 In the Modify Doors dialog box, make the necessary changes.
3 Click OK to accept the changes and exit the dialog box.
To move a door using grips
1 Click one of the layout tabs.
2 Select the door to move.
Four grips are associated with the door.
3 Click any of the grips other than the leaf grip.
4 Click a different wall location.
5 Press ESC to clear the grips.

Editing Windows with Grips


You can use grip edits to move a window, change the window swing, or
change the window hinge. For more information about modifying windows,
see Editing Windows in the online Autodesk Architectural Desktop Users
Guide.
To flip the window swing and hinge using grips
1 Click one of the layout tabs.
2 Select the window to edit.
Four grips are associated with the window.
3 Click the grip that stands alone.
4 To flip the window hinge, move the cursor to the opposite side, and click.
5 To flip the swing of the window, move your cursor to the opposite side,
and click.
6 Press ESC to clear the grips.
To modify the style, size, opening percent, or vertical alignment of a window
with the shortcut menu
1 Select the window to be modified, right click, and choose Window Modify
from the shortcut menu.
2 In the Modify Windows dialog box, make the necessary changes.
3 Click OK to accept the changes and exit the dialog box.

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To move a window using grips


1 Click one of the layout tabs.
2 Select the window to move.
Four grips are associated with the window.
3 Click the middle grip in the row of three.
4 Click a different wall location.
5 Press ESC to clear the grips.

Moving a window in a wall with grips

Adding Annotations and Schedules


To complete the design development phase of your project, documentation
specifies decisions made and agreed to. You can easily communicate these
decisions with Architectural Desktop as construction requirements by inserting annotation symbols and schedules in your drawing. Symbols and schedules keep your plans uncluttered and easy to read and can be quickly
inserted.

Adding Annotation Symbols


You can add text, dimensions, tolerances, symbols, and notes as annotation
to your drawing. You can set the plot size of any annotation that you add to
your drawings. If you are using a drawing template, than you can customize
the drawing scale in your template and save the changes. For more information about setting up your drawing, see Setting the Drawing Scale in the
online Autodesk Architectural Desktop Users Guide.

Adding Annotations and Schedules

43

The purpose of the documentation content commands is to insert all the


graphics needed to annotate a drawing. For example, you can insert section
lines, detail marks, match lines, and north arrows in your drawing using
AutoCAD DesignCenter. The default metric and imperial versions are similar,
differing only in their base units. For more information, see Using Design
Content in the online Autodesk Architectural Desktop Users Guide.

Adding Door and Window Tags


You can attach a schedule tag to doors and windows in your drawing. These
tags are used to annotate your drawing. Schedule tags force the appropriate
property sets to be added to the door and window objects. If that data is
changed, the associated schedule data changes as well. For more information
about schedule data, see Adding Schedule Tags in the online Autodesk
Architectural Desktop Users Guide.
To add a door tag
1 From the Documentation menu, choose Schedule Tags Door & Window
Tags.
AutoCAD DesignCenter is displayed in Custom view with Architectural
Desktop as the top node. For more information about AutoCAD
DesignCenter, see Managing Content with AutoCAD DesignCenter in
the online AutoCAD 2002 Users Guide.
2 Select the door or window tag to attach from the AutoCAD DesignCenter
palette by double-clicking the appropriate tag.

TIP You can insert a leader with your door or window tag by typing le
(Leader) on the command line before selecting the object to tag. You can
center the tag on the object by typing c (Center) on the command line, and
pressing ENTER after selecting the object to tag and before specifying the
location of the tag.
3 Select the object to tag.
4 Specify the location of the tag.
5 The Edit Schedule Data dialog box is displayed, and the appropriate property sets are automatically added to the object.
You can view and edit information associated with the door or window
you selected.
6 Click OK to exit the Edit Schedule Data dialog box.
7 Place another tag, or press ENTER to exit the command.

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NOTE Only objects with property sets added to them display schedule data
in schedule tables.

Adding a Section Line


You can create sections of your current drawing by first creating a section line
and then generating a section based on that section line. You can control the
objects in the section by creating a selection set. Use the section line as a
boundary and to control the shape of the section. For more information, see
Creating 2D and 3D Sections in the online Autodesk Architectural Desktop
Users Guide.
To add a section line
1 From the Documentation menu, choose Documentation Content Section Marks.
2 From the AutoCAD DesignCenter palette, select the section mark to be
used in your drawing. After you select the section mark, you can see a preview of it when you select the Preview button in the task bar.
3 Drag the block into your drawing.
4 Select the first point of the section line.
5 Specify additional points for the section line, and press ENTER to complete
the section line.
6 In the Edit Attributes dialog box, enter the Section Mark Number and the
Sheet Number, if required.
7 Click OK to exit the Edit Attributes dialog box.
8 Select the side for the arrow.
9 Press y (Yes), and press ENTER to add an AEC section object.

TIP For subsequent section marks, Y is the default.


To create a section
1 From the Documentation menu, choose Sections Create Section.
2 Select the section line in your drawing from which to generate your section.
3 Click 2d Section/Elevation Object with Hidden Line Removal in the Generate Section/Elevation dialog box.
4 Click Select Objects, select the objects to include in the section, and press
ENTER.

Adding Annotations and Schedules

45

5 Click Pick Point under Placement and select the insertion point to designate where the section is placed.
This insertion point is the center point of the resulting section.
6 Click OK to exit the Generate Section/Elevation dialog box and end the
command.

Adding a Leader
A leader is a line that visually connects annotations to a drawing object. From
any point or object in a drawing you can create a leader composed of straight
lines or smooth spline curves. When a straight leader is used, and the last
leader segment is at an angle greater than 15 degrees from horizontal, a small
hook line connects the annotation to the leader.
To add a leader
1 From the Documentation menu, choose Documentation Content Leaders.
2 Select the leader from the AutoCAD DesignCenter palette.
3 Specify the first point of the leader.
4 Continue specifying points for the leader.
5 Press ENTER when the leader is finished.
6 Type the identification for the leader in the Edit Attributes dialog box.

NOTE There are Straight and Spline leaders designated for multiple lines of
text.
7 Click OK to exit the Edit Attributes dialog box and end the command.

Working with Schedules


You can create schedules for any AutoCAD or Architectural Desktop object.
For example, you can create a schedule for doors, windows, fixtures, or
equipment blocks. All the data can be formatted and collected into a schedule table or exported directly to Microsoft Excel spreadsheet file
formats: worksheet (XLS), a comma separated values (CSV), or tab-delimited
text (TXT). This information can automatically update the schedule tables.
For more information about working with schedules, see Schedule Tables
in the online Autodesk Architectural Desktop Users Guide.
Schedule table styles specify what data are to be displayed and how the data
are formatted in schedule tables. You can use a sample schedule table style
for the purpose of getting started. The schedule table style has a large collec-

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tion of possible sets of values including title, column headers, properties to


display, orientations, and sorting.

Adding Schedule Tables


You can create schedule tables from schedule data after attaching schedule
tags to objects or otherwise adding property sets. When you place a schedule
after selecting the objects for the table, the table can be sized automatically,
or you can specify a size for the schedule table.
You can update the schedule table when an object that is included in the
table changes by right-clicking the table and selecting Update Table. For
more information about updating schedules, see Updating a Schedule
Table in the online Autodesk Architectural Desktop Users Guide.
To add a schedule table
1 From the Documentation menu, choose Schedule Tables Add Schedule
Table.
2 Select the door or window schedule table style.
3 Select or clear Add New Objects Automatically.
4 Select or clear Automatic Update.

NOTE Turning on the automatic update feature may significantly slow


down Autodesk Architectural Desktop performance when you are working
with large drawings. Use at your discretion.
5 Select or clear Scan Xrefs.
6 Select or clear Scan Block References.
7 Click OK.
8 Select the door or window objects to be included in the schedule table, or
type all, and press ENTER to include every door or window in your drawing.
9 Specify the location for the upper left of the schedule table.
10 Specify the lower right for the table, or press ENTER to place the table at
the current text size.

Adding Annotations and Schedules

47

Example door schedule

Adding Objects to a Schedule Table


You can add objects to an existing table, remove objects from a table, reselect
the objects to be included in a schedule table, and show the objects that are
included in a table.
To add objects to a schedule table
1 From the Documentation menu, choose Schedule Tables Add Table
Selection.
2 Select the schedule table to add to.
3 Select the objects to add to the table, and press ENTER.
Objects that might already be in the table are not added.

Removing Objects from a Schedule Table


You can remove objects from the schedule table by selecting them from the
drawing.
To remove objects from a schedule table
1 From the Documentation menu, choose Schedule Tables Remove Table
Selection.
2 Select the schedule table to remove objects from.
3 In the drawing, select the objects to remove from the table, and press
ENTER.

Editing the Schedule Table Style


You can modify the schedule table style.
To modify a schedule table style
1 Select the table schedule and right click to Edit Table Style in the shortcut
menu to modify the style of the table.

48

Chapter 2

Getting Started with Architectural Desktop

2 On the Columns tab, select the column of information to delete, and then
click Delete.
3 Click OK to exit the Edit Schedule Table dialog box and exit the command.

Plotting Your Drawing


As a final step of completing this project, you can plot your drawing. When
you are ready to compose a layout of your drawing on a sheet for plotting or
printing, you can use one of the layout tabs in the templates. For more information, see Plotting Your Drawings in the online AutoCAD 2002 Users
Guide.
To create a plot of your drawing
1 In your drawing file, select a layout tab suited for plotting.
2 From the File menu, choose Plot, or in the Standard toolbar, click

3 On the Plot Device tab in the Plot dialog box, choose the name of the plotter or printer configured to plot your drawing.
4 On the Plot Settings tab, verify the settings for paper size, drawing orientation, plot scale, and plot area.
5 Click OK to plot your drawing and exit the Plot dialog box.

Summary
You have now worked your way through a simple building design using some
of the fundamental features of Autodesk Architectural Desktop. This process
gives you a snapshot of the capabilities in Architectural Desktop.
At this point, you can complete some of the exercises in the tutorials for additional experience. Exercises designed to take you through practical applications are located on the Autodesk Architectural Desktop Tutorials CD. You can
access the exercises through Autodesk Learning Assistance.
If you want to explore some of the more complex features, here are some
additional tasks you can complete that will show you the streamlined functionality and power of Architectural Desktop:

Assemble three-dimensional mass elements to look at the mass of your


building and how it relates to the space around it.
Slice floorplates from the massing study to create building footprints.

Plotting Your Drawing

49

Use space boundaries to create a conceptual design of interior spaces,


and convert these boundaries into walls later in the design phase.
Use Style Manager to create multiple components of a custom wall.
Use the Stairs and Railings features to add, modify and customize stair
runs, landings, and railings.
Use roofs and roof slab tools to add a pitched or flat roof to your building model.
Dimension your drawing with AEC dimensions, dimension labels and
elevation labels.
Explore the powerful Area Evaluation features.
Use column grids to determine the buildings structural system.
Use Display Manager to watch how your intelligent AEC objects are displayed in different views of your drawing.
Use the Structural Members commands to add columns, beams, and
braces to your building.
Use grids to add ceiling grids to your plans for precision placement of
lighting fixtures.
Create elevations for presentation from your schematic design.

Whether you are working on a stair design or curtain walls, massing studies
or facilities management, the latest release of Architectural Desktop provides
an integrated collection of tools to get the work done. For a comprehensive
guide to all the features, see the online Autodesk Architectural Desktop Users
Guide.

50

Chapter 2

Getting Started with Architectural Desktop

Templates

This chapter explains the use of AutodeskArchitectural

In this chapter

Desktop, Release 3 templates and gives you the informa-

Using Architectural Desktop

templates

tion necessary to use templates effectively.


Drawing performance and size management is

Using layout tabs


Customizing templates

enhanced with the predefined settings, borders, and


layout tabs contained within the templates.
Whether you are an experienced user or new to
Architectural Desktop, you can begin drawing immediately and complete a project from concept to finish
when you use templates instead of starting from
scratch.

51

Using Autodesk Architectural Desktop,


Release 3.3 Templates
The templates included in Autodesk Architectural Desktop, Release 3.3 serve
as a guide for using model and paper space. Templates also represent different
ways to work on and to plot your project at different stages in a design process. Templates are preset with drawing units, drawing scales, annotation
plot sizes, and layer standards that you would use in a typical project.
Templates also contain basic sets of object styles and display controls specific
to working with objects in Architectural Desktop. You can get started on a
project immediately by using one of the templates that are installed with
Architectural Desktop.

NOTE Architectural Desktop templates are installed by default in the folder,


\Program Files\Autodesk Architectural Desktop 3\Template.
Templates contain multiple layout tabs with predefined display systems
applied to viewports. You can use display controls and viewports in the templates, or you can modify the display control settings to suit your own office
standards. The display system in Architectural Desktop controls how objects
are displayed. By specifying objects you want to display in a viewport and a
view direction, you can produce different architectural displays, such as floor
plans, reflected plans, elevations, 3D models, or schematic displays. For more
information, see Understanding the Display System in the online Autodesk
Architectural Desktop Users Guide.
If you are a new user of Architectural Desktop, it is recommended that you
use one of the basic Architectural Desktop templates to create your drawings
until you are more familiar with the program. The two basic templates that
you can use to create new drawings are:

AEC Arch (Imperial).dwt


AEC Arch (Metric).dwt

Use AEC Arch (Imperial).dwt to start drawings with imperial units, and use
AEC Arch (Metric).dwt to start drawings with metric units. Both of these templates include the fundamental settings and layout tabs to get you started.
If you are an experienced user of Architectural Desktop, you may want to
explore the other templates or create your own. In addition to the two basic
templates, the following templates are available in both imperial and metric
units:

52

Chapter 3

Templates

Space Planning
Massing
Building Model
Plot Floor Plan
Plot Reflected
Plot Sections
Plot Small Project

NOTE You may want to select a template based on the Architectural Program
Options that you selected when you installed Architectural Desktop. For
example, if you installed imperial architectural content and the 1998 AIA Layer
Guidelines, then you will probably want to start with a template using imperial
units.

Opening the Template


When you open an Architectural Desktop template, multiple layout tabs are
displayed at the bottom of the drawing area. Use the layout tabs to develop
your building project and to plot your drawings. The layout tabs that display
from left to right in each template reflect the general sequence of work flow
in a project.
You can choose the appropriate layout tab for the phase in your project on
which you want to work. Each layout tab has the following preset display
configurations:

The CONCEPT display configurations are meant for working on mass


elements, mass groups, and space studies. The display configurations
assigned to each viewport are defined for optimal use during these project
stages.
The WORK display configurations are intended for constructing the building model. The display sets include display representations that help you
during the work process (such as hatching in spaces) but may not be plotted in construction documentation.
The REFLECTED display configurations include representations of objects
as they would appear in a reflected ceiling plan and exclude those objects
that are on floor plans.
The PLOT display configurations are intended for producing plotted
outputs of the building model. They are preset to include only those
object representations that are in presentation drawings or construction
documents. For more information, see Display Configurations in the
online Autodesk Architectural Desktop Users Guide.

Using Autodesk Architectural Desktop, Release 3.3 Templates

53

The following sections are descriptions of each template with tables that
show the layout tabs, their recommended use, and the display configurations
that they contain:

AEC Arch Template

Layout tabs and display configurations for the AEC Arch template

54

Tab

Use for

Display
configuration

Model

(Not recommended)

WORK

Mass-Group

Creating massing models using mass


elements and mass groups

CONCEPT_MASS
and
CONCEPT_GROUP

Space

Space planning

CONCEPT_SPACE

Work-3D

Working in plan and 3D views

WORK

Work-FLR

Working in plan view

WORK

Work-RCP

Working on the reflected ceiling plan

WORK_REFLECTED

Work-SEC

Producing section and elevation views


of the model

WORK

Plot-FLR

Setting up floor plan drawings in plan


view for plotting

PLOT

Plot-RCP

Setting up reflected ceiling drawings


for plotting

PLOT_REFLECTED

Plot-SEC

Setting up section and elevation drawings


for plotting

PLOT

Template
Overview

Displays information contained on the


different layout tabs

Chapter 3

Templates

Space Planning Template

Layout tabs and display configurations for the Space Planning template
Tab

Use for

Display
configuration

Model

(Not recommended)

WORK

Space

Space planning

CONCEPT_SPACE

Template Overview

Displays information contained


on the different layout tabs

Massing Template

Layout tabs and display configurations for the Massing template


Tab

Use for

Display
configuration

Model

(Not recommended)

WORK

Mass-Group

Creating massing models using


mass elements and mass groups

CONCEPT_MASS
and
CONCEPT_GROUP

Template Overview

Displays information contained


on the different layout tabs

Building Model Template

Layout tabs and display configurations for the Building Model template
Tab

Use for

Display
configuration

Model

(Not recommended)

WORK

Work-3D

Working in plan and 3D views

DESIGN
DEVELOPMENT

Using Autodesk Architectural Desktop, Release 3.3 Templates

55

Layout tabs and display configurations for the Building Model template
Tab

Use for

Display
configuration

Work-FLR

Working in plan view (full screen display)

WORK

Work-RCP

Working on the reflected ceiling plan

WORK_REFLECTED

Plot-FLR

Setting up floor plan drawings in plan


view for plotting

CONTRACT
DOCUMENTS
SMALL SCALE

Template
Overview

Displays information contained on


the different layout tabs

Plot Floor Plan Template

Layout tabs and display configurations for the Plot Floor Plan template

56

Tab

Use for

Display
configuration

Model

(Not recommended)

PLOT

Plot-FLR-Small

Setting up floor plan drawings in plan


view for plotting

CONTRACT
DOCUMENTS
SMALL SCALE

Plot-FLR-Large

Setting up floor plan drawings in plan


view with visible wall components and
hatching on the plotted sheet

CONTRACT
DOCUMENTS
LARGE SCALE

Plot-FLR-Screened

Setting up floor plan drawings in plan


view with wall components and
hatching visibly lighter than other
objects on the plotted sheet

PLOT SCREENED

Plot-FLR-Poche

Setting up floor plan drawings in plan


view with walls shaded and no visible
wall components on the plotted sheet

DESIGN
DEVELOPMENT
POCHE

Plot-FLR-Design

Setting up floor plan drawings in plan


view with walls displayed only by the
shrink-wrap on the plotted sheet

DESIGN
DEVELOPMENT

Template
Overview

Displays information contained on


the different layout tabs

Chapter 3

Templates

Plot Sections Template

Layout tabs and display configurations for the Plot Sections template
Tab

Use for

Display
configuration

Model

(Not recommended)

PLOT

Plot-SEC

Setting up section and elevation drawings


for plotting

PLOT

Template
Overview

Displays information contained on the


different layout tabs

Plot Reflected Template

Layout tabs and display configurations for the Plot Reflected template
Tab

Use for

Display
configuration

Model

(Not recommended)

PLOT_REFLECTED

Plot-RCP

Setting up reflected ceiling drawings


for plotting

PLOT_REFLECTED

Plot-RCPScreened

Setting up reflected ceiling drawings


for plotting with screened backgrounds

PLOT_REFLECTED
SCREENED

Template
Overview

Displays information contained on


the different layout tabs

Plot Small Project Template

Layout tabs and display configurations for the Plot Small Project
template
Tab

Use for

Display
configuration

Model

(Not recommended)

PLOT

Using Autodesk Architectural Desktop, Release 3.3 Templates

57

Layout tabs and display configurations for the Plot Small Project
template (continued)
Tab

Use for

Display
configuration

Plot-FLR

Setting up floor plan drawings in plan


view for plotting

PLOT

Plot-FLRScreened

Setting up floor plan drawings in plan


view with wall components and
hatching visibly lighter than other
objects on the plotted sheet

PLOT SCREENED

Plot-FLRPoche

Setting up floor plan drawings in plan


view with walls shaded and no visible wall
components on the plotted sheet

DESIGN
DEVELOPMENT
POCHE

Plot-SEC

Setting up section and elevation drawings


for plotting

PLOT

Plot-RCP

Setting up reflected ceiling drawings


for plotting

PLOT_REFLECTED

Plot-RCPScreened

Setting up reflected ceiling drawings


for plotting with screened backgrounds

PLOT_REFLECTED
SCREENED

Template
Overview

Displays information contained on


the different layout tabs

NOTE The template settings are not necessarily the same as selecting Start
from Scratch when you start a new drawing, which would include the AutoCAD
default settings.

Starting a Drawing with an Architectural


Desktop Template
You can use one of four Architectural Desktop templates in either imperial or
metric units to start a drawing:

58

AEC Arch
Building Model
Massing
Space Planning

Chapter 3

Templates

NOTE All Architectural Desktop templates are installed in the following folder:
\Program Files\Autodesk Architectural Desktop 3\Template
Additional AutoCAD 2000i templates are installed in the following folder:
\Program Files\Autodesk Architectural Desktop\Template\AutoCAD
To start a drawing with an Architectural Desktop template from the Today
window
1 Start Autodesk Architectural Desktop.
2 In the Autodesk Architectural Desktop 3.0 Today window, select the Create Drawings tab under My Drawings.
3 From the Select How to Begin list, choose Template.
4 Select one of the following templates in either imperial or metric units:

AEC Arch
Building Model
Massing
Space Planning

NOTE You may want to select a template based on the Architectural Program Options that you selected when you installed Architectural Desktop. For
example, if you installed imperial architectural content and the 1998 AIA
Layer Guidelines, then you will probably want to start with a template using
imperial units.
5 Save the drawing.

Whats in the Templates


The Autodesk Architectural Desktop, Release 3 templates are preset with the
drawing units, drawing scales, annotation plotting sizes, layer standards,
object styles, and display representation defaults that you would use in a typical project. The templates also serve as a guide to using model and paper
space in Architectural Desktop correctly.

NOTE The template settings are not necessarily the same as selecting Start
from Scratch when you start a new drawing which include the AutoCAD default
settings.

Using Autodesk Architectural Desktop, Release 3.3 Templates

59

Display Settings
Each layout tab in a template contains one or more viewports, each assigned
a display configuration. A display configuration contains a collection of
display sets that determines how AEC objects are displayed. A display set has
specific view directions. The display configuration ensures that the objects in
the viewport are displayed with properties assigned to the display set for a
given view direction.
For example, if you view a door in a wall from the top, the wall is displayed
as parallel lines with hatching between the lines, and the door contains its
door swing. If you view the same objects in an isometric view, the wall is
displayed as faces representing interior and exterior surfaces, but the wall
hatching and door swing are not displayed. For more information, see Display Configurations in the online Autodesk Architectural Desktop Users Guide.

Object Styles
The templates also contain basic, or starter, sets of sample object styles that
you can use in your project. For example, when you add a wall to the model,
you can choose from a list of styles that include brick cavity, gypsum board,
or shaft wall, in addition to the standard wall style. Use the Style Manager to
access other predefined wall styles. You can access the Style Manager directly
by choosing it from the Desktop menu. Likewise, you can easily purge any
styles that you do not want in the template. You can use the sample styles as
a basis for creating additional styles. For more information, see Managing
Styles in Autodesk Architectural Desktop in the online Autodesk Architectural
Desktop Users Guide.

Using the Layout Tabs


A number of layout tabs in the Architectural Desktop templates have been
configured to allow you to work on different design phases of your projects
easily and efficiently. The templates include layout tabs for conceptual
design, building model design, and plotting.
There are advantages to working in layout tabs other than the Model tab. In
tabs other than Model, you can have different display configurations
assigned to different viewports, freeze different layers in each viewport, use
floating viewports, and specify different linetype scales. For more information, see Model Tab in the online Autodesk Architectural Desktop Users
Guide.

60

Chapter 3

Templates

The Template Overview tab is in each of the templates. This tab displays general information about the other tabs that are contained on that particular
template like viewport settings, scale, and display information.

Conceptual Design Layout Tabs


Two layout tabs, Mass-Group and Space, are configured for the conceptual
design phases of your projects. Use the Mass-Group tab to work on the initial
stage of conceptual or schematic design. Use the Space tab to work with space
planning and space boundaries.

Mass-Group Tab
The Mass-Group layout tab is available in the following templates:

AEC Arch
Massing

Use the Mass-Group layout tab to work on massing studies. The drawing area
is separated into two viewports with mutually exclusive display sets specifically designed for mass modeling. The display configuration in the left viewport is preset for working with mass elements. The display configuration in
the right viewport is preset for showing mass groups and does not display the
individual mass elements. The view direction in both viewports is isometric.
For more information about mass elements and mass groups, see Editing
Mass Elements and Mass Groups in the online Autodesk Architectural
Desktop Users Guide.

Space Tab
The Space layout tab is available in the following templates:

AEC Arch
Space Planning

Use the Space layout tab to work with spaces and space boundaries. The
drawing area is separated into two viewports, each preset with the same
display configuration. This display configuration does not show mass
elements and groups but does show the same space objects displayed in
three-dimensional and plan view simultaneously. The view direction in the
left viewport is preset to an isometric view, and the right viewport is preset
to a plan view. For more information, see Interior Space Planning in the
online Autodesk Architectural Desktop Users Guide.

Using the Layout Tabs

61

Work Layout Tabs


Four layout tabs, Work-3D, Work-FLR, Work-RCP, and Work-SEC, have been
configured to work on the building model.

Work-3D Tab
The Work-3D layout tab is available in the following template:

AEC Arch
Building Model

Use the Work-3D layout tab to work on everything in the model except
ceiling objects. The drawing area is separated into two viewports: the left
viewport is preset to an isometric view, and the right viewport is preset to a
plan view. Both viewports contain the WORK display configuration.

Work-FLR Tab
The Work-FLR layout tab is available in the following templates:

AEC Arch
Building Model

Use the Work-FLR layout tab to work in one viewport (full screen display) in
the drawing area. The viewport is preset to plan view, but it can be used in
any view. The display configuration is WORK.

Work-RCP Tab
The Work-RCP layout tab is available in the following template:

AEC Arch
Building Model

Use the Work-RCP layout tab to work on ceiling designs. The drawing area
contains one viewport. The display configuration for the single viewport is
Work_Reflected. This configuration will display objects that usually display
on a reflected ceiling plan and may not display on a floor plan. For more
information about plan and reflected display representations, see Display
Representations in the online Autodesk Architectural Desktop Users Guide.

Work-SEC Tab
The Work-SEC layout tab is available in the following template:

62

AEC Arch

Chapter 3

Templates

Use the Work-SEC layout tab to work on sections and elevations. The drawing area is separated into three viewports, all of which are configured to the
same Work display configuration. The left viewport is set to an isometric
view; the two right viewports are set to the front and the right side views. For
more information about sections and elevations, see Creating 2D and 3D
Sections and Creating 2D and 3D Elevations in the online Autodesk
Architectural Desktop Users Guide.

Plot Layout Tabs


When you are ready to compose a layout of your drawings on sheets for
plotting or printing, you can use the following tabs in the templates:

Plot-FLR
Plot-FLR-Small
Plot-FLR-Large
Plot FLR-Screened
Plot-FLR-Poche
Plot-FLR-Design
Plot-RCP
Plot-SEC

On small projects, you can use the same drawing file for working and plotting, but on larger projects you will probably construct your model in different drawing files for each floor. You can then insert each file as an external
reference into separate sheet files for plotting. You can delete any layout
tabs that are not needed for a particular drawing.

Plot-FLR Tab
The Plot-FLR layout tab is available in the following templates:

AEC Arch
Building Model
Plot Small Project

Use the Plot-FLR layout tab to arrange floor plan drawings in plan view. The
wall components, but not the hatching, is visible on the plotted sheet. The
scale of the preset viewport is 1/8'' or 1:100.

Plot-FLR-Small Tab
The Plot-FLR-Small layout tab is available in the following template:

Plot Floor Plan

Using the Layout Tabs

63

Use the Plot-FLR-Small layout tab to arrange floor plan drawings in plan
view. The wall components, but not the hatching, is visible on the plotted
sheet. The scale of the preset viewport is 1/8 or 1:100.

Plot-FLR-Large Tab
The Plot-FLR-Large layout tab is available in the following template:

Plot Floor Plan

Use the Plot-FLR-Large layout tab to arrange floor plan drawings in plan view.
Both the wall components and hatching are visible on the plotted sheet. The
scale of the preset viewport is 1/4 or 1:50.

Plot-FLR-Screened Tab
The Plot-FLR-Screened layout tab is available in the following template:

Plot Floor Plan

Use the Plot-FLR-Screened layout tab to arrange floor plan drawings in plan
view. Both the wall components and hatching are visibly dimmer than other
objects on the plotted sheet. The scale of the preset viewport is 1/8 or 1:100.

Plot-FLR-Poche
The Plot-FLR-Poche layout tab is available in the following template:

Plot Floor Plan

Use the Plot-FLR-Poche layout tab to arrange floor plan drawings in plan
view. The walls are shaded and no wall components are visible on the plotted
sheet. The scale of the preset viewport is 1/8 or 1:100.

Plot-FLR-Design Tab
The Plot-FLR-Design layout tab is available in the following template:

Plot Floor Plan

Use the Plot-FLR-Design layout tab to arrange floor plan drawings in plan
view with walls displayed only by the shrink-wrap. The scale of the preset
viewport is 1/8 or 1:100.

Plot-RCP Tab
The Plot-RCP layout tab is available in the following templates:

64

AEC Arch
Plot Reflected
Plot Small Project

Chapter 3

Templates

Use the Plot-RCP layout tab to arrange reflected ceiling drawings on a sheet
for plotting. Arrange viewports of designs you created on the Work-RCP tab.
The scale of the preset viewport is 1/8 or 1:100.

Plot-RCP-Screened Tab
The Plot-RCP-Screened layout tab is available in the following templates:

Plot Reflected
Plot Small Project

Use the Plot-RCP-Screened layout tab to arrange reflected ceiling drawings on


a sheet for plotting. Both the wall components and hatching are visibly dimmer than other objects on the plotted sheet. The scale of the preset viewport
is 1/8 or 1:100.

Plot-SEC Tab
The Plot-SEC layout tab is available in the following template:

AEC Arch
Plot Sections
Plot Small Project

Use the Plot-SEC layout tab to arrange section and elevation drawings on a
sheet for plotting. Arrange viewports of designs you created on the Work-SEC
tab. The scale of the preset viewports is 1/8 or 1:100.

NOTE The Plot layout tabs contain schematic layouts of sheets. You can insert
your own title block (as a block or as an external reference), as well as configure
the viewports to meet your requirements.
For more information about using floating viewports and setting up pages for
plotting, see Create Layouts and Plot Drawings, in the online AutoCAD
2002 Users Guide.

Model Tab
The Model tab can only be set to TILEMODE 1. That means you can divide,
or tile, the drawing area into multiple viewports. You cannot use floating
viewports. Each tiled viewport can display a different view of the model, for
example, a plan view in one viewport or a front or side elevation in another.
However, the same display configuration is used in all tiled viewports.
Display controls in manage object visibility, but it is still necessary to use
layer management in some working and plotting operations. When you

Using the Layout Tabs

65

work on the Model tab, you cannot freeze different layers in different tiled
viewports. However, if you work on other layout tabs, you can specify layer
visibility individually for each viewport.
In this layout, when you have set linetypes to be displayed similarly in all
viewports (PSLTSCALE=1), then the overall linetype scale (LTSCALE) should
be set to 1. In this case (which is generally preferred for architectural drawings), when you switch to the Model tab, the linetype scale is not displayed
properly. For more information about model space, see Work in Paper Space
and Model Space in the online AutoCAD 2002 Users Guide. For more information about tiled viewports, see Set Model Tab Viewports in the online
AutoCAD 2002 Users Guide.

Customizing Templates
It may be necessary for you to establish drawing standards that are unique to
a client, an industry, or your office. After you become familiar with the settings and configurations in the Architectural Desktop templates, you may
want to use certain settings from the templates and customize the rest. You
can make changes to a template to meet your requirements and then save it
as a new template.
You can also create templates by importing settings from a template into the
current drawing, and then saving the current drawing as a template. For
example, you can import the display configurations and representation sets
from the Architectural Desktop template into any other file. For more information about creating your own template, see Use a Template File in the
online AutoCAD 2002 Users Guide. For more information about importing
display settings to a custom template, see Importing Display Sets and
Importing Display Configurations in the online Autodesk Architectural
Desktop Users Guide.

66

Chapter 3

Templates

New Features

This chapter contains a preview of the new and

In this chapter

enhanced building model objects, user interface

New features in Autodesk

improvements, and expanded features for international


building model objects contained in Autodesk
Architectural Desktop, Release 3.3.

Architectural Desktop,
Release 3.3
New international features in

Autodesk Architectural
Desktop, Release 3.3
Enhanced features in Autodesk

Architectural Desktop,
Release 3.3

67

New Features in Autodesk Architectural


Desktop, Release 3.3
Autodesk Architectural Desktop, Release 3.3 has an integrated, robust set of
architectural features and enhancements that reduce workflow inefficiencies
and drafting inaccuracies that typically occur as a building design evolves
through successive, iterative phases of development. Through the use of efficient 2D drafting tools, smart objects update dynamically to reflect design
changes so that 3D building models can give you a comprehensive visual
understanding of the design. Thus, productivity is increased and coordination of drawings improved where errors are minimized and design recycle
times are reduced. The result is an intelligent drawing set that reduces costs
during construction and provides increased value to the building owner.
This feature-enhanced, third release of Autodesk Architectural Desktop provides a mature suite of tools for conceptual design, architectural design development, and construction documentation. New architectural and building
design objects include wall objects, structural members, window objects, and
curtain walls. These tools enable you to fully realize the benefits of the
object-modeling approach. As a designer, you can work in 2D or 3D while
using a streamlined interface that means ease-of-use and seamless integration with other Autodesk industry solutions. The result is enhanced
designer-to-designer and designer-to-contractor interaction.
By ensuring the production of more accurate construction documents with
scheduling information, associative dimensioning, and detail routines,
Autodesk Architectural Desktop, Release 3 streamlines and reduces costs during the construction process.
During the development cycle of this release, Autodesk interviewed customers, and conducted usability tests and surveys. Autodesk found that designers
not only needed enhancements to the existing library of building model
objects, but that they also needed new and improved objects with tools that
leveraged their power. Also, designers wanted timely and accurate data access
and data collaboration.
With this feedback, Autodesk developed the latest release of Architectural
Desktop and it delivers the following benefits:

68

Increased productivity by reducing design development recycle time


Improved coordination and accuracy of drawings, thereby serving as a
practical tool for construction documentation

Chapter 4

New Features

Improved user interface, streamlined commands, and a redesigned Help


system that enhances your design experience within the Architectural
Desktop environment
Enhanced collaboration and workflow efficiency through Internet-driven
design features
Seamless integration with other Autodesk AEC solutions and an intelligent drawing set that can be used by building owners for facilities planning and management information

Expanding the Building Model


In this latest release, the building model has been expanded to include new
architectural objects, including curtain walls, window assemblies, slabs and
roof slabs, and structural members. These additions increase productivity
and reduce design development cycle time, while offering a practical tool for
construction documentation. The following sections describe some of these
new objects.

Curtain Walls
A curtain wall is a wall-like object that supports the creation of curtain walls
or storefront windows commonly used in commercial construction. Curtain
walls allow for easy and accurate production of curtain wall styles and, when
modified, exhibit true object behavior.
Create curtain walls by specifying parameters, such as length, height, radius,
and starting and ending miter angles. Divide curtain walls vertically and horizontally to suit your design requirements. Specify the width and depth for
frames and mullions, and then specify the type of infill to use for each segment of the curtain wall. You can add custom graphics to a curtain wall as a
display component when you need a detailed three-dimensional truss as
mullions or a decorative light fixture applied to an infill.
To create curtain walls quickly and easily, convert existing walls and
2D layout grids to curtain walls. You can modify a curtain wall with the new
edit-in-place technology so that the curtain wall is 100 percent correct, and
then you can transfer these settings to all curtain walls with the same style.

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The Curtain Wall supports insertion of the following:

70

Doors
Windows
Curtain wall units
AEC Polygons
Panels

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Curtain wall in commercial design

Window Assemblies
A window assembly is similar to a parametric window that contains
anchored windows and doors. Window assemblies are usually inserted into a
wall. You can group doors and windows as one object and save it as a style
for future use and modification. This increases productivity by eliminating
the need to recreate and modify door and window groupings.
You can create window assemblies and specify parameters, including length,
height, rise, and starting and ending miter angles. Specify the width and
depth for frames and mullions, and then specify the type of infill to use for
each segment of the window assembly. You can add custom graphics as a display component of a window assembly when you need a highly detailed
three-dimensional truss as mullions or a decorative light fixture applied to an
infill.

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Window assembly characteristics:

Style-based
Similar behavior of openings
Nested custom grid layouts

Roof and Floor Slabs


With the latest release of Autodesk Architectural Desktop, you can create and
modify floor and roof slabs. These objects are designed to accurately model
floors and complex roofs.
During the conceptual design phase, you can use the original roof object to
provide an easy method of roof layout. Then, during design development
when you need a higher level of detail control, convert the roof to individual
roof slabs.
You can locate slabs by specifying thickness, vertical offset, horizontal offset,
and slope values. You can configure slab edges by specifying an overhang
value, square or plumb orientation, and angle. You can add a predefined profile to a slab edge as a fascia or soffit. For optimal reusability of your work,
define slab edge styles.

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With a palette of slab tools, you can trim, extend, and miter slabs, add or
remove vertices from slabs, and add or remove holes. You can add or subtract
AEC objects to or from slabs, and use Boolean add, subtract, and intersect
commands when working with two or more slabs.

Roof slab with fascia, dormer, hole and soffit styles

Supports the following:

Dormer creation
Boolean operations
Roof-to-roof slab conversion
Hole creation

Roof Slab Edges


Roof slabs can be customized to have any type of edge style. These edge styles
can be used to create roof fascias and soffits. These edge styles can be easily
created through the use of AEC profiles. Theres also the ability to define the
amount of overhang as well as orientation, such as plumb or square cut.
Use the roof slab object in your residential designs.

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Floor Slabs
Similar to the roof slab object, the new floor slab object supports the creation
of floors. Floors can be flat or sloped. This object also supports custom edges.

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Structural Members
Using the new structural members in Autodesk Architectural Desktop, you
can create intelligent columns, beams and braces in 2D and 3D. The
structural members help to provide a complete, integrated building model
solution.
Structural members allow you to judge the size of structural elements in relation to architectural features, and they carry forward structural information
for detailed analysis and design of structures. Add structural members to column grids in your structural plans. Use the members to visually check for
interferences in your designs.

The structural member entity has a number of controlling parameters. In its


simplest form you can define a path and a profile to sweep. Additional
options allow you to make a broad range of shapes. Structural options
include:
Trimming: You can create trim planes and apply offsets and angles. You
can view the results dynamically in a preview pane. The structural member
can also be trimmed with other entities, such as lines and polylines.
Block Attachment: You can attach any block to a member to modify its
shape.
Start and End Shapes: You can a component in a structural member start
out as one profile and end as another.

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Catalog-Driven Environment
All of the structural information in Autodesk Architectural Desktop is kept in
a catalog. This catalog serves as the interface for the creation of any structural
member. Easy to use, the catalog has Windows Explorer-like navigation
making structural member creation easy. Browse the catalog and select the
member by double-clicking. The member is then created. Structural members
are available in both imperial and metric forms.

AEC Polygon
The primary use of an AEC Polygon is to provide true color fills for producing
2D graphic renderings/elevations of curtain walls. AEC Polygons can also be
anchored to layout grids or layout curves, so that when the layout grid or
curve moves or changes size, the location and/or size of the AEC Polygon
changes with it. Create different AEC Polygon styles to represent a wide range
of different types of AEC Polygons for controlling the edge widths, color and
fill characteristics of groups of polygons.

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AEC Polygons support the following:

True color fills


Hatched boundaries
Boolean operations

Enhanced Building Model Objects


Autodesk Architectural Desktop, Release 3 has extended the function of
many of its existing objects. The following sections outline the objects and
the changes that they have undergone in this latest release.

Stairs
Improved stair objects are more flexible in supporting shapes. They have
been modified to show more detail in components as well as to show better
interaction with other objects.
You can now modify stair runs and landings separately. You can create
nonrectangular stairs with tapered edges or with a curved shape. Landings
can have nonrectangular shapes. You can use near-arbitrary profiles for the
edges of flights and landings. In addition, railings and stringers can be
anchored to stairs and can follow the edges of flights and landings.

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Stairs can now easily be edited and re-shaped by using grips. Stairs also support customized edges based on projection to objects such as walls and
AutoCAD entities such as polylines. Stairs can also support sloping risers.

Stairs support:

78

Grip editing for flight and landing adjustments


Customized stair edges by projection to any object, including walls and
polylines
Sloping risers
Improved dialog box layout

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Customize stair by projecting edges from aec objects or polylines

Railings
In previous releases of Architectural Desktop, railing components supported
only extrusions of round, square, or user-defined profiles. Rather than make
an expansion of these shapes, you can now specify custom blocks that can
replace individual railing components.
The railing object is style-based; it supports vertical and horizontal railing
styles, and it can be automatically anchored to a stair object after creation.

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Customizes components:

Balusters
Main posts
Dynamic posts
Guardrail
Handrail
Bottom rail

Walls
In this latest release of Architectural Desktop, the wall object has undergone
significant changes that can improve your productivity. The following is an
outline of the changes and improved function of walls that are present in this
release.
Walls have the following new features:

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Zero Cleanup Radii Support: Applies a cleanup radius to a wall start


and end points.
Wall Merge: Manually merges multiple wall objects to force wall
cleanup.

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Wall Body: Converts 3D solids to a wall object.


Wall Modifier: Easily draws polylines that modify a wall surface.
Profile Sweep: Sweeps a polyline along the length of a wall.
Shrinkwrap Hatching: Adds hatching to the shrinkwrap interference
condition.
Shrinkwrap Body Support: Sees the results of adding an interference
condition.
True Cut Planes: Sees true cut plane lines.
Multiple Cut Plane Support: Adds multiple cut plane heights.
Graphline Toggle: Toggles the graphline of a wall to the center or its
justification.

Profile sweeps

Shrinkwrap hatching

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Windows
Windows have been enhanced to support the creation of parametric
muntins. In previous releases, muntins were displayed by creating a custom
block and attaching it to a window. Though useful for visualization, this
method of creation had limitations, and it was difficult to create complex
muntins layout patterns. This latest release of Architectural Desktop provides
an easy way to create muntins with different layout patterns.
Parametric muntins types include:

Rectangular
Diamond
Sunburst
Starburst
Gothic

Parametric muntins

Parametric muntins are ideally suited for residential design.

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Section and Elevation Objects


The section and elevation feature in the latest release of Architectural
Desktop reduces the time and effort required to produce and maintain
construction documents. This feature also generates presentation-quality
sections and elevations from an Architectural Desktop building model.
You can now create section/elevation objects as 2D or 3D entities. The new
objects can also display hidden lines removed by the CreateHLR command.
Section/elevation objects can be modified by merging user-defined linework,
such as Architectural Desktop objects, and AutoCAD vector entities, such as
lines, polylines, arcs, and circles.

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Sections and elevations support the following:

Automatic 2D creation (CreateHLR)


Persistent line masking
Shrinkwrap
Hatching
Line weight control

Elevation Labels
Elevation labels are interactive multi-view blocks used for dimensioning
heights in a drawing. They are anchored to either the world coordinate
system (WCS) or a named user coordinate system (UCS). Elevation labels are
primarily used for measuring the height of building elements such as walls
or windows, but they can be used to measure every point in your drawing.
Elevation labels can be added in plan and section views. Autodesk
Architectural Desktop, Release 3 offers you a number of predefined blocks for
commonly used elevation labels. You can also create custom elevation labels.

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Spaces
Spaces have been enhanced in this latest release of Architectural Desktop.
You can quickly generate spaces based on walls, lines, arcs, polylines, and
circles. Similar to the way that AutoCAD hatch patterns are created, you can
generate spaces by defining a space boundary to create a selection set, and
then select an internal point.

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Layer Keying
You can now put an AEC object on a new layer with one easy command.
Select the object and choose a new layer key. You can change the layer key
style and remap the entire drawing to the new layer key style.

Scheduling
In Autodesk Architectural Desktop, Release 3.3, you can attach property set
definitions directly to object styles. It is an easy way to attach property sets
in a single step to all objects with the same style. It simplifies the creation of
schedule tables and reduces file size. Attach a property set to a style but not
to each object individually. When you want to modify a property set definition, you can do it once, and all objects connected to the style update
automatically.

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Chases, Ducts and Floor Openings


Autodesk Architectural Desktop, Release 3.3 contains a number of symbols
for indicating chases, ducts, and floor openings. You can assign interference
conditions between these symbols and walls and spaces to show such features as cable shafts, wall niches, chimneys, and elevator shafts.

User Interface Improvements


Autodesk Architectural Desktop includes two new utilities, the Style Manager
and the Display Manager, that provide central locations where you can access
style or display information. The Display Manager allows you view and
change display representations, display sets, and display configurations in
your current drawing, while the Style Manager allows you to work with styles
from multiple drawings.

Style Manager
The Style Manager is a central location in Autodesk Architectural Desktop
where you can view and work with styles in drawings or from Internet and
intranet sites. The Style Manager has Windows Explorer-like navigation
capabilities.
Every object style can now be accessed through this central interface for style
creation, editing, and importing. A filter dialog box allows you to focus on
only the styles that are relevant to the current design. Internet-driven
features such as the Download Styles From Web allow you to quickly
download custom content from the Web.
In addition to styles, you can work with schedule data formats and definitions for clean up groups, masking blocks, multi-view blocks, profiles, and
property sets.

User Interface Improvements

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Style Manager supports the following:

Multiple drawings
Download objects from a Web site
Filter styles by type

Display Manager
The new Display Manager in Autodesk Architectural Desktop, Release 3.3
brings together all display system features into a central location. You can use
the Display Manager to access all drawing display configurations, display
sets, display representations, and display properties for all available AEC
objects.
With new streamlined WindowsExplorer-like features, you can quickly navigate through object representations, sets, and display configurations as well
as see and understand their relationships.
The Display Manager allows you to copy object representations for greater
visual control. You can now take an object plan representation, copy it, and
create different architectural layouts including Demolition, Structural, and
MEP plans.

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Copy representations for more display control

Other Enhancements
Autodesk Architectural Desktop includes additional product enhancements
designed to facilitate your work process. Product enhancements include
pushpin Add and Modify object dialog boxes, streamlined Add and Insert
Object commands for quicker drafting, an AEC Object Explode command,
and new customized templates.

Pushpin Dialog Boxes


You can minimize all Architectural Desktop dialog boxes while you create or
modify objects. This enhancement significantly increases design space in
your drawing area.
Sometimes when you are working in a small drawing area, the Add and
Modify Object dialog boxes take up a lot of space and hide drawing objects
you need to access. You now have a way of hiding these dialog boxes until
you need them.

Other Enhancements

89

Select the Pushpin icon in the dialog box title bar. As you move your cursor
away from the dialog box, it is minimized to the title bar, freeing up more
space in your drawing area. To display the dialog box again, move your cursor
over the title bar.
If you do not want to minimize your Add and Modify Object dialog boxes,
deactivate the feature by clicking the Pushpin icon again to turn off the
Pushpin option.

Add Selected (Draw By Example) and Insert


Object Feature
The Add Selected option enhances your productivity by allowing you to
select an object and draw it without having to use menus and dialog boxes.
Drafting is quicker and more intuitive. You can access Add Selected by rightclicking an object to display a shortcut menu.
The Insert Object feature allows you to quickly insert doors, windows, openings, and window assemblies into a wall. The Insert Object feature eliminates
using menus as you create walls. Select the appropriate object insertion
options when you right-click to display a shortcut menu.

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Add selected object to drawing

Insert door into wall

Other Enhancements

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Explode AEC Objects


AEC Object Explode allows objects from Architectural Desktop to be converted or exploded into AutoCAD basic entities such as lines, arcs and
circles. You can now exchange drawings with another person who wants to
work on a copy of the drawing using only basic entities. You can use
AEC Object Explode when you want the drawing in a program to understand
only the basic DWG format, for example, a Facility Management application.
The new Explode AEC Objects function allows you to automatically explode
AEC objects to AutoCAD blocks, based on the viewport in which the
AEC objects are displayed. If you have multiple viewports in paperspace in
your drawing, you can explode them to different sets of AutoCAD entities.
You can also explode external references with this method.
A number of settings give you optimal control over layer, color and linetype
properties of the exploded objects.

Publish to Autodesk Architectural Studio


You can publish Autodesk Architectural Desktop design files to Autodesk
Architectural Studio, an Internet-based conceptual design environment. You
can use the conceptual design, sketching, modeling, and presentation tools
in Autodesk Architectural Studio to work with your published Autodesk
Architectural Desktop drawings.

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International Features
When you install Autodesk Architectural Desktop, Release 3.3, you have the
option of installing International Extensions. The Extensions contain extra
features that are needed in, for example, European or Asian architecture. If
you would like to know more about these features, see the following sections.

NOTE To use the following features, you must install the International
Extensions of Autodesk Architectural Desktop. For information about installing
International Extensions, see the Autodesk Architectural Desktop, Release 3.3
Installation Guide.

Area Calculation
This new documentation feature in Autodesk Architectural Desktop,
Release 3 allows you to calculate the areas in your floor plan. You can create
areas from scratch, from AEC objects such as stairs or columns, or from wall
boundaries. For example, you can assign calculation modifier styles to areas
to create, for example, an automatic plaster thickness deduction from walls,
or to calculate balcony areas at only 50 percent. Areas can be combined in
area groups to calculate construction or traffic areas.
You can export area calculations to spreadsheet (XLS) and text (TXT) formats,
with document templates that ensure professional layout and conformity to
company standards.

International Features

93

Special area decomposition views can separate your floor plan into areas, as
shown in the following illustration, according to various decomposition
norms.

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Triangular and trapezoid area decomposition

AEC Dimensions
The AEC Dimensions feature has been optimized and expanded in this latest
release of Autodesk Architectural Desktop. You can now automatically
dimension all AEC objects and create intelligent AEC dimensions from logical points of building objects. You can also create manual AEC dimensions
that dimension the points you define in the drawing. As you work with manual AEC dimensions, you can now choose between static dimension points
and transformable dimension points. You can also convert AutoCAD dimensions easily into AEC dimensions. The new AEC Dimension Style wizard
makes modifying dimension styles quick and easy.

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Live Sections
The Live Sections feature of Autodesk Architectural Desktop, Release 3.3
retains sectioned objects after sectioning, and it is also appropriate for
3D sections of building objects. You can assign different display properties to
components of sectioned objects, such as cut hatch patterns to object parts
inside and outside of a section, and to objects completely inside or outside
the section line.

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Live section retains objects

International Features

97

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Display System

The display system in Autodesk Architectural Desktop

In this chapter

controls how AEC objects are displayed in a designated

Understanding the display

system

viewport. By specifying the AEC objects you want to


display in a viewport and the direction from which you
want to view them, you can produce different architectural displays, such as floor plans, reflected plans, elevations, 3D models, or schematic displays.

Getting started with the Display

Manager
Viewing the display system in

the Display Manager


Creating and editing display

systems
Purging display systems
Setting display systems in a

drawing
Copying display systems

between drawings
Working with display systems

on the Web
Sending display systems by

email
Troubleshooting the display

system

99

Understanding the Display System


The display system in Autodesk Architectural Desktop controls how
AEC objects are displayed in a designated viewport. By specifying the
AEC objects you want to display in a viewport and the direction from which
you want to view them, you can produce different architectural displays,
such as floor plans, reflected plans, elevations, 3D models, or schematic
displays.
In order to understand the display system in Autodesk Architectural Desktop,
Release 3, you should be familiar with three main components: display representations, which control how individual AEC objects are displayed; display sets, which group display representations of AEC objects; and display
configurations, which assign display sets to particular view directions. These
three main components are hierarchical in nature; each display configuration contains a number of display sets and each display set contains a number of display representations. It is important to fully understand each component in order to understand how they work together to create the display
system.

NOTE Autodesk Architectural Desktop, Release 3 includes templates with predefined display systems applied to viewports. You can use the display systems
and viewports supplied by the templates, or you can modify the display system
settings to suit your own office standards. If you want to create your own display
systems, you can start a drawing from scratch or from a template that does not
contain pre-defined display systems.

Display Representations
At the first level of display control are display representations. In
Architectural Desktop, a display representation defines how a set of components for an AEC object are drawn. In traditional CAD and manual drafting,
a single object, such as a door, is typically drawn multiple times in different
drawings, each using separate collections of entities such as lines and arcs.
Display representations allow you to create only one object of multiple entities that can change the way it draws itself depending on the display representation definitions of that AEC object.

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Display representation examples

NOTE A representation of an AEC object is not dependent on view direction,


although it is usually designed with a specific view in mind. The plan view in the
previous illustration shows the plan representation of the AEC objects even
though the view direction is isometric.
In Autodesk Architectural Desktop, most AEC objects are made up of individual components. For example, a door has the following components: door
panel, frame, stop, swing, glass, and threshold. Each component of the
AEC object has both physical and graphical properties that help determine
the display representation of that AEC object. The physical properties of an
AEC object control width, height, shape, and location of the AEC object in
the drawing; the graphical properties control visibility (on/off), layer, color,
and linetype. To represent an AEC object in the drawing area, each display
representation uses both the physical and graphical properties of the
AEC object. You usually decide the physical properties of the AEC object
when you create it, but you can change the graphical properties of an AEC
object in its display representations. You can define multiple display

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101

representations for the same AEC object by copying existing display representations and modifying the graphical properties of the components.
The display representations that are available for each AEC object and the
names of those display representations, are based on the ways that you might
need to view the AEC object in your drawings. Different display representations of an AEC object might include different components of the AEC object
or additional display options.
The previous illustration shows that a single AEC object can be drawn in different ways, depending on the individual needs of different drawing types.
For example, the plan representation draws the door panel, frame, stop, and
swing components and the nominal representation draws the door panel,
frame, and swing components. Although both representations draw the door
panel, each representation draws it differently. The plan representation
draws a door panel as a rectangle, while the nominal representation draws it
as a single line.
In traditional CAD, each representation of the door is drawn separately as a
collection of entities, such as lines and arcs. Display representations allow
you to create only one object of multiple components that can change the
way it draws itself depending on the display representation you define for
that object.
To better understand the different display representations available for the
different AEC objects, the following procedure shows you how to view
display representations for sample AEC object types in the Display Manager.
For further information about the Display Manager see Getting Started with
the Display Manager on page 110.
To preview the display representation of an AEC object type
1 From the Desktop menu, choose Display Manager.
2 Click Floating Viewer.
3 Resize and reposition the Floating Viewer and Display Manager in the
drawing area so that both are visible.
4 Expand the Representations by Object folder in the tree view in the left
pane.
5 Select one of the object types, such as Door.
The right pane displays the detailed information associated with the
selected object type.
6 Under Display Representations in the right pane, select one of the representations, such as Model.

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The Floating Viewer displays the selected display representation of the


AEC object type.
7 Experiment with different AEC object types and their display
representations.
8 Click OK to exit the Display Manager.

Display Sets
At the second level of display control are display sets, which are collections
of display representations of AEC objects. A display set controls how a group
of AEC objects, such as a wall assembly consisting of a door and a window, is
displayed.

Display set examples

After you specify a drawing type such as a floor plan or elevation, all the
AEC objects in the drawing are usually drawn with similar representations.
A set of representations is not dependent on view direction, although it is

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103

usually designed with a specific view in mind. The plan view in the previous
illustration shows the plan representation of the AEC objects even though
the view direction is isometric.
In Autodesk Architectural Desktop, a display set is a collection of display
representations. It is organized based on drawing type. For example, a Plan
display set might contain the Plan display representations for a number of
AEC object types, while a 3D model display set might contain the Model
display representation for a number of AEC object types. It is possible for a
display set to contain zero or more display representations for a single
AEC object type. If a display set contains no display representations for an
AEC object type, the display set never draws those AEC objects. You can
define any number of display sets as you need them for the different types of
drawings you produce.

Display Configurations
At the final level of display control are display configurations. To understand
display configurations you must know how view direction relates to the display system. The previous two sections discussed how both display representations and display sets are not dependent on a view direction, although they
are usually defined with a view direction in mind. At the final level of display
control however, a specific view direction comes into play.
For example, the following illustration shows a viewport assigned the Plot
display configuration and the Top view direction. In this illustration, the
AEC objects are drawn with a plan representation.

AEC objects in plan view

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This viewport is also assigned the Plot display configuration and the Front
view direction. In this illustration the same AEC objects are drawn with an
elevation representation.

AEC objects in elevation view

This viewport is also assigned the Plot display configuration, but a


SE Isometric view direction. Notice the same AEC objects get drawn with a
3D representation.

AEC objects in SW isometric view

In Autodesk Architectural Desktop, a display configuration is assigned to


viewports, such as a floating viewport in paper space or all tiled viewports in
model space. If you are viewing your model in a paper space viewport and a
display configuration is assigned to the viewport, then that display configu-

Understanding the Display System

105

ration is used. If you are viewing your model in model space or in a tiled
viewport (the TILEMODE system variable is set to 1), then the default display
configuration is used. You can change the default display configuration
through the Display Manager. For further information about the Display
Manager see Getting Started with the Display Manager on page 110.
The display configuration also maps display sets to specific view directions.
A display configuration contains one or more display sets that control the
representation of AEC objects in your drawing when viewed from different
directions.

Plan display configuration in the Display Manager

In the Display Manager, the active viewport in the drawing has been assigned
the Plot display configuration, and is highlighted on the tree structure in the
left pane. The Plot display configuration has multiple display sets mapped to
specific view directions in the drawing. The Configuration tab in the right
pane shows the display sets mapped to the view directions. In this example,
the current view direction in the drawing (in bold type) is Top, to which the
Plan display set has been mapped, so the AEC objects in the active viewport
are drawn with the display representations in the Plan display set.
In the previous illustration of the Display Manager, when the view direction
in the active viewport is changed to Front, the AEC objects are drawn with
the display representations in the Section_Elev display set. This is also true

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when the view direction in the active viewport is changed to Right, Left, or
Back.
There are no non-orthogonal 3D view directions listed, but there is a Default
view direction. If the view direction is changed to one that is not currently
listed in the Configuration tab, such as a non-orthogonal 3D view,
AEC objects are drawn with whatever display set has been mapped to the
Default view direction. In this case, the AEC objects are drawn with the
Model display set.
The Default view direction is used when a view direction is selected that has
not been mapped with a specific display set, as in the case of the Bottom view
direction in this example. If the view direction of the active viewport is
changed to Bottom, AEC objects are drawn with the display set assigned to
the Default view direction, the Model display set. To learn more about how
to use the Display Manager, see Getting Started with the Display Manager
on page 110.

How It All Works Together


In Architectural Desktop, layouts are created for each type of drawing to be
created from your model. Within each layout, viewports are created based on
the number of different model views required for that type of drawing. Each
viewport is assigned a display configuration based on what is to be shown in
the viewport. A display configuration contains display sets that, in turn, contain display representations.

IMPORTANT A display configuration is defined for specific view directions, a


display set is defined for a set of AEC object types, and a display representation
is defined for a single AEC object type. A display configuration is view direction
dependent, while display sets and display representations are not.

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107

Display system hierarchy

The purpose of the display system is to determine how to draw a particular


AEC object in a particular viewport. The following is how an AEC object is
drawn in a specific viewport.

The active viewport has a current view direction and a display configuration assigned to it.
The display configuration has one or more display sets assigned to it and
selects the one that is mapped to the current view direction.
The display set has a group of display representations associated to it and
finds the one associated with the AEC object that needs to be drawn.
The AEC object is drawn in the active viewport using the appropriate display representations for the AEC object type and using the display properties for the individual AEC object.

NOTE If you change the view direction in the active viewport, the AEC object
may be redrawn using a different display representation, or it may not display
when it does not have a display representation in the active display set.

Changing the Display of an AEC Object in a


Viewport
An important procedure to learn is how to change the display of a specific
AEC object type in a specific viewport. For example, if you have a window

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AEC object in your model, and in one viewport the window is showing
incorrectly for your drawing, you must change the window representation in
that viewport.

Specifying the display of window components

If you do not have time to set up display configurations for your drawing, or
if this drawing is one that someone else set up and you are confused by the
current display system, then you must know how to change a specific
AEC object in a specific viewport.
The following procedure shows you how you can change the display representations of a specific AEC object in a specific viewport on the fly.
To change the display representation of an AEC object in a viewport
1 Set the viewport as current in which you want to make display changes.
2 Make sure that the current viewport is set to the desired view direction
with the appropriate display configuration.
3 Open the Display Manager, and expand the Sets folder in the tree view on
the left pane of the dialog box. The current display set is in bold text.
4 Click the current display set.
5 Click the Display Control tab on the right pane. This tab shows all the display representations that are active for the current display set.
6 Confirm that the display representations you want to display in your
viewport are selected for the current display set. If not, select the appropriate check box(es).
7 Click Apply for the Display Manager to accept your changes.
8 Click OK to close the Display Manager.
The current viewport and all viewports that have the same display configuration assigned to it are drawn with the new display representations.

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Getting Started with the Display Manager


When you open the Display Manager, all the display information from your
current drawing is displayed. The Display Manager is split into two re-sizable
panes and has a menu bar and toolbar.

Display Manager dialog box upon opening

Left Pane of the Display Manager


The left pane of the Display Manager organizes the display information in
your drawings in a hierarchical tree view that you can navigate by expanding
and collapsing the different levels in the tree. You can add, purge, rename,
copy, and send display system components in the tree view. The tree view is
always displayed in the left pane. As you select items in the tree, the right
hand pane, is appropriately updated.
Right Pane of the Display Manager
The right pane of the Display Manager shows the detailed display information, depending on what you select in the tree view in the left pane. You can
preview how an AEC object is displayed with a display representation, and
view the displays sets and the mapped view directions associated with each
display configuration. You can view the display representations of different
AEC object types, and access the default graphical display properties of the
AEC objects in your drawings.

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Display Manager Menu Bar and Toolbar


The top of the Display Manager includes a menu bar and a toolbar that allow
you to quickly access the menu commands. When you position your mouse
over a toolbar icon, a tooltip displays with an explanation of the icon.

Displaying the Display Manager


You can access the Display Manager directly, or you can set default display
configurations to viewports from the Select Display command. To access the
Display Manager directly, choose it from the Desktop menu. You can also
access the default display representations for AEC object types and the
default display configuration for the current drawing when you choose
Drawing Setup from the Desktop Menu, and then select the display tab in the
Drawing Setup dialog box.
When you open the Display Manager, all the display information of your
current drawing is displayed in the tree view of the Display Manager.
To display the Display Manager
1 From the Desktop menu, choose Display Manager.
The display information for the current drawing is displayed in the Display Manager tree view in the left pane. The drawing name is highlighted
in the tree view, and the drawing is expanded to display all the possible
display information. If the display components have plus signs (+) next to
them, they contain multiple configurations, sets or representations.

NOTE If your drawing is open as read-only, a lock displays on the folder


icon next to the drawing in the tree view.
2 To close the Display Manager, choose File Exit, click OK, or click the X
in the top right side of the Display Manager title bar.
After you open the Display Manager, you can change the size and position
of the Display Manager. For more information, see Moving and Resizing
the Display Manager on page 111.

Moving and Resizing the Display Manager


You can move and resize the Display Manager to change its position and size
in the drawing area.

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To move the Display Manager


1 From the Desktop menu, choose Display Manager.
2 To move the Display Manager, drag the title bar of the Display Manager to
the desired location.
To resize the Display Manager
1 From the Desktop menu, choose Display Manager.
2 To resize the Display Manager, move your cursor over the edge or a corner
of the dialog box until you see your cursor change representation to
stretching arrows. Click and drag the edge or corner of the dialog box to
the desired size.

Viewing Display Systems in the Display


Manager
The Display Manager is the central location of all display system information
for your drawing in Autodesk Architectural Desktop, Release 3. Within the
Display Manager you view all the components of the display system in the
current drawing. You can view basic display system information in the tree
view in the left pane of the Display Manager, or you can view more detailed
information about selected display components in the right pane of the
Display Manager. For more information about the Display Manager dialog
box, see Getting Started with the Display Manager on page 110.
Depending on what you select in the tree view in the left pane of the Display
Manager, the contents of the right pane change. In the right pane, you can
view all the detailed display information in a drawing, including details of
display configurations, display sets, and display representations of
AEC object types.
For visible AEC objects, like walls or doors, you can preview how the
AEC objects are displayed with a selected display representation. You can preview how the AEC objects are displayed for selected display sets that you
might have associated with specific display configurations. You can access
the graphical properties of AEC objects in the Display Manager directly.

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Viewing Drawing Information in the Display


Manager
You can view the drawing information of the current drawing in the Display
Manager, but you cannot edit the drawing information in the Display
Manager.
To view the drawing information in the Display Manager
1 From the Desktop menu, choose Display Manager.
2 By default, the left pane has the current drawing name highlighted in the
tree view, and the right pane shows the detailed drawing information.
3 Click OK to exit the Display Manager.

NOTE In the Display Manager dialog box, you can view the current drawing information by clicking the drawing name in the tree view of the left
pane. The right pane automatically updates to show the detailed drawing
information.

Viewing the Display Representations


You can view the display representations of the current drawing in the
Display Manager.
To view the display representations of the current drawing
1 From the Desktop menu, choose Display Manager.
2 In the tree view in the left pane of the Display Manager, select
Representations by Object.
The right pane displays all the display representations by object type.

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Display representations by objects in the current drawing

NOTE To view the display representations in the tree view only, you can
expand the Representations by Object folder.
3 Expand the Representations by Object folder in the tree view in the left
pane.
4 Select one of the object types, such as Wall.
The right pane displays the detailed information associated with the
selected object type.
5 Click OK to exit the Display Manager.

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Wall display representations

Viewing the Display Sets


You can view the display sets of the current drawing in the Display Manager.
To view the display sets of the current drawing
1 From the Desktop menu, choose Display Manager.
2 In the tree view in the left pane of the Display Manager, select Sets.
The right pane displays all the display sets.

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Display sets in the current drawing

NOTE To view the display sets in the tree view only, you can expand the
Sets folder.
3 Expand the Sets folder in the tree view in the left pane.
4 Select one of the Sets, such as Model.
The right pane displays the detailed information associated with the
selected display set.
5 Click OK to exit the Display Manager.

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Model display set detailed information

Viewing the Display Configurations


You can view the display configurations of the current drawing in the Display
Manager.
To view the display configurations of the current drawing
1 From the Desktop menu, choose Display Manager.
2 In the tree view in the left pane of the Display Manager, select
Configurations.
The right pane displays all the display configurations.

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Display configurations in the current drawing

NOTE To view the display configurations in the tree view only, you can
expand the Configuration folder.
3 Expand the Configurations folder in the tree view in the left pane.
4 Select one of the Configurations, such as Standard.
The right pane displays the detailed information associated with the
selected display configuration.
5 Click OK to exit the Display Manager.

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Standard display configuration detailed information

Previewing an AEC Object Types Representation


You can preview the representation of an AEC object type in the Display
Manager with the Floating Viewer.
To preview the display representation of an AEC object type
1 From the Desktop menu, choose Display Manager.
2 Click Floating Viewer.
3 Resize and reposition the Floating Viewer and Display Manager so that
both are visible in the drawing area.
4 Expand the Representations by Object folder in the tree view in the left
pane.
5 Select one of the object types, such as Door.
The right pane displays the detailed information associated with the
selected object type.
6 Under Display Representations in the right pane, select one of the representations, such as Model.
The Floating Viewer displays the selected display representation of the
AEC object type.

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7 Click OK to exit the Display Manager.

Previewing an AEC Object Types Representation


within a Display Set
You can preview the representation of an AEC object type within a Display
Set in the Display Manager with the Floating Viewer.
To preview the display representation of an AEC object type within a display
set
1 From the Desktop menu, choose Display Manager.
2 Click Floating Viewer.
3 Resize and reposition the Floating Viewer and Display Manager so that
both are visible in the drawing area.
4 Expand the Sets folder in the tree view in the left pane.
5 Select one of the Sets, such as Model.
6 Click the Display Control tab in the right pane.
7 Under Objects in the right pane, select one of the object types, such as
Wall.
The Floating Viewer displays the selected display representation of the
AEC object type.
8 Click OK to exit the Display Manager.

Previewing an AEC Object Types Default


Properties
You can preview default properties of an AEC object type in the Display
Manager.
To preview the default properties of an AEC object type
1 From the Desktop menu, choose Display Manager.
2 Expand the Representations by Object folder in the tree view in the left
pane.
3 Select one of the object types, such as Door.
The right pane displays the detailed information associated with the
selected object type.
4 Under Display Representations in the right pane, double-click one of the
representations, such as Model.

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The Entity Properties dialog box displays showing the default properties
of the selected AEC object type.
5 Click OK to exit the Display Manager.

Creating and Editing Display Systems


The Display Manager is the central location of all display system information
for your drawing in Autodesk Architectural Desktop, Release 3. Within the
Display Manager you can create and edit all the components of the display
system in the current drawing. You can create and edit display representations, display sets, and display configurations. You can enter notes and reference files in your display sets and display configurations. You can edit the
graphical properties of an AEC object type in the Display Manager.

Working with Display Representations


All AEC objects have a predefined number of default display representations.
Most of the AEC objects have Plan, Model, and Reflected display representations, because these are the most common design situations that require a
different view of an AEC object. Some AEC objects, such as cameras and reference AEC objects, have only a General representation, because the display
of these AEC objects does not change in different views.
You can add new display representations to an object by duplicating an existing display representation and renaming it. You can change the properties of
the predefined and duplicated display representations. However, you cannot
add new display representations from scratch or change the names of the
predefined display representations of an AEC object type.

Creating Duplicate Display Representations


You can create your own display representation by duplicating a predefined
display representation in the Display Manager. You cannot create a display
representation from scratch.
To create a duplicate display representation
1 From the Desktop menu, choose Display Manager.
2 In the tree view of the Display Manager, expand the Representation by
Object folder.
3 In the tree view under Representation by Object, select the AEC object
type you want to create a new display representation for.

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4 In the right pane of the Display Manager, right-click the display representation you want to duplicate, and choose Duplicate from the shortcut
menu.
The duplicated display representation is displayed as the last item in the
display representation list.
5 Type the new name for the display representation in the highlighted box.
6 Press ENTER.
7 Click OK to exit the Display Manager.

NOTE By default, the new display representation has the same name followed by the number 2.

Renaming Display Representations


You can rename your own display representation that you created by duplicating a predefined display representation in the Display Manager. You cannot rename the predefined display representations of an AEC object type.
To rename a duplicate display representation
1 From the Desktop menu, choose Display Manager.
2 In the tree view of the Display Manager, expand the Representation by
Object folder.
3 In the tree view under Representation by Object, select the AEC object
type you want to rename a duplicate display representation for.
4 In the right pane of the Display Manager, right-click the duplicate display
representation you want to rename, and choose Rename from the shortcut menu.
5 Type the new name for the display representation in the highlighted box.
6 Press ENTER.
7 Click OK to exit the Display Manager.

Editing Display Representations


You can edit the display representations in your current drawing in the
Display Manager. You can change the AutoCAD properties and display properties for any AEC object type. The AutoCAD properties include the layer,
color, linetype, and lineweight of the AEC object type. Additional properties
may be editable for some AEC object types such as, Hatching for
AEC Polygons and Other for Doors. The display properties of an AEC object
type include the visibility of the AEC object components.

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You can change the default display representations for the display configurations in your drawing by changing the display representations are assigned
to the display sets.
To edit a display representation of an AEC object type
1 From the Desktop menu, choose Display Manager.
2 In the tree view of the Display Manager, expand the Representation by
Object folder.
The right pane displays the detailed display representation information.
3 In the tree view under Representation by Object, select the AEC object
type you want to edit.
4 You can do the following options to edit the display representation.

To change the default display representation assigned to a display set,


select the appropriate boxes under Sets in the right pane of the Display
Manager.

NOTE To set the same display representation for all display sets, or to set
the same display set for all the display representations, right-click the display
representation or the display set respectively in the right pane of the Display
Manager, and choose Select All or Clear All from the shortcut menu.

To change the properties of the display representation, double-click the


display representation you want to edit in the right pane. The Entity
Properties dialog box is displayed.

NOTE By default, the layer of AEC object components is set to layer 0 and
the color and linetype are set to ByBlock. With these defaults, the AEC object
components inherit the color and linetype properties of the parent AEC
object. AEC object components cannot exist as AEC objects outside their
parent AEC object, as typical AutoCAD block AEC objects can. AEC object
components with these ByBlock defaults always inherit the layer, color, and
linetype properties of their parent AEC object.

In the Entity Properties dialog box, click the Layer/Color/Linetype tab


to change the AutoCAD properties including the visibility of the AEC
object components, to determine how the AEC object is displayed in
the display representation. To set the same display properties for multiple or all AEC object components in the Entity Properties dialog box,
use standard Microsoft Windows-based selection methods. For example, hold down SHIFT to select several consecutive AEC object compo-

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nents in the Component list. Hold down CTRL to select several nonconsecutive components.
If applicable, click tabs, such as Hatching or Other, to change additional AEC object specific properties.

NOTE The tabs in this dialog box depend on the AEC object type and
display representation that you select. For example, a wall AEC object in a
Model display representation displays only the Layer/Color/Linetype tab; a
wall AEC object in a plan display representation displays two additional tabs
to set display properties for hatching and cut-plane components.
5 When you finish changing the display representation of the AEC object
type, you can edit another display representation of the AEC object by
selecting another display representation from the list.

NOTE If you edit the display properties of the AEC object type in a display
representation, you can view the changes only in viewports where that display representation is current.
6 Click Apply.
7 Click OK to exit the Display Manager.

Deleting Display Representations


You can delete your own display representation that you created. However,
you cannot delete the predefined display representations of an AEC object
type.
To delete a display representation
1 From the Desktop menu, choose Display Manager.
2 In the tree view of the Display Manager, expand the Representation by
Object folder.
3 In the tree view under Representation by Object, select the AEC object
type you want to want to delete a display representation for.
4 In the right pane of the Display Manager, right-click the display representation you want to delete, and choose Delete from the shortcut menu.

NOTE You cannot delete the predefined display representations of an


AEC object type, such as Model, Plan, and General.
5 Click OK to exit the Display Manager.

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Working with Display Sets


There are four predefined default display sets: Model, Plan, Reflected, and
Section_Elev. These display sets are assigned display representations based on
the most common design situations that require different types of drawings
to be generated.
You can add new display sets by creating your own from scratch or by copying an existing display set and renaming it. You can rename, delete, or purge
display sets. For each display set you can change the display representations,
add general display set information, and add notes and reference files.

Creating New Display Sets


Display sets are groups of display representations. You can create your own
display sets to include only the AEC objects and AEC object components that
you specify. By default, no display representations are assigned to new display sets you create.
To create a new display set
1 From the Desktop menu, choose Display Manager.
2 In the tree view of the Display Manager, right-click Sets, and choose New
from the shortcut menu.
The Sets folder is expanded and a new display set is listed.
3 Type the name for the new display set in the highlighted box.
4 Press ENTER.
5 Click OK to exit the Display Manager.

NOTE By default, the new display set has the name, New Display Set.

Creating a Display Set from an Existing Display Set


You can create new display sets by copying existing display sets. This is beneficial when you need duplicate display sets with different names or multiple
display sets with minor display representation differences.
To create a display set from an existing display set
1 From the Desktop menu, choose Display Manager.
2 In the tree view of the Display Manager, expand the Sets folder.
3 Right-click the display set you want to copy, and choose New from the
shortcut menu.
The copied display set is in the display set list.

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4 Type the new name for the display set in the highlighted box.
5 Press ENTER.
6 Click OK to exit the Display Manager.

NOTE By default, the new display set has the name, New Display Set.

Renaming Display Sets


You can rename the display sets in your drawing in the Display Manager. It
is recommended that you rename your own display sets that you created in
the Display Manager, and do not rename the predefined display sets such as
Model and Plan.
To rename a new display set
1 From the Desktop menu, choose Display Manager.
2 In the tree view of the Display Manager, expand the Sets folder.
The right pane shows the display sets list for your drawing.
In the tree view, right-click the display set you want to rename, and
choose Rename from the shortcut menu.
3 In the right pane of the Display Manager, right-click the display set you
want to rename, and choose Rename from the shortcut menu.
4 Type the new name for the display set in the highlighted box.
5 Press ENTER.
6 Click OK to exit the Display Manager.

Editing Display Sets


You can edit the display sets in your drawing in the Display Manager. by
changing the default display representations assigned to each display set.
To edit a display set
1 From the Desktop menu, choose Display Manager.
2 In the tree view of the Display Manager, expand the Sets folder.
3 In the tree view under Sets, select the display set you want to edit.
The right pane displays the detailed display set information.
4 To change the default display representation assigned to a display set,
click in the appropriate boxes under Sets in the right pane of the Display
Manager.

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NOTE To set the same display representation for all display sets, or to set
the same display set for all the display representations, right-click the display
representation or the display set respectively in the right pane of the Display
Manager, and choose Select All or Clear All from the shortcut menu.
5 Click Apply.
6 Click OK to exit the Display Manager.

Deleting Display Sets


You can delete the display sets in your drawing in the Display Manager. It is
recommended that you delete your own display sets that you created in the
Display Manager, and do not delete the predefined display sets such as Model
and Plan.
To delete a display set
1 From the Desktop menu, choose Display Manager.
2 In the tree view of the Display Manager, expand the Sets folder.
3 In the tree view under Sets, right-click the display set you want to delete,
and choose Delete from the shortcut menu.
4 Click OK to exit the Display Manager.

Adding Notes and Reference Files to a Display Set


You can enter notes and reference files in your display sets. This is beneficial
when you are a new user getting familiar with display systems, and it can
assist a CAD Manager in maintaining design standards.
To add notes and reference files to a display set
1 From the Desktop menu, choose Display Manager.
2 In the tree view of the Display Manager, expand the Sets folder.
3 In the tree view under Sets, select the display set you want to add notes
and reference files to.
The right pane displays the detailed display set information.
4 In the right pane, select the General tab.
5 To add a description to the display set, type it in the Description field.
6 To add a note to the display set, or to attach, edit, or detach a reference
file, click Notes.
7 In the Notes dialog box, to add a note, type the note on the Text Notes tab.

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8 To attach, edit, or detach a reference file, click the Reference Docs tab, and
do any of the following:

To attach a reference file, click Add, select a document in the Select File
dialog box, and click OK. You can type a description of the reference
file on the Reference Docs tab.
To edit a reference file, select the file name in the list, click Edit, and
change the document or the description in the Reference Document
dialog box. To edit the file itself, double-click the reference file name to
start its application.
To detach a reference file, select the file name in the list, and click
Delete.

9 Click Apply.
10 Click OK to exit the Display Manager.

Working with Display Configurations


Display configurations are typically user-defined and are based on drawing
types to be produced. One predefined display configuration, Standard, is the
system default display configuration. You can add new display configurations by creating your own from scratch or by copying an existing display
configuration and renaming it. You can rename the new display configurations you add to your drawing, however, you cannot change the name of the
predefined Standard display configuration. For each display configuration,
you can change the display sets, add general display configuration information, and add notes and reference files.

Creating New Display Configurations


Display configurations are groups of display sets. You can create your own
display configurations to include only the display sets that you specify. By
default, the Standard display representation is duplicated for new display
configurations you create.
To create a new display configuration
1 From the Desktop menu, choose Display Manager.
2 In the tree view of the Display Manager, right-click Configurations, and
choose New from the shortcut menu.
The Configurations folder is expanded and a new display configuration is
listed.
3 Type the name for the new display configuration in the highlighted box.
4 Press ENTER.

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5 Click OK to exit the Display Manager.

NOTE By default, the new display set has the name, New Display
Configuration.

Creating a Display Configuration from an Existing Display


Configuration
You can create new display configuration by copying existing display configurations and renaming them. You can benefit from this when you need
duplicate display configurations with different names or multiple display
configurations with minor display representation differences.
To create a display configuration from an existing display configuration
1 From the Desktop menu, choose Display Manager.
2 In the tree view of the Display Manager, expand the Configurations folder.
3 Right-click the display configuration you want to copy, and choose New
from the shortcut menu.
The copied display configuration is in the display configuration list.
4 Type the new name for the display configuration in the highlighted box.
5 Press ENTER.
6 Click OK to exit the Display Manager.

NOTE By default, the new display configuration has the name, New Display Configuration.

Renaming Display Configurations


You can rename your own display configuration that you created in the
Display Manager, however, you cannot rename the predefined Standard
display configuration.
To rename a new display configuration
1 From the Desktop menu, choose Display Manager.
2 In the tree view of the Display Manager, expand the Configurations folder.
The right pane shows the display configuration list for your drawing.
In the tree view, right-click the display configuration you want to rename,
and choose Rename from the shortcut menu.

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3 In the right pane of the Display Manager, right-click the display configuration you want to rename, and choose Rename from the shortcut menu.
4 Type the new name for the display configuration in the highlighted box.
5 Press ENTER.
6 Click OK to exit the Display Manager.

Editing Display Configurations


You can edit the display configurations in your drawing in the Display
Manager by changing the default display sets assigned to each view direction.
You can override the display configuration by specifying a fixed display configuration that assigns a single view direction to display a single display set
in a viewport. For example, to view a plan representation from an isometric
viewing direction, set the default display set to Plan and set the fixed view
direction to Top.
To edit a display configuration
1 From the Desktop menu, choose Display Manager.
2 In the tree view of the Display Manager, expand the Configurations folder.
3 In the tree view under Configurations, select the display configuration
you want to edit.
The right pane displays the detailed display configuration information.
4 To change the default display set assigned to a view direction, select the
appropriate display set for each view direction in the list boxes under Display Representation Sets in the right pane of the Display Manager.
5 Click Apply.
6 Click OK to exit the Display Manager.

Deleting Display Configurations


You can delete your own display configurations that you created. However,
you cannot delete the predefined Standard display configuration, or the current system default display configuration.
To delete a display configuration
1 From the Desktop menu, choose Display Manager.
2 In the tree view of the Display Manager, expand the Configurations folder.
3 In the tree view under Configurations, right-click the display configuration you want to delete, and choose Delete from the shortcut menu.

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NOTE You cannot delete the predefined display configuration Standard, or


the current system default display configuration.
4 Click OK to exit the Display Manager.

Adding Notes and Reference Files to a Display Configuration


You can enter notes and reference files in your display configurations. This is
beneficial when you are a new user getting familiar with display systems, and
it can assist a CAD Manager in maintaining design standards.
To add notes and reference files to a display configuration
1 From the Desktop menu, choose Display Manager.
2 In the tree view of the Display Manager, expand the Configurations folder.
3 In the tree view under Configurations, select the display configuration
you want to add notes and reference files to.
The right pane displays the detailed display configuration information.
4 In the right pane, select the General tab.
5 To add a description to the display configuration, type it in the Description field.
6 To add a note to the display configuration, or to attach, edit, or detach a
reference file, click Notes.
7 In the Notes dialog box, to add a note, type the note on the Text Notes tab.
8 To attach, edit, or detach a reference file, click the Reference Docs tab, and
do any of the following:

To attach a reference file, click Add, select a document in the Select File
dialog box, and click OK. You can type a description of the reference
file on the Reference Docs tab.
To edit a reference file, select the file name in the list, click Edit, and
change the document or the description in the Reference Document
dialog box. To edit the file itself, double-click the reference file name to
start its application.
To detach a reference file, select the file name in the list, and click
Delete.

9 Click Apply.
10 Click OK to exit the Display Manager.

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Purging Display Systems


You can purge unused display system components from your drawing. You
cannot purge any display system components that are either in use, in a readonly drawing, or are Architectural Desktop Standard display system components such as the Standard display configuration.

Purging Display Representations


You can purge all display representation that you are not using from your
drawing or individual display representations by AEC object type. You cannot purge display representations that are assigned to any of the display sets
or display configurations, or those applied to viewports in your drawing, or
standard display representations such as Model and General.
To purge display representations
1 From the Desktop menu, choose Display Manager.
2 In the tree view of the Display Manager, right-click the Representation by
Object folder, and choose Purge from the shortcut menu.
The Purge Display Representations dialog box is displayed.
3 In the Purge Display Representations dialog box, select the display representations that you want to purge, and click OK.

NOTE The Purge Display Representations dialog box lists all the currently
unused display representations. By default, all unused display representations
are selected with check marks in their boxes. If all display representations are
currently used in the drawing, a warning message is displayed telling you
nothing can be purged and you cannot access the Purge Display Sets dialog
box. If you want to view and purge only display representations for a specific
AEC object type, right-click the AEC object type in the tree view of the Display
Manager, and choose Purge from the shortcut menu. The Purge Display Representations dialog box lists only the unused display representations for the
selected AEC object type, not the entire drawing.
4 Click OK to exit the Display Manager.

Purging Display Sets


You can purge display sets that you are not using from your drawing. You
cannot purge display sets that are assigned to display configurations, or that

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are applied to any of the viewports in your drawing. It is recommended that


you do not purge the predefined display sets such as Model and Plan.
To purge display sets
1 From the Desktop menu, choose Display Manager.
2 In the tree view of the Display Manager, right-click the Sets folder, and
choose Purge from the shortcut menu.
The Purge Display Sets dialog box is displayed.
3 In the Purge Display Sets dialog box, select the display sets that you want
to purge, and click OK.

NOTE The Purge Display Sets dialog box lists currently unused display sets.
By default, all unused display sets are selected with check marks in their
boxes. If all display sets are currently used in the drawing, the message,
Nothing is Purgable, is displayed and you are unable to access the Purge
Display Sets dialog box.
4 Click OK to exit the Display Manager.

Purging Display Configurations


You can purge display configurations that you are not using from your drawing. You cannot purge display configurations that are applied to any of the
viewports in your drawing, the default display configuration, or the Standard
display configuration.
To purge display configurations
1 From the Desktop menu, choose Display Manager.
2 In the tree view of the Display Manager, right-click the Configurations
folder, and choose Purge from the shortcut menu.
The Purge Display Configurations dialog box is displayed.
3 In the Purge Display Configurations dialog box, select the display configurations that you want to purge, and click OK.

NOTE The Purge Display Configurations dialog box lists currently unused
display configurations. By default, all unused display configurations are
selected with check marks in their boxes. If all display configurations are currently used in the drawing, the message, Nothing is Purgable, is displayed
and you are unable to access the Purge Configurations dialog box.

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4 Click OK to exit the Display Manager.

Setting Display Systems in a Drawing


You can set the defaults for the display system and its components for your
current drawing. When creating new viewports, model space, and tiled viewports, the default setting are automatically assigned. You can choose to use
the defaults as is, or you can modify the display system and its components
as necessary. Using the default drawing settings is beneficial when you are a
new user getting familiar with display systems, and it can assist a
CAD Manager in maintaining design standards. You can save templates with
default display system settings to maintain consistency.

Setting the Default Display Representations of


AEC Objects
You can specify the default display representation for each AEC object type.
You can use a predefined display representation such as Model or Plan, or use
a display representation that you created and exists in your current drawing.
You can set the default properties of the AEC objects such as layer, color, linetype, and visibility of the AEC object components.
To set the default display representation for an AEC object
1 From the Desktop menu, choose Display Manager.
2 In the Drawing Setup dialog box, click the Display tab.
3 Under Display Representations, set the display representations for any of
the AEC object types:

From the Object Type list, select an AEC object. The available display
representations for the selected AEC object are listed under Display
Representations.

NOTE You cannot modify the number or names of the display


representations of an AEC object from the Drawing Setup dialog box. For
further information about modifying display representations see, Working
with Display Representations on page 121.

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Under Display Representations, select the display representation that


you want to set, and click Edit.

Display System

NOTE If the display representation you select does not apply to the
selected AEC object, then the Edit option is unavailable and the message
Does Not Use Display Properties is displayed under the Object Type list.
4 In the Entity Properties dialog box, edit the display properties to determine how the AEC object (entity) is displayed in the display representation. To set the same display properties for multiple or all AEC object components in the Entity Properties dialog box, use standard MicrosoftWindows-based selection methods. For example, hold down SHIFT to select
several consecutive AEC object components in the Component list. Hold
down CTRL to select several nonconsecutive components.

Click the Layer/Color/Linetype tab to modify the graphical properties


of the AEC object components in the display representation that you
selected such as, layer, color, linetype, and visibility (on/off).

NOTE By default, the layer of AEC object components is set to 0 and the
color and linetype are set to ByBlock. With these defaults, the AEC object
components inherit the color and linetype properties of the parent
AEC object. AEC object components cannot exist as AEC objects outside their
parent AEC object as typical Autodesk AEC objects can. AEC object
components with these ByBlock defaults always inherit the layer, color, and
linetype properties of their parent AEC object.

Click the Hatching tab, if applicable, to modify the hatch properties of


each hatched component of the AEC object. These properties include
the hatch pattern, scale, angle, and orientation of the hatch.
Click the Other tab, if applicable, to modify other AEC object-specific
properties. For example, in the Plan display representation of a door,
you can add a straight swing to a door or a custom block to the display
of the door.

NOTE The tabs in this dialog box depend on the AEC object type and
display representation that you select. For example, a wall AEC object in a
Model display representation displays only the Layer/Color/Linetype tab; a
wall AEC object in a Plan display representation displays two additional tabs
to set display properties for hatching and cut-plane components.
5 Repeat steps 3 and 4 until you have set all the default display representations that you want to set.
6 Click OK.

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135

Setting the Default Display Configuration


You can specify the default display configuration that is applied to new viewports, model space, or tiled viewports.
To set the default display configuration for a viewport
1 From the Desktop menu, choose Drawing Setup.

NOTE You can set the default display configuration through the Display
Manager. Right-click the display configuration in the tree view of the Display
Manager, and choose Set as Drawing Default from the shortcut menu.
2 In the Drawing Setup dialog box, click the Display tab.
3 In the Drawing Default Display Configuration list box, select the display
configuration that you want to apply to new viewports or when the
TILEMODE system variable is set to 1.
4 Click OK.

NOTE When you access the Viewport Display Configuration dialog box to
apply a display configuration for a viewport in your drawing, the system
default display configuration is listed in the dialog box as System Default.

Setting the Display Configurations in Viewports


You can specify a display configuration for a viewport, model space, or tiled
viewport at any time during your design process. You change the current display configuration in a viewport by specifying a new display configuration.
To set a display configuration for the current viewport
1 Set the viewport as current in which you want to set the display configuration.

NOTE You can set the display configuration for the current viewport
through the Display Manager. Right-click the display configuration in the tree
view of the Display Manager, and choose Set To Current Viewport from the
shortcut menu.
2 From the Desktop menu, choose Select Display.

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3 In the Viewport Display Configuration dialog box, select the viewport display configuration that you want to use.
4 Click OK.

NOTE The viewport display configuration that you selected is now applied
to the current viewport. When you choose Select Display again from the
Desktop menu while that viewport is current, then the new display configuration is highlighted in the Set Display Configuration for Current Viewport list.

Copying Display Systems Between Drawings


Display systems and their components, such as display configurations and
display sets, can be shared between drawings. You can import display configurations and display sets from an existing drawing into your current drawing. You can export display configurations and display sets from your current
drawing to other existing drawings. This is beneficial when you are a new
user getting familiar with display systems, and it can assist a CAD Manager
in maintaining design standards. For further information about sharing
entire display system between drawings see, Sending Display Systems by
Email on page 141.

Importing Display Sets


You can import display sets from an existing drawing into your current
drawing.
To import display sets
1 From the Desktop menu, choose Display Manager.
2 Right-click the Sets folder, and choose Import/Export from the shortcut
menu.
3 In the Import/Export dialog box, click Open.
4 In the File to Import From dialog box, select a drawing file to import the
display sets from, and click Open.
5 In the Import/Export dialog box under External File, select one or more
sets that you want to import, and then click Import.
The display sets are now in your current drawing.

Copying Display Systems Between Drawings

137

NOTE You can select more than one item in a list by holding down CTRL
when you select the additional items.
If you use a display set name that already exists in the target drawing, the
Import/Export - Duplicate Names Found dialog box is displayed. This dialog
box lists the duplicate names. You can choose to leave the existing display set
in the drawing, overwrite the existing display set with the new one, or
rename the display set to a unique name.
6 Click OK to exit each dialog box.

Importing Display Configurations


You can import display configurations from an existing drawing into your
current drawing. When you import a display configuration, the display sets
that make up the display configuration are imported as well.
To import display configurations
1 From the Desktop menu, choose Display Manager.
2 Right-click the Configurations folder, and choose Import/Export from the
shortcut menu.
3 In the Import/Export dialog box, click Open.
4 In the File to Import From dialog box, select a drawing file to import the
display configuration from, and then click OK.

NOTE Importing a display configuration also imports the display sets that
make up the display configuration.
5 In the Import/Export dialog box under External File, select one or more
display configurations that you want to import, and then click Import.
The display configurations are now in your current drawing.

NOTE You can select more than one item in a list by holding down CTRL
while you select the additional items.
If you use a display configuration name that already exists in the target drawing, the Import/Export - Duplicate Names Found dialog box is displayed. This
dialog box lists the duplicate names. You can choose to leave the existing dis-

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play configuration in the drawing, overwrite the existing display configuration with the new one, or rename the display configuration to a unique name.
6 Click OK to exit each dialog box.

Exporting Display Sets


You can export display sets from your current drawing to an existing drawing
or to a new drawing file.
To export display sets
1 From the Desktop menu, choose Display Manager.
2 Right-click the Sets folder, and choose Import/Export.
3 In the Import/Export dialog box, do one of the following options.

Click Open, in the File to Import From dialog box, select a drawing file
to export the display configurations to, and click Open.
Click New, in the New Drawing File dialog box, type a name for the
new drawing file, and click Save.

4 In the Import/Export dialog box, select one or more display sets to export,
and click Export.
The display sets are now in the new or existing drawing.

NOTE You can select more than one item in a list by holding down CTRL
while you select the additional items.
If you use a display set name that already exists in the target drawing, the
Import/Export - Duplicate Names Found dialog box is displayed. This dialog
box lists the duplicate names. You can choose to leave the existing display set
in the drawing, overwrite the existing display set with the new one, or
rename the display set to a unique name.
5 Click OK to exit each dialog box.

Exporting Display Configurations


You can export display configurations from your current drawing to an existing drawing or to a new drawing file. When you export a display configuration, the display sets that make up the display configuration are exported as
well.

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139

To export display configurations


1 From the Desktop menu, choose Display Manager.
2 Right-click the Configurations folder, and choose Import/Export.
3 In the Import/Export dialog box, do one of the following options.

Click Open, in the File to Import From dialog box, select a drawing file
to export the display configurations to, and click Open.
Click New, in the New Drawing File dialog box, type a name for the
new drawing file, and click Save.

4 In the Import/Export dialog box, select one or more display configurations to export, and click Export.
The display configurations are now in the new or existing drawing.

NOTE You can select more than one item in a list by holding down CTRL
while you select the additional items.
If you use a display configuration name that already exists in the target drawing, the Import/Export - Duplicate Names Found dialog box is displayed. This
dialog box lists the duplicate names. You can choose to leave the existing display configuration in the drawing, overwrite the existing display configuration with the new one, or rename the display configuration to a unique name.
5 Click OK to exit each dialog box.

Working with Display Systems on the Web


In the Display Manager, you can access the Web and download Display
Systems and various components, such as Display Sets, directly into your
current drawing.

NOTE This feature of the Display Manager is available only when you have
Internet access available on your system. If you do not have access to the Internet
available on your system, the Web option is not available on the Display
Manager menu and shortcut menus.
When accessing the Web through the Display Manager, the right pane acts
as your Web browser and displays the Web page containing available display
configurations and other display system components. You can select what
you want to download and use standard Microsoft Windows-based naviga-

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tion methods to add the selected display system components into your
current drawing.

Downloading Display Systems from the Web


You can download display system components, such as display sets and display configurations, from the web directly into your drawings.

To download display systems from the Web


1 From the Desktop menu, choose Display Manager.
2 Depending on what display system component you want to download
from the Web, do one of the following:

Right-click the Configurations folder, and choose Configurations on


Point A.
Right-click the Sets folder, and choose Display Sets on Point A.
3 .Follow instructions on the Web page in the right pane of the Display
Manager to access the display system components you want to download.
4 Right-click the display system component image you want in the Web
browser. While holding down the right mouse button, drag the image into
the tree view in the left pane of the Display Manager.

NOTE Drop the image into the correct location in the tree view according
to what display component you have selected. For example, if you dragged
a display set into the tree view, add it into the Sets folder.
5 Repeat steps 3 and 4 until you have set all the display system components
that you want to download into your current drawing.
6 Click OK to exit the Display Manager.

Sending Display Systems by Email


In the Display Manager, you can share your display system by copying them
to a new drawing and sending the drawing by email to other users of
Architectural Desktop.

NOTE This feature of the Display Manager is available only when you have
email available on your system. If you do not have email available on your

Sending Display Systems by Email

141

system, the Send option is not available from the Display Manager menu and
shortcut menus.
You can send the entire display system in your drawing to another user of
Architectural Desktop. The Display Manager copies the display system
information to a new drawing file (.dwg), and attaches it to a new email
message, created with the email program on your system. Users of Autodesk
Architectural Desktop who receive your display system by email can import
your display system in their drawings, open the attached drawing file and
export your display system to their drawings, or use the attached drawing file
as a template for new drawings. For further information about importing and
exporting display systems, see Copying Display Systems Between Drawings
on page 137.

Sending the Display System in a Drawing


You can send the entire display system in one of your drawings to other users
of Architectural Desktop by copying them to a drawing file (.dwg) and sending the file by email.
To send a display system in a drawing
1 From the Desktop menu, choose Display Manager.
2 In the tree view of the Display Manager, select the drawing name of the
current drawing.
3 In the Display Manager, choose File Send.
Select the drawing in the tree view, right-click, and choose Send from the
shortcut menu.
4 If email is not available on your system, the Send option is not available
from the Display Manager menu and shortcut menus.
A new email message with the subject ADT Display System, is created
using your email program. A drawing file (.dwg) containing the display
information is added to the message as a file attachment.
5 Send the email message with your email program.

Troubleshooting the Display System


If you have a problem with the display system in your drawing, try one of the
suggestions below.

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Why isnt my entity displayed?


When you have AEC objects in your model that are not displaying correctly
in your viewports, the following procedure can help you find what may be
the problem.
To check why an entity is not displaying
1 In the Display Manager, check the display configuration to find out what
display set is being used in the viewport with the entity display problem.
2 In the detailed view of the display sets in the Display Manager, make sure
a display representation for the entity is selected in that display set.
3 If a display representation is selected, look at the display properties. Are all
components turned off? Are components on layers turned off?
4 Is the entity drawn on a layer that is turned off?

Why isnt my display system updating?


Under certain circumstances, such as when you switch view directions in
shade modes other than 2D wireframe, the display is not correctly restored.
In such cases, type objrelupdate on the command line, and either select
the problem AEC object or press ENTER to select all the AEC objects. This
forces the display system to regenerate all the current display
representations.

Display System Command List


Select Display...

Menu command

Command line

Select Display...

SelectDisplay

Right-click

Troubleshooting the Display System

143

Display Manager...

144

Menu command

Command line

Display Manager....

DisplayManager

Chapter 5

Display System

Right-click

European Plan Views

In this chapter, you find a description of the specific

In this chapter

Plan views for architectural objects containing Euro-

Accessing European Plan Views

pean standards for display. They contain special compo-

Modifying Display Properties in

Plan 1-100 and Plan 1-50

nents and features that are necessary for different planning stages of the project.

145

Working with the European Plan Views


The European plan views contain special display properties for architectural
objects, like doors, windows, and stairs. This chapter lists and describes those
display properties in the Plan 1-100 and Plan 1-50 display configurations.
For a detailed description of working with architectural objects see the corresponding chapter in this manual. For example, if you want detailed information about working with doors, go to Doors on page 641.
For a detailed description of the Display System see Display System on page
99.
In this chapter, you find a short description of how to access the European
plan views as well as how to change the display properties for each object.
Additionally, you can find a list with all the special display properties you can
set.

Accessing European Plan Views


There are two plan views designed specifically for European Architecture.
Plan 1-100 This view has been defined for creating design view plans. It
contains display representations for all AEC objects with the detail level
needed for delivering a plan in 1:100 scale. A door, for example, contains in
Plan 1-100 a panel, swing, and direction arrow. In Plan 1-50 it contains a
panel, swing, direction, and frame as well as special settings to modify the
frame display to L or U shaped.
Plan 1-50 This view has been defined for creating working plans. It contains
display representations for all AEC objects with the detail level needed for
delivering a plan in 1:50 scale. A window, for example, contains in Plan 1-50
the components frame, sash, glass as well as special settings to modify the
frame display with an offset. In Plan 1-100 it contains only one single window component.
When you open a new drawing it is opened per default in Plan 1-100 view.

NOTE When you have selected Imperial content during installation, new
drawings are opened in Plan view.
To access the European plan views
1 On the Desktop menu, select Display Manager.

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2 In the Display Manager, navigate to the Configurations folder.


3 Select the Plan 1-100 or the Plan 1-50 display configurations.
4 Select Attach to Current Viewport from the shortcut menu.
5 Click OK to exit the Display Manager.

Changing the Plan 1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of


Objects
You can access the display properties for any architectural object and change
them according to your needs.
You can change the display properties of architectural objects on three different levels:
System Default: If you change the display properties of an object on the
System Default level, all objects of that type you have created in your drawing take the new settings. If you add, for example, a door threshold symbol
on the system default level, all doors in your drawing are displayed with the
chosen door threshold symbol, until you change that setting again.
Style: If you change the display properties on the style level, all objects that
have that style take the new settings. If you add, for example, a door threshold symbol in a door style, all doors that are created with that style are displayed with the chosen door threshold symbol.
Object: If you change the display properties for one individual object, only
this object take the new settings. If you add, for example, a door threshold
symbol for one individual door, only this door is displayed with the chosen
door threshold symbol.
All three options are described in this section.
To change the entity display of objects
1 Select the object in your drawing for that you want to change the entity
display. If you want, for example, to add a door threshold symbol, select
the door in the drawing.
2 Select Entity Display from the shortcut menu.
3 In the Entity Display dialog box, click the Display Props tab.
4 Do any of the following:

If you want to change the entity display for the Plan 1-100 display representation, choose Plan 1-100 from the list.
If you want to change the entity display for the Plan 1-50 display representation, choose Plan 1-50 from the list.

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147

If you want to change the entity display for any additional display representations associated with the Plan 1-100 and Plan 1-50 views,
choose that display representation from the list. If you want, for example, to add a door threshold symbol, choose the Threshold Symbol Plan
display representation from the list.

5 Do any of the following:

If you want to change the entity display for all objects of that type in
the drawing, select System Default from the Property Source column.
If you want to change the entity display for all objects associated with
this style, select <Object> Style from the Property Source column. If you
want, for example, to change the entity display for a door style, select
Door Style from the list.
If you want to change the entity display for one individual object,
select <Object> from the Property Source column. If you want, for
example, to change the entity display for a door, select Door from the
list.

6 Click Attach Override if necessary.


7 Click Edit Display Props.
The Entity Properties dialog box consists of various tabs, that differ for
each individual object and each display representation.
A door, for example, contains in the Plan 1-100 display representation the
Layer/Color/Linetype tab and the Other tab, where you can set custom
blocks for the door display. The same door contains in its Plan 1-50 display representation the Layer/Color/Linetype tab, the Other tab, and additionally the Frame Display tab, where you can set the frame display. If you
choose the Threshold Symbol Plan display representation, the door contains a Layer/Color/Linetype tab, and the Other tab, where you can set the
threshold symbol.
For detailed information about the special European display settings refer
to the sections on the individual objects in Plan 1-100 on page 148 and
Plan 1-50 on page 159.
8 Edit the entity display as desired, and click OK twice to exit the dialog
boxes.

Plan 1-100
The Plan 1-100 view is designed specifically for creating design view plans.
The architectural objects contain all components and settings necessary for

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European Plan Views

working with the design view, but none of the additional details you would
need for a working plan.

Doors
The following sections list the display components of a door in Plan 1-100
view. Additionally you can find a description of how to add a door threshold
symbol to doors.

Components
The door in Plan 1-100 has the following display components:
Door Components in Plan 1-100
Name

Description

Panel

The filling of the door

Swing

The radius the door can swing to

Direction

An arrow indicating the direction in that the door swings.


NOTE The direction symbol is not available for all types of doors. It
is available, for example, for revolving doors.

To change door components


1 Open the Entity Display dialog box as described in Changing the Plan
1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of Objects on page 147, and click the Display
Props tab.
2 Select Plan 1-100 from the list.
3 Select the property source you want to edit. For information about property sources, see Changing the Plan 1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of
Objects on page 147.
4 Click Attach Override if necessary.
5 Click Edit Display Props.
6 Click the Layer/Color/Linetype tab.
7 Edit your components as desired. You can, for example, switch visibility
on and off, change colors or lineweights.
8 Click OK twice to exit the dialog boxes.

Plan 1-100

149

Door Threshold Symbols


When you have created a door with a threshold, you can add a threshold
symbol to it. For information about adding a door threshold, see Changing
the Door Threshold on page 665.
You have a number of different threshold symbols for various European Standards.

Different door threshold symbols

To change the door threshold symbol


1 Open the Entity Display dialog box as described in Changing the Plan
1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of Objects on page 147, and click the Display
Props dialog box.
2 Select Threshold Symbol Plan from the list.
3 Select the property source you want to edit. For information about property sources, see Changing the Plan 1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of
Objects on page 147.
4 Click Attach Override if necessary.
5 Click Edit Display Props.
6 Click the Layer/Color/Linetype tab, and edit the threshold symbol as
desired.
7 Click the Other tab, and select a threshold symbol.
8 Click OK twice to exit the dialog boxes.

Windows
The following section lists the display components of a window in
Plan 1-100 view.

Components
The window in Plan 1-100 consists of only one window component, because
Plan 1-100 offers a simplified view for the design plan. Therefore, the window is drawn in only one color and linetype.

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To change the window component


1 Open the Entity Display dialog box as described in Changing the Plan
1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of Objects on page 147, and click the Display
Props tab.
2 Select Plan 1-100 from the list.
3 Select the property source you want to edit. For information about property sources, see Changing the Plan 1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of
Objects on page 147.
4 Click Attach Override if necessary.
5 Click Edit Display Props.
6 Click the Layer/Color/Linetype tab.
7 Edit the window component as desired. You can, for example, switch visibility on and off, change color or lineweight.
8 Click OK twice to exit the dialog boxes.

Openings
The following sections list the display components of an opening in
Plan 1-100 view. Additionally you can find a description of how to add a
symbol to openings.

Components
The opening in Plan 1-100 has the following display components:
Opening Components in Plan 1-100
Name

Description

Length Lines

The length of the opening

Width Lines

The width of the opening

Cross Line A

The first crossline of the opening symbol

Cross Line B

The second crossline of the opening symbol

Hatch

The hatch of the opening symbol

Plan 1-100

151

To change opening components


1 Open the Entity Display dialog box as described in Changing the Plan
1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of Objects on page 147, and click the Display
Props tab.
2 Select Plan 1-100 from the list.
3 Select the property source you want to edit. For information about property sources, see Changing the Plan 1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of
Objects on page 147.
4 Click Attach Override if necessary.
5 Click Edit Display Props.
6 Click the Layer/Color/Linetype tab.
7 Edit your components as desired. You can, for example, switch visibility
on and off, change colors or lineweights.
8 Click OK twice to exit the dialog boxes.

Opening Sill Plan


1 Open the Entity Display dialog box as described in Changing the Plan
1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of Objects on page 147, and click the Display
Props tab.
2 Select Sill Plan from the list.
3 Select the property source you want to edit. For information about property sources, see Changing the Plan 1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of
Objects on page 147.
4 Click Attach Override if necessary.
5 Click Edit Display Props.
6 Change any of the following values for sill components: visibility, layer,
color, linetype, lineweight, linetype scale, and plot style.
7 Click the Other tab, and make any changes to sill dimensions, which
include the depth and extension of each sill.
8 Click OK to exit each dialog box.

Opening Symbol
When you have created an opening, you can add an opening symbol to it.
You have a number of different opening symbols to choose from.

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Different opening symbols

To change the opening symbol


1 Open the Entity Display dialog box as described in Changing the Plan
1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of Objects on page 147, and click the Display
Props tab.
2 Select Plan 1-100 from the list.
3 Select the property source you want to edit. For information about property sources, see Changing the Plan 1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of
Objects on page 147.
4 Click Attach Override if necessary.
5 Click Edit Display Props.
6 Click the Fill Type tab, and select an opening symbol.
7 Click OK twice to exit the dialog boxes.

Stairs
The following sections list the display components of a stair in Plan 1-100
view. Additionally you can find a description of how to add European standard stairline settings to stairs.

Components
The stair in Plan 1-100 has the following display components:
Stair Components in Plan 1-100
Name

Description

Nosing Above Cut


Plane

The nosing of the treads that are above the


cutline

Path Above Cut


Plane

The part of the walking line that is above the


cut plane

Outline Below Cut


Plane

The stair boundary below the cut plane

Plan 1-100

153

Stair Components in Plan 1-100


Name

Description

Nosing Below Cut


Plane

The nosing of the treads that are below the


cutline

Path Below Cut Plane

The part of the walking line that is below the


cut plane

Outline Below Cut


Plane

The stair boundary below the cut plane

To change stair components


1 Open the Entity Display dialog box as described in Changing the Plan
1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of Objects on page 147, and click the Display
Props tab.
2 Select Plan 1-100 from the list.
3 Select the property source you want to edit. For information about property sources, see Changing the Plan 1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of
Objects on page 147.
4 Click Attach Override if necessary.
5 Click Edit Display Props.
6 Click the Layer/Color/Linetype tab.
7 Edit your components as desired. You can, for example, switch visibility
on and off, change colors or lineweights.
8 Click OK twice to exit the dialog boxes.

Stairline Settings
For European architecture, you need a number of settings to define the stairline correctly.
To edit stairline settings
1 Open the Entity Display dialog box as described in Changing the Plan
1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of Objects on page 147, and click the Display
Props tab.
2 Select Plan 1-100 from the list.
3 Select the property source you want to edit. For information about property sources, see Changing the Plan 1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of
Objects on page 147.
4 Click Attach Override if necessary.

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5 Click Edit Display Props.


6 Click the Other tab.
7 To edit the stairline, do any of the following:

Choose whether you want to draw only one stair line or separate stair
lines for reach flight.

Stairline for whole stair and separate flights

Choose whether you want a straight or a curved stair line.

Straight and curved stairlines

Choose whether you want to apply the stair line to the whole stair or
separately to the parts above and below the cut plane.

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Stairline for whole stair and for parts above and below cutline

8 To edit arrow symbol settings, do any of the following:

Type the size of the start and end arrow symbols.


Type the offset of the end arrow symbol from the break marks.
Select the AutoCAD dimension style the shape of the start and end
arrow symbols are taken from.
Select if you want to have a standard arrow that is as wide as the stair
and as long as one tread.

9 Click OK twice to exit the dialog boxes.

Mass Elements
The following sections list the display components of a mass element in
Plan 1-100 view. Additionally you can find a description of how to add a cut
plane height to a mass element.

Components
The mass element in Plan 1-100 has the following display components:
Mass Element Components in Plan 1-100

156

Name

Description

Entity Boundary

The boundary of the whole object

Hatch Component

The hatch of the object at cut plane height

Cut Boundary

The boundary of the mass element at cut plane


height

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To change mass element components


1 Open the Entity Display dialog box as described in Changing the Plan
1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of Objects on page 147, and click the Display
Props tab.
2 Select Plan 1-100 from the list.
3 Select the property source you want to edit. For information about property sources, see Changing the Plan 1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of
Objects on page 147.
4 Click Attach Override if necessary.
5 Click Edit Display Props.
6 Click the Layer/Color/Linetype tab.
7 Edit your components as desired. You can, for example, switch visibility
on and off, change colors or lineweights.
8 Click OK twice to exit the dialog boxes.

Cut Plane Height


In the Plan 1-100 display representation, you can set a cut plane height for
mass elements, just like for walls.
To set the cut plane height for mass elements
1 Open the Entity Display dialog box as described in Changing the Plan
1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of Objects on page 147, and click the Display
Props tab.
2 Select Plan 1-100 from the list.
3 Select the property source you want to edit. For information about property sources, see Changing the Plan 1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of
Objects on page 147.
4 Click Attach Override if necessary.
5 Click Edit Display Props.
6 Click the Other tab.
7 Type a cut plane height for the mass element.
8 Click OK twice to exit the dialog boxes.

Mass Group
The following sections list the display components of a mass group in
Plan 1-100 view. Additionally you can find a description of how to add a cut
plane height to a mass group.

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157

Components
The mass group in Plan 1-100 has the following display components:

Mass Group Components in Plan 1-100


Name

Description

Entity

The boundary of any mass element attached to the


mass group

Marker

The mass group marker symbol

Hatch Component

The cut hatch of any mass elements attached to the


mass group

Cut Boundary

The cut boundary of any mass elements attached to the


mass group

To change mass group components


1 Open the Entity Display dialog box as described in Changing the Plan
1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of Objects on page 147, and click the Display
Props tab.
2 Select Plan 1-100 from the list.
3 Select the property source you want to edit. For information about property sources, see Changing the Plan 1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of
Objects on page 147.
4 Click Attach Override if necessary.
5 Click Edit Display Props.
6 Click the Layer/Color/Linetype tab.
7 Edit your components as desired. You can, for example, switch visibility
on and off, change colors or lineweights.
8 Click OK twice to exit the dialog boxes.

Cut Plane Height


In the Plan 1-100 display representation, you can set a cut plane height for
mass groups. The cut plane height of the mass group affects all mass elements
attached to it.

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To set the cut plane height for mass groups


1 Open the Entity Display dialog box as described in Changing the Plan
1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of Objects on page 147, and click the Display
Props tab.
2 Select Plan 1-100 from the list.
3 Select the property source you want to edit. For information about property sources, see Changing the Plan 1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of
Objects on page 147.
4 Click Attach Override if necessary.
5 Click Edit Display Props.
6 Click the Other tab.
7 Type a cut plane height for the mass group.
8 Click OK twice to exit the dialog boxes.

Plan 1-50
The Plan 1-50 view is designed specifically for creating working plans. The
architectural objects contain all components and settings necessary for working with the working plan. It is a very detailed view that is best suited for the
later stages of the floor plan development.

Doors
The following sections list the display components of a door in Plan 1-50
view. Additionally you can find a description of how to add a door threshold
symbol and change the door frame display.

Components
The door in Plan 1-50 has the following display components:
Door Components in Plan 1-50
Name

Description

Panel

The filling of the door

Swing

The radius the door can swing to

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159

Door Components in Plan 1-50


Name

Description

Direction

An arrow indicating the direction in that the door


swings.
NOTE The direction symbol is not available for all
types of doors. It is available, for example, for
revolving doors.

Frame

The frame components of the door. You can choose


between standard, L- or U-shaped frames.

To change door components


1 Open the Entity Display dialog box as described in Changing the Plan
1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of Objects on page 147, and click the Display
Props tab.
2 Select Plan 1-50 from the list.
3 Select the property source you want to edit. For information about property sources, see Changing the Plan 1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of
Objects on page 147.
4 Click Attach Override if necessary.
5 Click Edit Display Props.
6 Click the Layer/Color/Linetype tab.
7 Edit your components as desired. You can, for example, switch visibility
on and off, change colors or lineweights.
8 Click OK twice to exit the dialog boxes.

Door Frame
In Plan 1-50, the door display representation includes a component for the
door frame. You can choose with which shape the door frame is displayed
and set vertical and horizontal extensions for the door frame.

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Door frames with U-shape (left) and L-shape (right)

To change the door frame display


1 Open the Entity Display dialog box as described in Changing the Plan
1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of Objects on page 147, and click the Display
Props tab.
2 Select Plan 1-50 from the list.
3 Select the property source you want to edit. For information about property sources, see Changing the Plan 1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of
Objects on page 147.
4 Click Attach Override if necessary.
5 Click Edit Display Props.
6 Click the Frame Display tab.
7 Select a frame type. You can choose between standard, u-shaped and lshaped door types.
8 If you have selected an u-shaped or l-shaped door type, enter vertical and
horizontal extensions for the door frame.
9 Click OK twice to exit the dialog boxes.

Door Threshold Symbols


When you have created a door with a threshold, you can add a threshold
symbol to it. For information about adding a door threshold, see Changing
the Door Threshold on page 665.
You have a number of different threshold symbols for European Standards.

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161

Different door threshold symbols

To change the door threshold symbol


1 Open the Entity Display dialog box as described in Changing the Plan
1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of Objects on page 147, and click the Display
Props tab.
2 Select Threshold Symbol Plan from the list.
3 Select the property source you want to edit. For information about property sources, see Changing the Plan 1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of
Objects on page 147.
4 Click Attach Override if necessary.
5 Click Edit Display Props.
6 Click the Layer/Color/Linetype tab and edit the threshold symbol as
desired.
7 Click the Other tab, and select a threshold symbol.
8 Click OK twice to exit the dialog boxes.

Windows
The following sections list the display components of a window in Plan 1-50
view. Additionally you can find a description of how to change the window
frame display.

Components
The window in Plan 1-50 has the following display components:
Window Components in Plan 1-50

162

Name

Description

Frame

The frame in that the window is placed

Sash

The window sash

Glass

The glass inset of the window

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To change the window components


1 Open the Entity Display dialog box as described in Changing the Plan
1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of Objects on page 147, and click the Display
Props tab.
2 Select Plan 1-50 from the list.
3 Select the property source you want to edit. For information about property sources, see Changing the Plan 1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of
Objects on page 147.
4 Click Attach Override if necessary.
5 Click Edit Display Props.
6 Click the Layer/Color/Linetype tab.
7 Edit the window component as desired. You can, for example, switch visibility on and off, change colors or lineweights.
8 Click OK twice to exit the dialog boxes.

Window Frame
In Plan 1-50, the window display representation includes a component for
the window frame. You can choose if you want the window frame displayed
straight or with an offset to the window stock.

Window frame without offset (left) and with offset (right)

To change the window frame display


1 Open the Entity Display dialog box as described in Changing the Plan
1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of Objects on page 147, and click the Display
Props tab.
2 Select Plan 1-50 from the list.
3 Select the property source you want to edit. For information about property sources, see Changing the Plan 1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of
Objects on page 147.
4 Click Attach Override if necessary.
5 Click Edit Display Props.

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163

6 Click the Frame Display tab.


7 Select if you want the frame offset from the stock or not.
8 Click OK twice to exit the dialog boxes.

Openings
The following sections list the display components of an opening in
Plan 1-50 view. Additionally you can find a description of how to add an
opening symbol.

Components
The opening in Plan 1-50 has the following display components:
Opening Components in Plan 1-50
Name

Description

Length Lines

The length of the opening

Width Lines

The width of the opening

Cross Line A

The first crossline of the opening symbol

Cross Line B

The second crossline of the opening symbol

Hatch

The hatch of the opening symbol

To change opening components


1 Open the Entity Display dialog box as described in Changing the Plan
1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of Objects on page 147, and click the Display
Props tab.
2 Select Plan 1-50 from the list.
3 Select the property source you want to edit. For information about property sources, see Changing the Plan 1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of
Objects on page 147.
4 Click Attach Override if necessary.
5 Click Edit Display Props.
6 Click the Layer/Color/Linetype tab.
7 Edit your components as desired. You can, for example, switch visibility
on and off, change colors or lineweights.
8 Click OK twice to exit the dialog boxes.

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Opening Sill Plan


1 Open the Entity Display dialog box as described in Changing the Plan
1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of Objects on page 147, and click the Display
Props tab.
2 Select Sill Plan from the list.
3 Select the property source you want to edit. For information about property sources, see Changing the Plan 1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of
Objects on page 147.
4 Click Attach Override if necessary.
5 Click Edit Display Props.
6 Change any of the following values for sill components: visibility, layer,
color, linetype, lineweight, linetype scale, and plot style.
7 Click the Other tab, and make any changes to sill dimensions, which
include the depth and extension of each sill.
8 Click OK to exit each dialog box.

Opening Symbol
When you have created an opening, you can add an opening symbol to it.
You have a number of different opening symbols to choose from.

Different opening symbols

To change the opening symbol


1 Open the Entity Display dialog box as described in Changing the Plan
1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of Objects on page 147, and click the Display
Props tab.
2 Select Plan 1-50 from the list.
3 Select the property source you want to edit. For information about property sources, see Changing the Plan 1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of
Objects on page 147.
4 Click the Fill Type tab, and select an opening symbol.
5 Click OK twice to exit the dialog boxes.

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165

Stairs
The following sections list the display components of a stair in Plan 1-50
view. Additionally you can find a description of how to add a European standard stairline.

Components
The stair in Plan 1-50 has the following display components:
Stair Components in Plan 1-50
Name

Description

Nosing Below Cut


Plane

Nosing of the treads below the cutline

Nosing Above Cut


Plane

Nosing of the treads above the cutline

Path Below Cut Plane

Walking line below the cut plane

Path Above Cut


Plane

Walking line above the cut plane

Outline Below Cut


Plane

Stair boundary below the cut plane

Outline Above Cut


Plane

Stair boundary above the cut plane

Stringer Below Cut


Plane

Stringer below the cut plane

Stringer above cut


plane

Stringer above the cut plane

Riser Below Cut


Plane

Height of the steps below the cut plane

Riser Above Cut


Plane

Height of the steps above the cut plane

To change stair components


1 Open the Entity Display dialog box as described in Changing the Plan
1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of Objects on page 147, and click the Display
Props tab.
2 Select Plan 1-50 from the list.

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3 Select the property source you want to edit. For information about property sources, see Changing the Plan 1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of
Objects on page 147.
4 Click Attach Override if necessary.
5 Click Edit Display Props.
6 Click the Layer/Color/Linetype tab.
7 Edit your components as desired. You can, for example, switch visibility
on and off, change colors or lineweights.
8 Click OK twice to exit the dialog boxes.

Stairline Settings
For European Architecture, you need a number of settings to define the stairline correctly.
To edit stairline settings
1 Open the Entity Display dialog box as described in Changing the Plan
1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of Objects on page 147, and click the Display
Props tab.
2 Select Plan 1-50 from the list.
3 Select the property source you want to edit. For information about property sources, see Changing the Plan 1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of
Objects on page 147.
4 Click Attach Override if necessary.
5 Click Edit Display Props.
6 Click the Other tab.
7 To edit the stairline, do any of the following:

Choose whether you want to draw only one stair line or separate stair
lines for each flight.

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167

Stairline for whole stairs and for separate flights

Choose whether you want a straight or a curved stair line.

Straight and curved stairline

Choose whether you want to apply the stair line to the whole stair or
separately to the parts above and below the cut plane.

Stairline for whole stair and parts below and above cutline

8 To edit arrow symbol settings, do any of the following:

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Type the size of the start and end arrow symbols.


Type the offset of the end arrow symbol from the break marks.
Select the AutoCAD dimension style the shape of the start and end
arrow symbols are taken from.
Select if you want to have a standard arrow that is as wide as the stair
and as long as one tread.

9 Click OK twice to exit the dialog boxes.

Mass Element
The following sections list the display components of a mass element in
Plan 1-50 view. Additionally you can find a description of how to add a cut
plane height to a mass element.

Components
The mass element in Plan 1-50 has the following display components:

Mass Element Components in Plan 1-50


Name

Description

Entity Boundary

The boundary of the whole object

Hatch Component

The hatch of the object at cut plane height

Cut Boundary

The boundary of the mass element at cut plane


height

To change mass element components


1 Open the Entity Display dialog box as described in Changing the Plan
1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of Objects on page 147, and click the Display
Props tab.
2 Select Plan 1-50 from the list.
3 Select the property source you want to edit. For information about property sources, see Changing the Plan 1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of
Objects on page 147.
4 Click Attach Override if necessary.
5 Click Edit Display Props.
6 Click the Layer/Color/Linetype tab.

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169

7 Edit your components as desired. You can, for example, switch visibility
on and off, change colors or lineweights.
8 Click OK twice to exit the dialog boxes.

Cut Plane Height


In the Plan 1-50 display representation, you can set a cut plane height for
mass elements, just like for walls.
To set the cut plane height for mass elements
1 Open the Entity Display dialog box as described in Changing the Plan
1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of Objects on page 147, and click the Display
Props tab.
2 Select Plan 1-50 from the list.
3 Select the property source you want to edit. For information about property sources, see Changing the Plan 1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of
Objects on page 147.
4 Click the Other tab.
5 Type a cut plane height for the mass element.
6 Click OK twice to exit the dialog boxes.

Mass Group
The following sections list the display components of a mass group in
Plan 1-50 view. Additionally you can find a description of how to add a cut
plane height to a mass group.

Components
The mass group in Plan 1-50 has the following display components:
Mass Group Components in Plan 1-50

170

Name

Description

Entity

The boundary of any mass element attached to the


mass group

Marker

The mass group marker symbol

Hatch Component

The cut hatch of any mass elements attached to the


mass group

Cut Boundary

The cut boundary of any mass elements attached to


the mass group

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To change mass group components


1 Open the Entity Display dialog box as described in Changing the Plan
1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of Objects on page 147, and click the Display
Props tab.
2 Select Plan 1-50 from the list.
3 Select the property source you want to edit. For information about property sources, see Changing the Plan 1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of
Objects on page 147.
4 Click Attach Override if necessary.
5 Click Edit Display Props.
6 Click the Layer/Color/Linetype tab.
7 Edit your components as desired. You can, for example, switch visibility
on and off, change colors or lineweights.
8 Click OK twice to exit the dialog boxes.

Cut Plane Height


In the Plan 1-50 display representation, you can set a cut plane height for
mass groups. The cut plane height of the mass group affects all mass elements
attached to it.
To set the cut plane height for mass groups
1 Open the Entity Display dialog box as described in Changing the Plan
1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of Objects on page 147, and click the Display
Props tab.
2 Select Plan 1-50 from the list.
3 Select the property source you want to edit. For information about property sources, see Changing the Plan 1-100 and Plan 1-50 Display of
Objects on page 147.
4 Click Attach Override if necessary.
5 Click Edit Display Props.
6 Click the Other tab.
7 Type a cut plane height for the mass group.
8 Click OK twice to exit the dialog boxes.

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Model Explorer and


Viewers

The Model Explorer is a window in which you can

In this chapter

create, view, and manipulate mass elements and mass

Using Model Explorer

groups. You can create your entire conceptual model by


using Model Explorer. The main viewing window

Using the Object Viewer


Using the Floating Viewer
Changing the entity display

display is similar to the 3D orbit view.

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Using Model Explorer


The Model Explorer is a window in which you can create, view, and manipulate mass elements and mass groups. Mass elements are primitive objects
representing specific shapes and having definable parametric behaviors.
Mass groups are assemblages of mass elements combined in a specific order.
For more information, see Mass Groups and Mass Elements in the online
Autodesk Architectural Desktop Users Guide.
You can create your entire conceptual model by using Model Explorer. The
main viewing window display is similar to the 3D orbit view. You can attach
AEC objects and mass elements to mass groups and view them in the Model
Explorer. For more information about 3D orbit view, see Specifying 3D
Views Interactively (3D Orbit) in the online AutoCAD 2002 Users Guide.
To display objects from your drawing in the Model Explorer, from the Concept menu, choose Model Explorer.
The Model Explorer is divided into three major areas: the command area
across the top, the graphics area on the right, and the tree view list of drawings in the left pane.

The command area contains menus and toolbars related to the Model
Explorer.
The graphics area displays the mass elements or groups that are selected
in the tree view.
The tree view lists mass groups and attached objects and displays icons
that indicate the operation property of the objectsadditive, subtractive,
and intersectionas follows:

Both squares yellow = additive


Top portion of the two squares yellow = subtractive
Middle of squares yellow = intersection

An additive operation in the Model Explorer combines the total volume of


two or more solids or two or more regions into a composite object. A subtractive operation removes the common area of one set of solids from another.
An intersection removes non-overlapping portions and creates a composite
solid from the common volume.

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The order of the objects and mass elements in the tree view dictates the outcome of the group when mass elements are combined. The Model Explorer
is the only viewer where the order of objects and elements can be set.

NOTE To return to the Model Explorer, click an object within the tree view.

Using Display Commands


The following options change the display of the objects in the Model
Explorer.

Wireframe Produces a display in the current viewport in which all lines


are present, including those hidden by other objects.
Hide Regenerates a three-dimensional model with hidden lines
suppressed.
Shade Displays a flat-shaded image of the drawing in the current
viewport.
Render Creates a realistically shaded image of a three-dimensional
wireframe or solid model. Displays the image better in a perspective
view.
Pan Pans the view in the graphics area of the Model Explorer.
Zoom Realtime Zooms the Model Explorer display as you move your
pointing device.
Orbit Sets the display in the graphics area to 3D orbit view.
Adjust Distance Moves the view in the graphics area.

You can select the following views from the list:

Top, Bottom, Left, Right, Front, Back: Sets the current view to the
selected view.
SW Isometric, SE Isometric, NE Isometric, NW Isometric: Sets the
current view to the selected isometric view.

You can also select any saved view from this list.

Using Model Explorer

175

NOTE Hold down SHIFT and click to pan in the graphics area of the Model
Explorer. Hold down CTRL and click to zoom in the graphics area of the Model
Explorer.

Using Mass Commands

New Grouping Creates a new mass group in the drawing.


New Element Creates a new mass element in the drawing.
Cut Cuts the selected item in the tree view to the Clipboard.
Copy Copies the selected item from the tree view to the Clipboard.
Paste Pastes the selected item into the tree view at the selected
location.
Delete Item Deletes an item from the tree view and from the drawing.
Attach Items Attaches existing mass elements or objects to the selected
mass group. Select one or more elements or objects in the drawing. This
option is available only when a mass group is selected in the tree view.
Detach Items Detaches the selected mass elements or objects from the
mass group. This option is available only when a mass group is selected
in the tree view.
Properties Opens the properties dialog box for the selected mass
element, object, or mass group.
Display Configuration Changes the display configuration of the
objects in the Model Explorer. Select a display configuration from the
list.

Creating a Mass Element


You can create a mass element quickly in the Model Explorer.
To create a mass element using the Model Explorer
1 From the Concept menu, choose Show Model Explorer.
2 From the Model Explorer File menu, choose New Element, or click

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3 In the Add Mass Element dialog box under Shape, select Arch, Barrel
Vault, Box, Doric, Cone, Cylinder, Dome, Gable, Pyramid, Isosceles Triangle, Right Triangle, or Sphere.
4 Enter width, depth, and height.
5 Click the drawing, place the element, and choose the rotation.
6 Press ENTER to end the command.

Creating a Mass Group


You can create a mass group quickly in the Model Explorer.
To create a mass group using the Model Explorer
1 From the Concept menu, choose Show Model Explorer.
2 From the Model Explorer File menu, choose New Grouping, or click

3 Place the mass marker in your drawing.


The location does not represent the location of the mass elements that are
added to the marker. Therefore, you can locate the mass marker in any
convenient area.
4 Select an angle for the mass marker.
The new mass group is added to the project tree in the Model Explorer.

Creating a Mass Element in a Mass Group


You can create a mass element that is automatically attached to an existing
group. This method is quicker than creating a mass group through the menu
and then attaching elements.
To create a mass element attached to a mass group
1 From the Concept menu, choose Show Model Explorer.
2 In the tree view, select an existing mass group.
3 Right-click, and then select Create Element from the shortcut menu.
4 In the Add Mass Element dialog box under Shape, select Arch, Barrel
Vault, Box, Doric, Cone, Cylinder, Dome, Gable, Pyramid, Isosceles Triangle, Right Triangle, or Sphere.
5 Click the drawing, place the element, and choose the rotation.
6 Press ENTER to end the command.

Attaching a Mass Element to a Mass Group


After a mass group is created, you can attach existing mass elements to the
group.

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177

To attach a mass element to a mass group


1 From the Concept menu, choose Show Model Explorer.
2 In the tree view, select an existing mass group.
3 Right-click, and then select Attach Elements from the shortcut menu.
4 Select the existing mass elements to add to the group.
5 Press ENTER to add the elements to the group and end the command.

Attaching Objects to a Mass Group


After a mass group is created, you can attach objects in the drawing to the
group.
To attach an object to a mass group
1 From the Concept menu, choose Show Model Explorer.
2 In the tree view, select an existing mass group.
3 Right-click, and then select Attach Elements from the shortcut menu.
4 Select the existing objects to add to the group.
5 Press ENTER to add the objects to the group and end the command.

Setting a Mass Element Operation to Additive


Mass elements are additive when you create them. After a mass element has
been added to a mass group, its operation can be changed to produce different results. You can also change the operation of the mass element back to
additive. For more information about mass elements, see Mass Elements
in the online Autodesk Architectural Desktop Users Guide.

Specifying an additive mass element operation

To set the operation of a mass element to Additive


1 From the Concept menu, choose Show Model Explorer.
2 In the tree view, select an existing mass element.

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3 Right-click, and then select Operation Additive from the shortcut


menu.
4 In the project tree, click Project to update the display.
The display changes to indicate the new operation property of the mass
element.

Setting a Mass Element Operation to Subtractive


Mass elements are additive when you create them. After a mass element has
been added to a mass group, its operation can be changed to produce different results. If the mass element is subtractive, its shape is taken out of the
mass group. For more information about mass elements, see Mass Elements
in the online Autodesk Architectural Desktop Users Guide.

Specifying a subtractive mass element operation

To set the operation of a mass element to subtractive


1 From the Concept menu, choose Show Model Explorer.
2 In the tree view, select an existing mass element.
3 Right-click, and then select Operation Subtractive from the shortcut
menu.
4 In the tree view, click Project to update the display.
The display changes to indicate the new subtractive operation of the mass
element.

Setting a Mass Element Operation to Intersection


Mass elements are additive when you create them. After a mass element has
been added to a mass group, its operation can be changed to produce different results. If the mass element is set to intersect, a shape is defined by the
overlap where the mass element intersects with another mass element. For
more information about mass elements, see Mass Elements in the online
Autodesk Architectural Desktop Users Guide.

Using Model Explorer

179

Specifying an intersection mass element operation

To set the operation of a mass element to intersection


1 From the Concept menu, choose Show Model Explorer.
2 In the tree view, select an existing mass element.
3 Right-click, and then select Operation Intersect from the shortcut
menu.
4 In the project tree, click Project to update the display.
The display changes to indicate the new intersection operation of the
mass element.

Setting the Order of Mass Elements


The operation (additive, subtractive, intersection) of each mass element in a
mass group is based on the elements higher in the project tree. You can use
the Model Explorer to move mass elements within mass groups by dragging
and dropping within the project tree. Elements are listed in the Model
Explorer tree view in the order they are created in the Model Explorer or
selected for the mass group.
To set the order of mass elements in the Model Explorer
1 From the Concept menu, choose Show Model Explorer.
2 Click the element you want to move.
3 Drag the element to the target location in the tree view and release the
button.

Moving a Mass Element from One Mass Group to Another


You can move a mass element from one mass group to another in the Model
Explorer project tree. The results can be viewed in the Model Explorer viewer.
To move a mass element to another mass group
1 From the Concept menu, choose Show Model Explorer.

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2 Click the element you want to move.


3 Drag the element to another group in the tree view.

Viewing Entities on a Nonvisible Layer


When you start the Model Explorer for the first time, the default for viewing
objects is set so that any object on a layer that is frozen or turned off is not
displayed. You can change the setting and view all entities (objects), regardless of the visibility of the layer on which they reside.
To view all entities in the Model Explorer
1 From the Concept menu, choose Show Model Explorer.
2 From the Model Explorer View menu, choose Show All Layers.
The check mark () in the menu next to Show All Layers indicates that all
entities are displayed in the Model Explorer.

Maintaining Zoom Percentage and Position of an


Object
When you select an object in the Model Explorer tree view, the zoom percentage and location of the object is maintained. This is useful when you
want to examine how the object relates to the rest of the drawing.
You can set the Model Explorer to display the selected object only and display
it at maximum size.
To change the position and zoom percentage of an object in the Model
Explorer
1 From the Concept menu, choose Show Model Explorer.
2 From the Model Explorer View menu, choose Auto Zoom Extents.
3 Select the object to view from the tree view. The Model Explorer window
is displayed only the selected object, zoomed to fit the window.

Object Viewer
The Object Viewer is displayed objects you select in your drawing, based on
the current display configuration in the drawing. You can manipulate the
viewing angle and then set the drawing view equal to the view in the Object
Viewer.

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181

To display objects from your drawing in the Object Viewer, select the objects,
right-click, and choose Object Viewer from the shortcut menu.
The view in the Object Viewer is the same as the drawing view. If the drawing
is in plan view, the objects in the Object Viewer are in 2D plan view. If you
are viewing your drawing in 3D, then the objects are displayed in 3D.

Wireframe Displays objects in the current viewport with all lines present,
including those hidden by other objects.
Hide Regenerates three-dimensional objects with hidden lines
suppressed.
Shade Displays flat-shaded objects in the current viewport.
Render Creates realistically shaded images of three-dimensional
wireframe or solid objects. Displays better in a perspective view.
Pan Moves the current view without changing its size.
Zoom Increases or decreases the apparent size of objects in the current
viewport.
Orbit Sets the display window to 3D orbit view.
Move Displaces objects a specified distance in a specified direction.

From the list at the right side of the Object Viewer, you can select the
following.

Top, Bottom, Left, Right, Front, or Back: Sets the current view to
the selected view.
SW Isometric, SE Isometric, NE Isometric, or NW Isometric: Sets
the current view to the selected isometric view.
Named views are also available from this list.

Save Bitmap Saves the current view as a bitmap (BMP) file.


Copy Copies the view to the Clipboard.
Parallel Sets the view to a parallel plane.
Perspective Sets a perspective view.

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Lens Length Stores the length of the lens used in perspective viewing
for the current viewport.
Set View Sets the view in the drawing equal to the view in the Object
Viewer.

You can choose the following zoom options.

Zoom Window, Zoom Center, Zoom Extents, Zoom In, Zoom


Out, or Zoom Factor: Increases or decreases the apparent size of objects
in the current viewport.
From the list at the bottom of Object Viewer, you can select the display
configuration.

Display Configuration: Sets which display configuration is shown in


the viewer.

NOTE Hold down SHIFT and click to pan in the Object Viewer. Hold down
CTRL and click to zoom in the Object Viewer.

Floating Viewer
You can view the object you are currently drawing by using the Floating
Viewer. In the Add and Modify dialog boxes when you are creating objects,
click

. A small window is displayed, titled Viewer.

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The following options are available in the Floating Viewer:

Wireframe Displays objects in the current viewport with all lines


present, including those hidden by other objects.
Hide Regenerates three-dimensional objects with hidden lines
suppressed.
Shade Displays flat-shaded objects in the current viewport.
Render Creates realistically shaded images of three-dimensional
wireframe or solid objects. Displays better in a perspective view.
Pan Moves the current view without changing its size.
Zoom Increases or decreases the apparent size of objects in the current
viewport.
Orbit Sets the display window to 3D orbit view.
Move Displaces objects a specified distance in a specified direction.

You can select the following from the list.

Top, Bottom, Left, Right, Front, or Back: Sets the current view to
the selected view.
SW Isometric, SE Isometric, NE Isometric, or NW Isometric: Sets
the current view to the selected isometric view.
Display Configuration: Sets which display configuration is shown in
the viewer.
Named views are also available from this list as shown in the following
illustration.

Changing the Entity Display


You can change the AutoCAD properties and display properties for any
AEC object. This includes controlling the color, layer, linetype, and linetype

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scale of the object and overriding the default display properties for a selected
object.

Changing the AutoCAD Properties of an Object


You can change the color, layer, linetype, linetype scale, and lineweight for a
selected object. For some objects, you can also change the hatching associated with the object.
To change the AutoCAD properties of an object
1 Select an object.
2 Right-click, and select Entity Display from the shortcut menu.
3 Click AutoCAD Props.
4 Change any of the following in the object: color, layer, linetype, linetype
scale, and lineweight .
5 Click OK.

Changing the Display Properties of an Object


The display properties of an object affect the way the object appears in the
drawing. You can override the default display for the current display configuration by setting a different visibility, layer, color, linetype, hatching, and
cut plane height for the selected object.
To change the display properties of an object
1 Select an object.
2 Right-click, and select Entity Display from the shortcut menu.
3 In the Entity Display dialog box, click the Display Props tab.
4 Optionally, select a different display set for the object from the list. The
display in the current viewport is the default representation and has an
asterisk next to it.
5 Do any of the following:

To change how the object is displayed in the current viewport, select


the object from the property source and click Attach Override.
To change what is displayed for the representation of the selected
object, click Edit Display Properties. This includes the visibility, layer,
color, and linetype. To edit each property, click the field. These changes
affect only the selected object.
To reset the display representation to the next property source in the
list, click Remove Override.

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6 Click OK to set the display for the selected object.

NOTE You can either select Attach Override or click the Attached column
to attach an override. Attach Override is available only when you select a
property source that is attached to the display representation.
System Default is the default display representation. When a display configuration is overridden, a red X and the word Overridden are displayed in
the list.

Show Model Explorer Command List

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Menu Command

Command Line

Show Model
Explorer...

ModelExplorer

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Right-click

Mass Elements

You can create mass elements to define the shape and

In this chapter

configuration of your preliminary study, or mass model.

Creating mass elements

After you create the mass elements you need, you can
change their size as necessary to reflect the building

Changing mass elements


Changing mass element

properties

design.

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Creating Mass Elements


You can create mass elements to define the shape and configuration of your
preliminary study, or mass model. After you create the mass elements you
need, you can change their size as necessary to reflect the building design.

Mass element: A single object that has behaviors based on its shape.
For example, you can set the width, depth, and height of a box mass
element, and the radius and height of a cylinder mass element.
Mass elements are parametric, which allows each of the shapes to have
very specific behavior when it comes to the manipulation of each mass
elements shape. For example, if the corner grip point of a box is
selected and dragged, then the width and depth are modified. It is easy
to change the shape to another form by right-clicking on the element
and selecting a new shape from the list.

Through Boolean operations (addition, subtraction, intersection), mass


elements can be combined into a mass group. The mass group provides a
representation of your building during the concept phase of your project.

Mass group: Takes the shape of the mass elements and is placed on a
separate layer from the mass elements.
Mass model: A virtual mass object, shaped from mass elements, that
defines the basic structure and proportion of your building. A marker
appears as a small box in your drawing to which you attach mass
elements.

As you continue developing your mass model, you can combine mass
elements into mass groups and create complex building shapes through
addition, subtraction, or intersection of mass elements. You can still edit
individual mass elements attached to a mass group to further refine the
building model.
To study alternative design schemes, you can create a number of mass
element references. When you change the original of the referenced mass
element, all the instances of the mass element references are updated.
The mass model that you create with mass elements and mass groups is a
refinement of your original idea that you carry forward into the next phase
of the project, in which you change the mass study into floorplates and then
into walls. The walls are used to start the design phase.

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Adding Mass Elements


Mass elements are the basic building blocks for the building model. To create
a mass model of your building, you create and modify mass elements and
arrange them in mass groups. In the next phase of the project, you can convert the basic building model into floorplates and then walls to create your
building design.
To create mass elements, you start with basic shapes and then manipulate
them for the desired result. The twelve basic shapes are arch, barrel vault,
box, cone, cylinder, dome, doric column, gable, pyramid, isosceles triangle,
right triangle, and sphere.
Use grips to manipulate mass elements after you create them. For more information about grips, see Use Grips to Edit Objects in the online AutoCAD
2002 Users Guide.

Creating an Arch Mass Element


When you create an arch mass element, you specify the width, depth, height,
and radius.

Creating an arch mass element

To create an arch mass element


1 From the Concept menu, choose Mass Elements Add Mass Element.
2 In the Add Mass Element dialog box, from the Shape list, select Arch.
3 Change the width, depth, height, and radius as necessary, or select Specify
on Screen to use the pointing device to change the size of the element.
4 Use the pointing device to specify the insertion point in your drawing.
The insertion point is at the centroid of the bottom face of the arch mass
element.
5 Specify a rotation angle or press ENTER for a rotation angle of zero degrees.
6 Click Close or press ENTER to end the command.

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189

Creating a Barrel Vault Mass Element


When you create a barrel vault mass element, you specify the width and
radius.

Creating a barrel vault mass element

To create a barrel vault mass element


1 From the Concept menu, choose Mass Elements Add Mass Element.
2 In the Add Mass Element dialog box, from the Shape list, select Barrel
Vault.
3 Change the width and radius as necessary, or select Specify on Screen to
use the pointing device to change the size of the element.
4 Use the pointing device to specify the insertion point in your drawing.
The insertion point is at the centroid of the bottom face of the barrel vault
mass element.
5 Specify a rotation angle or press ENTER for a rotation angle of zero degrees.
6 Click Close or press ENTER to end the command.

Creating a Box Mass Element


When you create a box mass element, you specify the width, depth, and
height.

Creating a box mass element

To create a box mass element


1 From the Concept menu, choose Mass Elements Add Mass Element.
2 In the Add Mass Element dialog box, from the Shape list, select Box.

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3 Change the width, depth, and height as necessary to match your buildings basic size, or select Specify on Screen to use the pointing device to
change the size of the element.
4 Use the pointing device to specify the insertion point in your drawing.
The insertion point is at the centroid of the bottom face of the box mass
element.
5 Specify a rotation angle or press ENTER for a rotation angle of zero degrees.
6 Click Close or press ENTER to end the command.

Creating a Cone Mass Element


When you create a cone mass element, you specify the height and radius.

Creating a cone mass element

To create a cone mass element


1 From the Concept menu, choose Mass Elements Add Mass Element.
2 In the Add Mass Element dialog box, from the Shape list, select Cone.
3 Change the height and radius as necessary, or select Specify on Screen to
use the pointing device to change the size of the element.
4 Use the pointing device to specify the insertion point in your drawing.
The insertion point is at the centroid of the bottom face of the cone mass
element.
5 Specify a rotation angle or press ENTER for a rotation angle of zero degrees.
6 Click Close or press ENTER to end the command.

Creating a Cylinder Mass Element


When you create a cylinder mass element, you specify the height and radius.

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191

Creating a cylinder mass element

To create a cylinder mass element


1 From the Concept menu, choose Mass Elements Add Mass Element.
2 In the Add Mass Element dialog box, from the Shape list, select Cylinder.
3 Change the height and radius as necessary, or select Specify on Screen to
use the pointing device to change the size of the element.
4 Use the pointing device to specify the insertion point in your drawing.
The insertion point is at the centroid of the bottom face of the cylinder
mass element.
5 Specify a rotation angle or press ENTER for a rotation angle of zero degrees.
6 Click Close or press ENTER to end the command.

Creating a Dome Mass Element


Then you create a dome mass element, you specify the radius.

Creating a dome mass element

To create a dome mass element


1 From the Concept menu, choose Mass Elements Add Mass Element.
2 In the Add Mass Element dialog box, from the Shape list, select Dome.
3 Change the radius as necessary, or select Specify on Screen to use the
pointing device to change the size of the element.
4 Use the pointing device to specify the insertion point in your drawing.

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The insertion point is at the centroid of the bottom face of the dome mass
element.
5 Specify a rotation angle or press ENTER for a rotation angle of zero degrees.
6 Click Close or press ENTER to end the command.

Creating a Doric Column Mass Element


When you create a doric column mass element, you specify the height and
radius.

Creating a doric column mass element

To create a doric column mass element


1 From the Concept menu, choose Mass Elements Add Mass Element.
2 In the Add Mass Element dialog box, from the Shape list, select Doric.
3 Change the height and radius as necessary, or select Specify on Screen to
use the pointing device to change the size of the element.
4 Use the pointing device to specify the insertion point in your drawing.
The insertion point is at the centroid of the bottom face of the doric column mass element.
5 Specify a rotation angle or press ENTER for a rotation angle of zero degrees.
6 Click Close or press ENTER to end the command.

Creating a Gable Mass Element


When you create a gable mass element, you specify the width, depth, height,
and rise.

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193

Creating a gable mass element

To create a gable mass element


1 From the Concept menu, choose Mass Elements Add Mass Element.
2 In the Add Mass Element dialog box, from the Shape list, select Gable.
3 Change the width, depth, height, and rise as necessary, or select Specify
on Screen to use the pointing device to change the size of the element.
4 Use the pointing device to specify the insertion point in your drawing.
The insertion point is at the centroid of the bottom face of the gable mass
element.
5 Specify a rotation angle or press ENTER for a rotation angle of zero degrees.
6 Click Close or press ENTER to end the command.

Creating a Pyramid Mass Element


When you create a pyramid mass element, you specify the width, depth, and
height.

Creating a pyramid mass element

To create a pyramid mass element


1 From the Concept menu, choose Mass Elements Add Mass Element,.
2 In the Add Mass Element dialog box, from the Shape list, select Pyramid.

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3 Change the width, depth, and height as necessary, or select Specify on


Screen to use the pointing device to change the size of the element.
4 Use the pointing device to specify the insertion point in your drawing.
The insertion point is at the centroid of the bottom face of the pyramid
mass element.
5 Specify a rotation angle or press ENTER for a rotation angle of zero degrees.
6 Click Close or press ENTER to end the command.

Creating an Isosceles Triangle Mass Element


When you create an isosceles triangle mass element, you specify the width,
depth, and height.

Isosceles triangle mass element

To create an isosceles triangle mass element


1 From the Concept menu, choose Mass Elements Add Mass Element,.
2 In the Add Mass Element dialog box, from the Shape list, select Isosceles
Triangle.
3 Change the width, depth, and height as necessary, or select Specify on
Screen to use the pointing device to change the size of the element.
4 Use the pointing device to specify the insertion point in your drawing.
The insertion point is at the centroid of the bottom face of the isosceles
triangle mass element.
5 Specify a rotation angle or press ENTER for a rotation angle of zero degrees.
6 Click Close or press ENTER to end the command.

Creating a Right Triangle Mass Element


When you create a right triangle mass element, you specify width, depth,
and height.

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195

Creating a right triangle mass element

To create a right triangle mass element


1 From the Concept menu, choose Mass Elements Add Mass Element,.
2 In the Add Mass Element dialog box, from the Shape list, select
Right Triangle.
3 Change the width, depth, and height as necessary, or select Specify on
Screen to use the pointing device to change the size of the element.
4 Use the pointing device to specify the insertion point in your drawing.
The insertion point is at the centroid of the bottom face of the right triangle mass element.
5 Specify a rotation angle or press ENTER for a rotation angle of zero degrees.
6 Click Close or press ENTER to end the command.

Creating a Sphere Mass Element


When you create a sphere mass element, you specify the radius.

Creating a sphere mass element

To create a sphere mass element


1 From the Concept menu, choose Mass Elements Add Mass Element.
2 In the Add Mass Element dialog box, from the Shape list, select Sphere.
3 Change the radius as necessary, or select Specify on Screen to use the
pointing device to change the size of the element.
4 Use the pointing device to specify the insertion point in your drawing.
The insertion point is at the centroid of the sphere mass element.

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5 Specify a rotation angle or press ENTER for a rotation angle of zero degrees.
6 Click Close or press ENTER to end the command.

Creating a Mass Element by Extruding a Profile


You can create a custom-shaped mass element by using an AEC profile as the
basis of its shape. First, create the shape for the extrusion by defining a profile. The extrusion projects the shape of the AEC profile to create the mass
element.
To create a custom shape, use the AEC Profile command from the Desktop
menu. For more information about creating a custom shape, see Creating a
Profile from a Polyline on page 1657.

Creating an extruded mass element from a defined profile

To create an extruded mass element from a defined profile


1 From the Concept menu, choose Mass Elements Add Mass Element.
2 In the Add Mass Element dialog box, from the Shape list, select Extrusion.

NOTE The Extrusion option is available only when an AEC Profile is defined.
3 From the Profile list, select the profile to use when creating the mass element.
4 Use the pointing device to specify the insertion point in your drawing.
The insertion point is at the centroid of the bottom face of the extrusion
mass element.
5 Specify the height of the extrusion mass element.
The width and depth of the extrusion mass element are based on the original width and depth of the defined profile. You can specify different
width and depth values if necessary

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197

6 Specify a rotation angle or press ENTER for a rotation angle of zero degrees.
7 Click Close or press ENTER to end the command.

Creating a Mass Element by Revolving a Profile


You can create a mass element by defining an AEC profile as the basis of its
shape and then revolving the profile about an axis. First, create the shape for
the revolution by defining a profile. The axis of revolution is along the X axis
of the profile as it is drawn.
For more information about defining profiles, see Creating a Profile from a
Polyline on page 1657.

Creating a revolved mass element from a defined profile

To create a revolved mass element using defined profile


1 From the Concept menu, choose Mass Elements Add Mass Element.
2 In the Add Mass Element dialog box, from the Shape list, select Revolution.

NOTE The Revolution option is available only when an AEC Profile is


defined.
3 From the Profile list, select the profile to use when creating the mass element.
4 Use the pointing device to specify the insertion point in your drawing.
The insertion point is at the centroid of the bottom face of the revolved
mass element.
5 Specify a rotation angle or press ENTER for a rotation angle of zero degrees.
6 Click Close or press ENTER to end the command.

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Converting 3D Objects to Mass Elements


You can convert Architectural Desktop objects and other AutoCAD ACIS solids to Free Form mass elements. When you convert an object to a Free Form
mass element, the object is split into a collection of faces that compose the
original shape.

NOTE When you convert objects to Free Form mass elements, your drawing
size will increase, potentially slowing drawing performance.
To convert an AutoCAD ACIS solid to a Free Form mass element
1 On the command line, type masselement.
2 Type c (convert), and press ENTER.
3 Select the AutoCAD ACIS solid or solids that you want to convert to a Free
Form mass element.
4 Type a name that will display in the Model Explorer and press ENTER.
5 Type y (Yes) to erase the existing geometry, and press ENTER twice to end
the command.

Specifying the Size of a Rectangular Mass Element Dynamically


When you create a mass element, you can use the pointing device to specify
some of the valid size parameters. Some parameters are set; for example, the
radius of an arch is automatically one quarter of the width, and the rise of a
gable is automatically half of the height.
A rectangular mass element is any element that has four lines at its base, such
as an arch, barrel vault, box, gable, pyramid, isosceles triangle, or right
triangle.
To create a rectangular mass element by using the pointing device
1 From the Concept menu, choose Mass Elements Add Mass Element.
2 In the Add Mass Element dialog box, from the Shape list, select a rectangular mass element.
3 Select Specify on Screen to use the pointing device to change the size of
the element.
4 Use the pointing device to specify the first corner point.
5 Specify the second corner point for width and depth.
6 Specify the height.
7 Specify a rotation angle.
8 Click Close or press ENTER to end the command.

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199

Specifying the Size of a Circular Mass Element Dynamically


When you create a mass element, you can use the pointing device to specify
all the valid size parameters.
To create a circular mass element by using the pointing device
1 From the Concept menu, choose Mass Elements Add Mass Element.
2 In the Add Mass Element dialog box, from the Shape list, select a circular
mass element.
3 Select Specify on Screen to use the pointing device to change the size of
the element.
4 Use the pointing device to specify the center point.
5 Specify the radius and height as necessary.
6 Specify a rotation angle.
7 Click Close or press ENTER to end the command.

Editing Mass Elements


After you have created mass elements, you can edit and reposition them to
generate the general form of your building mass model.

Changing Mass Elements Using Grips


When you select a mass element, grips appear at specific points. You can use
these grips to edit the mass element quickly. The standard grip editing features available depend upon the shape of the selected element.
Grip mode needs to be turned on for grip editing to work. Grip mode is on
by default.

Changing the Area of a Rectangular Mass Element Using Grips


You can change the shape of a rectangular mass element quickly by using
grips. A rectangular mass element is any element that has four lines at its
base, such as an arch, barrel vault, box, gable, pyramid, isosceles triangle,
right triangle, or extrusion.

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Editing corner grips

To use grips to change the area of a rectangular mass element


1 Select the rectangular mass element to display its grips.
2 Click any corner grip to select it.
3 Move the pointing device.
The location of the opposite corner remains fixed while you are moving
the mass element corner with the pointing device.
4 Click to set the new location for the mass element corner.

Changing the Height of a Mass Element Using Grips


You can change the height of a mass element quickly by using grips.

Editing top grips

To use grips to change the height of a mass element


1 Switch to a 3D view.
2 Select the mass element to display its grips.
3 Click the grip at the top of the mass element to select it.
4 Move the pointing device.

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201

The height of the mass element changes as you move the pointing device.
5 Click to set the new height of the mass element.

Moving a Mass Element Using Grips


You can move a mass element quickly by using grips.

Editing center grips

To use grips to move a mass element


1 Select the mass element to display its grips.
2 Click the center grip to select it.
3 Move the pointing device.
The entire mass element moves as you move the pointing device.
4 Click to place the mass element at its new location.

Changing the Arch Radius of an Arch Mass Element Using


Grips
You can change the radius of the arch within an arch mass element quickly
by using grips.

Editing arch grips

To use grips to change the width of an arch in an arch mass element


1 Select the arch mass element to display its grips.

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2 Click the arch grip to select it.


3 Move the pointing device to change the radius of the arch.
The radius of the arch changes as you move the pointing device.
4 Click to set the new radius of the arch.

Changing the Roof Height of a Gable Mass Element Using


Grips
You can change the roof height of a gable mass element quickly by using
grips.

Editing roof grips

To use grips to change the roof height of a gable mass element


1 Switch to a 3D view.
2 Select the gable mass element to display its grips.
3 Click the roof grip at the midpoint of the roof ridgeline to select it.
4 Move the pointing device to change the height of the roof.
The height of the roof ridgeline and the walls changes as you move the
pointing device, leaving the roof slope and gable configuration
unchanged.
5 Click to set the new height of the roof.

Changing the Wall Height of a Gable Mass Element Using


Grips
You can change the wall height of a gable mass element quickly by using
grips.

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Editing wall grips

To use grips to change the height of gable wall mass element


1 Switch to a 3D view.
2 Select the gable mass element to display its grips.
3 Click the wall grip at the top of the wall to select it.
4 Move the pointing device to change the height of the wall.
The height of the wall changes as you move the pointing device, while the
roof ridgeline position remains fixed. This changes the roof slope and
gable configuration.
5 Click to set the new height of the wall.

Changing the Radius of a Circular Mass Element Using Grips


You can change the radius of a circular mass element quickly by using grips.
Circular mass elements include cones, cylinders, domes, doric columns,
spheres, and revolutions.

Editing radius grips

To use grips to change the size of a circular mass element


1 Select the circular mass element to display its grips.
2 Click the radius grip on the circle to select it.
You can select any one of the radius grips on the same circle to change the
size.
3 Move the pointing device in or out.

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The mass element becomes larger or smaller depending on the direction


of the movement.
4 Click to set the new radius of the circular mass element.

Changing an Existing Mass Element


You can change an existing mass element into another mass element shape,
add it to an existing mass group, and change its size.
To change an existing mass element
1 From the Concept menu, choose Mass Elements Modify Mass Elements.
2 Select a mass element and press ENTER.
3 In the Modify Mass Element dialog box, from the Shape list, select a new
basic shape.
4 From the Group list, select a new group for the mass element.

NOTE The group must already have been created.


5 In the measurement boxes, type new values for the mass element.
6 Click Apply to change the properties for the selected element and remain
in the dialog box to continue modifying the element, or click OK to exit
the dialog box.

NOTE When you change the size of a mass element, the center point
remains constant and the change is applied to both sides of the element.

Changing Mass Element Properties


Dimensions, mass group, and location are all properties of a mass element.
You can specify these properties when you create a mass element, or you can
change properties later.
By changing a mass elements general properties, you can attach notes,
attach a reference, and add a description to the mass element.

Changing Mass Element Notes, Descriptions, or Reference


Files
To add a description or a note to a mass element, or attach, edit, or detach
a reference file
1

From the Concept menu, choose Mass Elements Modify Mass Element.

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205

2 Select the mass element and press ENTER.


3 In the Modify Mass Element dialog box, click

4 In the Mass Elements Properties dialog box, click the General tab.
5 To add a description to the mass element, type in the Description field.
6 To add a note to the mass element, or to attach, edit, or detach a reference
file, click Notes.
7 In the Notes dialog box, to add a note, type the note on the Text Notes tab.
8 To attach, edit, or detach a reference file, click the Reference Docs tab, and
do any of the following:

To attach a reference file, click Add, select a document in the Select File
dialog box, and click OK. You can type a description of the reference
file on the Reference Docs tab.
To edit a reference file, select the file name in the list, click Edit, and
change the document or the description in the Reference Document
dialog box. To edit the file itself, double-click the reference file name to
start its application.
To detach a reference file, select the file name in the list and click
Delete.

9 Click OK to exit each dialog box. To apply the changes and remain in the
dialog box, click Apply.

Changing the Mass Element Shape or Size


A mass element can be changed from one shape to another. You can control
its size by specifying different dimension properties.
To change the mass element shape or size
1 From the Concept menu, choose Mass Elements Modify Mass Element.
2 Select the mass element and press ENTER.
3 In the Modify Mass Element dialog box, click

4 In the Mass Elements Properties dialog box, click the Dimensions tab.
5 Change the type of mass element by selecting a basic shape from the Type
box.
6 Type values in the Size section, and then click OK.

NOTE In the Size section, the boxes available depend upon the mass element selected in the Type box.
7 Click OK to exit the dialog box.

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Changing the Mass Group of a Mass Element


You can change the mass group the mass element is attached to by changing
its element properties.
To change the mass group of a mass element
1 Select the mass element.
2 Right-click, and choose Element Properties from the shortcut menu.
3 In the Mass Element Properties dialog box, click the Mass Group tab.
4 Select the group from the Group list.

NOTE The group must already have been created.


5 Click OK to exit the dialog box.

Changing the Location Properties of a Mass Element


You can relocate an existing mass element by changing the coordinate values
of its insertion point.
The mass element also has an orientation with respect to the world coordinate system or the current user coordinate system. For example, if the top
and bottom of the mass element are parallel to the XY plane, its normal is
parallel to the Z axis. You can change the orientation of the mass element by
aligning its normal with another axis.
You can also rotate the mass element on its plane by changing the rotation
angle.
To change the location properties of a mass element
1 From the Concept menu, choose Mass Elements Modify Mass Element.
2 Select the mass element and press ENTER.
3 In the Modify Mass Element dialog box, click

4 In the Mass Element Properties dialog box, click the Location tab.
5 Do any of the following:

To relocate the mass element, change the coordinate values under


Insertion Point.
To reorient the mass element, change the axis to which the normal is
parallel. To locate the mass element on the XY plane, make the normal
of the space parallel to the Z axis: under Normal, type 1 in the Z box,
and type 0 in the X and Y boxes. To locate the mass element on the YZ
plane, type 1 in the X box and type 0 in the Y and Z boxes. To locate

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207

the mass element on the XZ plane, type 1 in the Y box and type 0 in
the X and Z boxes.
To change the rotation of the mass element, type a new value for Rotation Angle.

6 Click OK to close the Location tab, and then click Apply to see the changes
to the mass element without leaving the Mass Element Properties dialog
box.
7 When you finish making changes, click OK to exit the dialog box.

Change the Display Properties of a Mass Element


You can change display properties for one mass element or for a group of
mass elements.
To change the display properties of a mass element
1 Select the mass element.
2 Right click and click Entity Display.
3 Click the Display Props tab.
4 Do any of the following:

Select a mass element from the property source and click Attach Override to change how the object is displayed in the current viewport in
the drawing.

NOTE You can either select Attach Override or click in the Attached column
to attach an override. Attach Override is only available when you select a
property source that is attached to the display representation.

NOTE The System Default is the default display representation. When a


Display Contribution is overridden, a red X and the word Overridden is
displayed in the list.

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Click Remove Override to reset the display representation to the next


property source in the list.
Click Edit Display Properties to change what is displayed for the representation of the mass element. This includes the visibility, layer, color,
and linetype. To edit each property, click its field.
Click Edit Display Properties, then the Hatching tab to set what hatch
is displayed in each display representation for the mass element. The

Mass Elements

Hatching tab is displayed only in some display representations, including Plan and Sketch.
5 Click OK to set the display for the mass element.

Set the Hatch Pattern for Mass Elements


You can set the hatch pattern for mass element display properties.
To set the hatch pattern for mass element display properties
1 Select the mass element.
2 Right click and click Entity Display.
3 Click the Display Props tab.
4 Click Edit Display Properties, and then click the Hatching tab to set the
hatch to be displayed in each display representation for the mass element.

The Hatching tab is displayed only in some display representations,


including Plan and Reflected.

5 Select a hatch to change in the Pattern list.


6 In the Hatch Pattern dialog box, select the type of hatch for the selected
component.

If you select Predefined in the Type field, select a pattern from the Pattern Name list.
If you select Custom in the Type field, type the custom pattern name
in the Custom Pattern box.
If you select User-Defined in the Type field, click Double Hatch on or
off.

7 Click OK.
8 Click the Scale/Spacing list to change the value for the selected
component.
9 Click the Angle list to type a new angle for the hatch pattern.
10 Click the Orientation field to change from making the change global or
for the selected object.
11 Click OK to save the changes and exit each dialog box.

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209

Mass Elements Command List

Menu Command

Command Line

Right-click (with mass


element selected)

MassElement
Add Mass Element...

MassElementAdd

Add Mass Element to


Group...

MassGroupAddElem

Modify Mass
Element...

MassElementModify

Element Modify...

MassElementProps

Element Properties...
Right-click (with mass
element selected and
attached to a mass
group)

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MassElementOpAdd

Operation Additive

MassElementOpSubtract

Operation Subtractive

MassElementOpIntersect

Operation Intersect

Mass Elements

Mass Groups

After you have created basic mass elements, you can

In this chapter

combine them into mass groups to create more complex

Using mass group markers

shapes. Mass groups allow you to view multiple


configurations to see which ones work best for your
design needs.

Adding mass elements to a

mass group
Attaching and detaching mass

elements
Making mass elements additive

and subtractive
Creating an intersection from

mass elements
Changing mass group

properties

211

Mass Groups
After you have created basic mass elements, you can combine them into
mass groups to create more complex shapes. A mass group is a collection of
mass elements whose shapes the mass group combine according to a certain
order and according to Boolean operations (additive, subtractive, or intersection) you assign to the mass elements.
To create the mass group, you attach mass elements, other AEC objects, or
AutoCAD objects to a mass marker that you place in a convenient area of
your drawing.
You can attach anything to a mass group marker, but the mass group combines only closed, solid shapes. For example, a line has no solid properties
and therefore does not contribute anything to the shape of the mass group;
however, an AutoCAD 3D solid does contribute to the final shape.

Creating a Mass Group


To create a mass group, you must first place a group marker and then you
can add mass elements to the mass group.

Adding a Mass Group Marker


The mass group is controlled by a mass group marker that you place in the
drawing. The mass group marker is view dependent and changes size as you
zoom within the drawing. Attach mass elements to the marker to create a
mass group. You can view it in the Model Explorer. For more information
about the Model Explorer, see Model Explorer and Viewers on page 173.

NOTE Mass group markers are not plotted.


To add a mass group marker
1 From the Concept menu, choose Mass Groups Add Mass Group.
2 Place the mass group marker in your drawing.
The location does not represent the location of the mass elements that
you attach to the marker, so locate the marker in any convenient area in
your drawing.
3 Specify a rotation angle for the mass marker.

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Changing the Size of the Mass Group Marker


You can change the size of the mass group marker by editing its display properties.
To change the size of mass group marker
1 Select the mass group marker.
2 Right-click and choose Entity Display from the shortcut menu.
3 In the Entity Display dialog box, click the Display Props tab.
4 Select a representation from the list.
5 Select the property source to edit, attaching the override needed to edit
the marker. For more information, see Creating and Editing Display Systems in the online Autodesk Architectural Desktop Users Guide.
6 Click Edit Display Props and change any of the following values for
marker components: visibility, layer, color, linetype, lineweight, linetype
scale, and plot style.
7 Click the Other tab, and make any changes to the marker size.
8 Click OK to exit each dialog box.

Adding a Mass Element to a Mass Group


After you have placed a mass group marker in the drawing, you can add mass
elements to create a mass group.

Adding mass elements to a mass group

To add a mass element to a mass group


1 From the Concept menu, click Mass Elements Add Mass Element to
Group.
2 Select an existing mass group marker.
3 In the Add Mass Element dialog box, select a Shape for the mass element.

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213

4 From the Operation list, select Add, Subtract, or Intersect for the mass element. To make mass elements additive or subtractive, or to create a intersection, see later topics in this section.
5 Specify an insertion point in your drawing.
6 Specify a rotation angle.
7 Press ENTER to end the command.
The newly created mass element is now part of the selected mass group.

Attaching an Existing Mass Element to a Group


Existing mass elements can be added to a mass group.
To attach an existing mass element to a mass group
1 From the Concept menu, choose Mass Groups Attach Elements.
2 Select the mass group marker.
3 Select one or more mass elements to attach to the mass group.
4 Press ENTER to end the command.

Detaching a Mass Element from a Group


After you have defined a mass group and added mass elements to it, you may
decide that one or more elements do not fit your model. You can detach
them from the mass group.
To detach mass elements from a mass group
1 From the Concept menu, choose Mass Groups Detach Elements.
2 Select the mass group marker.
3 Select the mass elements to detach from the mass group.
4 Press ENTER to end the command.

Making a Mass Element Additive


All objects are additive by default when they are created. When two mass elements are grouped together, they form one mass containing both objects.
Mass elements can also operate by subtraction or intersection.
You can change the operation of a mass element as it is being added to a mass
group or after it has been attached to a mass group.
To make a mass element additive
1 From the Concept menu, choose Mass Groups Make Additive.
2 Select the mass element to make additive.

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3 Press ENTER to end the command.

Making a Mass Element Subtractive


When a mass element in a group operates by subtraction, it subtracts its mass
wherever it overlaps another object.

Subtracting a mass element from a mass group

You can change the operation of a mass element as it is being added to a mass
group or after it has been attached to a mass group.
To make a mass element subtractive
1 From the Concept menu, choose Mass Groups Make Subtractive.
2 Select the mass element you want to make subtractive.

NOTE When you select the mass element, make sure you select the mass
element, not the view of the mass group. When a mass element becomes part
of a mass group, it gets placed in that display set, which is usually displayed
with a different layer and color. To select a single element, you need to turn
off the mass group layer.
3 Press ENTER to end the command.

Creating an Intersection from Mass Elements


By changing how a mass element operates, you can use the intersection of
two mass elements to create a new mass shape.

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215

Intersection mass element

You can change the operation of a mass element as it is being added to a mass
group or after it has been attached to a mass group.
To create a mass element from the intersection of two elements
1 From the Concept menu, choose Mass Groups Make Intersection.
2 Select the mass element to make intersecting.

NOTE When you select the mass element, make sure you select the mass
element, not the view of the mass group. When a mass element becomes part
of a mass group, it gets placed in that display set, which is usually displayed
with a different layer and color. To select a single element, you need to turn
off the mass group layer.
3 Press ENTER to end the command.

Changing Mass Group Properties


The properties of a mass group include its location, the group it belongs to,
and its general properties, including notes, references, and descriptions. You
can change the properties of a mass group after it has been created. You can
nest mass groups under other mass groups to create variations of your design
project.

Changing the Mass Group Notes, Descriptions, or Reference


Files
To add a description or a note to a mass group or attach, edit, or detach a
reference file
1 From the Concept menu, choose Mass Groups Mass Group Properties.

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2 Select the mass group and press ENTER.


3 In the Mass Group Properties dialog box, click the General tab.
4 To add a description to the mass group, type the text in the Description
field.
5 To add a note to the mass group, or to attach, edit, or detach a reference
file, click Notes.
6 In the Notes dialog box, to add a note, type the note on the Text Notes tab.
7 To attach, edit, or detach a reference file, click the Reference Docs tab, and
do any of the following:

To attach a reference file, click Add, select a document in the Select File
dialog box, and click OK. You can type a description of the reference
file on the Reference Docs tab.
To edit a reference file, select the file name in the list, click Edit, and
change the document or the description in the Reference Document
dialog box. To edit the file itself, double-click the reference file name to
start its application.
To detach a reference file, select the file name in the list and click
Delete.

8 Click OK to exit each dialog box.

Changing the Mass Group Properties


You can change the group a mass group is attached to.
To change the mass group properties
1 From the Concept menu, choose Mass Groups Mass Group Properties.
2 Select the mass group and press ENTER.
3 In the Mass Group Properties dialog box, click the Mass Group tab.
4 Select the group from the Group list.
5 Select an operation type, additive, subtractive, or intersect.
6 Click OK.

Changing the Location Properties of a Mass Group


You can relocate an existing mass group by changing the coordinate values
of its insertion point.
The mass group also has an orientation with respect to the world coordinate
system or the current user coordinate system. For example, if the top and bottom of the mass group are parallel to the XY plane, its normal is parallel to

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217

the Z axis. You can change the orientation of the mass group by aligning its
normal with another axis.
You can also rotate the mass group on its plane by changing the rotation
angle.

NOTE You can change the location of objects attached to a group by selecting
the objects and using grips. You can also use the MOVE command. For more
information, see Move Objects in the online AutoCAD 2002 Users Guide.
To change the location properties of a mass group
1 From the Concept menu, choose Mass Groups Mass Group Properties.
2 Select the mass group and press ENTER.
3 In the Mass Group Properties dialog box, click the Location tab.
4 Do any of the following:

To relocate the mass group, change the coordinate values under Insertion Point.
To reorient the mass group, change the axis to which the normal is parallel. To locate the mass group on the XY plane, make the normal of the
space parallel to the Z axis: under Normal, type 1 in the Z box, and
type 0 in the X and Y boxes. To locate the mass group on the YZ plane,
type 1 in the X box and type 0 in the Y and Z boxes. To locate the mass
group on the XZ plane, type 1 in the Y box and type 0 in the X and Z
boxes.
To change the rotation of the mass group, type a new value for Rotation
Angle.

5 When you finish making changes, click OK to exit the dialog box.

Mass Groups Command List

Menu Command

Command Line
MassGroup

Add Mass Group

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MassGroupAdd

Right-click (with mass group


selected)

Menu Command

Command Line

Right-click (with mass group


selected)

Mass Group
Properties...

MassGroupProps

Group Properties...

Make Additive

MassElementOpAdd

Make Subtractive

MassElementOpSubtract

Make Intersection

MassElementOpIntersect

Attach Elements

MassGroupAttach

Attach Elements

Detach Elements

MassGroupDetach

Detach Elements

ModelExplorer

Show Model Explorer...

MassGroupAddElem

Add New Element...

Mass Groups

219

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Space Planning

10

Space planning is an inside-out design process in which

In this chapter

you define the interior spaces of the building and then

Creating spaces

define the boundary around those spaces. As you design


from the inside out, you can think of spaces as equivalent to rooms, space boundary edges as walls, and a
group of spaces within a boundary as a department.

Editing spaces
Changing the properties of

a space
Creating space styles
Editing space styles

221

Interior Space Planning


Space planning is an inside-out design process in which you define the interior spaces of the building and then define the boundary around those
spaces. As you design from the inside out, you can think of spaces as equivalent to rooms, space boundary edges as walls, and a group of spaces within
a boundary as a department.
You solve spatial problems conceptually, using space boundaries as forms and
spaces as voids. The display system can help you visualize your spatial
arrangement. For more information, see Getting Started with the Display
Manager on page 110.
After all the spaces have been created, you can convert the boundaries into
walls and use them later in the building design phase.
You can create space styles and use them to create spaces that conform to certain size rules that you control. For example, you can set limits for an office
space style to keep the size of an office within certain constraints. For more
information, see Creating Space Styles on page 238.

Creating Spaces
Often, the controlling factor in the design of a building is not the overall
form, but the size, proportion, and required relationships of the necessary
spaces. You can use space objects to study these variables.
A space is an object with volume that includes visual representations of a
floor and ceiling. Its primary variables are area, length, width, and room
height (measured from top of floor to bottom of ceiling). Additional variables
are floor thickness, space height (measured from bottom of floor to top of
ceiling), ceiling thickness, and distance above the ceiling to the top of the
volume (this area is not normally visible but is reserved by the space object
for use in conjunction with space boundaries). Spaces are used as placeholders for future rooms in the interior of a building.
You can create space styles that set target, minimum, and maximum dimensions for different types of spaces, such as an office space or a cafeteria space.
When you use space styles, the set sizes help you create spaces that are appropriate for your design.
You can convert closed polylines into spaces. You can also generate spaces
from walls and linework in your drawing, assigning tags and property set
information automatically.

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Creating a Space
To create a space
1 From the Concept menu, choose Spaces Add Space.
2 In the Add Space dialog box, select a style from the Style list. The parameters in the Add Space dialog box change when you select a new style.
3 Change the area, length, or width values to define the space object before
inserting it in the drawing.
4 Specify a location for the space object.
5 Specify a rotation angle.
6 Press ENTER to end the command.

Creating a space

Creating a Space with a Ceiling Boundary


You can create a space with a ceiling boundary, which is a visual representation of a ceiling. The ceiling boundary is a solid volume above the space
whose top represents the future ceiling. Defining a ceiling boundary at a
point lower than the top of the space might represent a typical dropped
ceiling grid in an office.

NOTE To remove a ceiling boundary, simply set the thickness of the ceiling
boundary to zero.
To create a space with a ceiling boundary
1 From the Concept menu, choose Spaces Add Space.
2 In the Add Space dialog box, select Ceiling Boundary.
The thickness of the ceiling boundary is determined by the space style
being used. You can change the ceiling thickness as you create spaces by

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223

changing the dimensions of the space. For more information, see Changing the Dimension Properties of a Space on page 236.
3 Specify a location for the space object.
4 Specify a rotation angle.
5 Press ENTER to end the command.

Creating a Space with a Floor Boundary


You can create a space with a floor boundary, which is a solid volume below
the space that represents the future floor.
By default, the floor extends below the current working coordinate Z=0 by
the depth of the floor as defined in the Space Properties dialog box. For more
information, see Changing the Properties of a Space on page 235.

NOTE To remove a floor boundary, simply set the thickness of the floor
boundary to zero.
To create a space with a floor boundary
1 From the Concept menu, choose Spaces Add Space.
2 In the Add Space dialog box, select Floor Boundary.
The thickness of the floor boundary is determined by the space style being
used. You can change the floor thickness as you create spaces by changing
the dimensions of the space. For more information, see Changing the
Dimension Properties of a Space on page 236.
3 Specify a location for the space object.
4 Specify a rotation angle.
5 Press ENTER to end the command.

Creating a Space with a Set Area


You constrain a space to a certain area value while you create it.
To create a space with a set area
1 From the Concept menu, choose Spaces Add Space.
2 In the Add Space dialog box, click the Area Lock

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to turn it on.

NOTE The initial value in the Area box is set by the style selected in the
Style list.
3 Select Specify on Screen to use the pointing device to change the size of
the space.
4 Click to place the insertion point of the space at the drag point.
As you move the pointing device, the shape of the space changes, but its
area stays the same. The space is constrained by the area value in the dialog box.
5 Specify a second point to establish the length of one side of the space.
The width of the space is calculated from the locked area.
6 Specify a rotation angle.
7 Click Close to end the command.

Creating a space with a set area

Creating a Space with a Set Length


You can constrain a space to a certain length while you create it.
To create a space with a set length
1 From the Concept menu, choose Spaces Add Space.
2 In the Add Space dialog box, click the Length Lock

to turn it on.

NOTE The initial value in the Length box is set by the style selected in the
Style list.
3 Select Specify on Screen to use the pointing device to change the size of
the space.

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225

4 Click to place the insertion point of the space at the drag, or corner, point.
For more information, see Changing the Drag Point of a Space on page
226.
As you move the pointing device, the width of the space and its area
change, but the length stays the same. The space is constrained by the
length value in the dialog box.
5 Specify a second point to establish the width of the space.
6 Specify a rotation angle.
7 Click Close to end the command.

Creating a Space with a Set Width


You can constrain a space to a certain width while you create it.
To create a space with a set width
1 From the Concept menu, choose Spaces Add Space.
2 In the Add Space dialog box, click the Width Lock

to turn it on.

NOTE The initial value in the Width box is set by the style selected in the
Style list.
3 Select Specify on Screen to use the pointing device to change the size of
the element.
4 Click to place the insertion point of the space at the drag point. For more
information, see Changing the Drag Point of a Space on page 226.
As you move the pointing device, the length of the space and its area
change, but the width stays the same. The space is constrained by the
width value in the dialog box.
5 Specify a second point to establish the length of the space.
6 Specify a rotation angle.
7 Click Close to end the command.

Changing the Drag Point of a Space


The drag point of a space is the corner point you use to insert the space in
your drawing. You may want to place a group of space objects in a row or in
a particular pattern. By changing the drag point of a space to a different
corner and using an object snap, you can precisely locate the space in the
drawing.

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Specifying space object drag points

To change the drag point of a space


1 From the Concept menu, choose Spaces Add Space.
2 In the Add Space dialog box, click Drag Point until the crosshairs are at the
correct corner of the space.
3 Specify an insertion point.

NOTE You can use object snaps to locate the insertion point precisely.
4 Specify a rotation angle.
5 Click Close to end the command.

Converting Polylines to Spaces


A quick way to create a space is to draw a closed polyline and convert it into
a space. This method is also useful for creating a space with an irregular
shape.
You can use a series of lines and arcs to create the polyline. The polyline must
not intersect itself, and it must be closed.
To convert a polyline to a space
1 From the Concept menu, choose Spaces Convert to Spaces.
2 Select an existing closed polyline.
3 Type y (Yes) to erase the polyline or type n (No) to keep the polyline in
the drawing.
4 In the Space Properties dialog box, change any of the values and click OK.
For more information, see Changing the Properties of a Space on page
235.

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227

Generating Spaces from Walls


You create spaces from walls in your drawing. The walls need to be closed,
but can have openings in them such as doors or windows. The command
knows to ignore these objects in the wall when creating spaces. These spaces
can have tags automatically associated with them.
To generate spaces from walls
1 From the Concept menu, choose Spaces Generate Spaces.
2 In the Generate Spaces dialog box, select Walls Only from the Selection
Filter list and click OK.
3 Select the walls from which to generate the spaces and press ENTER.
4 In the Generate Spaces dialog box, you can select a different style for the
spaces.
5 To define the tag settings for the spaces, click Tag Settings.
6 Click Add Tag to New Spaces on and select a tag definition from the list to
add the tag to the new spaces.
7 Click Add Property Set to New Spaces on and select a property set and
properties from the list to add the property set to the new spaces.
8 Click Auto-Increment Numeric Properties on to automatically increment
the number associated with the space tag. Set the increment amount, then
click OK to return to the Generate Spaces dialog box.
9 Click within an area enclosed by the selected walls. A space is created in
that area with the selected tag and property set, if selected.
10 You can click Viewing Information About Spaces to view information
about spaces in the drawing.
11 You can click Modify Boundary Set to select a different Select FIlter for creating spaces.
12 Click Close to end the command.

Generating Spaces from Walls, Lines, Arcs,


Polylines, and Circles
You create spaces from walls, lines, arcs, polylines, and circles in your drawing. The walls and lines need to be closed, but the walls can have openings
in them such as doors or windows. The command knows to ignore these
objects in the wall when creating spaces. These spaces can have tags automatically associated with them.

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To generate spaces from lines, arcs, polylines and circles


1 From the Concept menu, choose Spaces Generate Spaces.
2 In the Generate Spaces dialog box, select Walls, lines, arcs, polylines, and
circles from the Selection Filter list and click OK.
3 Select the walls and lines from which to generate the spaces and press
ENTER.
4 In the Generate Spaces dialog box, you can select a different style for the
spaces.
5 To define the tag settings for the spaces, click Tag Settings.
6 Click Add Tag to New Spaces on and select a tag definition from the list to
add the tag to the new spaces.
7 Click Add Property Set to New Spaces on and select a property set and
properties from the list to add the property set to the new spaces.
8 Click Auto-Increment Numeric Properties on to automatically increment
the number associated with the space tag. Set the increment amount, then
click OK to return to the Generate Spaces dialog box.
9 Click within an area enclosed by the selected walls and lines. A space is
created in that area with the selected tag and property set, if selected.
10 You can click Viewing Information About Spaces to view information
about spaces in the drawing.
11 You can click Modify Boundary Set to select a different Select Filter for creating spaces.
12 Click Close to end the command.

Generating Spaces from All Linework


You create spaces from all the lines in your drawing. The lines need to form
closed areas This option when generating spaces is similar to exploding all
the objects and creating spaces from that linework. These spaces can have
tags automatically associated with them.
To generate spaces from all the linework in the drawing
1 From the Concept menu, choose Spaces Generate Spaces.
2 In the Generate Spaces dialog box, select All linework from the Selection
Filter list and click OK.
3 Select the linework from which to generate the spaces and press ENTER.
4 In the Generate Spaces dialog box, you can select a different style for the
spaces.
5 To define the tag settings for the spaces, click Tag Settings.

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229

6 Click Add Tag to New Spaces on and select a tag definition from the list to
add the tag to the new spaces.
7 Click Add Property Set to New Spaces on and select a property set and
properties from the list to add the property set to the new spaces.
8 Click Auto-Increment Numeric Properties on to automatically increment
the number associated with the space tag. Set the increment amount, then
click OK to return to the Generate Spaces dialog box.
9 Click within an area enclosed by the selected lines. A space is created in
that area with the selected tag and property set, if selected.
10 You can click Viewing Information About Spaces to view information
about spaces in the drawing.
11 You can click Modify Boundary Set to select a different Select Filter for creating spaces.
12 Click Close to end the command.

Updating Generated Spaces


You can update spaces that have been generated from walls and linework in
your drawing. If you have moved any of the items that form the boundary
set for the generated spaces, you can update the space to match the new
shape.
To update generated spaces
1 From the Concept menu, choose Spaces Generate Spaces.
2 In the Generate Spaces dialog box, select the Selection Filter you used to
generate the spaces and click OK.
3 Select the items in the boundary set from which to update the spaces and
press ENTER.
4 In the Generate Spaces dialog box, you can select a different style for the
spaces.
5 Click Update Space.
6 Click the space to update.
7 Click an internal point in the new area for the space.
8 Click Close to end the command.

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Modifying Spaces
After you place space objects in your drawing, you can move them, resize
them, create interference conditions, and change their properties to fit your
design needs.

Editing Spaces
You can change the style of a space. You can change the size of a space by
specifying dimensions in a dialog box or by using grips.

Changing the Style of an Existing Space


You can assign a different space style to an existing space. The new space style
defines the target, minimum, and maximum size and assigns display properties for the net boundary, gross boundary, and space hatch. You create the
new space style before applying it to new or existing spaces.
To change the style of an existing space
1 From the Concept menu, choose Spaces Modify Space.
2 Select the space.
3 In the Modify Space dialog box, select a new style from the Style list.
4 Click Apply to remain in the dialog box and continue modifying the space
style, or click OK to exit the dialog box.

Changing the Size of a Space


After a space has been created, you can change its length and width. If the
length is changed, the area is changed, keeping the width constant. Similarly,
if you change the width, the area is changed and the length stays constant.
You can also change the height of the space or add or remove the floor or
ceiling boundary.

NOTE The height displayed in the Modify Space dialog box is the space
between the upper surface of the floor slab and the lower surface of the ceiling
plane, which is referred to as the room height, not the overall height of the space
object.
To change the size of an existing space
1 From the Concept menu, choose Spaces Modify Space.
2 Select the space you want to change.

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231

3 In the Modify Space dialog box, type a new length or width.


4 Add or remove the floor boundary and ceiling boundary.
5 Click Apply to remain in the dialog box and continue modifying the
space, or click OK to exit the dialog box.

Changing a Space Using Grips


By using grips to edit spaces, you can create nonrectangular spaces. The
length of the space is displayed as the value of the longest distance between
any two vertices on the X axis. The width is the longest distance between any
two vertices on the Y axis. The area is calculated from the size of the space.

Changing a space using side grips

To change a space using grips


1 Select an existing space.
2 Select the grips you want to use to edit the space.
3 Move the pointing device to change the size of the space.

Changing a space using corner grips

Joining Existing Spaces


You can join two spaces to create one larger space. The spaces may be overlapping, tangential, or separate. The resulting space is considered one space

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even if the two original spaces did not touch. The characteristics of the first
space selected override those of the second space selected.

Joining existing spaces

To join existing spaces


1 From the Concept menu, choose Spaces Join Spaces.
2 Select the first space.
3 Select a space to join with the first space.

Dividing an Existing Space


You can divide a space into smaller spaces by using a divide line. The space
is split at the line.
Adding space boundary edges also divides spaces if the space boundary is set
to Manage Contained Spaces. This option creates a space within the space
boundary. Any changes to the space boundary also affect the space managed
by the boundary. If the Manage Contained Spaces option is cleared when a
space boundary is edited, any changes to the space boundary do not change
the spaces within it.

Dividing existing spaces

To divide an existing space


1 From the Concept menu, choose Spaces Divide Spaces.
2 Select a space to divide.
3 Specify the divide line start point.

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233

4 Specify the divide line endpoint.

NOTE The start point and endpoint of the divide line establish an line that
extends, dividing all parts of the selected space that lie on opposite sides of
the line.
The space is divided into smaller spaces at the divide line.

Creating Interference Conditions for a Space


You can place AEC objects, such as mass elements, in a space to create custom
openings or cutouts in the space. This method is called creating an interference
condition.
Before you use this procedure, it is necessary to place an existing AEC object
in the correct location in the space. For example, a column grid structure
might have columns within the space. Once set as interference conditions,
the columns cut out an area at the floor and ceiling of the space.
Calculations of the area of the space are correctly based on both the space
and the interference conditions set for that space. These calculations can be
used in schedules. For more information, see Schedules.
When you use this command, other objects attached to the space, such as a
ceiling grid, recognize the interference condition. For example, if you add a
column to the space as an interference condition, as long as the ceiling grid
is anchored to the space object, the ceiling grid is cut. If you move the
column, the ceiling grid is updated automatically with the new column
location.
To add interference conditions to spaces
1 From the Concept menu, choose Spaces Interference Condition.
2 Type a to add an interference condition to selected spaces.
3 Select spaces you want to be affected by the interference condition.
4 Select an existing AEC object intersecting the space as the interference
condition.

Removing an Interference Condition from a Space


You can remove existing interference conditions from spaces.

NOTE Make sure that your display shows the interference object, so you can
select it in step 4 in the following task.

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To remove interference conditions from spaces


1 From the Concept menu, choose Spaces Interference Condition.
2 Type r to remove an interference condition from selected spaces.
3 Select spaces that are affected by the interference condition.
4 Select the AEC object intersecting the space as the interference condition.

Changing the Properties of a Space


You can specify the properties of a space when you create it, or you can
change its properties after it has been created. The dimension properties of a
space include the constraints of the space, its dimensions, its style, floor and
ceiling boundary thickness, and the height of the space above the ceiling
boundary. The location properties of a space include its location in the drawing, its orientation to the planes of the UCS, and its rotation angle.
You can also attach notes and reference files to a space and add a description.

Changing the Notes, Descriptions, or Reference Files for a


Space
To add a description or a note to a space or attach, edit, or detach a reference file.
1 From the Concept menu, choose Spaces Modify Space.
2 Select the space and press ENTER.
3 In the Modify Space dialog box, click

4 In the Space Properties dialog box, click the General tab.


5 To add a description to the space style, type the text in the Description
field.
6 To add a note to the space, or to attach, edit, or detach a reference file,
click Notes.
7 In the Notes dialog box, to add a note, type the note on the Text Notes tab.
8 To attach, edit, or detach a reference file, click the Reference Docs tab, and
do any of the following:

To attach a reference file, click Add, select a document in the Select File
dialog box, and click OK. You can type a description of the reference
file on the Reference Docs tab.
To edit a reference file, select the file name in the list, click Edit, and
change the document or the description in the Reference Document

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235

dialog box. To edit the file itself, double-click the reference file name to
start its application.
To detach a reference file, select the file name in the list and click
Delete.

9 To attach or edit schedule data, click Property Sets. For more information,
see Attaching Schedule Data and Editing Schedule Data in the online
Autodesk Architectural Desktop Users Guide.
10 Click OK to exit each dialog box. To apply the changes and remain in the
dialog box, click Apply.

Changing the Style of a Space


You can change the style of the space after it has been created. For example,
you can change an office space to a meeting space.
To change the style of a space
1 From the Concept menu, choose Spaces Modify Space.
2 Select the space and press ENTER.
3 In the Modify Space dialog box, click

4 In the Space Properties dialog box, click the Style tab.


5 Select the style you want from the list and click OK.
6 Click Apply to change the selected space to the new style, and click OK to
exit the dialog box.

Changing the Dimension Properties of a Space


You can control the constraints of the space and its dimensions by changing
its dimension properties.
You can control all dimension aspects of the space, including the floor and
ceiling boundary thickness and the height of the space above the ceiling
boundary.
To change the space dimension properties
1 From the Concept menu, choose Spaces Modify Space.
2 Select the space and press ENTER.
3 In the Modify Space dialog box, click

4 In the Space Properties dialog box, click the Dimensions tab.


The Plan Constraints section displays the target, minimum, and maximum size for the space.

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5 In the Component Dimensions section, do any of the following:

Type a new length or width for the existing space.


Type a new value for the space height, the floor or ceiling boundary
thickness, or the height above the ceiling.

6 Click OK to exit the dialog box.

Changing the Location Properties of a Space


You can relocate an existing space by changing the coordinate values of its
insertion point.
The space also has an orientation with respect to the world coordinate system or the current user coordinate system. For example, if the top and bottom of the space are parallel to the XY plane, its normal is parallel to the Z
axis. You can change the orientation of the space by aligning its normal with
another axis.
You can also rotate the space on its plane by changing the rotation angle.
To change the location properties of a space
1 From the Concept menu, choose Spaces Modify Space.
2 Select the space and press ENTER.
3 In the Modify Space dialog box, click

4 In the Space Properties dialog box, click the Location tab.


5 Do any of the following:

To relocate the space, change the coordinate values under Insertion


Point.
To reorient the space, change the axis to which the normal is parallel.
To locate the space on the XY plane, make the normal of the space parallel to the Z axis: under Normal, type 1 in the Z box, and type 0 in the
X and Y boxes. To locate the space on the YZ plane, type 1 in the X box
and type 0 in the Y and Z boxes. To locate the space on the XZ plane,
type 1 in the Y box and type 0 in the X and Z boxes.

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237

To change the rotation of the space, type a new value for Rotation
Angle.

6 Click OK to close the Location tab, and then click Apply to see the changes
to the space object without leaving the Space Properties dialog box.
7 When you finish making changes, click OK to exit the dialog box.

Space Styles
A space style is a collection of settings for variables associated with a space
object. Depending on the scope of the drawing, you could create different
space styles to represent a wide range of different types of spaces, from separate zoning areas in a master plan to different room types in a residential
project.
The current space style determines the properties of new spaces you create in
the drawing. The space style controls the target width, length, and area of a
space. When you are creating a new space, the minimum and maximum
area, length, and width set by the current space style cannot be exceeded.
The description field in the General space style properties stores the information you specify. This information is used when you perform a space inquiry
as one of the basic divisions in its queries. For more information, see Viewing Information About Spaces on page 247.
It makes sense to create space styles that represent the basic divisions of the
drawing that you need to keep track of separately, whether these are departmental or functional divisions.
When you edit the display properties of a space style, those changes are
applied to existing spaces of that style throughout the current drawing.
When you create, import, export, or edit styles, you access the Style Manager.
The Style Manager provides a central location in Autodesk Architectural
Desktop, where you can work with styles from multiple drawings and templates. For more information about using the Style Manager, see Getting
Started with the Style Manager on page 1527.

Creating Space Styles


You can create new space styles for your drawing, including space styles for
different kinds of rooms. For example, space styles provided with Autodesk
Architectural Desktop include kitchens, offices of different sizes, restrooms,
cafeterias, and libraries. When you name a space style, spaces are automati-

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cally grouped and can generate reports based on the first part of the space
style name.

Creating a Space Style


To create a space style
1 From the Concept menu, choose Spaces Space Styles.
The Style Manager is displayed, with the current drawing expanded in the
tree view. The Space styles in the current drawing are displayed under the
Space style type. All other style and definition types are filtered out in the
tree view.
2 With the space style type selected, right-click and choose New.
3 Type a name for the new space style, and press ENTER.
4 To edit the style properties of your new space style, select the style, rightclick, and choose Edit.
The Space Style Properties dialog box is displayed. You can add notes to
the style, change the dimensions of the space, and change the display
properties of the new style. For more information about changing each
style property, see Editing Space Styles on page 240.
5 When you finish changing the space style properties, click OK to return to
the Style Manager.
6 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Creating a Space Style from an Existing Style


You can create a new space style by copying an existing style and
modifying it.
To create a space style based on an existing style
1 From the Concept menu, choose Spaces Space Styles.
The Style Manager is displayed, with the current drawing expanded in the
tree view. The space styles in the current drawing are shown under the
space style type. All other style and definition types are filtered out in the
tree view.
2 Select an existing style to copy under the space style type, and press
CTRL+C.
3 Press CTRL+V.
A copy of the existing style is created.
4 To rename the style, select the style, right-click, and choose Rename. Type
a name for the new style, and press ENTER.

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5 To edit the style properties of your new space style, select the style, rightclick, and choose Edit.
The Space Style Properties dialog box is displayed. You can add notes to
the style, change the dimensions of the space, and change the display
properties of the new style. For more information about changing each
style property, see Editing Space Styles on page 240.
6 When you finish changing the space style properties, click OK to return to
the Style Manager.
7 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style
Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Editing Space Styles


The changes you make to an existing space style take effect the next time you
use it to create a space. Spaces already created with the space style are not
updated unless you change the display properties of the space style or the Net
to Gross Offset. If you edit the display properties or the Net to Gross Offset
of a space style, those changes are applied to existing spaces of that style
throughout the existing drawings.

Changing the Space Style Notes, Descriptions, or Reference


Files
To add a description or a note to a space style or attach, edit, or detach a
reference file
1 From the Concept menu, choose Spaces Space Styles.
The Style Manager is displayed with the current drawing expanded in the
tree view. The space style type is selected within the current drawing, and
all other style types are filtered out in the tree view.
2 Under the space style type, select the space style that you want to change,
right-click, and choose Edit.
3 In the Space Style Properties dialog box, click the General tab.
4 To add a description to the space style, type in the Description field.
5 To add a note to the space style, or to attach, edit, or detach a reference
file, click Notes.
6 In the Notes dialog box, to add a note, type the note on the Text Notes tab.
7 To attach, edit, or detach a reference file, click the Reference Docs tab, and
do any of the following:

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To attach a reference file, click Add, select a document in the Select File
dialog box, and click OK. You can type a description of the reference
file on the Reference Docs tab.
To edit a reference file, select the file name in the list, click Edit, and
change the document or the description in the Reference Document
dialog box. To edit the file itself, double-click the reference file name to
start its application.
To detach a reference file, select the file name in the list and click
Delete.

8 To attach or edit schedule data, click Property Sets. For more information,
see Attaching Schedule Data and Editing Schedule Data in the online
Autodesk Architectural Desktop Users Guide.
9 When you finish changing the space style properties, click OK to return to
the Style Manager.
10 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style
Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Changing the Space Style Dimension Properties


You can change the target area and the minimum and maximum areas, the
target length and the minimum and maximum lengths, and the target width
and the minimum and maximum widths for a particular space style. When
you create spaces, if you specify a space area, length, or width that falls outside the sizes specified for that style, the area, length, or width is truncated
to the target size, and a warning is displayed.
The Net to Gross Offset value controls the width of the boundary when you
convert spaces to walls. The net area of the space (after subtracting the offset)
becomes the usable floor area. This value also sets the Node object snap for
the placement of spaces. By default the Net to Gross Offset is turned off (not
visible).
When you change the Net to Gross Offset value for a space style, the new
value is applied to existing spaces of that style in the drawing.

Specifying a space net to gross offset

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241

To change space style dimension properties


1 From the Concept menu, choose Spaces Space Styles.
The Style Manager is displayed with the current drawing expanded in the
tree view. The space style type is selected within the current drawing, and
all other style types are filtered out in the tree view.
2 Under the space style type, select the space style that you want to change,
right-click, and choose Edit.
3 In the Space Style Properties dialog box, click the Dimensions tab.
4 To set a different area for the space style, type a new target area, minimum
area, or maximum area for the space style.

NOTE The target area must fall between the set minimum and maximum
values.
5 To set a different length for the space style, type a new target length, minimum length, or maximum length for the space style.

NOTE The target length must fall between the set minimum and maximum values.
6 To set a different width for the space style, type a new target width, minimum width, or maximum width for the space style.

NOTE The target width must fall between the set minimum and maximum
values.
7 To set a different Net to Gross Offset for a space style, type a new value.
8 When you finish changing the space style properties, click OK to return to
the Style Manager.
9 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style
Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Changing the Space Style Display Properties


Display properties include the visibility, layer, color, and linetype.
To change space style display properties
1 From the Concept menu, choose Spaces Space Styles,.

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The Style Manager is displayed with the current drawing expanded in the
tree view. The space style type is selected within the current drawing, and
all other style types are filtered out in the tree view.
2 Under the space style type, select the space style that you want to change,
right-click, and choose Edit.
3 In the Space Style Properties dialog box, click the Display Props tab.
4 Select the display set for the space style from the list.
The current viewport display is the default representation display. The
default has an asterisk next to it in the list.
5 Do one of the following:

To change how spaces of the selected style are displayed only in the current viewport in the drawing, select the style from the property source
list and click Attach Override.
To attach an override, you can either select Attach Override or click in
the Attached column. Attach Override is available only when you
select a property source that is attached to the display representation.

NOTE System Default is the default display representation. When a Display


Configuration is overridden, a red X and the word Overridden is
displayed in the list.

To reset the display representation to the next property source in the


list, click Remove Override.
To change how spaces of the selected space style are displayed throughout the drawing, click Edit Display Properties. To edit each property,
click its field. The changes you make affect only the selected style.

6 Click OK to set the display properties for the style.

Setting the Hatch Pattern for a Space Style


To change space style display properties
1 From the Concept menu, choose Spaces Space Styles,.
The Style Manager is displayed with the current drawing expanded in the
tree view. The space style type is selected within the current drawing, and
all other style types are filtered out in the tree view.
2 Under the space style type, select the space style that you want to change,
right-click and choose Edit.
3 In the Space Style Properties dialog box, click the Display Props tab.
4 Select the display set for the space style from the list.

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243

The current viewport display is the default representation display. The


default has an asterisk next to it in the list.
5 To set which hatch pattern is displayed in each display representation for
the space style, click Edit Display Properties, and in the Entity Properties
dialog box click the Hatching tab.
The Hatching tab is displayed in only some of the display representations,
including Plan and Reflected.
6 In the Pattern list, select a hatch pattern to change.
7 In the Hatch Pattern dialog box, select the type of hatch pattern for the
selected component and click OK.

If you select Predefined in the Type field, select a pattern from the Pattern Name list.
If you select Custom in the Type field, type the custom pattern name
in the Custom Pattern box.
If you select User-Defined in the Type field, click Double Hatch on or
off.

8 Click the Scale/Spacing list to change the value for the selected
component.
9 Click the Angle list to type a new angle for the hatch pattern.
10 Click the Orientation field to change from making the hatching change
global or for only the selected space style.
11 When you finish changing the space style properties, click OK to return to
the Style Manager.
12 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style
Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Purging a Space Style


If you no longer need a space style, you can delete it from the drawing.
To purge a space style
1 From the Concept menu, choose Spaces Space Styles,.
The Style Manager is displayed, with the current drawing expanded in the
tree view. The space styles in the current drawing are displayed under the
space style type. All other style and definition types are filtered out in the
tree view.
2 Do one of the following:

244

To purge a single unused space style in your current drawing, select the
style under the style type, right-click, and choose Purge.

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To purge all the unused space styles in your current drawing, with the
Space Style type selected, right-click, and choose Purge.

A confirmation dialog box with the styles that you selected to purge is
displayed.
3 Click OK to purge the styles.

NOTE To display the confirmation dialog box only when you press the
SHIFT key as you purge the styles, select Only Show this Confirmation Dialog

When the Shift Key is Down.


4 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style
Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Importing a Space Style


You can import a space style from an existing drawing.

NOTE You can manage space styles efficiently by creating them all in one
drawing you reserve for this purpose and importing them into other drawings as
needed.
To import a space style
1 From the Concept menu, choose Spaces Space Styles,.
The Style Manager is displayed, with the current drawing expanded in the
tree view. The space styles in the current drawing are displayed under the
space style type. All other style and definition types are filtered out in the
tree view.
2 In the Style Manager, choose File Open drawing to browse for the drawing that contains the style that you want to copy to your current drawing.
3 Select the drawing with the style that you want to copy, and click Open.
The new drawing opens in the Style Manager tree view, filtered to display
only the space style type.
4 Click the plus sign (+) next to Space Styles to display the space styles in
the drawing.
5 Select the space style that you want to copy, and choose Edit Copy.
6 Select the current drawing, and choose Edit Paste.
The style is copied into the current drawing. If the current drawing already
contains a style with the same name, the duplicate names are displayed in
the Import/Export - Duplicate Names Found dialog box.

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245

7 To resolve any duplicate style names, select one of the following options:

To not replace the existing style in the drawing with the new style of
the same name, select Leave Existing.
To replace the existing style in the drawing with the new style, select
Overwrite Existing.
To rename the new style so both styles exist in the drawing, select
Rename to Unique. New style names are appended with a number in
the Style Manager.

8 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style
Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Exporting a Space Style to a New Drawing


You can copy Space styles from your current drawing to a new drawing.
To export a space style to a new drawing
1 From the Concept menu, choose Spaces Space Styles,.
The Style Manager is displayed, with the current drawing expanded in the
tree view. The Space styles in the current drawing are displayed under the
Space style type. All other style and definition types are filtered out in the
tree view.
2 In the Style Manager, choose File New drawing to create the new drawing to copy the style to.
3 Type a name for the new drawing, and click Save.
The new drawing opens in the Style Manager tree view, filtered to display
only the Space style type.
4 Select the style in the current drawing that you want to copy to the new
drawing, and choose Edit Copy.
5 Select the new drawing, and choose Edit Paste.
The style is copied to the new drawing.
6 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style
Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Exporting Space Styles to an Existing Drawing


You can copy Space styles from your current drawing to another drawing.
To export a space style to an existing drawing
1 From the Concept menu, choose Spaces Space Styles,.
The Style Manager is displayed, with the current drawing expanded in the
tree view. The Space styles in the current drawing are displayed under the

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Space style type. All other style and definition types are filtered out in the
tree view.
2 In the Style Manager, choose File Open drawing to browse for the existing drawing that you want to copy the style to.
3 Select the drawing that you want to copy the style to, and click Open.
The drawing opens in the Style Manager tree view, filtered to display only
the Space style type.
4 Select the style in the current drawing that you want to copy to the second
drawing, and choose Edit Copy.
5 Select the second drawing, and choose Edit Paste.
The style is copied into the second drawing. If the drawing already contains a style with the same name, the duplicate names are displayed in the
Import/Export - Duplicate Names Found dialog box.
6 To resolve any duplicate style names, select one of the following options:

To not replace the existing style in the drawing with the new style of
the same name, select Leave Existing.
To replace the existing style in the drawing with the new style, select
Overwrite Existing.
7 To rename the new style so both styles exist in the drawing, select Rename
to Unique. New style names are appended with a number in the Style
Manager.
8 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style
Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Viewing Information About Spaces


You can view the total area used by each space style, as well as the quantity
of each space style used. For individual spaces, you can view the space style,
description, individual area, and maximum and minimum size.
To view information about spaces
1 From the Concept menu, choose Spaces Space Inquiry.
2 In the Space Information dialog box, for totals, click the Space Info Total
tab and view the information.
3 In the Space Information dialog box, click the Space Information tab and
view the information about individual spaces.
4 Click OK to exit the dialog box.

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247

Creating a Space Report


You can create a database file from the information in the Space Information
dialog box.
To create a database file of space information
1 From the Concept menu, choose Spaces Space Inquiry.
2 In the Space Information dialog box, click either the Space Info Total tab
or the Space Information tab.
3 Click Create MDB.
4 In the Database File dialog box, type a name for the database file.
The default name is the current drawing name.
5 Click Save.
6 In the Space Information dialog box, click OK to exit.

Spaces Command List

Menu Command

Command Line

Right-click (with space


selected)

Space

248

Add Space...

SpaceAdd

Modify Space...

SpaceModify

Convert to Spaces...

SpaceConvert

Generate Spaces...

SpaceAutoGenerate

Space Styles...

SpaceStyle

Space Inquiry...

SpaceQuery

Join Spaces

SpaceJoin

Join

Divide Spaces

SpaceDivide

Divide

Interference
Condition

SpaceInterference

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Space Modify...

Menu Command

Command Line

Right-click (with space


selected)

SpaceSwap

Swap

SpaceProps

Space Properties...

SpaceStyleEdit

Edit Space Style...

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Space Boundaries

11

As you continue to design your building, you can think

In this chapter

of spaces as equivalent to rooms, space boundary edges

Creating and editing space

boundaries

as walls, and the grouping of spaces by a boundary as a


department.

Changing space boundary

properties
Converting objects to

You can create space boundary objects with or without

boundaries

included space objects. Spaces and boundaries combine


to create the complete representation of the space, the
interior space, and the surrounding boundaries.

251

Space Boundaries
A space boundary is a division between spaces that may exist as a solid form
boundary or as an area separation boundary. You can create space boundary
objects with or without included space objects. If spaces are created with
space boundary objects, then the boundaries are dependent on those space
objects. If you delete such a space, the boundary edges are removed as well.
Spaces and boundaries combine to create the complete representation of the
space, the interior space and the surrounding boundaries. You can attach
spaces to boundaries after both have been created.

Viewing spaces and space boundaries

There are two types of space boundaries, solid form and area separation. Solid
form boundaries equate to walls with a specified thickness. Solid form
boundaries can be later converted to a wall between two spaces. This boundary shares all the characteristics of a wall, including:

Justification
Base height
Thickness

Area separation boundaries have a thickness of zero and cannot be converted


to walls. An area separation boundary divides a space without anything solid
between the spaces. For example, an area separation boundary might separate two departments in an open office.

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Viewing solid form and area separation space boundaries

Creating a Space Boundary


You can create a space boundary with a solid form around the edge of the
boundary that represents walls around the space. Solid form boundaries can
be straight lines or arcs. You can later convert solid form boundaries to walls
with the Generate Walls command. See Converting Space Boundaries to
Walls on page 260.
You also can create a space boundary with a line of zero thickness around the
edge of the boundary. These area separation boundaries cannot be converted
to walls.
To create a space boundary
1 From the Concept menu, choose Space Boundaries Add Boundary.
2 In the Add Space Boundary dialog box, select either Solid Form or Area
Separation.
3 Select Manage Contained Spaces.
This option creates a space within the space boundary. Any changes to the
space boundary also affect the space managed by the boundary. If the
Manage Contained Spaces option is cleared when a space boundary is
edited, any changes to the space boundary do not change the spaces
within it.
4 Set the Height, Offset, and Width for the space boundary.

The Height option sets the height of a solid form boundary. This option
is available when Solid Form is selected. The height is the distance from
the top of the floor elevation to the top of the space boundary. When
you convert the space boundary to a wall, the wall uses the height
parameters of the space boundary.

Space Boundaries

253

The Offset option sets the offset distance from the start and end points
of the space boundary segment to the space boundary baseline as you
draw the space boundary.

Specifying a space boundary offset distance

The Width option sets the width of a solid form boundary. This option
is available when Solid Form selected. When you convert the space
boundary to a wall, the wall uses the width parameters of the space
boundary.

5 If you are creating a solid form boundary, in the Justify list, set the justification of the space boundary as you draw it.
This option controls how the boundary is drawn with respect to the
selected points. If the Right option is selected, the space boundary is
drawn on the inside of the selected point; that is, the selected points fall
on the exterior face of the boundary. If the Center option is selected, the
boundary uses the selected points as the centerline. If the Left option is
selected, the selected points are used for the location of the inner surface
of the space boundary.

Specifying space boundary justification

6 Click your drawing.


7 Specify points to define the boundary.

NOTE After you specify the third point for the space boundary, the Ortho
Close and Polyline Close options become available.

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Ortho Close closes the space by drawing two walls or space boundaries based
on the direction you specify. The direction is extended until it meets a line
perpendicular to the initial edge of either the wall or space boundary.
Polyline Close closes the wall by creating a wall segment from the last point
specified for the walls to the first point specified in this group of walls.
8 Press ENTER to end the command.

Creating a space boundary

When a closed shape is created, it is designated by a hatched space contained within the space boundary in plan view.

Creating Space Boundaries


You can create space boundaries from existing spaces, slices, polylines, arcs,
and lines. For more information about slices, see Slice Floorplates on page
269.
Each section of a space boundary is also called a space boundary edge. When
you select a section of the space boundary, the section that is highlighted is
one space boundary edge. You can manipulate each edge separately.

Converting Objects to Boundaries


You can create space boundaries from existing spaces, or by converting slices
or sketches to space boundaries.

Creating Space Boundaries

255

Converting a Space to a Boundary


You can create space boundaries from existing spaces. Two or more non-overlapping spaces create one space boundary that surrounds each space object.
These boundaries do not need to be connected to be considered the same
space boundary.
To add a space boundary to a space
1 From the Concept menu, choose Space Boundaries Convert to Boundaries.
The following command line is displayed:
Convert [Edges/SPace/SLice]:

2 Type sp (Spaces), and then select the space to convert.


3 Press ENTER.

Converting a Slice to a Boundary


You can create a space boundary from a slice.
To create a space boundary from a slice
1 From the Concept menu, choose Space Boundaries Convert to Boundaries.
The following command line is displayed:
Convert [Edges/SPace/SLice]:

2 Type sl (Slices), and then select the slice to convert.

NOTE The slice you select must have objects attached to it.
3 Press ENTER.

NOTE The interior floor line of the bounded space is set at the elevation of
the slice; the thickness of the floor may extend below the slice.

Converting Sketching to a Boundary


You can create space boundary edges from existing polylines, lines, arcs, and
circles.
To create a space boundary from polylines, lines, arcs, and circles
1 From the Concept menu, choose Space Boundaries Convert to Boundaries.

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The following command line is displayed:


Convert [Edges/SPace/SLice]:

2 Type e (edges), and then select the polyline, line, arc or circle to convert.
3 Type y to erase the original polylines, lines, arcs, and circles, or type n to
keep them in the drawing.
Change the properties for the new space boundary edges. See Editing
Boundary Edges on page 259.
4 Press ENTER.

Converting a polyline to a space boundary

Attaching Spaces to a Space Boundary


You can add spaces to an existing space boundary by attaching a space to an
existing boundary and creating a space boundary around the existing space.
The boundary is considered to be the same boundary, for space information
totals, for instance.

NOTE The space boundary must have the Manage Contained Spaces option
selected before spaces are attached to it. See Creating a Space Boundary on
page 253.
To attach existing spaces to a boundary
1 From the Concept menu, choose Space Boundaries Attach Spaces to
Boundary.
2 Select the space boundary.
3 Select the spaces to attach to the selected boundary.
4 Press ENTER.
The spaces have boundaries created around each one, and they are added
to the existing space boundary.

Creating Space Boundaries

257

Merging Boundaries
You can combine two or more boundaries to make one space boundary.
To merge existing boundaries
1 From the Concept menu, choose Space Boundaries Merge Boundaries.
2 Select the gaining space boundary.
3 Select a second boundary to merge with the first boundary.
The two boundaries become one boundary.

Splitting Space Boundaries


You can split an existing space boundary into two smaller boundaries if it
contains more than one space.
To split a boundary
1 From the Concept menu, choose Space Boundaries Split Boundary.
2 Select the spaces in the boundary to split from the larger boundary.
3 Press ENTER.
The split boundary becomes two boundaries.

Adding Boundary Edges


You can add an additional space boundary edge to an existing space boundary. The newly added edge becomes a part of the existing space boundary.
The new edge cuts the space within the boundary if the boundary manages
the spaces within it. For more information, see Creating a Space Boundary
on page 253.
To add an edge to a boundary
1 From the Concept menu, choose Space Boundaries Add Boundary
Edges.
2 Select an existing space boundary.
3 In the Add Space Boundary dialog box, select the segment type, height,
offset, width, and justification for the new space boundary edge.
4 To match the properties of an existing space boundary edge, click
and then select the existing space boundary.

5 Specify a start point and an endpoint for the new space boundary edge.

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NOTE The start point and endpoint must touch the spaces inside the existing boundaries, in order to form a new space within the added edges.

Editing Boundary Edges


You can change specific space boundary edges on an existing space boundary. You can modify a space boundary edge by changing its segment type,
width, and height and its boundary conditions for both floor and ceiling.
To modify existing boundary edges
1 From the Concept menu, choose Space Boundaries Edit Boundary
Edges.
2 Select existing space boundary edges to change.
3 In the Boundary Edge Properties dialog box, you can change the segment
type, dimensions, and design rules for the selected space boundary edges.
For information about segment types, dimensions, and design rules, see
Changing the Space Boundary Properties on page 262.
4 Click OK to change the selected space boundary edges.

Removing Boundary Edges


You can remove specific space boundary edges from an existing space boundary. If the space boundary is managing contained spaces and if removing the
boundary edge changes the boundary from enclosed to open, the managed
spaces are deleted as well.
To remove existing boundary edges
1 From the Concept menu, choose Space Boundaries Remove Boundary
Edges.
2 Select existing space boundary edges to delete.
3 Press ENTER.
The edges are removed from the space boundary.

Anchoring Objects to Boundaries


You can anchor objects to space boundaries. An anchored object is constrained to the space boundary. You can move it along the space boundary,
but it cannot move off the boundary until it is detached from it.

Creating Space Boundaries

259

The center of the bottom face of the object is anchored to the insertion point
on the space boundarys bottom face and at a point midway of the boundary
width.
For more information about anchors, see Working with Curve Anchors on
page 1591.
To anchor an object to a space boundary
1 From the Concept menu, choose Space Boundaries Anchor to Boundary.
2 Type a to anchor an object to the space boundary.
3 Select the object to anchor to the boundary.
4 Select the space boundary to anchor the object to.
The object is placed on the space boundary and is anchored to that location on the space boundary.

Releasing Objects from Space Boundaries


You can release objects that have been anchored to space boundaries.
To release an object from a space boundary
1 From the Concept menu, choose Space Boundaries Anchor to Boundary.
2 Type f to detach an object from the space boundary.
3 Select the object to detach from the boundary.
4 Press ENTER to release the attached object.
The object is no longer anchored and can now be moved off the space
boundary.

Converting Space Boundaries to Walls


You can convert existing space boundaries to walls to be carried forward into
the design phase of the drawing.
If you want to create a wall up to ceiling height only, set the value of the
space above ceiling height to zero (0). Also, the wall generated has a baseline
at zero (0) if the boundary is created in the world coordinate system, but the
wall itself extends below baseline by a distance equal to the floor thickness.
For more information about the world coordinate system, see Use Coordinates and Coordinate Systems in the online AutoCAD 2002 Users Guide.

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NOTE When walls are generated from a space boundary, any segments that
are adjoining and collinear will become a single wall. In order to prevent segments from joining automatically, make them different widths. This is useful, for
example, when the walls must be different styles.
After you convert the space boundaries to walls, you can use the Modify Wall
command to change the style of the walls. For more information, see Editing Walls on page 362.
To convert space boundaries to walls
1 From the Concept menu, select Space Boundaries Generate Walls.
2 Select one or more space boundaries to convert to walls.
The space boundary is converted to a standard wall.

NOTE The space boundary and any spaces that it is managing stay in the
drawing, but there is no link between the space boundary and the created
wall object. If you need to edit the boundaries, delete the walls, change the
boundaries, and then convert the space boundaries to walls again.

Editing Space Boundaries


You can change an existing space boundary from a solid form boundary to
an area separation boundary. You can also change the notes, descriptions, or
reference files attached to a space boundary; segment type, width, and justification; design rules; and location properties.

Modifying a Space Boundary


You can change an existing space boundary from a solid form boundary to
an area separation boundary. Depending on the type of boundary, you can
change its height and width, how it is drawn with respect to the points you
specified (justification), and whether changes to the boundary change the
space contained within it.
To change all segments of a space boundary
1 From the Concept menu, choose Space Boundaries Modify Boundary.
2 Select the space boundary to modify, and then press ENTER.
3 In the Modify Space Boundary dialog box, do one of the following:

Editing Space Boundaries

261

Change the segment type to Solid Form or Area Separation.


Solid Form: Creates a boundary edge with a specific width. This
boundary edge can be later converted to a wall.
Area Separation: Creates a boundary that is a partition or space
divider line. An area separation boundary edge cannot be converted to
a wall. For example, it can be used to separate spaces for different
departments within one space.

Change the height of the space boundary, if the height is not controlled by the managed spaces.
Change whether the space boundary manages the contained spaces.
Manage Contained Spaces: Creates a space within the space
boundary. Any changes to the space boundary also affect the space
managed by the boundary. If the Manage Contained Spaces option is
cleared when a space boundary is edited, any changes to the space
boundary do not change the spaces within it.

For solid form boundaries, change the width and justification of the
space boundary.

4 Click Apply to change the selected space boundary and remain in the dialog box to continue modifying the boundary, or click OK to exit the dialog
box.

Changing the Space Boundary Properties


You can change the space boundary notes, descriptions, or reference files;
segment type, width, and justification; design rules; and location properties.

Changing the Space Boundary Notes, Descriptions, or


Reference Files
To add a description or a note to a space boundary or attach, edit, or detach
a reference file
1 From the Concept menu, choose Space Boundaries Modify Boundary.
2 Select the boundary and press ENTER.
3 In the Modify Space Boundary dialog box, click

4 In the Space Boundary Properties dialog box, click the General tab.
5 To add a description to the space boundary, type in the Description field.
6 To add a note to the space boundary, or to attach, edit, or detach a reference file, click Notes.
7 In the Notes dialog box, to add a note, type the note on the Text Notes tab.

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8 To attach, edit, or detach a reference file, click the Reference Docs tab, and
do any of the following:

To attach a reference file, click Add, select a document in the Select File
dialog box, and click OK. You can type a description of the reference
file on the Reference Docs tab.
To edit a reference file, select the file name in the list, click Edit, and
change the document or the description in the Reference Document
dialog box. To edit the file itself, double-click the reference file name to
start its application.
To detach a reference file, select the file name in the list and click
Delete.

9 To attach or edit schedule data, click Property Sets. For more information,
see Attaching Schedule Data and Editing Schedule Data in the online
Autodesk Architectural Desktop Users Guide.
10 Click OK to exit each dialog box. To apply the changes and remain in the
dialog box, click Apply.

Changing the Space Boundary Segment Type, Width, and


Justification
To change the space boundary segment type, width, and justification
1 From the Concept menu, choose Space Boundaries Modify Boundary.
2 Select the boundary to modify, and then press ENTER.
3 In the Modify Space Boundary dialog box, click

4 In the Space Boundary Properties dialog box, click the Dimensions tab.

5 Do one of the following:

Select either Solid Form or Area Separation to change the segment type.

Editing Space Boundaries

263

Solid Form: Creates a boundary edge with a specific width. This


boundary edge can be later converted to a wall. The following options
are available for solid form boundaries.
Area Separation: Creates a boundary that is a partition or space
divider line. An area separation boundary edge cannot be converted to
a wall. For example, it can be used to separate spaces for different
departments within one space.

Change the width and justification of the space boundary.


Width: Specifies the width of the boundary.
Justify: Controls how the boundary is drawn with respect to the
selected points. If the Right option is selected, the space boundary is
drawn on the inside of the selected point; that is, the selected points
fall on the exterior face of the boundary. If the Center option is
selected, the boundary uses the selected points as the centerline. If the
Left option is selected, the selected points are used for the location of
the inner surface of the space boundary.

NOTE These options are available when Solid Form is selected.


6 Click OK to apply the change to the selected boundary.

NOTE If the Manage Contained Spaces option is selected, space areas are
updated when you change the thickness or location of boundary edges. See
Creating a Space Boundary on page 253.

Changing the Space Boundary Design Rules


Space boundary design rules control where the boundary is drawn in relation
to the floor and ceilings. These settings are carried through when the space
boundary is converted to walls.
To change the space boundary design rules
1 From the Concept menu, choose Space Boundaries Modify Boundary.
2 Select the boundary to modify, and then press ENTER.
3 In the Modify Space Boundary dialog box, click

4 In the Space Boundary Properties dialog box, click the Design Rules tab.

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5 In the Ceiling section, clear Automatically Determine from Spaces if you


want to change the boundary conditions at the ceiling. Otherwise, the
conditions are automatically set from the contained spaces.

Specifying ceiling conditions

6 Change the Base Height of the boundary. This option sets the height of
the space boundary from the top of the floor to the bottom of the ceiling.
7 Change the Upper Extension value. This option sets the height of the
space boundary above the ceiling.
8 If you want the wall to stop at the bottom of the ceiling, select Wall Stops
at Ceiling.
9 In the Floor section, clear Automatically Determine from Spaces if you
want to change the boundary conditions at the floor. Otherwise, the conditions are automatically set from the contained spaces.

Editing Space Boundaries

265

Specifying floor conditions

10 Change the Lower Extension value. This option sets the thickness of the
floor below the space boundary.
11 If you want the wall to stop at the top of the floor, select Wall Stops at
Floor.
12 Click OK to exit each dialog box.

Changing the Location Properties of a Space Boundary


You can relocate an existing space boundary by changing the coordinate values of its insertion point.
The space boundary also has an orientation with respect to the world coordinate system or the current user coordinate system. For example, if the top
and bottom of the space boundary are parallel to the XY plane, its normal is
parallel to the Z axis. You can change the orientation of the space boundary
by aligning its normal with another axis.
You can also rotate the space boundary on its plane by changing the rotation
angle.
To change the location properties of a space boundary
1 From the Concept menu, choose Space Boundaries Modify Boundary.
2 Select the space boundary and press ENTER.
3 In the Modify Space Boundary dialog box, click

4 In the Space Boundary Properties dialog box, click the Location tab.
5 Do any of the following:

266

To relocate the space boundary, change the coordinate values under


Insertion Point.
To reorient the space boundary, change the axis to which the normal is
parallel. To locate the space boundary on the XY plane, make the nor-

Chapter 11

Space Boundaries

mal of the space parallel to the Z axis: under Normal, type 1 in the Z
box, and type 0 in the X and Y boxes. To locate the space boundary on
the YZ plane, type 1 in the X box and type 0 in the Y and Z boxes. To
locate the space boundary on the XZ plane, type 1 in the Y box and
type 0 in the X and Z boxes.
To change the rotation of the space boundary, type a new value for
Rotation Angle.

6 Click OK to close the Location tab, and then click Apply to see the changes
to the space boundary object without leaving the Space Boundary Properties dialog box.
7 When you finish making changes, click OK to exit the dialog box.

Space Boundaries Command List

Menu Command

Command Line

Right-click (with space


boundary selected)

Space Boundary
Add Boundary...

SpaceBoundaryAdd

Modify Boundary...

SpaceBoundaryModify

Convert to
Boundaries...

SpaceBoundaryConvert

Attach Spaces to
Boundary

SpaceBoundaryMergeSpace

Attach Spaces to
Boundaries

Merge Boundaries

SpaceBoundaryMerge

Merge Boundaries

Split Boundary

SpaceBoundarySplit

Split Boundary

Add Boundary Edges

SpaceBoundaryAddEdges

Add Edges

Edit Boundary Edges

SpaceBoundaryEdge

Edit Edges...

Remove Boundary
Edges

SpaceBoundaryRemoveEdge
s

Remove Edges

Anchor to Boundary

SpaceBoundaryAnchor

Boundary Modify...

Editing Space Boundaries

267

Menu Command

Command Line

Right-click (with space


boundary selected)

Generate Walls

SpaceBoundaryGenerateWal
ls

Generate Walls

SpaceBoundaryProps

Boundary Properties...

SpaceBoundaryInsertJoint

Insert Joint

SpaceBoundaryAnchorSetBn
d

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Slice Floorplates

12

A slice can be thought of as a representation of a

In this chapter

theoretical floor level. Slices are chosen and manipu-

Generating a slice

lated by an associated marker, the slice marker. When


you attach mass groups to the slice marker, the slice
marker creates the perimeter geometry of the building,
known as a floorplate. Anytime you change the mass
groups attached to the slice marker, the floorplate is

Changing slice properties


Setting the slice elevation
Converting a slice to a polyline
Attaching and detaching objects

to a slice
Converting space boundaries to

walls

updated.

269

Creating Floorplates
A slice can be thought of as a representation of a theoretical floor level. Like
mass groups, slices are chosen and manipulated by an associated marker, the
slice marker. When you attach mass groups to the slice marker, the slice
marker creates the perimeter geometry of the building, known as a floorplate.
Anytime you change the mass groups attached to the slice marker, the floorplate is updated.
If you attach mass elements instead of mass groups to the slice, the operational aspects (additive, subtractive, and intersection) of the mass elements
are not recognized by the slice. To have these aspects recorded by the slice,
attach the mass group. For more information about additive, subtractive, and
intersection operations, see Mass Groups on page 212.
After the floorplates have been created, you can convert slices to space
boundaries or polylines and then generate walls. You cannot create walls
directly from the slice itself.

Generating a Slice
The slice object is defined by a small crossed box. Like the mass group marker,
the slice marker can be located in a convenient place in your drawing. For
more information about the mass group marker, see Adding a Mass Group
Marker on page 212.
The Generate Slice command can create multiple slices at regular height
intervals. A slice marker is created for each slice.

Generating slice objects

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To generate a slice
1 From the Concept menu, choose Slice Floorplates Generate Slice.
2 Specify the number of slices you want to create.
3 Specify the lower-left and upper-right corners for the slice marker.

NOTE Keep the slice marker small so as not to clutter your drawing.
4 Specify a rotation for the slice marker.
5 Type the starting height of the slice.
6 Type the distance between the slices.
7 Press ENTER to end the command.

Setting the Slice Elevation


After creating a slice, you can change the elevation of it.
To change the slice elevation
1 From the Concept menu, choose Slice Floorplates Set Slice Elevation.
2 Select the slice marker.
3 Type a new slice elevation on the command line.

Converting a Slice to a Polyline


After objects have been attached to a slice marker, you can convert the slice
to a polyline. You can convert polylines to spaces, walls, or profiles.
To convert a slice to a polyline
1 From the Concept menu, choose Slice Floorplates Convert to Polyline.
2 Select the slice marker.
3 The outlines of the objects attached to the slice marker are converted to
polylines.

Attaching Objects to a Slice


You can attach mass elements or mass groups to a slice to create the building
floorplate.

Creating Floorplates

271

To attach an object to a slice marker


1 From the Concept menu, choose Slice Floorplates Attach Objects.
2 Select the slice marker.
3 Select the mass elements or mass groups you want to include in the slice.
4 Press ENTER.

Attaching a mass group to slice objects

Detaching Objects from a Slice


You can detach mass elements or mass groups from a slice to change a
floorplate.
To detach an object from a slice marker
1 From the Concept menu, choose Slice Floorplates Detach Objects.
2 Select the slice marker.
3 Select the mass elements or mass groups you want to exclude from the
slice.
4 Press ENTER.

Modifying Slice Properties


You can change the location properties of a slice. You can also attach notes,
attach a reference file, and add a description to the slice.

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Changing the Notes, Descriptions, or Reference


Files for a Slice
To add a description or a note to a slice or attach, edit, or detach a reference
file
1 Select the slice to modify, right-click, and choose Slice Properties from the
shortcut menu.
2 In the Slice Properties dialog box, click the General tab.
3 To add a description to the slice, type the text in the Description field.
4 To add a note to the slice, or to attach, edit, or detach a reference file, click
Notes.
5 In the Notes dialog box, to add a note, type the note on the Text Notes tab.
6 To attach, edit, or detach a reference file, click the Reference Docs tab, and
do any of the following:

To attach a reference file, click Add, select a document in the Select File
dialog box, and click OK. You can type a description of the reference
file on the Reference Docs tab.
To edit a reference file, select the file name in the list, click Edit, and
change the document or the description in the Reference Document
dialog box. To edit the file itself, double-click the reference file name to
start its application.
To detach a reference file, select the file name in the list and click
Delete.

7 Click OK to exit each dialog box. To apply the changes and remain in the
dialog box, click Apply.

Changing the Slice Location Properties


You can relocate an existing slice by changing the coordinate values of its
insertion point.
The slice also has an orientation with respect to the world coordinate system
or the current user coordinate system. For example, if the top and bottom of
the slice are parallel to the XY plane, its normal is parallel to the Z axis. You
can change the orientation of the slice by aligning its normal with another
axis.
You can also rotate the slice on its plane by changing the rotation angle.

Modifying Slice Properties

273

To change the location properties of a slice


1 Select the slice to modify, right-click, and choose Slice Properties from the
shortcut menu.
2 In the Mass Group Properties dialog box, click the Location tab.
3 Do any of the following:

To relocate the slice, change the coordinate values under Insertion


Point.
To reorient the slice, change the axis to which the normal is parallel. To
locate the slice on the XY plane, make the normal of the space parallel
to the Z axis: under Normal, type 1 in the Z box, and type 0 in the X
and Y boxes. To locate the slice on the YZ plane, type 1 in the X box
and type 0 in the Y and Z boxes. To locate the slice on the XZ plane,
type 1 in the Y box and type 0 in the X and Z boxes.
To change the rotation of the slice, type a new value for Rotation Angle.

4 Click OK to close the Location tab, and then click Apply to see the changes
to the slice object without leaving the Mass Group Properties dialog box.
5 When you finish making changes, click OK to exit the dialog box.

Slice Floorplates Command List

Menu Commands

Command Line

Right-click

Generate Slice

AecSliceCreate

Set Slice Elevation

AecSliceElevation

Set Elevation

Convert to Polyline

AecSliceToPline

Convert to Polyline

Attach Objects

AecSliceAttach

Attach Objects

Detach Objects

AecSliceDetach

Detach Objects

AecSlice
AecSliceProps

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Slice Properties...

Design Content

13

From the Design menu, you can locate AEC drawing

In this chapter

data and drawings and drag them into your drawings.

Changing the design content

menu

You can also create AEC content using multi-view


blocks, masking blocks, and profiles and drag them into

Adding content
Adding fixture layouts

your drawings.

275

Using Design Content


From the Design menu, you can locate AEC drawing data and drawings and
drag them into your drawings. You can also create AEC content using multiview blocks, masking blocks, and profiles and drag them into your drawings.
Content in Autodesk Architectural Desktop, Release 3 is accessed through
Custom view in AutoCAD DesignCenter. In Custom view, the top-level for
AEC content is named Architectural Desktop. When you start one of the content commands from the Design menu, the AutoCAD DesignCenter is
displayed and the correct folder for the selected content is displayed.

There are four different Design Content submenus that can display in the
menu: Architectural Desktop Metric Content, Architectural Desktop Metric
D A CH Content (designed specifically for Germany, Austria and Switzerland), Architectural Desktop Imperial Content and CSI Master Format Imperial Content.
For information about AutoCAD DesignCenter, see chapter 14, Managing
Content in AutoCAD DesignCenter in the AutoCAD 2002 Users Guide.

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Chapter 13 Design Content

AutoCAD DesignCenter Custom View


When you are in Custom view in AutoCAD DesignCenter, Architectural
Desktop is at the top, and the tree view displays the file system folders and
file system shortcuts only. All other files stored in the directory structure are
not displayed. In Custom view, drawing files do not function as containers
as they do in the Desktop view of AutoCAD DesignCenter. Instead, each
drawing file represents one piece of AEC content; therefore, drawing files are
not displayed in Custom view.
You can navigate the file system using shortcuts within Custom view to
customize content hierarchies for specific needs. In all other aspects, navigation in the Custom view tree is identical to navigation in the Desktop view
of AutoCAD DesignCenter.
Like other AutoCAD DesignCenter palettes, the Custom view palette provides four different display options: Large Icons, Small Icons, List, and
Details. Only Large Icons display an image of the content. All other options
display the generic DWG icon. When the palette displays the contents of a
directory, it displays all directories, drawings, and shortcuts. You can drag
drawings and shortcuts to drawings from the palette into the drawing.
Each file displayed in Custom view in the AutoCAD DesignCenter is a DWG
file containing one piece of AEC content.
Note the following specific differences between AutoCAD DesignCenter and
Custom view in AutoCAD DesignCenter used with AEC Content:

Drawings that represent AEC content are not displayed in the tree view as
containers. Drawings are shown only in the palette.
The Preview window displays a user-controllable higher-resolution image
of the content. This can be a different image from the Large Icons image.
The Large Icons image is a bitmap stored with the drawing file. The
preview is the last saved view of the content drawing zoomed to the
extents of the drawing.
Special icons indicate shortcuts.
The root of Custom view is named Architectural Desktop.

The Preview window provides a higher-resolution preview of the content


than is available in the Large Icons view. In the Custom view, the Preview
window behaves exactly like the Object Viewer. For more information about
the Object Viewer, see Object Viewer on page 181.

Using Design Content

277

Changing the Design Content Menu


You can change the display of AutoCAD DesignCenter menu between metric
and imperial by accessing the AutoCAD options and selecting the type of
content to display. The initial display of the menu is set when you install the
program. For more information about installing the software, see the
Autodesk Architectural Desktop, Release 3 Installation Guide.

NOTE To access Custom view, you must have loaded AutoCAD DesignCenter
in the current drawing session.
To change the display of the AutoCAD DesignCenter menu
1 From the Tools menu, choose Options.
2 In the Options dialog box, select the AEC Content tab.
3 In the Content Menu section, select the content menu you would like to
use.
4 Click OK.
The Design Content menu now reflects the change that you made in the
Options dialog box.

Adding AutoCAD Architectural Desktop


Content
You can place symbols through AutoCAD DesignCenter. Depending on your
installation you have access to different folders and symbols, like Imperial
symbols, Metric symbols, CSI symbols and D A CH symbols (symbols for
Germany, Austria and Switzerland).

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Chapter 13 Design Content

Adding Metric Content


You can place metric symbols for USA through AutoCAD DesignCenter.

NOTE It depends on your installation whether this folder is present in your


AutoCAD DesignCenter. If it is not, but you would like to have it, install this specific content from your Installation CD.

Adding Bathroom Fittings Content


Using AutoCAD DesignCenter, you can drag bathroom fittings symbols into
your drawing, including basins, baths, and showers.
To add bathroom fittings symbols
1 From the Design menu, choose Design Content Bathroom Fittings, or
on the Design Content - Metric toolbar, click
.
2 In AutoCAD DesignCenter, select the type of symbol to be placed in your
drawing, such baths, drinking fountains, or floor sinks.
3 Select the specific bathroom fitting symbol to be used in the drawing.
You can view the symbol in 2D and 3D in the Preview window.
4 Drag the block into your drawing and then place it at the location for the
block.
The block is placed in your drawing using the current display configuration.

NOTE If you release the left button before the item is displayed in the main
window, the block is placed at the origin. When the item is displayed at the
cursor, the block is placed at the point of release.

NOTE If you use the right button on your pointing device to place the
block, then an Insert option is displayed. The appropriate Add Multi-View
Block dialog box, or Add Mask Blocks dialog box is displayed to place the
block.

Adding Metric Content

279

Adding Domestic Furniture Content


Using AutoCAD DesignCenter, you can drag domestic furniture fittings symbols into your drawing, including garden furniture and potted plants.
To add domestic furniture fittings symbols
1 From the Design menu, choose Design Content Domestic Furniture, or
on the Design Content - Metric toolbar, click
.
2 In AutoCAD DesignCenter, select the type of symbol to be placed in your
drawing, such sofas or garden furniture.
3 Select the specific domestic furniture symbol to be used in the drawing.
Note that you can view the symbol in 2D and 3D in the Preview window.
4 Holding down the button on your pointing device, drag the block into
your drawing and then release the button at the location for the block.
The block is placed in your drawing using the current display configuration.

NOTE If you release the left button before the item is displayed in the main
window, the block is placed at the origin. When the item is displayed at the
cursor, the block is placed at the point of release.

NOTE If you use the right button on your pointing device to place the
block, then an Insert option is displayed. The appropriate Add Multi-View
Block dialog box, or Add Mask Blocks dialog box is displayed to place the
block.

Adding Electrical Services Content


Using AutoCAD DesignCenter, you can drag electrical services symbols into
your drawing, including power outlets and switches.
To add electrical services symbols
1 From the Design menu, choose Design Content Electrical Services, or
on the Design Content - Metric toolbar, click
.
2 In AutoCAD DesignCenter, select the type of symbol to be placed in your
drawing, such power outlets or switches.
3 Select the specific electrical services symbol to be used in the drawing.
Note that you can view the symbol in 2D and 3D in the Preview window.

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4 Holding down the button on your pointing device, drag the block into
your drawing and then release the button at the location for the block.
The block is placed in your drawing using the current display configuration.

NOTE If you release the left button before the item is displayed in the main
window, the block is placed at the origin. When the item is displayed at the
cursor, the block is placed at the point of release.

NOTE If you use the right button on your pointing device to place the
block, then an Insert option is displayed. The appropriate Add Multi-View
Block dialog box, or Add Mask Blocks dialog box is displayed to place the
block.

Adding Kitchen Fittings Content


Using AutoCAD DesignCenter, you can drag kitchen fittings symbols into
your drawing, including kitchen sinks and refrigerators.
To add kitchen fittings symbols
1 From the Design menu, choose Design Content Kitchen Fittings, or on
the Design Content - Metric toolbar, click
.
2 In AutoCAD DesignCenter, select the type of symbol, such as stoves or
dishwashers, to be placed in your drawing.
3 Select the specific kitchen fitting symbol to be used in the drawing.
Note that you can view the symbol in 2D and 3D in the Preview window.
4 Holding down the button on your pointing device, drag the block into
your drawing and then release the button at the location for the block.
The block is placed in your drawing using the current display configuration.

NOTE If you release the left button before the item is displayed in the main
window, the block is placed at the origin. When the item is displayed at the
cursor, the block is placed at the point of release.

NOTE If you use the right button on your pointing device to place the
block, then an Insert option is displayed. The appropriate Add Multi-View

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281

Block dialog box, or Add Mask Blocks dialog box is displayed to place the
block.

Adding Office Furniture Content


Using AutoCAD DesignCenter, you can drag furniture symbols into your
drawing, including conference tables and filing cabinets.
To add furniture symbols
1 From the Design menu, choose Design Content Office Furniture, or on
the Design Content - Metric toolbar, click
.
2 In AutoCAD DesignCenter, select the type of symbol to be placed in your
drawing, such desks or circular tables.
3 Select the specific office furniture symbol to be used in the drawing.
Note that you can view the symbol in 2D and 3D in the Preview window.
4 Holding down the button on your pointing device, drag the block into
your drawing and then release the button at the location for the block.
The block is placed in your drawing using the current display configuration.

NOTE If you release the left button before the item is displayed in the main
window, the block is placed at the origin. When the item is displayed at the
cursor, the block is placed at the point of release.

NOTE If you use the right button on your pointing device to place the
block, then an Insert option is displayed. The appropriate Add Multi-View
Block dialog box, or Add Mask Blocks dialog box is displayed to place the
block.

Adding Pipe and Duct Content


Using AutoCAD DesignCenter, you can drag pipe and duct symbols into your
drawing, including pipe details and sanitary fittings.
To add pipe and duct symbols
1 From the Design menu, choose Design Content Piped and Ducted
Services, or on the Design Content - Metric toolbar, click
.

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2 In AutoCAD DesignCenter, select the type of symbol to be placed in your


drawing, such pipe details or valves.
3 Select the specific piped and ducted services symbol to be used in the
drawing.
You can view the symbol in 2D and 3D in the Preview window.
4 Drag the block into your drawing and then place it at the location for the
block.
The block is placed in your drawing using the current display configuration.

NOTE If you release the left button before the item is displayed in the main
window, the block is placed at the origin. When the item is displayed at the
cursor, the block is placed at the point of release.

NOTE If you use the right button on your pointing device to place the
block, then an Insert option is displayed. The appropriate Add Multi-View
Block dialog box, or Add Mask Blocks dialog box is displayed to place the
block.

Adding Site Content


Using AutoCAD DesignCenter, you can drag site symbols into your drawing
including boats and trees.
To add site symbols
1 From the Design menu, choose Design Content Site, or on the Design
Content - Metric toolbar, click
.
2 In AutoCAD DesignCenter, select the type of symbol to be placed in your
drawing, such boats or street furniture.
3 Select the specific site symbol to be used in the drawing.
You can view the symbol in 2D and 3D in the Preview window.
4 Drag the block into your drawing and then place it at the location for the
block.
The block is placed in your drawing using the current display configuration.

NOTE If you release the left button before the item is displayed in the main
window, the block is placed at the origin. When the item is displayed at the

Adding Metric Content

283

cursor, the block is placed at the point of release.

NOTE If you use the right button on your pointing device to place the
block, then an Insert option is displayed. The appropriate Add Multi-View
Block dialog box, or Add Mask Blocks dialog box is displayed to place the
block.

Adding Metric D A CH Content


You can place German, Austrian and Swiss metric symbols through AutoCAD
DesignCenter.

NOTE It depends on your installation whether this folder is present in your


AutoCAD DesignCenter. If it is not, but you would like to have it, install this specific content from your Installation CD.

Adding DIN Symbols


Using AutoCAD DesignCenter, you can drag DIN Symbols into your drawing,
including drainage, electrical services and heating symbols.
To add DIN symbols
1 From the Design menu, choose Design Content Symbols DIN, or on the
Design Content - Metric toolbar, click
.
2 In AutoCAD DesignCenter, select the type of symbol to be placed in your
drawing, such as communication systems, drainage or fire protection.
3 Select the specific symbol to be used in the drawing.
Note that you can view the symbol in the preview window.
4 Holding down the button on your pointing device, drag the block into
your drawing and then release the button at the location for the block.
The block is placed in your drawing using the current display configuration.

NOTE If you release the left button before the item is displayed in the main
window, the block is placed at the origin. When the item is displayed at the

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Chapter 13 Design Content

cursor, the block is placed at the point of release.

NOTE If you use the right button on your pointing device to place the
block, then an Insert option is displayed. The appropriate Add Multi-View
Block dialog box, or Add Mask Blocks dialog box is displayed to place the
block.

Adding PlanzV 90 Symbols


Using AutoCAD DesignCenter, you can drag PlanzV 90 symbols into your
drawing.
To add PlanzV90 symbols
1 From the Design menu, choose Design Content PlanzV 90 Symbols, or
on the Design Content - Metric toolbar, click
.
2 In AutoCAD DesignCenter, select the type of symbol to be placed in your
drawing.
3 Select the specific symbol to be used in the drawing.
Note that you can view the symbol in the preview window.
4 Holding down the button on your pointing device, drag the block into
your drawing and then release the button at the location for the block.
The block is placed in your drawing using the current display configuration.

NOTE If you release the left button before the item is displayed in the main
window, the block is placed at the origin. When the item is displayed at the
cursor, the block is placed at the point of release.

NOTE If you use the right button on your pointing device to place the
block, then an Insert option is displayed. The appropriate Add Multi-View
Block dialog box, or Add Mask Blocks dialog box is displayed to place the
block.

Adding SIA Symbols


Using AutoCAD DesignCenter, you can drag SIA symbols into your drawing,
including sanitary and heating installations.

Adding Metric D A CH Content

285

To add SIA symbols


1 From the Design menu, choose Design Content SIA Symbols, or on the
Design Content - Metric toolbar, click
.
2 In AutoCAD DesignCenter, select the type of symbol to be placed in your
drawing.
3 Select the specific symbol to be used in the drawing.
Note that you can view the symbol in the preview window.
4 Holding down the button on your pointing device, drag the block into
your drawing and then release the button at the location for the block.
The block is placed in your drawing using the current display configuration.

NOTE If you release the left button before the item is displayed in the main
window, the block is placed at the origin. When the item is displayed at the
cursor, the block is placed at the point of release.

NOTE If you use the right button on your pointing device to place the
block, then an Insert option is displayed. The appropriate Add Multi-View
Block dialog box, or Add Mask Blocks dialog box is displayed to place the
block.

Adding Office Symbols


Using AutoCAD DesignCenter, you can drag office furniture symbols into
your drawing, including conference tables and filing cabinets.
To add office symbols
1 From the Design menu, choose Design Content Office, or on the Design
Content - Metric toolbar, click
.
2 In AutoCAD DesignCenter, select the type of symbol to be placed in your
drawing, such as conference tables or chairs.
3 Select the specific office furniture symbol to be used in the drawing.
Note that you can view the symbol in the preview window.
4 Holding down the button on your pointing device, drag the block into
your drawing and then release the button at the location for the block.
The block is placed in your drawing using the current display configuration.

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Chapter 13 Design Content

NOTE If you release the left button before the item is displayed in the main
window, the block is placed at the origin. When the item is displayed at the
cursor, the block is placed at the point of release.

NOTE If you use the right button on your pointing device to place the
block, then an Insert option is displayed. The appropriate Add Multi-View
Block dialog box, or Add Mask Blocks dialog box is displayed to place the
block.

Adding Site Symbols


Using AutoCAD DesignCenter, you can drag site symbols into your drawing,
including cars and trees.
To add site symbols
1 From the Design menu, choose Design Content Site, or on the Design
Content - Metric toolbar, click
.
2 In AutoCAD DesignCenter, select the type of symbol to be placed in your
drawing, such as cars or street furniture.
3 Select the specific site symbol to be used in the drawing.
Note that you can view the symbol in the preview window.
4 Holding down the button on your pointing device, drag the block into
your drawing and then release the button at the location for the block.
The block is placed in your drawing using the current display configuration.

NOTE If you release the left button before the item is displayed in the main
window, the block is placed at the origin. When the item is displayed at the
cursor, the block is placed at the point of release.

NOTE If you use the right button on your pointing device to place the
block, then an Insert option is displayed. The appropriate Add Multi-View
Block dialog box, or Add Mask Blocks dialog box is displayed to place the
block.

Adding Metric D A CH Content

287

Adding Furniture Symbols


Using AutoCAD DesignCenter, you can drag furniture symbols into your
drawing, including tables and beds.
To add furniture symbols
1 From the Design menu, choose Design Content Furniture, or on the
Design Content - Metric toolbar, click
.
2 In AutoCAD DesignCenter, select the type of symbol to be placed in your
drawing, such as kitchen or living room furniture.
3 Select the specific symbol to be used in the drawing.
Note that you can view the symbol in the preview window.
4 Holding down the button on your pointing device, drag the block into
your drawing and then release the button at the location for the block.
The block is placed in your drawing using the current display configuration.

NOTE If you release the left button before the item is displayed in the main
window, the block is placed at the origin. When the item is displayed at the
cursor, the block is placed at the point of release.

NOTE If you use the right button on your pointing device to place the
block, then an Insert option is displayed. The appropriate Add Multi-View
Block dialog box, or Add Mask Blocks dialog box is displayed to place the
block.

Adding Imperial Content


You can place imperial symbols for USA through AutoCAD DesignCenter.

NOTE It depends on your installation whether this folder is present in your


AutoCAD DesignCenter. If it is not, but you would like to have it, install this specific content from your Installation CD.

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Chapter 13 Design Content

Adding Appliance Content


Using AutoCAD DesignCenter, you can drag appliance symbols into your
drawing, for example, ovens, dishwashers, washers, and dryers. These symbols are automatically scaled and are placed in your drawing using the current display configuration.
To add an appliance symbol
1 From the Design menu, choose Design Content Appliances or on the
Design Content - Imperial toolbar, click
.
2 In AutoCAD DesignCenter, select the type of symbol to be placed in your
drawing, such as dishwashers, kitchen units, or refrigerators.
3 Select the specific appliance symbol to be used in the drawing.
Note that you can view the symbol in the preview window.
4 Holding down the button on your pointing device, drag the block into
your drawing and then release the button at the location for the block.
The block is placed in your drawing using the current display configuration.

NOTE If you release the left button before the item is displayed in the main
window, the block is placed at the origin. When the item is displayed at the
cursor, the block is placed at the point of release.

NOTE If you use the right button on your pointing device to place the
block, then an Insert option is displayed. The appropriate Add Multi-View
Block dialog box, or Add Mask Blocks dialog box is displayed to place the
block.

Adding Casework Content


Using AutoCAD DesignCenter, you can drag casework symbols into your
drawing, for example, different-sized base cabinets and corner cabinets.
These symbols are automatically scaled and are placed in your drawing using
the current display configuration.
To add a casework symbol
1 From the Design menu, choose Design Content Casework or on the
Design Content - Imperial toolbar, click
.

Adding Imperial Content

289

2 In AutoCAD DesignCenter, select the type of symbol to be placed in your


drawing, such as base cabinets, corner cabinets, or tall cabinets.
3 Select the specific casework symbol to be used in the drawing.
Note that you can view the symbol in the preview window.
4 Holding down the button on your pointing device, drag the block into
your drawing and then release the button at the location for the block.
The block is placed in your drawing using the current display configuration.

NOTE If you release the left button before the item is displayed in the main
window, the block is placed at the origin. When the item is displayed at the
cursor, the block is placed at the point of release.

NOTE If you use the right button on your pointing device to place the
block, then an Insert option is displayed. The appropriate Add Multi-View
Block dialog box, or Add Mask Blocks dialog box is displayed to place the
block.

Adding Ceiling Fixture Content


Using AutoCAD DesignCenter, you can drag ceiling fixture symbols into
your drawing, for example, ceiling fans and smoke detectors. These symbols
are automatically scaled and are placed in your drawing using the current display configuration.
To add a ceiling fixture symbol
1 From the Design menu, choose Design Content Ceiling Fixtures or on
the Design Content - Imperial toolbar, click
.
2 In AutoCAD DesignCenter, select the type of symbol to be placed in your
drawing, such as smoke detectors and ceiling fans.
3 Select the specific ceiling symbol to be used in the drawing.
Note that you can view the symbol in the preview window.
4 Holding down the button on your pointing device, drag the block into
your drawing and then release the button at the location for the block.
The block is placed in your drawing using the current display configuration.

NOTE If you release the left button before the item is displayed in the main
window, the block is placed at the origin. When the item is displayed at the

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Chapter 13 Design Content

cursor, the block is placed at the point of release.

NOTE If you use the right button on your pointing device to place the
block, then an Insert option is displayed. The appropriate Add Multi-View
Block dialog box, or Add Mask Blocks dialog box is displayed to place the
block.

Adding Electrical Fixture Content


Using AutoCAD DesignCenter, you can drag electrical fixture symbols into
your drawing, including exit signs, different types of lighting, and telephones.
To add an electrical fixture symbol
1 From the Design menu, choose Design Content Electric Fixtures or on
the Design Content - Imperial toolbar, click
.
2 In AutoCAD DesignCenter, select the type of symbol to be placed in your
drawing, such as exit signs, fluorescent lights, or incandescent lights.
3 Select the specific electric symbol to be used in the drawing.
Note that you can view the symbol in 2D and 3D in the preview window.
4 Holding down the button on your pointing device, drag the block into
your drawing and then release the button at the location for the block.
The block is placed in your drawing using the current display configuration.

NOTE If you release the left button before the item is displayed in the main
window, the block is placed at the origin. When the item is displayed at the
cursor, the block is placed at the point of release.

NOTE If you use the right button on your pointing device to place the
block, then an Insert option is displayed. The appropriate Add Multi-View
Block dialog box, or Add Mask Blocks dialog box is displayed to place the
block.

Adding Imperial Content

291

Adding Equipment Content


Using AutoCAD DesignCenter, you can drag equipment symbols into your
drawing, including office equipment, elevators, and vending machines.
To add an equipment symbol
1 From the Design menu, choose Design Content Equipment or on the
Design Content - Imperial toolbar, click
.
2 In AutoCAD DesignCenter, select the type of symbol to be placed in your
drawing, such as elevators or office equipment.
3 Select the specific equipment symbol to be used in the drawing.
Note that you can view the symbol in 2D and 3D in the preview window.
4 Holding down the button on your pointing device, drag the block into
your drawing and then release the button at the location for the block.
The block is placed in your drawing using the current display configuration.

NOTE If you release the left button before the item is displayed in the main
window, the block is placed at the origin. When the item is displayed at the
cursor, the block is placed at the point of release.

NOTE If you use the right button on your pointing device to place the
block, then an Insert option is displayed. The appropriate Add Multi-View
Block dialog box, or Add Mask Blocks dialog box is displayed to place the
block.

Adding Furniture Content


Using AutoCAD DesignCenter, you can drag furniture symbols into your
drawing, including bookcases, file cabinets, lamps, and tables.
To add a furniture symbol
1 From the Design menu, choose Design Content Furniture or on the
Design Content - Imperial toolbar, click
.
2 In AutoCAD DesignCenter, select the type of symbol to be placed in your
drawing, such as sofas, chairs, or desks.
3 Select the specific furniture symbol to be used in the drawing.
Note that you can view the symbol in 2D and 3D in the preview window.

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Chapter 13 Design Content

4 Holding down the button on your pointing device, drag the block into
your drawing and then release the button at the location for the block.
The block is placed in your drawing using the current display configuration.

NOTE If you release the left button before the item is displayed in the main
window, the block is placed at the origin. When the item is displayed at the
cursor, the block is placed at the point of release.

NOTE If you use the right button on your pointing device to place the
block, then an Insert option is displayed. The appropriate Add Multi-View
Block dialog box, or Add Mask Blocks dialog box is displayed to place the
block.

Adding Plumbing Content


Using AutoCAD DesignCenter, you can drag plumbing symbols into your
drawing, including sinks, baths, and showers.
To add a plumbing symbol
1 From the Design menu, choose Design Content Plumbing, or on the
Design Content - Imperial toolbar, click
.
2 In AutoCAD DesignCenter, select the type of symbol to be placed in your
drawing, such as showers or baths.
3 Select the specific plumbing symbol to be used in the drawing.
Note that you can view the symbol in 2D and 3D in the preview window.
4 Holding down the button on your pointing device, drag the block into
your drawing and then release the button at the location for the block.
The block is placed in your drawing using the current display configuration.

NOTE If you release the left button before the item is displayed in the main
window, the block is placed at the origin. When the item is displayed at the
cursor, the block is placed at the point of release.

NOTE If you use the right button on your pointing device to place the
block, then an Insert option is displayed. The appropriate Add Multi-View

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293

Block dialog box, or Add Mask Blocks dialog box is displayed to place the
block.

Adding Site Content


Using AutoCAD DesignCenter, you can drag site symbols into your drawing,
including boats, signs, people, and vehicles.
To add site symbols
1 From the Design menu, choose Design Content Site or on the Design
Content - Imperial toolbar, click
.
2 In AutoCAD DesignCenter, select the type of symbol to be placed in your
drawing, such signs, people, or sports fields.
3 Select the specific site symbol to be used in the drawing.
Note that you can view the symbol in the preview window.
4 Holding down the button on your pointing device, drag the block into
your drawing and then release the button at the location for the block.
The block is placed in your drawing using the current display configuration.

NOTE If you release the left button before the item is displayed in the main
window, the block is placed at the origin. When the item is displayed at the
cursor, the block is placed at the point of release.

NOTE If you use the right button on your pointing device to place the
block, then an Insert option is displayed. The appropriate Add Multi-View
Block dialog box, or Add Mask Blocks dialog box is displayed to place the
block.

Adding CSI Imperial Content


You can place CSI Masterformat symbols through AutoCAD DesignCenter.

NOTE It depends on your installation whether this folder is present in your


AutoCAD DesignCenter. If it is not, but you would like to have it, install this specific content from your Installation CD.

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Chapter 13 Design Content

Adding Division 1 General Requirements


Content
Using AutoCAD DesignCenter, you can drag CSI Division 1 General Requirements symbols into your drawing.
To add CSI Division 1 General Requirements symbols
1 From the Design menu, choose Design Content Division 1 General
Requirements.
2 In AutoCAD DesignCenter, select the General Requirements section.
3 Select the specific general symbol to be used in the drawing.
Note that you can view the symbol in 2D and 3D in the preview window.
4 Holding down the button on your pointing device, drag the block into
your drawing and then release the button at the location for the block.

NOTE If you release the left button before the item is displayed in the main
window, the block is placed at the origin. When the item is displayed at the
cursor, the block is placed at the point of release.

NOTE If you use the right button on your pointing device to place the
block, then an Insert option is displayed. The appropriate Add Multi-View
Block dialog box, or Add Mask Blocks dialog box is displayed to place the
block.
5 Specify a rotation angle for the symbol.

Adding Division 2 Site Construction Content


Using AutoCAD DesignCenter, you can drag CSI Division 2 Site Construction
symbols into your drawing.
To add CSI Division 2 Site Construction symbols
1 From the Design menu, choose Design Content Division 2 Site Construction.
2 In AutoCAD DesignCenter, select the site section to select the specific
symbol from.
3 Select the specific site symbol to be used in the drawing.
Note that you can view the symbol in 2D and 3D in the Preview window.

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295

4 Holding down the button on your pointing device, drag the block into
your drawing and then release the button at the location for the block.

NOTE If you release the left button before the item is displayed in the main
window, the block is placed at the origin. When the item is displayed at the
cursor, the block is placed at the point of release.

NOTE If you use the right button on your pointing device to place the
block, then an Insert option is displayed. The appropriate Add Multi-View
Block dialog box, or Add Mask Blocks dialog box is displayed to place the
block.

Adding Division 10 Specialties Content


Using AutoCAD DesignCenter, you can drag CSI Division 10 Specialties symbols into your drawing.
To add CSI Division 10 Specialties symbols
1 From the Design menu, choose Design Content Division 10 Specialties.
2 In AutoCAD DesignCenter, select the specialties section to select the specific symbol from.
3 Select the specific specialties symbol to be used in the drawing.
Note that you can view the symbol in 2D and 3D in the preview window.
4 Holding down the button on your pointing device, drag the block into
your drawing and then release the button at the location for the block.

NOTE If you release the left button before the item is displayed in the main
window, the block is placed at the origin. When the item is displayed at the
cursor, the block is placed at the point of release.

NOTE If you use the right button on your pointing device to place the
block, then an Insert option is displayed. The appropriate Add Multi-View
Block dialog box, or Add Mask Blocks dialog box is displayed to place the
block.

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Chapter 13 Design Content

Adding Division 11 Equipment Content


Using AutoCAD DesignCenter, you can drag CSI Division 11 Equipment
symbols into your drawing.
To add CSI Division 11 Equipment symbols
1 From the Design menu, choose Design Content Division 11 Equipment.
2 In AutoCAD DesignCenter, select the equipment section to select the specific symbol from.
3 Select the specific equipment symbol to be used in the drawing.
Note that you can view the symbol in 2D and 3D in the preview window.
4 Holding down the button on your pointing device, drag the block into
your drawing and then release the button at the location for the block.

NOTE If you release the left button before the item is displayed in the main
window, the block is placed at the origin. When the item is displayed at the
cursor, the block is placed at the point of release.

NOTE If you use the right button on your pointing device to place the
block, then an Insert option is displayed. The appropriate Add Multi-View
Block dialog box, or Add Mask Blocks dialog box is displayed to place the
block.

Adding Division 12 Furnishing Content


Using AutoCAD DesignCenter, you can drag CSI Division 12 Furnishing symbols into your drawing.
To add CSI Division 12 Furnishing symbols
1 From the Design menu, choose Design Content Division 12 Furnishing.
2 In AutoCAD DesignCenter, select the furnishing section to select the specific symbol from.
3 Select the specific furnishing symbol to be used in the drawing.
Note that you can view the symbol in 2D and 3D in the preview window.
4 Holding down the button on your pointing device, drag the block into
your drawing and then release the button at the location for the block.

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297

NOTE If you release the left button before the item is displayed in the main
window, the block is placed at the origin. When the item is displayed at the
cursor, the block is placed at the point of release.

NOTE If you use the right button on your pointing device to place the
block, then an Insert option is displayed. The appropriate Add Multi-View
Block dialog box, or Add Mask Blocks dialog box is displayed to place the
block.

Adding Division 13 Special Construction Content


Using AutoCAD DesignCenter, you can drag CSI Division 13 Special Construction symbols into your drawing.
To add CSI Division 13 Special Construction symbols
1 From the Design menu, choose Design Content Division 13 Special
Construction.
2 In AutoCAD DesignCenter, select the special construction section to select
the specific symbol from.
3 Select the specific construction symbol to be used in the drawing.
Note that you can view the symbol in 2D and 3D in the preview window.
4 Holding down the button on your pointing device, drag the block into
your drawing and then release the button at the location for the block.

NOTE If you release the left button before the item is displayed in the main
window, the block is placed at the origin. When the item is displayed at the
cursor, the block is placed at the point of release.

NOTE If you use the right button on your pointing device to place the
block, then an Insert option is displayed. The appropriate Add Multi-View
Block dialog box, or Add Mask Blocks dialog box is displayed to place the
block.

Adding Division 14 Conveying Systems Content


Using AutoCAD DesignCenter, you can drag CSI Division 14 Conveying Systems symbols into your drawing.

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To add CSI Division 14 Conveying Systems symbols


1 From the Design menu, choose Design Content Division 14 Conveying
Systems.
2 In AutoCAD DesignCenter, select the conveying system section to select
the specific symbol from.
3 Select the specific conveying symbol to be used in the drawing.
Note that you can view the symbol in 2D and 3D in the preview window.
4 Holding down the button on your pointing device, drag the block into
your drawing and then release the button at the location for the block.

NOTE If you release the left button before the item is displayed in the main
window, the block is placed at the origin. When the item is displayed at the
cursor, the block is placed at the point of release.

NOTE If you use the right button on your pointing device to place the
block, then an Insert option is displayed. The appropriate Add Multi-View
Block dialog box, or Add Mask Blocks dialog box is displayed to place the
block.

Adding Division 15 Mechanical Content


Using AutoCAD DesignCenter, you can drag CSI Division 15 Mechanical
symbols into your drawing.
To add CSI Division 15 Mechanical symbols
1 From the Design menu, choose Design Content Division 15 Mechanical.
2 In AutoCAD DesignCenter, select the mechanical section to select the specific symbol from.
3 Select the specific mechanical symbol to be used in the drawing.
Note that you can view the symbol in 2D and 3D in the preview window.
4 Holding down the button on your pointing device, drag the block into
your drawing and then release the button at the location for the block.

NOTE If you release the left button before the item is displayed in the main
window, the block is placed at the origin. When the item is displayed at the
cursor, the block is placed at the point of release.

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NOTE If you use the right button on your pointing device to place the
block, then an Insert option is displayed. The appropriate Add Multi-View
Block dialog box, or Add Mask Blocks dialog box is displayed to place the
block.

Adding Division 16 Electrical Content


Using AutoCAD DesignCenter, you can drag CSI Division 16 Electrical symbols into your drawing.
To add CSI Division 16 Electrical symbols
1 From the Design menu, choose Design Content Division 16 Electrical.
2 In AutoCAD DesignCenter, select the electrical section to select the specific symbol from.
3 Select the specific electrical symbol to be used in the drawing.
Note that you can view the symbol in 2D and 3D in the preview window.
4 Holding down the button on your pointing device, drag the block into
your drawing and then release the button at the location for the block.

NOTE If you release the left button before the item is displayed in the main
window, the block is placed at the origin. When the item is displayed at the
cursor, the block is placed at the point of release.

NOTE If you use the right button on your pointing device to place the
block, then an Insert option is displayed. The appropriate Add Multi-View
Block dialog box, or Add Mask Blocks dialog box is displayed to place the
block.

Fixture Layout Overview


Using DesignCenter, you can drag various pre-constructed fixture layouts
using DesignCenter into your drawings. Then, you can explode them into
component parts. For example, after you drop a toilet stall into your drawing
and explode it, the stall walls are wall objects, the door to the stall is a door
object, and the toilet is a multi-view block.

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See Fixture Layout Notes and Hints for more information about fixture layout content.
DISCLAIMER: The intent of the fixture layouts is to provide samples from
which to create your own office standards for restroom design. All of the
components can be modified, as required, to meet project and code requirements, then added to the DesignCenter for access. The samples provided do
not necessarily meet jurisdictional regulations or ADA (Americans with
Disabilities Act) requirements.

Fixture Layout Notes and Hints

The layout files are custom content set to Content Type: Drawing.
They have no layer key, because all objects have hard-coded layers within
the file. You can change the layers, as required.
They are not set to Explode on Insert, because you can place them at only
one rotation and orientation (not mirrored), and it is easier to reposition
them as unexploded blocks.
To set rotation and mirroring before insertion, double-click the icon
instead of dragging the content to display the standard AutoCAD Insert
dialog box.
The rotation angle and scale (for mirroring) can be set in the Insert dialog
box or on the command line. If you use the command line, you can see
the result of each option before actually inserting the content. You can
apply multiple settings on the command line, even though the prompt
says Specify insertion point: after the first one. You can still type
another X, Y, or R.
Use X = -1 or Y = -1 to mirror the content.
We recommend that you do not use the Explode (on Insert) option in this
dialog box. The drag jig is not displayed and you can not mirror about one
axis.
Use the NODe object snap to position individual stall and urinal layouts
next to each other. The toilet partitions and screens are inserted with centered baselines, so the node snap places them correctly.
After insertion, the stall layouts can be exploded in order to have the partition objects clean up with each other. The layout can also be adjusted to
extend partitions, or move doors, fixtures, or grab bars.
Stall partitions are wall objects placed in the wall group Toilet_Ptn. They
do not clean up with other walls. Urinal screens are in the Standard
group, but set to Do Not Cleanup.
Each lavatory layout consists of a counter, made of a wall object with the
cleanup group Toilet_Counter with lavatory MV Blocks anchored as
follows:
Lavs (1) Wall anchor; centered along curve

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301

Lavs (2) - (4) Layout Curve (on counter); even spacing (1-6 start & end
offset)
Lavs (5) Layout Curve (on counter); repeat @ 3-0 (1-6 start & end offset)

Use the ENDpoint object snap to position a counter against a stall or urinal screen.
After exploding, the lav counters can be trimmed or extended to the rest
room walls. The lavs adjust appropriately, depending on the anchoring
mode.
The rest room files are preconfigured assemblies of individual layouts,
arranged as typical Mens and Womens rooms.

DISCLAIMER: The intent of the fixture layouts is to provide samples from


which to create your own office standards for rest room design. All of the
components can be modified, as required, to meet project and code requirements, then added to the DesignCenter for access. The samples provided do
not necessarily meet jurisdictional regulations or ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) requirements.

Placing Fixture Layout Content


You can place fixture layouts into your drawing. Then, you can explode the
layout into its component parts that can be modified to your specifications.

NOTE After you create your custom fixture layout, save the layout as Custom
Design Content for easy placement in future drawings.
See Fixture Layout Notes and Hints for more information about fixture layout content.
To place fixture layout content
1 From the Design menu, choose Design Content Fixture Layout.
2 In AutoCAD DesignCenter, select the type of layout to be placed in your
drawing.
3 With the layout selected, double-click.
4 Use the Insert dialog box to control the placement of the layout. Click OK
when finished.
5 Specify the location for the fixture layout.
6 To modify the components of the layout, type explode.
7 Select the fixture layout, and press ENTER.

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The components can be edited separately.


DISCLAIMER: The intent of the fixture layouts is to provide samples from
which to create your own office standards for rest room design. All of the
components can be modified, as required, to meet project and code requirements, then added to the DesignCenter for access. The samples provided do
not necessarily meet jurisdictional regulations or ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) requirements.

Fixture Layout Overview

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Walls

14

The wall object contains all the geometry necessary to

In this chapter

represent a wall in 2D and 3D views, including edges

Creating and editing walls

and surfaces.

Managing wall cleanup groups


Changing wall styles
Dimensioning walls
Defining surface modifiers
Creating and editing endcap

styles
Changing wall properties and

wall style properties

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Creating Walls
Objects are representations of real-world architectural features. The wall
object contains all the geometry necessary to represent a wall in 2D and 3D
views, including edges and surfaces.
The display of a wall object depends on the direction from which you view
the wall. In plan view, the wall object is displayed as parallel lines, as an
architect would typically draw a wall. In 3D view, the wall object is displayed
as it would appear in the real world, with surfaces showing length, thickness,
and height. You control what you want to display in each particular view.
Objects have relationships with each other. For example, door objects in a
wall object are constrained by the wall. You can move a door within a wall
but not outside it.
You can set specific sets of wall to only intersect and clean up with other walls
of the same group by using wall cleanup groups.

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Default wall style types

Creating Straight Walls


To create a straight wall
1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Add Wall.
2 In the Add Walls dialog box, select the wall style.
3 Click Straight to set the wall to a straight segment.
4 Specify a start point for the wall.

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307

NOTE You cannot undo the first point when creating a wall. If you started
the wall at the wrong point, either finish at least one segment or click Cancel
to close the dialog box and then start the wall again.
5 Specify another point to end this segment of the wall.
The marker on one side of the wall indicates the direction the wall is being
drawn.
6 Continue placing wall segments to create, for example, a building exterior
or a room.

Drawing straight wall segments

You can use the Ortho Close or Polyline Close options to finish the creation of an enclosed space.

Ortho Close: Closes the space by drawing two walls or space boundaries based on the direction you specify. The direction is extended until
it meets a line perpendicular to the initial edge of either the wall or
space boundary.

Using the ortho close option

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NOTE While you are specifying the ortho direction, the first part of a space
boundary does not display. The first segment re-displays after the last space
boundary segments are drawn.

Polyline Close: Closes the wall by creating a wall segment from the
last point specified for the walls to the first point specified in this group
of walls.

7 Click Close, or press ENTER to end the command.

NOTE On the toolbar in the Add Walls dialog box, you can click Floating
Viewer to view the wall, click Properties to change any property of the wall,
click Match to match the property of another wall object, and click Undo to
undo the wall object.

Creating Curved Walls


To create curved walls
1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Add Wall.
2 In the Add Walls dialog box, select the wall style.
3 Click Curved to set the wall to a curved segment.
4 Specify a start point for the wall.

NOTE You cannot undo the first point when creating a wall. If you started
the wall at the wrong point, either finish at least one segment, or click Cancel
to close the dialog box and then start the wall again.
5 Specify the midpoint of the curve.
6 Specify the endpoint of the curved wall.
The marker on one side of the wall indicates the direction the wall is being
drawn.
7 Continue placing wall segments to create, for example, a building exterior
or a room.

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309

Drawing curved wall segments

You can use the Ortho Close or Polyline Close options to finish the creation of an enclosed space. For an explanation of these options, see Creating Straight Walls on page 307.
8 Click Close, or press ENTER to end the command.

NOTE On the toolbar in the Add Walls dialog box, you can click Floating
Viewer to view the wall, click Properties to change any property of the wall,
click Match to match the property of another wall object, and click Undo to
undo the wall object.

NOTE When you draw a wall, the true length of the wall is the distance
between the two end grips. The wall can appear to have a different length
when it cleans up with other walls; the difference can be twice the cleanup
radius longer or shorter than the true length. The true length is the
length reported by Properties and Schedules. To get the most accurate information about wall length in schedules, always make sure that walls that clean
up with each other have end grips that coincide.

NOTE The smoothness (tesselation) of curved edges is controlled by the


FACETDEV variable. This variable sets the number of facets to display on
curved AEC objects. This must be set before converting the polyline to slabs.
The facet deviation is available only on the command line by typing
AecFacetDev.
The number you set as the facet deviation defines the maximum distance

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from the chord to the arc, the chord being an edge that is created from
faceting the curve, to the true mathematical arc. The facet deviation has a
range of greater than zero (0) and no upper limit.
The minimum number of facets is 8. For example, create a cylinder mass
element to have a 1 radius, and set the facetdev to 1, the cylinder has 8
faces.

Creating a Combination of Straight and Curved


Walls
To create a combination of straight and curved walls
1 From the Design menu, click Walls Add Wall.
2 In the Add Walls dialog box, select the wall style.
3 Click Straight to set the wall to a straight segment.
4 Specify a start point for the wall.

NOTE You cannot undo the first point when creating a wall. If you started
the wall at the wrong point, either finish at least one segment or click Cancel
to close the dialog box and then start the wall again.
5 Specify the endpoint of the straight wall segment.
6 In the Add Walls dialog box, click Curved to set the wall to a curved segment.
7 Click the drawing to place the second point before the midpoint.
8 Specify the midpoint of the curve.
9 Specify the endpoint of the curved wall segment.
10 Continue placing wall segments. You can switch between straight and
curved wall segments.

NOTE On the toolbar in the Add Walls dialog box, you can click Floating
Viewer to view the wall, click Properties to change any property of the wall,
click Match to match the property of another wall object, and click Undo to
undo the wall object.

NOTE When you draw a wall, the true length of the wall is the distance
between the two end grips. The wall can appear to have a different length

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311

when it cleans up with other walls; the difference can be twice the cleanup
radius longer or shorter than the true length. The true length is the
length reported by Properties and Schedules. To get the most accurate information about wall length in schedules, make sure that walls that clean up
with each other have end grips that coincide.

NOTE The smoothness (tesselation) of curved edges is controlled by the


FACETDEV variable. This variable sets the number of facets to display on
curved AEC objects. This must be set before converting the polyline to slabs.
The facet deviation is available only on the command line by typing
AecFacetDev.
The number you set as the facet deviation defines the maximum distance
from the chord to the arc, the chord being an edge that is created from
faceting the curve, to the true mathematical arc. The facet deviation has a
range of greater than zero (0) and no upper limit.
The minimum number of facets is 8. For example, create a cylinder mass
element to have a 1 radius, and set the facetdev to 1, the cylinder has 8
faces.

Modifying Walls
You can change any of the attributes of a wall, like height, style, width, and
justification, after it has been created. You can also change the properties of
the wall.
You can add doors, windows, openings, and assemblies quickly to walls using
the shortcut menu.
Using wall tools, you can define surface modifiers to create different wall
conditions, define and change endcaps at the start and the end of a wall, set
interference conditions, and reverse the direction of a wall by switching its
start point and endpoint.

Changing Style of an Existing Wall


You can change the wall style of one or more walls. For more information,
see Wall Styles on page 343.

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To change the style of an existing wall


1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Modify Wall.
2 Select one or more walls to be modified, and press ENTER.
3 In the Wall Modify dialog box, select a different style from the Style list.
4 Click Apply to change the walls and remain in the dialog box to continue
modifying the walls, or click OK to exit the dialog box.

Changing the Wall Base Height


You can quickly change the base height of one wall or a group of walls. The
base height changes the wall height of the wall from floor to ceiling.
To change the base height
1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Modify Wall.
2 Select one or more walls to be modified, and press ENTER.
3 In the Wall Modify dialog box, type a new height.
4 Click Apply to change the walls and remain in the dialog box to continue
modifying the walls, or click OK to exit the dialog box.

Changing the Wall Width


You can quickly change the width of one wall or a group of walls.
To change the width
1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Modify Wall.
2 Select one or more walls to be modified, and press ENTER.

NOTE Only the standard walls are available to modify. Any imported/predesigned walls that have a set width cannot be modified this way.
3 Type a new width
4 Click Apply to change the walls and remain in the dialog box to continue
modifying the walls, or click OK to exit the dialog box.

Changing the Wall Justification


You can change the justification of one wall or a group of walls.

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313

Specifying wall justification

To change the wall justification


1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Modify Wall.
2 Select one or more walls to be modified, and press ENTER.
3 Select one of the justification settings: Baseline, Left, Center, or Right.
4 Click Apply to change the walls and remain in the dialog box to continue
modifying the walls, or click OK to exit the dialog box.

Matching the Characteristics of an Existing Wall


You can change selected walls by copying the wall style, height, width, and
justification of existing walls in your drawing.
To match the characteristics of an existing wall
1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Modify Wall.
2 Select one or more walls to be modified, and press ENTER.
3 Type m (Match) or click

4 Select the wall in the drawing you want the selected walls to match and
press ENTER.
5 Click Apply to change the walls and remain in the dialog box to continue
modifying the walls or click OK to exit the dialog box.

Adding a Window to a Wall


You can add a window to a wall quickly using the shortcut menu.

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To add a window to a wall


1 Select an existing wall.
2 Right click, then choose Insert Window.
3 In the Add Window dialog box, enter all the values for the window, and
specify an insertion point along the wall.
4 Continue to place windows by selecting window styles and specifying
insertion points.
5 Press ENTER to end the command.

Adding an Opening to a Wall


You can add a window to a wall quickly using the shortcut menu.
To add an opening to a wall
1 Select an existing wall.
2 Right click, then choose Insert Opening.
3 In the Add Opening dialog box, enter all the values for the opening, and
specify an insertion point along the wall.
4 Continue to place openings by selecting opening shapes and specifying
insertion points.
5 Press ENTER to end the command.

Adding a Door to a Wall


You can add a window to a wall quickly using the shortcut menu.
To add a door to a wall
1 Select an existing wall.
2 Right click, then choose Insert Door.
3 In the Add Door dialog box, enter all the values for the door, and specify
an insertion point along the wall.
4 Continue to place doors by selecting door styles and specifying insertion
points.
5 Press ENTER to end the command.

Adding an Assembly to a Wall


You can add a window to a wall quickly using the shortcut menu.

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315

To add an assembly to a wall


1 Select an existing wall.
2 Right click, then choose Insert Assembly.
3 In the Add Door & Window Assemblies dialog box, enter all the values for
the door, and specify an insertion point along the wall.
4 Continue to place assemblies by selecting assembly styles and specifying
insertion points.
5 Press ENTER to end the command.

Changing Wall Properties


You can change the properties of existing walls in your drawing by adding
notes and reference files, changing the style and dimensions, controlling the
wall cleanup information, editing the roof and floorline, setting an override,
changing the wall modifier, and moving the wall.

Attaching Notes and Files to a Wall


To attach notes and files to walls
1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Modify Wall.
2 Select the wall, and press ENTER.
3 In the Wall Modify dialog box, click

4 In the Wall Properties dialog box, click the General tab.


5 To add a description to the wall style, type it in the Description field.
6 To add a note to the wall, or to attach, edit, or detach a reference file, click
Notes.
7 In the Notes dialog box, to add a note, type it on the Text Notes tab.
8 To attach, edit, or detach a reference file, click the Reference Docs tab, and
do any of the following:

316

To attach a reference file, click Add, select a document in the Select File
dialog box, and click OK. You can type a description of the reference.
To edit a reference file, select the file name in the list, click Edit, and
change the document or the description in the Reference Document
dialog box. To edit the file, double-click the reference file name to start
its application.

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To detach a reference file, select the file name in the list, and click
Delete.

9 To attach or edit schedule data, click Property Sets. For more information,
see Attaching Schedule Data and Editing Schedule Data in the online
Autodesk Architectural Desktop Users Guide.
10 Click OK to exit each dialog box. To apply the changes and remain in the
dialog box, click Apply.

Changing the Wall Style Properties


You can change the style of existing walls by selecting a new one from a list
of existing wall styles.
The new style you assign to the selected wall changes some of the settings on
the other tabs in the Wall Properties dialog box.
To set wall style properties
1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Modify Wall.
2 In the Wall Modify dialog box, click

3 In the Wall Properties dialog box, click the Style tab.


4 Select the style you want from the list, and click OK.
5 Click Apply to change the style for the selected wall and remain in the dialog box to continue modifying the wall, or click OK to exit the dialog box.

NOTE You can set all values in the Wall Properties dialog boxes back to the
style defaults by clicking Reset to Style Defaults.

Changing the Wall Dimension Properties


You can change the size of the wall.
To change wall dimension properties
1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Modify Wall.
2 Select the wall, and press ENTER.
3 In the Wall Modify dialog box, click

4 In the Wall Properties dialog box, click the Dimensions tab.

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317

5 Change the wall width, base height, length, radius (for curved walls), and
the wall justification.
Width: Changes the base wall width.
Base Height: Changes the height of the wall from the floor to the ceiling.
Length: Changes the length of the wall, from the start point to the
endpoint.

NOTE This is the distance between the two end grips. The dimension
added to the drawing when you use the Create Wall Dimensions command
accounts for the cleanup of the wall.
Radius: Changes the radius of a curved wall. This option is available
only when a curved wall segment is selected.
Justification: Changes the location of the wall in relation to the points
you specify to create the wall. With center justification, the points you
specify to draw the wall define the center of the walls thickness. With
right justification, the points define the right side of the wall. With left
justification, the points define the left side of the wall.
6 Click OK.
7 Click Apply to change the properties for the selected wall and keep the
dialog box open to continue modifying the wall, or click OK to exit the
dialog box.

Changing the Wall Cleanup Properties


You can control which walls join and clean up with other walls by using
cleanup groups. Walls must be in the same cleanup group to join and clean
up properly. By default, walls are created using the Standard cleanup group.

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You can create new wall cleanup groups for specific sets of walls, and either
assign them to a new cleanup group as they are created or through the use of
the Modify Walls command.

Wall graph lines and cleanup circles

Wall display representations

Intersecting Walls
Intersecting walls clean up properly based on the intersection of cleanup
circles and wall graph lines in existing and new wall segments as they are
drawn. These conditions include the intersection of existing and new wall
graph lines, the intersection of an existing wall graph line with a new wall
cleanup circle, and the intersection of an existing wall cleanup circle with a
new wall graph line.

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319

Wall cleanup conditions

When walls intersect and clean up properly, a new wall joint is created at the
intersection of the wall graph lines. The exact location of the wall joint
depends on the location of the new wall segment endpoint. In many cases,
the wall joint location does not coincide with the existing wall segment centerline. The location of the wall joint is based on a weighted average distance
between wall segment endpoints, as well as the thickness of the wall
segments.
The resulting wall intersection and cleanup splits the existing wall segment
into two sections, each with its own wall graph line.

Wall joints and wall graph lines at wall intersections

To change the wall cleanup properties


1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Modify Wall.
2 Select the wall, and press ENTER.

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3 In the Wall Modify dialog box, click

4 In the Wall Properties dialog box, click the Cleanups tab.

5 In the Automatically Cleanup Wall Intersections, select whether the


selected walls automatically clean up with other walls in the selected
Cleanup Group Definition.
6 Select a Cleanup Group Definition from the list for the selected walls. For
walls to clean up, they must be in the same cleanup group definition.
7 In the Cleanup Radius, set the radius for the cleanup circle at the end of
each selected wall.
8 In the Cleanup Radius Overrides, you can set an override for either end of
the wall. Start and End are based on the direction the wall was drawn.
9 In the Graph Line position box, you can set the graph line to the centerline or baseline of the selected walls.

NOTE You can set the wall cleanup radius to zero. In this case, the wall
graph lines need to touch in order for a wall to occur.

Overriding the Wall Cleanup Radius


You can override the default wall cleanup radius at either or both ends of a
wall.
To override the wall cleanup radius
1 From the Design menu, choose Wall Tools Override Cleanup Radius.
2 Select the wall, and press ENTER.
3 Select a point near the end of the wall where you want to change the
cleanup radius.
4 Type a new radius, and press ENTER.

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321

Toggling the Wall Graph Display


When you initially draw a wall segment, a wall graph line is drawn coincident with the wall centerline. The start point of the wall graph line is the
midpoint of the first end of the wall segment. This wall graph line start point
is also the center of the wall segments first cleanup circle. In addition, a
cleanup circle is displayed at the end of the wall segment with its center at
the end of the wall graph line when you select the wall graph. Using this
command, you can toggle the wall graph display quickly.
To toggle the wall graph display
1 From the Design menu, choose Wall Tools Toggle Wall Graph Display.

Wall Cleanups and Priorities


Walls with multiple components clean up based on the priorities assigned to
each component and their location within the wall. Matching component
edges with the same priority are extended or trimmed to their intersection
points. Components with a higher priority (a low priority number) cut
through components with a lower priority (a high priority number).

Wall cleanup priorities

Performing Wall Cleanups


This is the order in which the program calculates and performs wall cleanups.
1 Component information is gathered from the wall graph.

Endcaps are calculated. Endcaps that do not fit in the section may also
produce a defect marker.
Sides of components are combined with endcaps to produce a component profile (like a 2D region).
When this profile is self-intersecting, the red defect marker is displayed.

2 Adjacent higher priority components are gathered from the wall graph
from neighboring wall segments.

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3 Higher priority component profiles are subtracted from the lower priority
component profiles.
4 Doors, windows, openings, and interferences are cut and/or applied.
5 Shrinkwrap may be calculated and hatching applied.

NOTE A failed shrinkwrap calculation may also result in the defect marker.
6 Graphics are drawn to an output device (for example, the AutoCAD
screen, Object Viewer, Osnap stream, explode stream, and a plotter).
7 Solutions are cached for subsequent draw requests, until the wall is modified again.
Recommendations
You may get red circles in your drawing when using wall cleanups. These are
defect symbols and indicate that the wall segment is incorrectly set up. The
following are some basic tips that may assist you.
There are several reasons why a wall might be displayed with a defect symbol.
Work through the following troubleshooting recommendations to solve the
problem.

Review the wall cleanup radius settings for each wall segment. A good
starting point is to set the wall cleanup radius equal to half of the wall
width. However, this might not fit every situation and you might need to
adjust the value to achieve the desired effect.

NOTE The wall segment must be longer than its assigned cleanup radius.

Use a smaller than necessary cleanup radius. It is much easier to solve


problems by increasing the cleanup radius of a wall than decreasing it. A
small cleanup radius also makes the graph display much more readable.
The cleanup circle radius should be between one-half the wall width and
the wall width.
When errors occur, it is probably because of a very short wall segment.
These short segments can be easily found by turning on the graph display
representation. They can be fixed by either adjusting the baselines or
increasing the cleanup radius.
Draw with center justification on and use an offset to simulate right or left
justification. Using this method, you can draw very short segments and
tight wall jogs, provided the appropriate cleanup radius is used.
Be precise with your baselines.

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Use the following procedure to verify that the wall segments are inserted at
a common Z elevation:
1 On the command line, type la (for Layer), and press ENTER.
2 In the Layer Properties Manager, freeze all layers except for the designated
wall layer.
3 Return to the drawing and select all remaining displayed objects, rightclick, and choose Wall Properties from the shortcut menu.
4 In the Wall Properties dialog box, choose the Location tab.
5 Verify that the Insertion Point Z value is consistent.
If *VARIES* is displayed, then at least one of the walls is inserted at a
different Z elevation. Change this value to zero (0) (or to the desired elevation), and click OK.
Another way that walls do not clean up properly, even though the insertion point is shown as equals on the Location tab, is when the wall is at
an angle. This can occur when the normal Z value varies. You can also use
the Properties window to see both the start and endpoint Z values
together.

NOTE In the Properties window, an entry is left blank when the values vary.

Troubleshooting Wall Cleanups


This section answers common questions associated with wall cleanups.

What if short walls display the defect marker?


This is caused by the cleanup radius being too large. To fix this, reduce the
cleanup radius of all walls at the wall graph joint, or adjust the baselines so
that the centerlines ends fall within the wall graph joint radii.

Varying wall circle cleanup radii

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What if walls that are close together display the defect marker?
This is caused by the cleanup radius being too large. To fix this, reduce the
cleanup radius of all walls at the wall graph joint, or adjust the baselines so
that the centerlines ends fall within the wall graph joint radii.

Adjusting wall segment lengths for proper clean up

While using small cleanup radii, wall joints clean up incorrectly


or not at all. How can I fix this?
Turn on the Wall Graph and adjust the baselines or increase the cleanup radii
until the problem is fixed. Also, make sure that there are not any short wall
segments in the wall. These can happen where centerlines intersect, or when
a segment is too short to produce a full profile. Delete the short wall segment
to fix the cleanup problem.

Adjusting wall cleanup circle radii for proper clean up

What happens when walls at a low angle (like 30 degrees) need


to be chamfered?
Create a mass element box and add it to both walls as a subtractive interference. Make sure the box is as tall as the walls are, then freeze the mass
element layer.

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Chamfering a wall corner with a mass element

To chamfer a wall corner


1 Select the walls to chamfer.
2 From the Design menu, choose Wall Tools Interference Condition.
3 Type a (Add) to add an interference condition and press ENTER.
4 Select the mass element as the AEC Entity to add.
5 Type s (Subtractive) to make the shrinkwrap plan effect subtractive and
tress ENTER.
6 Press ENTER to complete the command.
7 Choose Desktop Layer Manager and freeze the layer for the mass element.
8 Click OK to exit the Layer Manager.

When I closed my drawing, all the wall cleanups looked fine.


Now when I open the drawing, there are defect markers in the
drawing. What causes this and how can I fix it?
This is caused by the order in which the walls clean up. Under some circumstances the order in which walls are cleaned up has an effect on the display.
When troubleshooting this condition, select the walls in question, right
click, click Wall Modify, then click OK. Try this a couple of times on different
walls to see whether you can locate the unstable wall. Usually, adjusting the
baseline of the unstable wall fixes this problem.
You can also try turning cleanups off, then turning them back on after adding several walls. This quickly refreshes all wall cleanups in the drawing.

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Changing the Roof Line and Floor Line of a Wall


You can use the roof and floor lines to create nonrectangular walls. The Roof/
Floor Line tab is available only when you select one wall to edit.

Modifying a wall roof line

You edit vertex locations on the floor and roof lines to create steps, gables,
and other floor and roof conditions.

Modifying a wall floor line

To set the roof and floor line properties


1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Modify Wall.
2 Select the wall, and press ENTER.
3 In the Wall Modify dialog box, click

4 In the Wall Properties dialog box, click the Roof/Floor Line tab.
5 Do any of the following:

Add a gable to the roof line of a wall.


Add a step.
Insert a vertex.
Delete a vertex.
Edit a vertex.
Reverse the floor or roof line.

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Adding a Gable to the Roof Line of a Wall


To add a gable to the roof line of a wall
1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Modify Wall.
2 Select the wall, and press ENTER.
3 In the Wall Modify dialog box, click

4 In the Wall Properties dialog box, click the Roof/Floor Line tab.
5 With Edit Roof Line selected, click Add Gable.

Modifying a wall roof line by adding a gable

NOTE This option is available only when the roof line has not been edited.
After the roof line changes, you cannot automatically add a gable using this
option.
A third vertex is added to the roof line set halfway between the two ends
of the roof line and eight feet up from the roof line.

NOTE The table at the top of the dialog box displays information about
each vertex in the wall. You can also select the vertex to edit from the list.
6 Continue editing the roof or floor line, and then click OK.
7 Click Apply to see your changes applied to the wall in the drawing. Continue editing your roof and floor lines, or click OK to exit the dialog box.

Adding a Step to the Roof Line or Floor Line of a


Wall
To add a step to the roof line or floor line of a wall
1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Modify Wall.

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2 Select the wall, and press ENTER.


3 In the Wall Modify dialog box, click

4 In the Wall Properties dialog box, click the Roof/Floor Line tab.
5 With either Edit Roof Line or Edit Floor Line selected, click Add Step.

Modifying a wall floor line by adding a step

NOTE This option is available only when the line has not been edited. After
the line has been changed, you cannot automatically add a step using this
option.
A third vertex is added to the line set halfway between the two ends of the
line and four feet from the line, and a step is created from the selected vertex to the second vertex.
The active vertex in the dialog box illustration changes when you select a
different line to edit. Any changes you make to the wall are reflected in
the Wall Properties dialog box.
The table at the top of the Wall Properties dialog box displays information
about each vertex in the wall. You can also select the vertex to edit from
the list.
6 Continue editing the roof or floor line, and then click OK.
7 Click Apply to see your changes applied to the wall in the drawing. Continue editing the roof and floor lines, or click OK to exit the dialog box.

Changing Vertices in the Roof Line or Floor Line


of a Wall
To change vertices in the roof line or floor line of a wall
1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Modify Wall.
2 Select the wall, and press ENTER.
3 In the Wall Modify dialog box, click

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4 In the Wall Properties dialog box, click the Roof/Floor Line tab.

The active vertex in the illustration changes when you select a different
line to edit. Any changes you make to the wall are reflected in the Vertex
Editing illustration.
5 With either Edit Roof Line or Edit Floor Line selected, do any of the
following:

To add a vertex, click Insert Vertex. In the Wall Roof/Floor Line Vertex
dialog box, specify the horizontal offset and vertical offset for the new
vertex, type a distance, and click OK. The new vertex is displayed in the
Vertex Editing illustration at the end of this task.

Modifying a wall roof line by adding a vertex

Horizontal Offset: Specifies the existing vertex from which to measure


the placement of the next vertex and how far away from the existing vertex to place the new one. Distance is measured in the direction the wall is
drawn. You can enter a negative number to set the vertex in the reverse
direction.
From Wall Start measures distance from the wall start point.
From Wall End measures distance from the wall endpoint.
From Wall Midpoint measures distance from the wall midpoint.
From Previous Point measures distance from the vertex one closer
to the wall start point.
From Next Point measures distance from the vertex one closer to the
wall endpoint.

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From Midpoint of Neighbors measures distance from the midpoint


of the selected vertex and the next one closer to the wall endpoint.
Distance sets the distance from the specified point to create the
new vertex.
Vertical Offset: Specifies the location from which to measure the
height of the next vertex and how far away from the existing location to
place the new vertex. You can enter a negative number to set the vertex
toward the ground.
From Wall Base Height sets height from the base height of the wall.
From Next Point sets height from the height of the next point.
From Previous Point sets height from the height of the previous
point.
From Baseline sets height from the baseline of the wall.
Distance sets the distance from the specified location to create the
new vertex.

To move a vertex, select a vertex from the list or by clicking on a vertex


in the Vertex Editing illustration and click Edit Vertex. In the Wall
Roof/Floor Line Vertex dialog box, specify the Horizontal Offset and
Vertical Offset for the vertex, type a new distance, and click OK. The
change to the vertex is displayed in the Wall Properties dialog box.
To delete a vertex, click Delete Vertex and select a vertex from the list
or from the Vertex Editing illustration. The selected vertex is deleted,
and the line automatically connects the two adjacent vertices.

6 Continue editing the roof line or floor line, and then click OK.
7 Click Apply to see the changes applied to the wall in the drawing. Continue editing roof and floor lines, or click OK to exit the dialog box.

Reversing the Roof Line or Floor Line of a Wall


To reverse the roof line or floor line of a wall
1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Modify Wall.
2 Select the wall, and press ENTER.
3 In the Wall Modify dialog box, click

4 In the Wall Properties dialog box, click the Roof/Floor Line tab.
5 With either Edit Roof Line or Edit Floor Line selected, click Reverse.

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Reversing a wall roof line

The selected line is reversed; the condition is applied to the opposite end
of the line. The list and illustration change to reflect the reversal of vertices.
6 Continue editing the roof or floor line, and then click OK.
7 Click Apply to see your changes applied to the wall in the drawing. Continue editing the roof and floor lines, or click OK to exit the dialog box.

Setting Wall Style Overrides


You can change the priority of a wall component so that when it intersects
with another wall, it has more or less priority than its counterpart on the
other wall. You can also set different endcaps than are specified in the wall
style.
To set the wall style override properties
1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Modify Wall.
2 Select the wall, and press ENTER.
3 In the Wall Modify, dialog box, click

4 In the Wall Properties dialog box, click the Wall Style Overrides tab.

5 To set a new priority override or change an existing priority override, click


Add Override or Edit Override.

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6 In the Priority Override dialog box, select Start or End of the wall for the
priority override, select the component whose priority you want to
change, change the position or the priority, and click OK.
The component is listed in the table on the Wall Style Overrides tab with
the position of the override and the new priority level.
Start priority override: Changes the priority of the components at
the beginning of a wall to customize the intersection with another wall.
End priority override: Changes the priority of the components at the
end of a wall to customize the intersection with another wall.
Priority: Controls which component takes precedence at an intersection. The lower the number, the higher the priority.
7 To delete an existing override, select a component from the table, and
click Remove Override.
8 To set an endcap override, click A - Start Endcap, or B - End Endcap and in
the Select an Endcap Style dialog box, select a new endcap style, and click
OK.
The endcap style override is listed next to A - Start Endcap or B - End Endcap on the Wall Style Overrides tab.
9 Click OK. Click Apply to see your changes applied to the wall in the drawing and continue setting wall style overrides, or click OK to exit the dialog
box.

Adding Wall Modifiers Manually


You can add components to walls in any location. The components can be
applied to both sides of a wall or to only one side. For more information
about wall modifiers, see Creating and Editing Wall Modifier Styles on page
366.
To add wall modifiers
1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Modify Wall.
2 Select the wall, and press ENTER.
3 In the Wall Modify dialog box, click

4 In the Wall Properties dialog box, click the Wall Modifiers tab, and click
Add.
A new entry is added to the table at the top of the tab. This represents the
new modifier to be added to the wall. Any changes to the modifier are
reflected in this table.

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333

5 Select a modifier style and a component name, and specify where to apply
the component: right side, left side, or both sides of the wall.
The modifier style must have been already created. For more information,
see Creating and Editing Wall Modifier Styles on page 366. Any components created with the Define Surface Modifier command for the selected
wall style are listed in Component Name. The left and right sides of the
wall are determined from the start and endpoints of the wall.
6 Select the start position offset, the start elevation offset, and the end elevation offset for the component.
Start Position Offset: In conjunction with the wall start, wall end, or
wall midpoint, Start Position Offset sets the distance for the beginning of
the wall modifier. You can use a negative number to measure the distance
in the reverse wall direction.
Start Elevation Offset: In conjunction with the wall bottom, wall
baseline, wall base height, or wall top, Start Elevation Offset sets the
distance for the beginning height of the wall modifier. You can use a
negative number to measure the distance down the wall instead of up the
wall.
End Elevation Offset: In conjunction with the wall bottom, wall baseline, wall base height, or wall top, End Elevation Offset sets the distance
for the ending height of the wall modifier. You can use a negative number
to measure the distance down the wall instead of up the wall.

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Wall modifier parameters

7 Select or clear Use Drawn Size.


Use Drawn Size: Sets the component to the size at which it was originally drawn. When Use Drawn Size is turned off, the Scaled Size option is
available, and you can set the size of the wall modifier.
8 Select Mirror X to set the modifier to be mirrored in the X direction, or
select Mirror Y to set the modifier to be mirrored in the Y direction.
9 Select Measure to Center to set the modifier to be measured to the center
of the wall.
10 Click OK. Click Apply to see your changes applied to the wall in the drawing and continue changing wall modifiers, or click OK to exit the dialog
box.

Removing Wall Modifiers Manually


To remove wall modifiers
1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Modify Wall.
2 Select the wall, and press ENTER.
3 In the Wall Modify dialog box, click

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4 In the Wall Properties dialog box, click the Wall Modifiers tab.
5 Select one or more wall modifiers from the table, and click Remove.
The wall modifiers are removed from the selected wall.

Managing Wall 3D Modifiers


You can manage the wall interference objects, the wall sweep modifiers, and
the wall body modifiers in the 3D Modifier dialog box. Each of these modifiers are created elsewhere, but you can edit and remove them in this dialog
box once created.

Managing Wall Interference Objects


You can edit or remove existing wall interference objects, including the
shrinkwrap effect for each interference object.
To manage wall interference objects
1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Modify Wall.
2 Select a wall with interference objects, and press ENTER.
3 In the Wall Modify dialog box, click

4 In the Wall Properties dialog box, click the 3d Modifiers tab.


5 Select the interference object from the list.
6 In the Shrinkwrap Effect column, you can change the way shrinkwrap is
applied to the interference object. You can select Additive, Subtractive or
Ignore.
Additive: Adds the interference condition to the shrinkwrap.
Subtractive: Takes the object shape out of the shrinkwrap effect.
Ignore: Ignores the object when using shrinkwrap.
7 You can also delete the interference condition by clicking Remove.
8 Click OK to close the 3d Modifiers tab, and then click Apply to see the
changes to the wall object without leaving the Wall dialog box.
9 When you finish making changes, click OK to exit the dialog box.

Managing Wall Sweep Modifiers


You can edit or remove existing sweep modifiers, including the profile, component to apply the sweep to, the miter angles and the offsets in the wall.
To manage wall sweep modifiers
1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Modify Wall.

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2 Select a wall with sweeps applied to it, and press ENTER.


3 In the Wall Modify dialog box, click

4 In the Wall Properties dialog box, click the 3d Modifiers tab.


5 Select the sweep modifier from the list.
6 In the Component column, you can select another component to apply
the sweep profile to.
7 In the Start Miter and End Miter columns, you can type new miter angles
for the start and end of the wall.
8 In the Offset Vertical column, you can change the Z offset of the sweep.
9 In the Offset Within column, you can change the location of the sweep
within the wall.
10 You can also delete the sweep modifier by clicking Remove.
11 Click OK to close the 3d Modifiers tab, and then click Apply to see the
changes to the wall object without leaving the Wall dialog box.
12 When you finish making changes, click OK to exit the dialog box.

Managing Wall Body Modifiers


You can edit or remove existing wall body modifiers, including what component to apply the modifier to, the operation for the modifier, and the description for the modifier.
To manage wall body modifiers
1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Modify Wall.
2 Select a wall with sweeps applied to it, and press ENTER.
3 In the Wall Modify dialog box, click

4 In the Wall Properties dialog box, click the 3d Modifiers tab.


5 Select the body modifier from the list.
6 In the Component list, you can select which component to apply the
body modifier to.
7 In the Operation column, you can change the operation to Additive,
Subtractive, or Replace.
8 In the Description column, you can edit the description for the wall body
modifier.
9 You can also delete the body modifier by clicking Remove.
10 Click OK to close the 3d Modifiers tab, and then click Apply to see the
changes to the wall object without leaving the Wall dialog box.

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11 When you finish making changes, click OK to exit the dialog box.

Changing the Wall Location Properties


You can relocate an existing wall by changing the coordinate values of its
insertion point. The wall also has an orientation with respect to the world
coordinate system (WCS) or the current user coordinate system (UCS). For
example, if the top and bottom of the wall are parallel to the XY plane, its
normal is parallel to the Z axis. You can change the orientation of the wall
by aligning its normal with another axis. You can also rotate the wall on its
plane by changing the rotation angle.
For more information about the world coordinate system, see Use Coordinates and Coordinate Systems in the online AutoCAD 2002 Users Guide.
To change the location properties of a wall
1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Modify Wall.
2 Select the wall, and press ENTER.
3 In the Modify Wall dialog box, click

4 In the Wall Properties dialog box, click the Location tab.


5 Do any of the following:

To relocate the wall, change the coordinate values under Insertion


Point.
To reorient the wall, change the axis to which the normal is parallel. To
locate the wall on the XY plane, make the normal of the wall parallel
to the Z axis: under Normal, type 1 in the Z box, and type 0 in the X
and Y boxes. To locate the wall on the YZ plane, type 1 in the X box
and type 0 in the Y and Z boxes. To locate the wall on the XZ plane,
type 1 in the Y box and type 0 in the X and Z boxes.
To change the rotation of the wall, type a new value for Rotation Angle.

6 Click OK to close the Location tab, and then click Apply to see the changes
to the wall object without leaving the Wall dialog box.
7 When you finish making changes, click OK to exit the dialog box.

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Wall Entity Display Properties


Through the wall entity properties, you can control the layer, color, and linetype of wall components, the hatching used with each component, the cut
plane for the wall, and other specific wall display information.

Managing the Layer, Color, and Linetype for Wall


Components
For each component in a wall style, you can set the layer information, the
color, linetype, and the lineweight. The layer, color, linetype, and plot style
information can be set in either a wall style or for individual walls.

NOTE This procedure sets the layer, color, linetype, lineweight, and plot style
for a wall style.
To manage the layer, color and linetype for a wall style
1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Wall Styles.
2 Select the wall style that you want to change, and choose Edit from the
shortcut menu.
3 In the Wall Style Properties dialog box, click the Display Props tab.
4 Select Plan as the display representation.
5 Click Edit Display Properties, and then click the Layer/Color/Linetype tab
to set the layer/color/linetype for each wall component in each display
representation for the wall style.
6 Select the component to change.
7 In the Visible column, select whether that component is visible or not in
this display.
8 In the Layer column, set the layer for the component.
9 In the Color column, set the color for the component. When you select
the color, the Select Color dialog box displays.
10 In the Linetype column, select a linetype for the component. When you
select the linetype, the Select Linetype dialog box displays with valid linetypes to select.
11 In the Lineweight column, select a new lineweight for the component.
When you select the lineweight, the Lineweight dialog box displays with
valid lineweights to select.

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339

12 In the Lt Scale column, you can type a new linetype scale for the component.
13 In the Plot Style column, you can set a new plot style scale for the
component.
14 When you finish changing the wall style properties, click OK to return to
the Style Manager.
15 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Managing the Hatching for Wall Components


You can control the hatching of specific components in walls. The hatching
settings can be set in either a wall style or for individual walls.

NOTE This procedure sets the hatching for a wall style.


To manage wall component hatching for wall styles
1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Wall Styles.
2 Select the wall style that you want to change, and choose Edit from the
shortcut menu.
3 In the Wall Style Properties dialog box, click the Display Props tab.
4 Select Plan as the display representation.

NOTE The Hatching tab is not displayed in the Model display representation.
5 Click Edit Display Properties, and then click the Hatching tab to set the
hatch in each display representation for the wall style.
6 Select a hatch in the Pattern list.
7 In the Hatch Pattern dialog box, select the type of hatch for the selected
component.

340

If you select Predefined in the Type field, select a pattern from the Pattern Name list.
If you select Custom in the Type field, type the custom pattern name
in the Custom Pattern box.
If you select User-Defined in the Type field, turn Double Hatch on or
off.
You select Solid Fill from the Type list.

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8 Click OK.
9 Click Scale/Spacing to change the value for the selected component.
10 Click Angle to type a new angle for the hatch pattern.
11 Click Orientation to make the change global or to change only the
selected object.
12 When you finish changing the wall style properties, click OK to return to
the Style Manager.
13 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Managing the Cut Plane Display Information


To better visualize the elements of a wall in plan view, you can create cut
planes. The main cut plane is where the shrinkwrap and hatching are
applied. The plan display shows the components and objects in the wall as
they are displayed at the height of each cut plane. The hatching settings can
be set for either a wall style or for individual walls.

NOTE This procedure sets the cut plane height and additional cut planes for
a wall style.
To set the cut planes for a wall style
1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Wall Styles.
2 Select the wall style that you want to change, and choose Edit from the
shortcut menu.
3 In the Wall Style Properties dialog box, click the Display Props tab.
4 Select Plan as the display representation.

NOTE The Cut Plane tab is displayed only in some display representations,
such as Plan.
5 Click Edit Display Properties, and then click the Cut Plane tab to set the
cut plane in each display representation for the wall style.
6 Type a height in the Cut Plane Height text box to specify the cut plane
where shrinkwrap, component boundaries, and hatching takes effect.
7 Select Automatically Choose Above and Below Cut Plane Heights to show
the components above and below the cut plane height.

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8 To specifically define a cut plane, select Manual Above and Below Cut
Plane Heights, and click Add.
If you add a cut plane at a height lower than the Cut Plane Height, objects
are displayed using the properties specified for the Below Cut Plane component on the Layer/Color/Linetype tab.
If you add a cut plane at a height higher than the Cut plane Height,
objects are displayed using the properties specified for the Above Cut
Plane component on the Layer/Color/Linetype tab.
9 When you finish changing the wall style properties, click OK to return to
the Style Manager.
10 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Managing Other Wall Display Information


You can set other display properties for the wall style, such as whether to display complex endcaps, to show door and window frames, or whether to show
the miter of specific wall components. The other display information can be
set in either a wall style or for individual walls.
To manage other display information for a wall style
1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Wall Styles.
2 Select the wall style that you want to change, and choose Edit from the
shortcut menu.
3 In the Wall Style Properties dialog box, click the Display Props tab.
4 Select Plan as the display representation.

NOTE The Other tab is displayed only in some display representations,


such as Plan.
5 Click Edit Display Properties, and then click the Other tab to set the information in each display representation for the wall style.
6 Select Display Inner Lines Above to display the component lines within
the wall above the cut plane, for example, through a window or door in
the wall.
7 Select Display Inner Lines Below to display the component lines within
the wall below the cut plane, for example through a window or door in
the wall.
8 Select Never Display Lines Below Openings to not display lines beneath a
window or opening off.

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9 Select Display Endcaps to show complex endcaps. When this is clear, only
a single line is used to display the endcap. The complex shape is still there,
but is not shown in this display.
10 Select Cut Door Frame to not show the frame of the door in the plan view.
The wall display is shown to meet the door without the door frame. The
door frame is still there, but is not shown.
11 Select Cut Window Frame to not show the frame of the window in the plan
view. The wall display is shown to meet the window without the window
frame. The window frame is still there, but is not shown.
12 Select Component Draw Order by Priority to draw the components by
their priority. If this is clear, the components are drawn in the order that
they were created. This is useful when you want a specific component
color or style to be displayed over other components.
13 Select Do True Cut to perform a slice of the actual 3D model at each
defined cut plane height. This is useful when using sweeps and modifiers
to walls, so you can see a more accurate view of the wall.
14 Select Draw Miter for Components for each component where you want
to show miter lines at wall corners.
15 When you finish changing the wall style properties, click OK to return to
the Style Manager.
16 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Wall Styles
Wall styles control the appearance of wall objects. Using wall styles, you can
combine components, endcaps, and descriptions to create new types of
walls, such as concrete walls, masonry walls, and brick cavity walls.
When you create, import, export, or edit styles, you access the Style Manager.
The Style Manager provides a central location in Autodesk Architectural
Desktop, where you can work with styles from multiple drawings and
templates. For more information about using the Style Manager, see Getting
Started with the Style Manager on page 1527.

Creating New Wall Styles


You can create a new wall style, or you can copy and edit an existing wall
style.

Wall Styles

343

Creating a New Wall Style


You can create a new wall style. After you create the new wall style, you can
edit the style properties of the wall.
To create a new wall style
1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Wall Styles.
The Style Manager is displayed, with the current drawing expanded in the
tree view. The wall styles in the current drawing are displayed under the
wall style type. All other style and definition types are filtered out in the
tree view.
2 With the wall style type selected, right-click, and choose New from the
shortcut menu.
3 Type a name for the new wall style, and press ENTER.
4 To edit the style properties of your new wall style, select the style, rightclick, and choose Edit from the shortcut menu.
The Wall Style Properties dialog box is displayed. You can add notes to the
style, add endcaps and wall components, and change the display properties of the new style. For more information about changing each style
property, see Changing Wall Style Properties on page 348.
5 When you finish changing the wall style properties, click OK to return to
the Style Manager.
6 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Creating a New Wall Style from an Existing Style


You can create a new wall style from a style in the current drawing.
To create a new wall style from an existing style
1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Wall Styles.
2 The Style Manager is displayed, with the current drawing expanded in the
tree view. The wall styles in the current drawing are displayed under the
wall style type. All other style and definition types are filtered out in the
tree view.
3 Select an existing style to copy under the wall style type, and press
CTRL+C.
4 Press CTRL+V.
A copy of the existing style is created.
5 To rename the style, select the style, right-click, and choose Rename from
the shortcut menu. Type a name for the new style, and press ENTER.

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6 To edit the style properties of your new wall style, select the style, rightclick, and choose Edit from the shortcut menu.
The Wall Style Properties dialog box is displayed. You can add notes to the
style, add endcaps and components, and change the display properties of
the new style. For more information about changing each style property,
see Wall Styles on page 343.
7 When you finish changing the wall style properties, click OK to return to
the Style Manager.
8 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Purging a Wall Style


You can delete wall styles that are not being used in the current drawing. You
can delete a single unused wall style, or all wall styles in your drawing.
To purge a wall style
1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Wall Styles.
The Style Manager is displayed, with the current drawing expanded in the
tree view. The wall styles in the current drawing are displayed under the
wall style type. All other style and definition types are filtered out in the
tree view.
2 Do one of the following:

To purge a single unused wall style in your current drawing, select the
style under the style type, right-click, and choose Purge from the shortcut menu.
To purge all the unused wall styles in your current drawing, with the
wall style type selected, right-click, and choose Purge from the shortcut
menu.

A confirmation dialog box with the styles that you selected to purge is
displayed.
3 Click OK to purge the styles.

NOTE To display the confirmation dialog box only when you press the
SHIFT key as you purge the styles, select Only Show this Confirmation Dialog

When the Shift Key is Down.


4 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

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Importing a Wall Style


You can copy wall styles from an existing drawing and use them in your
current drawing. You can manage your object styles more efficiently by
storing them in a single drawing or template and copying them into new
drawings.
To import a wall style
1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Wall Styles.
The Style Manager is displayed, with the current drawing expanded in the
tree view. The wall styles in the current drawing are displayed under the
wall style type. All other style and definition types are filtered out in the
tree view.
2 In the Style Manager, choose File Open drawing to browse for the drawing that contains the style that you want to copy to your current drawing.
3 Select the drawing with the style that you want to copy, and click Open.
The new drawing opens in the Style Manager tree view, filtered to display
only the wall style type.
4 Click the plus sign (+) next to Wall Styles to display the wall styles in the
drawing.
5 Select the wall style that you want to copy, and choose Edit Copy.
6 Select the current drawing, and choose Edit Paste.
The style is copied into the current drawing. If the current drawing already
contains a style with the same name, the duplicate names are displayed in
the Import/Export - Duplicate Names Found dialog box.
7 To resolve any duplicate style names, select one of the following options:

To not replace the existing style in the drawing with the new style of
the same name, select Leave Existing.
To replace the existing style in the drawing with the new style, select
Overwrite Existing.
To rename the new style so both styles exist in the drawing, select
Rename to Unique. New style names are appended with a number in
the Style Manager.

8 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Exporting a Wall Style to a New Drawing


You can copy wall styles from your current drawing to a new drawing.

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To export a wall style to a new drawing


1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Wall Styles.
The Style Manager is displayed, with the current drawing expanded in the
tree view. The wall styles in the current drawing are displayed under the
wall style type. All other style and definition types are filtered out in the
tree view.
2 In the Style Manager, choose File New drawing to create the new drawing to copy the style to.
3 Type a name for the new drawing, and click Save.
The new drawing opens in the Style Manager tree view, filtered to display
only the wall style type.
4 Select the style in the current drawing that you want to copy to the new
drawing, and choose Edit Copy.
5 Select the new drawing, and choose Edit Paste.
The style is copied to the new drawing.
6 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Exporting Wall Styles to an Existing Drawing


You can copy wall styles from your current drawing to another drawing.
To export a wall style to an existing drawing
1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Wall Styles.
The Style Manager is displayed, with the current drawing expanded in the
tree view. The wall styles in the current drawing are displayed under the
wall style type. All other style and definition types are filtered out in the
tree view.
2 In the Style Manager, choose File Open drawing to browse for the existing drawing that you want to copy the style to.
3 Select the drawing that you want to copy the style to, and click Open.
The drawing opens in the Style Manager tree view, filtered to display only
the wall style type.
4 Select the style in the current drawing that you want to copy to the second
drawing, and choose Edit Copy.
5 Select the second drawing, and choose Edit Paste.
The style is copied into the second drawing. If the drawing already contains a style with the same name, the duplicate names are displayed in the
Import/Export - Duplicate Names Found dialog box.

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347

6 To resolve any duplicate style names, select one of the following options:

To not replace the existing style in the drawing with the new style of
the same name, select Leave Existing.
To replace the existing style in the drawing with the new style, select
Overwrite Existing.

7 To rename the new style so both styles exist in the drawing, select Rename
to Unique. New style names are appended with a number in the Style
Manager.
8 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Changing Wall Style Properties


Each wall created has a style associated with it. You can create new styles or
change existing styles by using wall properties and wall style properties
together. You can add additional components to walls to change the display
of walls, and you can change the endcaps at each end of the wall.

Attaching Notes and Files to a Wall Style


To attach notes and files to a wall style
1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Wall Styles.
The Style Manager is displayed with the current drawing expanded in the
tree view. The wall style type is selected within the current drawing, and
all other style types are filtered out in the tree view.
2 Under the wall style type, select the wall style that you want to change,
right-click, and choose Edit from the shortcut menu.
3 In the Wall Style Properties dialog box, click the General tab.
4 To add a description to the wall style, type the text in the Description field.
5 To add a note to the wall style, or to attach, edit, or detach a reference file,
click Notes.
6 In the Notes dialog box, to add a note, type the note on the Text Notes tab.
7 To attach, edit, or detach a reference file, click the Reference Docs tab, and
do any of the following:

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To attach a reference file, click Add, select a document in the Select File
dialog box, and click OK. You can type a description of the reference
file on the Reference Docs tab.

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To edit a reference file, select the file name in the list, click Edit, and
change the document or the description in the Reference Document
dialog box. To edit the file, double-click the reference file name to start
its application.
To detach a reference file, select the file name in the list, and click
Delete.

8 To attach or edit schedule data, click Property Sets. For more information,
see Attaching Schedule Data and Editing Schedule Data in the online
Autodesk Architectural Desktop Users Guide.
9 When you finish changing the wall style properties, click OK to return to
the Style Manager.
10 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Setting the Wall Style Default Properties


To set the wall style defaults
1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Wall Styles.
The Style Manager is displayed with the current drawing expanded in the
tree view. The wall style type is selected within the current drawing, and
all other style types are filtered out in the tree view.
2 Under the wall style type, select the wall style that you want to change,
right-click, and choose Edit from the shortcut menu.
3 In the Wall Style Properties dialog box, click the Defaults tab.

4 To set the default wall width for the wall style, click the Wall Width box
on and type the width.
5 To set the default base height for the wall style, click the Base Height box
on and type the base height.

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6 To set the default justification for the wall style, click the Justify box on
and select a justification from the list.
7 To set the whether the walls with this wall style automatically clean up,
click the Automatic Cleanups box on and select Yes from the list.
8 To set the default cleanup radius for the wall style, click the Cleanup
Radius box on and type a radius in the box.
9 To set the cleanup group definition walls to which the wall style belongs,
click the Cleanup Group Definition box, and select a cleanup group definition from the list.
10 To set the default floor line offset from the baseline for the wall style, click
the Floor line box, and type the offset distance in the box.
11 To set the default roof line offset from the base height for the wall style,
click the Roof line box and type the offset distance in the box.
12 When you finish changing the wall style properties, click OK to return to
the Style Manager.
13 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Changing the Wall Style Endcaps Properties


You can set the default wall and opening endcap styles
To change the wall style endcaps properties
1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Wall Styles.
The Style Manager is displayed with the current drawing expanded in the
tree view. The wall style type is selected within the current drawing, and
all other style types are filtered out in the tree view.
2 Under the wall style type, select the wall style that you want to change,
right-click, and choose Edit from the shortcut menu.
3 In the Wall Style Properties dialog box, click the Endcaps tab.
4 On the Endcaps tab, select either Wall Endcap Style or Opening Endcap
Style.
5 Select an endcap from the list.
6 When you finish changing the wall style properties, click OK to return to
the Style Manager.
7 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

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Adding a Component to a Wall Style


To add a component to a wall style
1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Wall Styles.
The Style Manager is displayed with the current drawing expanded in the
tree view. The wall style type is selected within the current drawing, and
all other style types are filtered out in the tree view.
2 Under the wall style type, select the wall style that you want to change,
right-click, and choose Edit from the shortcut menu.
3 In the Wall Style Properties dialog box, click the Components tab, and
click Add.
4 Type a name for the new component, and specify the priority for the component when walls intersect.
The lower the number, the higher the priority it is given when two walls
intersect.
5 To set the edge offset or the width for the wall style component, click Edge
Offset or Width.

Wall component offset directions

6 In the Component Offset or Component Width dialog box, set the base
value for the offset or the width. To calculate the edge offset or the width
based on the base width, click Use Base Width and select an operator and
an operand.

Wall component baseline offset parameters

7 Click OK.
The new value or operation is displayed in the table in the Edge Offset
column or the Width column.

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351

Adding the first wall component

8 To set the top elevation offset or bottom elevation offset, type a new value,
and select from where the distance is to be measured: Wall Top, Base
Height, Baseline, or Wall Bottom.

Adding the second wall component

9 When you finish changing the wall style properties, click OK to return to
the Style Manager.
10 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

NOTE You can add as many components to a wall style as you like, but only
the first 20 are controlled by the display system. It is suggested that you limit
your components to 20.

Removing a Component from a Wall Style


To remove a component from a wall style
1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Wall Styles.
The Style Manager is displayed with the current drawing expanded in the
tree view. The wall style type is selected within the current drawing, and
all other style types are filtered out in the tree view.
2 Under the wall style type, select the wall style that you want to change,
right-click, and choose Edit from the shortcut menu.
3 In the Wall Style Properties dialog box, click the Components tab.
4 Select a component from the list, and click Remove.

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5 When you finish changing the wall style properties, click OK to return to
the Style Manager.
6 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Changing the Wall Style Display Properties


You can change wall display properties for one wall or for a group of walls.
To set the wall style display properties
1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Wall Styles.
The Style Manager is displayed with the current drawing expanded in the
tree view. The wall style type is selected within the current drawing, and
all other style types are filtered out in the tree view.
2 Under the wall style type, select the wall style that you want to change,
right-click, and choose Edit from the shortcut menu.
3 In the Wall Style Properties dialog box, click the Display Props tab.
4 Optionally, select a different display set for the wall style from the list. The
current viewport display is the default representation display. An asterisk
is displayed next to the default.
5 Do any of the following:

Select the wall style from the property source, and click Attach Override
to change how the object is displayed in the current viewport in the
drawing.

NOTE You can either select Attach Override or click in the Attached column
to attach an override. Attach Override is available only when you select a
property source that is attached to the display representation.
The System Default is the default display representation. When a Display
Contribution is overridden, a red X and the word Overridden is displayed
in the list.

Click Remove Override to reset the display representation to the next


property source in the list.
Click Edit Display Properties to change the display for the representation of the wall style. This includes the visibility, layer, color, and linetype. To edit each property, click its field. These changes are only for
the wall style.

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353

Click Edit Display Properties, then the Hatching tab to set what hatch
is displayed in each display representation for the wall style. The
Hatching tab is displayed only in some display representations, including Plan and Reflected. For more information, see Creating and Editing Display Systems on page 121.
Click Edit Display Properties and then the Other tab to set the cut plane
height, what inner lines are displayed, and what miters to draw for a
the wall style. Other display features that are set here include whether
to display lines below openings, whether to display endcaps, and
whether to cut door and window frames. The Other tab is displayed
only in some display representations, including Plan and Reflected. For
an explanation of display representations, see Display Representations on page 100.

6 Click OK to set the display for the wall style.

Wall Component Index


These are the component index priorities for all of the wall styles in the style
libraries.

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Component

Index

Concrete

200

Concrete (Footing)

200

CMU

300

CMU Veneer

350

Precast Panel

400

Stud

500

Insulation

600 (CMU/Brick, Stud/Brick)

Rigid Insulation

404 (Brick)

Air Gap

700

Air Gap (Brick Brick)

405

Air Gap (CMU CMU)

305

Air Gap (Stud Stud)

505

Brick

400

Brick Veneer

410

Siding

900

Metal Panel

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Stucco

1100

Glass

1200

GWB

1200

GWB (X)

1200,1210,1220,1230

Bulkhead

1800

Casework - Base

2010

Casework - Upper

2000

Casework - Counter

2020

Casework - Backsplash

2030

Toilet Partition

3000

Setting the Hatch Pattern for a Wall Style


To set the hatch pattern for wall style display properties
1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Wall Styles.
The Style Manager is displayed with the current drawing expanded in the
tree view. The wall style type is selected within the current drawing, and
all other style types are filtered out in the tree view.
2 Under the wall style type, select the wall style that you want to change,
right-click, and choose Edit from the shortcut menu.
3 In the Wall Style Properties dialog box, click the Display Props tab.
4 Click Edit Display Properties, and then click the Hatching tab to set the
hatch to be displayed in each display representation for the wall style.
The Hatching tab is displayed only in some display representations,
including Plan and Reflected.
5 Select a hatch to change in the Pattern list.
6 In the Hatch Pattern dialog box, select the type of hatch for the selected
component.

If you select Predefined in the Type field, select a pattern from the Pattern Name list.
If you select Custom in the Type field, type the custom pattern name
in the Custom Pattern box.
If you select User-Defined in the Type field, click Double Hatch on or
off.

7 Click OK.

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355

8 Click the Scale/Spacing list to change the value for the selected
component.
9 Click the Angle list to type a new angle for the hatch pattern.
10 Click the Orientation field to change from making the change global or
for the selected object.
11 When you finish changing the wall style properties, click OK to return to
the Style Manager.
12 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Wall Cleanup Definitions


Creating a Wall Cleanup Group Definition
The first step in setting up in assigning walls to different wall cleanup groups
is creating a new wall cleanup group definition.
To create a new wall cleanup group definition
1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Cleanup Group Definitions.
The Style Manager is displayed with the current drawing expanded in the
tree view. The cleanup group definitions in the current drawing are displayed under the Cleanup Group Definition type. All other style and definition types are filtered out in the tree view.
2 With the Cleanup Group Definition type selected, right-click, and choose
New from the shortcut menu.
3 Type a name for the new cleanup group definition, and press ENTER.
4 To edit the properties of your new cleanup group definition, select the definition, right-click, and choose Edit from the shortcut menu.
The Cleanup Group Definition Properties dialog box is displayed. You can
add notes and add reference files to the definition.
5 When you finish changing the cleanup group definition properties, click
OK to return to the Style Manager.
6 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

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Editing a Wall Cleanup Group Definition


You can control the name and description of the Wall Cleanup Group
definition, and you can attach notes and files to the group.
To edit a wall cleanup group definition
1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Cleanup Group Definitions.
The Style Manager is displayed with the current drawing expanded in the
tree view. The cleanup group definition type is selected within the current
drawing, and all other definition types are filtered out in the tree view.
2 Under the Cleanup Group Definition type, select the cleanup group definition that you want to change, right-click, and choose Edit from the
shortcut menu.
3 In the Cleanup Group Definition Properties dialog box, click the General
tab.
4 In the Cleanup Group Definitions Properties dialog box, type a new name
for the Wall Cleanup Group definition in the Name dialog box.
5 Type a description of the Wall Cleanup Group definition in the Description box.
6 To add a note to the cleanup group, or to attach, edit, or detach a reference
file, click Notes.
7 In the Notes dialog box, to add a note, type the note on the Text Notes tab.
8 To attach, edit, or detach a reference file, click the Reference Docs tab, and
do any of the following:

To attach a reference file, click Add, select a document in the Select File
dialog box, and click OK. You can type a description of the reference
file on the Reference Docs tab.
To edit a reference file, select the file name in the list, click Edit, and
change the document or the description in the Reference Document
dialog box. To edit the file, double-click the reference file name to start
its application.
To detach a reference file, select the file name in the list, and click
Delete.

9 When you finish changing the cleanup group definition properties, click
OK to return to the Style Manager.
10 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

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357

Purging a Wall Cleanup Group Definition


You can delete wall cleanup group definitions that are not being used in the
current drawing.
To purge a wall cleanup group definition
1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Cleanup Group Definitions.
The Style Manager is displayed, with the current drawing expanded in the
tree view. The cleanup group definitions in the current drawing are displayed under the Cleanup Group Definition type. All other style and definition types are filtered out in the tree view.
2 Do one of the following:

To purge a single unused cleanup group definition in your current


drawing, select the definition, right-click, and choose Purge from the
shortcut menu.
To purge all the unused cleanup group definitions in your current
drawing, with the Cleanup Group Definition type selected, right-click,
and choose Purge from the shortcut menu.

3 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Importing Wall Cleanup Group Definitions


You can import wall cleanup group definitions from an existing drawing and
use them in a new drawing.

NOTE You can manage wall cleanup group definitions efficiently by creating
them all in one drawing you reserve for this purpose and importing them into
other drawings as needed.
To import wall cleanup group definitions
1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Cleanup Group Definitions.
The Style Manager is displayed, with the current drawing expanded in the
tree view. The cleanup group definitions in the current drawing are displayed under the Cleanup Group Definitions type. All other style and definition types are filtered out in the tree view.
2 In the Style Manager, choose File Open drawing to browse for the drawing that contains the definition that you want to copy to your current
drawing.

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3 Select the drawing with the definition that you want to copy, and click
Open.
The new drawing opens in the Style Manager tree view, filtered to display
only the Cleanup Group Definition type.
4 Click the plus sign (+) next to Cleanup Group Definition to display the
cleanup group definitions in the drawing.
5 Select the cleanup group definition that you want to copy, and choose
Edit Copy.
6 Select the current drawing, and choose Edit Paste.
The definition is copied into the current drawing. If the current drawing
already contains a definition with the same name, the duplicate names are
displayed in the Import/Export - Duplicate Names Found dialog box.
7 To resolve any duplicate definition names, select one of the following
options:

To not replace the existing definition in the drawing with the new definition of the same name, select Leave Existing.
To replace the existing definition in the drawing with the new definition, select Overwrite Existing.
To rename the new definition so both definitions exist in the drawing,
select Rename to Unique. New definition names are appended with a
number in the Style Manager.

8 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Exporting Wall Cleanup Group Definitions to a


New Drawing
You can export wall cleanup group definitions from your current drawing to
a new drawing.
To export wall cleanup group definitions to a new drawing
1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Cleanup Group Definitions.
The Style Manager is displayed, with the current drawing expanded in the
tree view. The cleanup group definitions in the current drawing are displayed under the Cleanup Group Definitions type. All other style and definition types are filtered out in the tree view.
2 In the Style Manager, choose File New drawing to create the new drawing to copy the definition to.
3 Type a name for the new drawing, and click Save.

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359

The new drawing opens in the Style Manager tree view, filtered to display
only the cleanup group definitions type.
4 Select the definition in the current drawing that you want to copy to the
new drawing, and choose Edit Copy.
5 Select the new drawing, and choose Edit Paste.
The definition is copied to the new drawing.
6 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Exporting Wall Cleanup Group Definitions to an


Existing Drawing
You can export wall cleanup group definitions from the current drawing to
another drawing.
To export wall cleanup group definitions to an existing drawing
1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Cleanup Group Definitions.
The Style Manager is displayed, with the current drawing expanded in the
tree view. The cleanup group definitions in the current drawing are displayed under the Cleanup Group Definitions type. All other style and definition types are filtered out in the tree view.
2 In the Style Manager, choose File Open drawing to browse for the existing drawing that you want to copy the definition to.
3 Select the drawing that you want to copy the definition to, and click
Open.
The drawing opens in the Style Manager tree view, filtered to display only
the Cleanup Group Definitions type.
4 Select the definition in the current drawing that you want to copy to the
second drawing, and choose Edit Copy.
5 Select the second drawing, and choose Edit Paste.
The definition is copied into the second drawing. If the drawing already
contains a definition with the same name, the duplicate names are displayed in the Import/Export - Duplicate Names Found dialog box.
6 To resolve any duplicate definition names, select one of the following
options:

360

To not replace the existing definition in the drawing with the new definition of the same name, select Leave Existing.
To replace the existing definition in the drawing with the new definition, select Overwrite Existing.

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7 To rename the new definition so both definitions exist in the drawing,


select Rename to Unique. New definition names are appended with a
number in the Style Manager.
8 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Assigning a Wall Cleanup Group to New Walls


When you create walls, you can assign them to a wall cleanup group so they
do not clean up with walls from another group.
To create walls with a different wall cleanup group
1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Add Wall.
2 In the Add Walls dialog box, select the wall style.
3 Select the wall cleanup group from the Group list.
4 You need to create a new wall cleanup group before you can assign walls
to that group. See Creating a Wall Cleanup Group Definition on page
356.
5 Click Straight or Curved to set the type of wall to create.
6 Specify a start point for the wall.
7 Specify another point to end this segment of the wall.
The marker on one side of the wall indicates the direction the wall is being
drawn.
8 Continue placing wall segments to create, for example, a building exterior
or a room.
You can use the Ortho Close or Polyline Close options to finish the creation of an enclosed space.

Ortho Close: Closes the space by drawing two walls or space boundaries based on the direction you specify. The direction is extended until
it meets a line perpendicular to the initial edge of either the wall or
space boundary.
Polyline Close: Closes the wall by creating a wall segment from the
last point specified for the walls to the first point specified in this group
of walls.

9 Click Close to end the command.

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361

Assigning a Different Wall Cleanup Group


Definition to Existing Walls
You can change the wall cleanup group of existing walls. This procedure is
useful when you see a place in the drawing where you would like to prevent
two walls from cleaning up with each other.
To change the wall cleanup group of existing walls
1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Modify Wall.
2 Select the walls to change, and press ENTER.
3 In the Wall Modify dialog box, select the wall cleanup group from the
Group list.
You need to create a new wall cleanup group before you can assign walls
to that group. See Creating a Wall Cleanup Group Definition on page
356.
4 Click OK to set the selected walls to the new wall cleanup group.

Editing Walls
You can create walls by converting lines and sketches into walls. You can
then edit walls by adding and anchoring objects to them, by creating special
conditions, by changing the roof or floor lines, and by joining them with
other walls.

Converting Lines to Walls


You can create line diagrams or sketches of walls using lines, arcs, circles, and
polylines to create the building exterior and rooms, and then you can convert them to walls with one command.
To convert lines to walls
1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Convert to Walls.
2 Select the lines, arcs, circles, or polylines to convert to walls.
3 Type y (Yes) to erase the selected geometry, or type n (No) to keep the
geometry in the drawing.
4 Change the general, style, dimensions, and location properties of the wall.
5 Click OK to exit the dialog box and create the walls.

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Adding Wall Modifiers Automatically


You can add components to walls in any location by selecting points on the
wall. The components can then be applied to one or both sides of the wall.
To add a wall modifier automatically
1 From the Design menu, choose Wall Tools Add Wall Modifier.
2 Select a wall.
3 Select the start point for the wall modifier. After you select the first point,
a temporary line is displayed to show you the length of the modifier.
4 Select the endpoint for the modifier.
5 Select the side of the wall to draw the modifier.
6 Type the depth for the wall modifier at the command line.
7 In the Add Wall Modifier dialog box, specify the style for the modifier.
8 If you select Offset Opposite Face, the wall is drawn along the line of the
modifier.
9 Select the start elevation offset and the end elevation offset for the component.
Start Elevation Offset: In conjunction with the wall bottom, wall
baseline, wall base height, or wall top, Start Elevation Offset sets the
distance for the beginning height of the wall modifier. You can use a
negative number to measure the distance down the wall instead of up the
wall.
End Elevation Offset: In conjunction with the wall bottom, wall baseline, wall base height, or wall top, End Elevation Offset sets the distance
for the ending height of the wall modifier. You can use a negative number
to measure the distance down the wall instead of up the wall.

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Wall modifier parameters

10 Click OK to add the modifier to the wall.

Removing Wall Modifiers


You can remove existing wall modifiers.
To remove an existing wall modifier
1 From the Design menu, choose Wall Tools Remove Wall Modifier.
2 Select a wall.
3 Select the modifier.

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Removing a wall modifier

Converting a Polyline to a Wall Modifier


You can convert an existing polyline into a wall modifier. The polyline can
be drawn in the location for the wall modifier, or it can be projected to the
wall. The polyline cannot be closed.
To convert polyline to a wall modifier
1 Draw a polyline in the shape and location of the wall modifier.
2 From the Design menu, choose Wall Tools Convert Polyline to Wall
Modifier.
3 Select a wall.
4 Select the polyline.
5 Type y (Yes) to erase the selected polyline, or type n (No) to keep the
polyline in the drawing.

Converting a polyline to a wall modifier

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6 If you select Offset Opposite Face, the wall is drawn along the line of the
modifier.
7 Select the start elevation offset and the end elevation offset for the component.
Start Elevation Offset: In conjunction with the wall bottom, wall
baseline, wall base height, or wall top, Start Elevation Offset sets the
distance for the beginning height of the wall modifier. You can use a
negative number to measure the distance down the wall instead of up the
wall.
End Elevation Offset: In conjunction with the wall bottom, wall baseline, wall base height, or wall top, End Elevation Offset sets the distance
for the ending height of the wall modifier. You can use a negative number
to measure the distance down the wall instead of up the wall.

Wall modifier parameters

8 Click OK to add the modifier to the wall.

Creating and Editing Wall Modifier Styles


You can customize the surface of a wall by adding modifiers, such as inchthick stucco or wainscoting. After you define the wall modifier, you can add
it to either side of the wall and at any location. First, create wall modifier

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styles in the Style Manager. Then, you can place a modifier on the wall using
the Wall Modifiers tab in the Wall Properties dialog box.
When you create, import, export, or edit styles, the Style Manager is
displayed. The Style Manager provides a central location in Autodesk
Architectural Desktop, where you can work with styles from multiple
drawings and templates. For more information about using the Style
Manager, see Getting Started with the Style Manager on page 1527.

Creating a New Wall Modifier Style


You can create wall surface modifiers to be added to walls.
To define a surface modifier
1 From the Design menu, choose Wall Tools Wall Modifier Styles.
The Style Manager is displayed, with the current drawing expanded in the
tree view. The wall modifier styles in the current drawing are displayed
under the Wall Modifier style type. All other style and definition types are
filtered out in the tree view.
2 Select the wall modifier style type, right-click, and choose New from the
shortcut menu.
3 Type a name for the new wall modifier style, and press ENTER.
4 To edit the style properties of your new wall modifier style, select the style,
right-click, and choose Edit from the shortcut menu.
The Wall Modifier Style Properties dialog box is displayed. You can add
notes to the style.
5 After you finish changing the wall modifier style properties, click OK to
return to the Style Manager.
6 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.
7 Click OK to save the new wall modifier style and exit the dialog box.

Creating a Wall Modifier Style from an Existing Style


You can create a new wall modifier style by copying and modifying an
existing style.
To create a wall modifier style from an existing style
1 From the Design menu, choose Wall Tools Wall Modifier Styles.
The Style Manager is displayed, with the current drawing expanded in the
tree view. The wall modifier styles in the current drawing are displayed
under the Wall Modifier style type. All other style and definition types are
filtered out in the tree view.

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2 Select an existing style to copy under the Wall Modifier style type, and
press CTRL+C.
3 Press CTRL+V.
A copy of the existing style is created.
4 To rename the style, select the style, right-click, and choose Rename from
the shortcut menu. Type a name for the new style, and press ENTER.
5 To edit the style properties of your new wall modifier style, select the style,
right-click, and choose Edit from the shortcut menu.
The Wall Modifier Style Properties dialog box is displayed. You can add
notes to the style.
6 When you finish changing the wall modifier style properties, click OK to
return to the Style Manager.
7 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Editing a Wall Modifier Style Using a Polyline


You can create a new shape for a wall modifier by selecting an existing
polyline.
To edit a wall modifier style using a polyline
1 Draw a polyline in the shape you want to use for the wall modifier.
2 From the Design menu, choose Wall Tools Wall Modifier Styles.
The Style Manager is displayed, with the current drawing expanded in the
tree view. The wall modifier styles in the current drawing are displayed
under the Wall Modifier style type. All other style and definition types are
filtered out in the tree view.
3 Select the style you want to edit, right-click, and choose Set From on the
shortcut menu.
4 Select the polyline from the drawing.
5 Click OK to exit the dialog box.

Attaching Notes or Files to a Wall Modifier Style


To attach notes or files to a wall modifier style
1 From the Design menu, choose Wall Tools Wall Modifier Styles.
The Style Manager is displayed with the current drawing expanded in the
tree view. The wall modifier style type is selected within the current drawing, and all other style types are filtered out in the tree view.

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2 Under the Wall Modifier style type, select the wall modifier style that you
want to change, right-click, and choose Edit from the shortcut menu.
3 In the Wall Modifier Style Properties dialog box, click the General tab.
4 To add a description to the wall modifier style, type it in the Description
field.
5 To add a note to the wall modifier, or to attach, edit, or detach a reference
file, click Notes.
6 In the Notes dialog box, type the note on the Text Notes tab.
7 To attach, edit, or detach a reference file, click the Reference Docs tab, and
do any of the following:

To attach a reference file, click Add, select a document in the Select File
dialog box, and click OK. You can type a description of the reference
file on the Reference Docs tab.
To edit a reference file, select the file name in the list, click Edit, and
change the document or the description in the Reference Document
dialog box. To edit the file, double-click the reference file name to start
its application.
To detach a reference file, select the file name in the list, and click
Delete.

8 When you finish changing the wall modifier style properties, click OK to
return to the Style Manager.
9 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Purging a Wall Modifier Style


If no walls have a specific wall modifier style, you can purge the style from
the drawing.
To purge a wall modifier style
1 From the Design menu, choose Wall Tools Wall Modifier Styles.
The Style Manager is displayed, with the current drawing expanded in the
tree view. The wall modifier styles in the current drawing are displayed
under the Wall Modifier style type. All other style and definition types are
filtered out in the tree view.
2 Do one of the following:

To purge a single unused wall modifier style in your current drawing,


select the style under the style type, right-click, and choose Purge from
the shortcut menu.

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To purge all the unused wall modifier styles in your current drawing,
select the wall modifier style type, right-click, and choose Purge from
the shortcut menu.

3 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Importing Wall Modifier Styles


You can import existing wall modifier styles from another drawing. Using
this method, you can set up one drawing with all wall modifier styles in it,
and then import styles as you need them.
To import wall modifier styles
1 From the Design menu, choose Wall Tools Wall Modifier Styles.
The Style Manager is displayed, with the current drawing expanded in the
tree view. The wall modifier styles in the current drawing are displayed
under the Wall Modifier style type. All other style and definition types are
filtered out in the tree view.
2 In the Style Manager, choose File Open Drawing to browse for the drawing that contains the style that you want to copy to your current drawing.
3 Select the drawing with the style that you want to copy, and click Open.
The new drawing opens in the Style Manager tree view, filtered to display
only the wall modifier style type.
4 Click the plus sign (+) next to Wall Modifier Styles to display the wall
modifier styles in the drawing.
5 Select the wall modifier style that you want to copy, and choose Edit
Copy.
6 Select the current drawing, and choose Edit Paste.
The style is copied into the current drawing. If the current drawing already
contains a style with the same name, the duplicate names are displayed in
the Import/Export - Duplicate Names Found dialog box.
7 To resolve any duplicate style names, select one of the following options:

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To not replace the existing style in the drawing with the new style of
the same name, select Leave Existing.
To replace the existing style in the drawing with the new style, select
Overwrite Existing.
To rename the new style so both styles exist in the drawing, select
Rename to Unique. New style names are appended with a numeral in
the Style Manager.

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8 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Exporting Wall Modifier Styles to an Existing Drawing


You can export wall modifier styles from one drawing to another.
To export wall modifier styles to an existing drawing
1 From the Design menu, choose Wall Tools Wall Modifier Styles.
The Style Manager is displayed, with the current drawing expanded in the
tree view. The wall modifier styles in the current drawing are displayed
under the Wall Modifier style type. All other style and definition types are
filtered out in the tree view.
2 In the Style Manager, choose File Open Drawing to browse for the existing drawing that you want to copy the style to.
3 Select the drawing that you want to copy the style to, and click Open.
The drawing opens in the Style Manager tree view, filtered to display only
the wall modifier style type.
4 Select the style in the current drawing that you want to copy to the second
drawing, and choose Edit Copy.
5 Select the second drawing, and choose Edit Paste.
The style is copied into the second drawing. If the drawing already contains a style with the same name, the duplicate names are displayed in the
Import/Export - Duplicate Names Found dialog box.
6 To resolve any duplicate style names, select one of the following options:

To not replace the existing style in the drawing with the new style of
the same name, select Leave Existing.
To replace the existing style in the drawing with the new style, select
Overwrite Existing.

7 To rename the new style so both styles exist in the drawing, select Rename
to Unique. New style names are appended with a number in the Style
Manager.
8 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Exporting Wall Modifier Styles to a New Drawing


You can export wall modifier styles from an existing drawing to a new
drawing.

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To export wall modifier styles to a new drawing


1 From the Design menu, choose Wall Tools Wall Modifier Styles.
The Style Manager is displayed, with the current drawing expanded in the
tree view. The wall modifier styles in the current drawing are displayed
under the Wall Modifier style type. All other style and definition types are
filtered out in the tree view.
2 In the Style Manager, choose File New Drawing to create the new drawing to copy the style to.
3 Type a name for the new drawing, and click Save.
The new drawing opens in the Style Manager tree view, filtered to display
only the wall modifier style type.
4 Select the style in the current drawing that you want to copy to the new
drawing, and choose Edit Copy.
5 Select the new drawing, and choose Edit Paste.
The style is copied to the new drawing.
6 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Inserting a Wall Modifier as a Polyline


You can insert an existing wall modifier into your drawing as a polyline. You
can then edit the polyline and either create a new modifier or overwrite an
existing one.
To insert a wall modifier as a polyline
1 From the Design menu, choose Wall Tools Insert Modifier Style as Polyline.
2 Select the modifier style to insert as a polyline.
3 Click OK.
4 Select an insertion point in the drawing.
The selected wall modifier is inserted in the drawing as a polyline.

Creating and Editing Endcap Styles


You can define different endcap styles to control, for example, how the wall
meets doors and windows and the width and depth of ending pieces. These
endcaps are placed on walls through the settings on the Wall Style Overrides
tab in the Wall Properties dialog box.

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When you create, import, export, or edit styles, you access the Style Manager.
The Style Manager provides a central location in Autodesk Architectural
Desktop, where you can work with styles from multiple drawings and
templates. For more information about using the Style Manager, see Getting
Started with the Style Manager on page 1527.

Creating a Wall Endcap Style


To create a wall endcap style
1 From the Design menu, choose Wall Tools Wall Endcap Styles.
The Style Manager is displayed, with the current drawing expanded in the
tree view. The wall endcap styles in the current drawing are displayed
under the Endcap style type. All other style and definition types are filtered out in the tree view.
2 Select the endcap style type, right-click, and choose New from the shortcut menu.
3 Type a name for the new endcap style, and press ENTER.
4 To edit the style properties of your new endcap style, select the style, rightclick, and choose Edit from the shortcut menu.
The Endcap Style Properties dialog box is displayed. You can add notes to
the style.
5 When you finish changing the endcap style properties, click OK to return
to the Style Manager.
6 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Creating a Wall Endcap Style from an Existing Style


You can copy and modify an existing wall endcap style to create a new wall
endcap style.
To create a wall endcap style from an existing style
1 From the Design menu, choose Wall Tools Wall Endcap Styles.
The Style Manager is displayed, with the current drawing expanded in the
tree view. The endcap styles in the current drawing are displayed under
the Endcap style type. All other style and definition types are filtered out
in the tree view.
2 Select an existing style to copy under the Endcap style type, and press
CTRL+C.
3 Press CTRL+V.
A copy of the existing style is created.

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4 To rename the style, select the style, right-click, and choose Rename from
the shortcut menu. Type a name for the new style, and press ENTER.
5 To edit the style properties of your new endcap style, select the style, rightclick, and choose Edit from the shortcut menu.
The Endcap Style Properties dialog box is displayed. You can add notes to
the style.
6 When you finish changing the endcap style properties, click OK to return
to the Style Manager.
7 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Editing an Endcap Style Using Polylines


You can create the shape of a wall endcap by selecting existing polylines and
setting the index number and offset distance for each component of the
endcap.
To create a wall endcap style from existing polylines
1 Draw a polyline in the shape of the wall endcap you want to create.
2 From the Design menu, choose Wall Tools Wall Endcap Styles.
The Style Manager is displayed, with the current drawing expanded in the
tree view. The endcap styles in the current drawing are displayed under
the Endcap style type. All other style and definition types are filtered out
in the tree view.
3 Select the style you want to edit, right-click, and choose Set From on the
shortcut menu.
4 Select the polyline in the drawing.

NOTE If you select a polyline with width, the segments with width will be
invisible when the endcap is placed on the wall.
5 Set the component index for the segment.
6 Type y (Yes) to add another component to the endcap style, or type n (No)
to continue creating the endcap style.
7 Type a return offset for the component.

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Polyline endcap parameters

8 When you finish changing the endcap style properties, click OK to return
to the Style Manager.
9 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Attaching Notes and Files to a Wall Endcap Style


To attach notes or files to a wall endcap style
1 From the Design menu, choose Wall Tools Wall Endcap Styles.
The Style Manager is displayed with the current drawing expanded in the
tree view. The endcap style type is selected within the current drawing,
and all other style types are filtered out in the tree view.
2 Under the Endcap style type, select the endcap style that you want to
change, right-click, and choose Edit.
3 To add a description to the endcap style, type it in the Description field.
4 To add a note to the endcap, or to attach, edit, or detach a reference file,
click Notes.
5 In the Notes dialog box, type it on the Text Notes tab.
6 To attach, edit, or detach a reference file, click the Reference Docs tab, and
do any of the following:

To attach a reference file, click Add, select a document in the Select File
dialog box, and click OK. You can type a description of the reference
file on the Reference Docs tab.
To edit a reference file, select the file name in the list, click Edit, and
change the document or the description in the Reference Document
dialog box. To edit the file, double-click the reference file name to start
its application.
To detach a reference file, select the file name in the list, and click
Delete.

7 When you finish changing the endcap style properties, click OK to return
to the Style Manager.

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8 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Purging a Wall Endcap Style


If no walls have a specific wall endcap style, you can purge the style from the
drawing.
To purge a wall endcap style
1 From the Design menu, choose Wall Tools Wall Endcap Styles.
The Style Manager is displayed, with the current drawing expanded in the
tree view. The endcap styles in the current drawing are displayed under
the Endcap style type. All other style and definition types are filtered out
in the tree view.
2 Do one of the following:

To purge a single unused endcap style in your current drawing, select


the style under the style type, right-click, and choose Purge from the
shortcut menu.
To purge all the unused endcap styles in your current drawing, select
the endcaps style type, right-click, and choose Purge from the shortcut
menu.

3 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Importing Wall Endcap Styles


You can import existing wall endcap styles from another drawing. Using this
method, you can set up one drawing with all endcap styles in it and then
import them as needed.
To import wall endcap styles
1 From the Design menu, choose Wall Tools Wall Endcap Styles.
The Style Manager is displayed, with the current drawing expanded in the
tree view. The endcap styles in the current drawing are displayed under
the Endcap style type. All other style and definition types are filtered out
in the tree view.
2 In the Style Manager, choose File Open drawing to browse for the drawing that contains the style that you want to copy to your current drawing.
3 Select the drawing with the style that you want to copy, and click Open.
The new drawing opens in the Style Manager tree view, filtered to display
only the endcap style type.

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4 Click the plus sign (+) next to Endcap Styles to display the endcap styles
in the drawing.
5 Select the endcap style that you want to copy, and choose Edit Copy.
6 Select the current drawing, and choose Edit Paste.
The style is copied into the current drawing. If the current drawing already
contains a style with the same name, the duplicate names are displayed in
the Import/Export - Duplicate Names Found dialog box.
7 To resolve any duplicate style names, select one of the following options:

To not replace the existing style in the drawing with the new style of
the same name, select Leave Existing.
To replace the existing style in the drawing with the new style, select
Overwrite Existing.
To rename the new style so both styles exist in the drawing, select
Rename to Unique. New style names are appended with a numeral in
the Style Manager.

8 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Exporting Wall Endcap Styles to an Existing Drawing


You can export wall endcap styles from the current drawing to another
drawing.
To export wall endcap styles to an existing drawing
1 From the Design menu, choose Wall Tools Wall Endcap Styles.
The Style Manager is displayed, with the current drawing expanded in the
tree view. The endcap styles in the current drawing are displayed under
the Endcap style type. All other style and definition types are filtered out
in the tree view.
2 In the Style Manager, choose File Open drawing to browse for the existing drawing that you want to copy the style to.
3 Select the drawing that you want to copy the style to, and click Open.
The drawing opens in the Style Manager tree view, filtered to display only
the endcap style type.
4 Select the style in the current drawing that you want to copy to the second
drawing, and choose Edit Copy.
5 Select the second drawing, and choose Edit Paste.
The style is copied into the second drawing. If the drawing already contains a style with the same name, the duplicate names are displayed in the
Import/Export - Duplicate Names Found dialog box.

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6 To resolve any duplicate style names, select one of the following options:

To not replace the existing style in the drawing with the new style of
the same name, select Leave Existing.
To replace the existing style in the drawing with the new style, select
Overwrite Existing.

7 To rename the new style so both styles exist in the drawing, select Rename
to Unique. New style names are appended with a numeral in the Style
Manager.
8 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Exporting Wall Endcap Styles to a New Drawing


You can export wall endcap styles from an existing drawing to a new
drawing.
To export wall endcap styles to a new drawing
1 From the Design menu, choose Wall Tools Wall Endcap Styles.
The Style Manager is displayed, with the current drawing expanded in the
tree view. The endcap styles in the current drawing are displayed under
the Endcap style type. All other style and definition types are filtered out
in the tree view.
2 In the Style Manager, choose File New drawing to create the new drawing to copy the style to.
3 Type a name for the new drawing, and click Save.
The new drawing opens in the Style Manager tree view, filtered to display
only the endcap style type.
4 Select the style in the current drawing that you want to copy to the new
drawing, and choose Edit Copy.
5 Select the new drawing, and choose Edit Paste.
The style is copied to the new drawing.
6 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Inserting an Endcap Style as a Polyline


You can insert an existing wall endcap style into your drawing as a polyline.
You can then edit the polyline and either create a new endcap style or
overwrite an existing style.

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To insert an endcap style as a polyline


1 From the Design menu, choose Wall Tools Insert Endcap Style as Polyline.
2 Select the endcap style to insert as a polyline.
3 Click OK.
4 Select an insertion point in the drawing.
The selected endcap style is inserted in the drawing as a polyline.

Overriding an Endcap Style


You can select an existing wall and change the endcap style on that wall.
To override an endcap style
1 From the Design menu, choose Wall Tools Override Endcap Style.
2 Select a wall.
3 Select a point close to end where you want the endcap to be overridden.
4 In the Select an Endcap Style dialog box, select a style to override the existing style, and click OK.

Merging Walls
You can use the profile of selected walls and merge the walls. This does not
provide automatic wall cleanup, but merging walls is useful in tight situations that involve short wall segments.
To merge two walls
1 From the Design menu, choose Wall Tools Merge Walls.
2 Type a (Add) to merge walls.
3 Select a wall to merge with.
4 Select other walls to merge with the first wall, and press ENTER.

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Merging wall segments

5 You can continue to add or remove wall merges, or you can press ENTER
to exit the command.

Removing a Merged Wall


You can remove walls from a group of merged walls.
To remove a wall from a wall merge
1 From the Design menu, choose Wall Tools Merge Walls.
2 Type r (Remove) to remove a wall from a merge.
3 Select the first wall selected during the wall merge.
4 Select the walls to remove from the merge and press ENTER.
5 You can continue to add or remove wall merges, or you can press ENTER
to exit the command.

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Changing the Roof Line of a Wall


You can change the height of the roof line of an existing wall. You can also
create a polyline that represents the current roof line of selected walls.
To change the roof line
1 From the Design menu, choose Wall Tools Roof Line.
2 Type o (Offset), select the walls to change, and then type a value to offset
the roof line from the current height of the wall.
3 Type p (Project) to project the roof line to a selected polyline, select the
walls to change, and then select the polyline to project the roof line to.

NOTE For best results, the polyline does not need to be in the same plane
as the selected walls, but it should be parallel to the walls.
4 Type g (Generate polyline) to generate a polyline, and then select the
walls for the polyline to be created from.
5 Type a (Auto project) to project the wall roof line to another object, select
the walls, and then select the object to project to.
6 Type r (Reset) to remove any roof line changes made to the wall.

NOTE Auto project is useful when projecting walls to roofs.


7 Press ENTER to end the command.

Changing the Floor Line of the Wall


You can change the height of the floor line of an existing wall. You can also
create a polyline that represents the current floor line of selected walls.
To change the floor line
1 From the Design menu, choose Wall Tools Floor Line.
2 Type o (Offset), select the walls to change, and then type a value to offset
the floor line from the current height of the wall.
3 Type p (Project) to project the floor line to a selected polyline, select the
walls to change, and then select the polyline to project the floor line to.

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NOTE For best results, the polyline does not need to be in the same plane
as the selected walls, but it should be parallel to the walls.
4 Type g (Generate polyline) to generate a polyline along the current roofline of the wall, and then select the walls for the polyline to be created
from.
5 Type a (Auto project) to project the wall floor line to another object, select
the walls, and then select the object to project to.
6 Type r (Reset) to remove any floor line changes made to the wall.
7 Press ENTER to end the command.

Adding an Interference Condition


You can place AEC objects, such as mass elements, in walls to create custom
openings or cutouts in the wall. Before you use this procedure, it is necessary
for an existing AEC object to be placed at the correct location in the wall. An
example is a column grid structure where columns are connected by walls.
To add interference conditions to walls
1 From the Design menu, choose Wall Tools Interference Condition.
2 Type a (Add) to add an interference condition.
3 Select walls that are to be affected by the interference condition and press
ENTER.
4 Select an existing AEC object intersecting the wall as the interference
condition and press ENTER.
5 You can type either a (Additive), s (Subtractive), or i (Ignore).
6 Press ENTER to end the command.

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Removing an Interference Condition


You can remove AEC objects, such as mass elements, from walls that they
have been added to.
To remove interference conditions from walls
1 From the Design menu, choose Wall Tools Interference Condition.
2 Type r (Remove) to remove an interference condition and press ENTER.
3 Select walls that are to have the interference condition removed and press
ENTER.
4 Select an existing AEC object that has been added to the wall as an interference condition.
5 Press ENTER to end the command.

Sweeping a Profile
You can define a profile and use that shape as the shape of a wall component.
The insertion point of the profile is used as the lower-left corner of the wall
component. The profile is not scaled when swept on the wall.
To sweep a profile along a wall component
1 Define the AEC Profile to use.
2 From the Design menu, choose Wall Tools Sweep Profile.
3 Select the walls to sweep and press ENTER.
4 Select the profile from the Profile Definitions dialog box and press OK.
5 Type the component index number to assign the profile to that component and press ENTER.

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Assigning a sweep profile to a wall

Changing the Sweep Profile Miter Angles


You can change the angles where two walls with AEC Profiles attached to
them meet.

NOTE If you miter the end of walls, then no endcaps are drawn.
To change the sweep profile miter angle
1 From the Design menu, choose Wall Tools Sweep Profile Miter Angles.
2 Select the first wall.
3 Select the second wall.

Adding an Object to the Wall


You can add a mass element or an AEC object with mass to a wall or to a component in the wall.
To add an object to a wall
1 Add an object in the location you want added to the wall.
2 From the Design menu, choose Wall Tools Body Modifier.
3 Select the wall.
4 Select the object to add to the wall.
5 Type the component index number of the component to add the object
to and press ENTER.

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6 Type a (Additive) to add the body modifier to the wall and press ENTER.
7 Type a description for the body modifier and press ENTER.
8 Type y (Yes) to erase the selected geometry, or type n (No) to keep the
geometry in the drawing and press ENTER.

Adding a body modifier to a wall

Subtracting an Object from a Wall


You can subtract the shape of a mass element or object with mass from the
wall or from a component in the wall.
To subtract a shape from a wall
1 Add an object in the location you want subtracted from the wall.
2 From the Design menu, choose Wall Tools Body Modifier.
3 Select the wall.
4 Select the object to subtract from the wall.
5 Type the component index number of the component to subtract the
object from.
6 Type s (Subtractive) to add the body modifier to the wall.
7 Type a description for the body modifier.
8 Type y (Yes) to erase the selected geometry, or type n (No) to keep the
geometry in the drawing.

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Subtracting a body modifier from a wall

Replacing the Wall with an Object


You can replace the entire wall or a component in the wall with a mass element or an AEC object with mass.
To subtract a shape from a wall
1 Add an object in the location you want to replace the wall.
2 From the Design menu, choose Wall Tools Body Modifier.
3 Select the wall.
4 Select the object to replace the wall.
5 Type the component index number of the component to replace on the
wall and press ENTER.
6 Type r (Replace) to replace the wall with the body modifier and press
ENTER.
7 Type a description for the body modifier and press ENTER.
8 Type y (Yes) to erase the selected geometry, or type n (No) to keep the
geometry in the drawing and press ENTER.

Replacing a wall with a body modifier

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Joining Walls
You can combine the baselines of two walls. The command also transfers all
sub-objects and anchored objects from one wall to the other.
Sub-objects include roofline, floorline anchors, wall modifiers, wall style
overrides, and interference conditions. Anchored objects include doors, windows, and openings anchored to the walls.
The requirements for walls to be joined are the following:

Base curve geometry


Linear walls must have colinear baselines and be touching at one
endpoint.
Arc walls must have the same center, radius, and be touching at one
end.
Walls must be of the same style and width and must be part of the same
cleanup group.

To join two walls


1 From the Design menu, choose Wall Tools Join Walls.
2 Select the first wall to join.
3 Select the second wall to join.

Reversing Wall Start/End


Walls are drawn from the first specified point to the last point. Some commands and properties are affected by that order. For example, you can add
wall modifiers to the left or right side of a wall. Left to right sides are west to
east, respectively, when a wall is drawn from south to north, regardless of
how the wall is displayed in the current view.
If you must apply commands in the opposite order, you can change the direction walls are drawn. This command affects each wall segment you select.
To change the starting point of a wall
1 From the Design menu, choose Wall Tools Reverse Wall Start/End.
2 Select the walls to be changed.
3 Press ENTER to change the direction the walls are drawn and to end the
command.

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Anchoring an Object to a Wall


You can attach objects to walls. An attached object is constrained by the wall.
You can move the object along the wall, but it does not move from the wall
until it is detached. Objects anchored to walls follow connected wall
segments.
The center of the bottom face of the object is anchored to the insertion point
on the bottom face of the wall which is midway in the wall width.
To attach an object to a wall
1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Tools Anchor to Wall.
2 Type a (Attach) to attach an object to the wall and press ENTER.
3 Select the object to attach to the wall.
4 Select the wall to attach the object to.
The object is placed on the wall and is anchored to that location on the
wall.

Detaching Objects from a Wall


You can detach an object that has been anchored to a wall.
To detach an object from a wall
1 From the Design menu, choose Wall Tools Anchor to Wall.
2 Type f (Free object) to detach an object from the wall and press ENTER.
3 Select the object to detach, and press ENTER.
The object is no longer constrained by the wall and can be moved off the
wall.

Setting the Anchored End of an Object


You can specify the end of the wall to anchor objects to.
After you select the end of the wall to anchor the object, all anchors are
changed to the end of the selected wall without moving the anchored
objects.
To set the endpoint of an object anchored to a wall
1 Select one or more objects anchored to the same wall segment.
2 Right-click, and choose Wall Anchor Set Anchored End from the shortcut menu.

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3 Specify a point near the end of the wall to designate the end for anchoring
the selected objects.
The object is now anchored to the end of the selected wall without moving the anchored objects.

Dimensioning a Single Wall


You can add dimensions to a single wall.
To dimension a wall
1 From the Design menu, choose Wall Tools Dimension Walls.
2 Select the wall to dimension, and press ENTER.
3 Specify a location for the dimension line.
4 Specify a second point to set the angle of the dimension line, or type p
(Parallel) to set the dimension line parallel to the wall.

NOTE For walls with openings or for doors and windows, the dimension is
measured either from the center of the opening or from the outer frame of
the opening. The latter option is a more valid dimension for a wall with doors
or windows. To set this parameter, change the wall settings options for
required dimensioning in the Options dialog box. For more information, see
AEC Options on page 1445.

Dimensioning Multiple Walls


You can create dimensions for multiple walls.
To dimension multiple walls
1 From the Design menu, choose Wall Tools Dimension Walls.
2 Select the walls to dimension, and press ENTER.
3 Specify a location for the dimension line.
4 Specify a second point to set the angle of the dimension line, or type p to
set the dimension line parallel to the wall.

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389

Dimensioning to the center of wall openings

NOTE For walls with openings or with doors and windows, the dimension
is measured either from the center of the opening or from the outer frame of
the opening. The latter is more valid for a wall with doors or windows. To set
this parameter, change the wall settings options for required dimensioning in
the Options dialog box. For more information, see AEC Options on page
1445.

Dimensioning to the edge of wall openings

Add and Modify Dialog Box Behavior


This section refers to the Add/Modify dialog boxes for Walls, Curtain Walls,
Roof Slabs, Stairs, and Railings.
Default Values and the Registry
In the Add dialog, style default values are never persisted to the registry as
the last used value. Only those values that you actually enter are persisted.
For example, you add a wall, then select the standard style (which has no
defaults), set the base height to 10, draw a few walls, and close the Add dialog
box. The 10 base height is stored as the last used value in the registry. Now

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you add another wall. The last used base height of 10 is retrieved from the
registry and is displayed in the Height box. Now you select a style with a
default base height of 13. The Height in the Add dialog box changes to 13.
You then draw a few walls and close the Add dialog box. In this case, the last
used value in the registry remains as 10; the 13 value taken from the style
defaults is not saved in the registry.
When an Add command is invoked for Walls, Curtain Walls, Roof Slabs,
Slabs, Stairs, and Railings, a three-step process occurs:
1 Restore the last-saved values from the registry.
2 Overwrite with any active style defaults for the last used style.
3 If the style is not changed, apply user-overridden values, also stored in the
registry, for any parameter affected by a default.
Default Values Application
In the Add dialog for Walls, Curtain Walls, Roof Slabs, Slabs, and Railings,
style defaults are always applied whenever you change the style in the Add
dialog box. Also all values are reset back to the last used value before appropriate values are applied from the style defaults, which then change the data
in the dialog controls.
For example, use two different wall styles, WallStyle1 and WallStyle2.
WallStyle1 has the following default values: Base Height = 13 and Wall
Width = 6".
WallStyle2 has a Base Height of 8.
The last used values are as follows: Base Height = 3-6" and Wall Width = 4".
When you select WallStyle1, then the base height is set to 13 and the wall
width to 6". When you select WallStyle2, the base height is set to 8 and the
wall width is reset back to the last user value, 4".
For Railings, the values are drawn from the Style when you select another
style, because every stair and railing style provides all possible values.
Color-coded Parameters
If a value does not have an active style-based default, then the title text for
the field is colored the current Window Text Color; usually this is Black.
If a value matches the style-based default, then the title text for the field is
Blue.
If a value does have a style-based default, but its value does not match that
of the default, then the title text for the field is Red. This occurs when you
override the default value.

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Object Properties Values Persistence


Values not displayed directly in the Add or Modify dialog box are never persisted to the registry as last used values.
For example, while adding a wall, you click the Properties button and change
the wall cleanup radius to another value. The desired walls are added to the
drawing the command is closed. The last cleanup radius value is not persisted
to the registry.
There is one exception to this rule for Stairs. The state of the calculator locks
is always persisted. This includes tread, rise, straight length, and number of
risers.

Walls Command List

Menu command

Command line

Right-click (with wall


selected)

Walls
Wall

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Add Wall

WallAdd

Modify Wall

WallModify

Convert to Walls

WallConvert

Wall Styles...

Wall Style

Cleanup Group
Definitions...

Wall, then CL

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Wall Modify...

WallStyleEdit

Edit Wall Style...

WallProps

Wall Properties...

DoorAdd

Insert Door...

WindowAdd

Insert Window...

OpeningAdd

Insert Opening...

WinAssemblyAdd

Insert Window
Assembly...

Menu command

Command line

Right-click (with wall


selected)

CurtainWallConvertWall

Model Tools Convert


to Curtain Wall

WallAddSelected

Add Selected

Add Wall Modifier...

WallModifierAdd

Plan Tools Add Wall


Modifier...

Remove Wall Modifier...

WallModifierRemove

Plan Tools Remove Wall


Modifier

Convert Polyline to Wall


Modifier...

WallModifierConvert

Plan Tools Convert


Polyline to Wall
Modifier...

Wall Modifier Styles...

WallModifierStyle

Insert Modifier Style as


Polyline

WallModifier

Override Endcap Style

WallApplyEndcap

Wall Endcap Styles...

WallEndCapStyle

Insert Endcap Style


as Polyline

WallEndCap

Merge Walls

WallMerge

Plan Tools Merge

Override Cleanup
Radius

WallApplyCleanupRadius
Override

Plan Tools Override


Cleanup Radius

Toggle Wall Graph


Display

WallGraphDisplayToggle

Roof Line

RoofLine

Model Tools Roof Line

Floor Line

FloorLine

Model Tools Floor Line

Interference Condition

WallInterference

Model Tools
Interference

Sweep Profile

WallSweep

Model Tools Sweep


Profile

Wall Tools

Plan Tools Override


Endcap

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394

Menu command

Command line

Right-click (with wall


selected)

Sweep Profile Miter


Angles

WallSweepMiterAngles

Model Tools Sweep


Profile Miter Angles

Body Modifier

WallBody

Model Tools Body


Modifier

Join Walls

Wall Join

Plan Tools Join

Reverse Wall Start/End

Wall Reverse

Plan Tools Reverse

Anchor to Wall

WallAnchor

Dimension Walls

WallDim

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Plan Tools Dimension

Curtain Walls

15

Curtain walls provide a grid or framework for inserting

In this chapter

objects such as windows and doors. They have many

Creating curtain walls

similarities to standard walls including a baseline, roof


line, and floor line, and they allow for interferences. You
can insert doors and windows into a curtain wall, just
like standard walls, but the insertion process is different.
Curtain walls are also different from standard walls in
that they are made up of one or more grids. Each grid in
a curtain wall has either a horizontal division or a vertical division, but you can nest the grids to create a variety
of patterns from simple to complex.

Working with nested grids in

curtain walls
Modifying the display of curtain

walls
Modifying the elements in a

curtain wall
Modifying curtain walls
Editing objects anchored in

curtain walls
Creating curtain wall units
Modifying the elements in a

curtain wall unit


Modifying the elements in a

curtain wall unit


Modifying curtain wall units

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Curtain Walls
Curtain walls provide a grid or framework for inserting objects such as
windows and doors. You can use curtain walls to model components such as

Large scale curtain walls


Storefronts with components
Assemblies of custom shaped doors and windows

Curtain walls have many similarities to standard walls. They have a baseline,
roof line, and floor line, and allow for interferences. They are also stylebased, meaning there are preset characteristics assigned to each curtain wall
that determine its appearance. You can insert doors and windows into a curtain wall, just like standard walls, but the insertion process is different.
Curtain walls are also different from standard walls in that they are made up
of one or more grids. Each grid in a curtain wall has either a horizontal
division or a vertical division, but you can nest the grids to create a variety
of patterns from simple to complex.

Curtain wall nested grid examples

Each cell in a grid can contain either a panel infill, to represent basic cladding
materials such as a stone wall panel or glazing, or an object such as a window
or a door.

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Specifying panel and window infill

Other objects you can insert in a grid include curtain wall units and window
assemblies. Curtain wall units are very similar to curtain walls except that the
grid cells can contain only panel infills, not objects. Curtain wall units are
designed to represent complex elements that are repeated within your main
curtain wall.

Specifying curtain wall unit infill

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397

Window assemblies serve a similar function as curtain wall units but window
assemblies can contain panel infills or objects such as doors or windows.
Window assemblies can be inserted into curtain walls and standard walls.

Specifying window assembly infill

Both curtain wall units and window assemblies can reduce the need for
nested grids, making edits to the curtain wall easier.
Grids are the foundation of curtain walls, curtain wall units, and window
assemblies. Every grid has four element types

Divisions: Define the direction of the grid (horizontal or vertical) and


the number of cells
Cell Infills: Contain another grid, a panel infill, or an object such as a
window or a door
Frames: Define the edge around the outside of the primary grid and
nested grids
Mullions: Define the edges between the cells

NOTE Division is an abstract element, in contrast to the other three element types that represent physical elements of the curtain wall.

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Each element type is assigned a default definition that describes what


elements of that type look like.

Element type

Default definitions

Divisions

Primary horizontal grid with a fixed cell dimension of 13


and secondary vertical grid with a fixed cell dimension of 3

Cell Infills

Cells containing simple panels 2" thick

Frames

Left, right, top, and bottom outer edges of grid 3" wide
and 3" deep

Mullions

Edges between cells 1" wide and 3" deep

Specifying grid element types

You can create new element definitions and assign those definitions to
specific elements within the curtain wall. For example, you can create
multiple infill definitions, and then assign different infills to specific cells in
the grid.

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399

Specifying different infill definitions

Likewise, you can create multiple frame definitions, and then assign a different definition to each frame edge (top, bottom, left, right).

Specifying different frame definitions

You create element definitions from the Design Rules tab of the Curtain Wall
Style Properties dialog box. Select an element from the tree to display a list
of definitions for that element, icons for adding and removing definitions,
and text boxes for creating the definitions.

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From the same Design Rules tab, you can assign the definitions to specific
elements in a grid. Select a grid from the tree to display a list of assignments
for that grid, icons for creating new assignments and columns in the assignment table for specifying the definition to use and where. You can also edit
the definitions at the bottom of the dialog box.

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To get started with curtain walls, draw a curtain wall using one of the
methods described in the next section, Creating Curtain Walls. Try a
variety of the existing curtain wall styles, find a style you like and make a
copy of it. Then, modify the element definitions and assignments to suit
your own needs. For more information, see Modifying the Elements in a
Curtain Wall on page 477.
After you become more familiar with curtain walls, element definitions, and
assignments, you can use the following steps to create a curtain wall.
To create a curtain wall
1 Create a new curtain wall style. For more information, see Creating a
New Curtain Wall Style on page 473.
2 Create element definitions for the curtain wall style. For more information, see Creating Element Definitions for a Curtain Wall Style on page
419.
3 Assign element definitions to specific elements in the curtain wall. For
more information, see Assigning Definitions to Curtain Wall Elements
on page 450.

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4 Draw a curtain wall using the style you created. For more information, see
the next section, Creating Curtain Walls.
5 Make any minor adjustments to the cells or edges using the curtain wall
overrides. For more information, see Overriding Cell and Edge Assignments in Curtain Walls on page 478.

Creating Curtain Walls


Curtain walls are created in much the same way as standard walls. You can
specify a style, a height, and start and endpoints. Curtain walls can be
straight, or curved or a combination of the two. Unlike standard walls, you
can also create curtain walls that are based on a curve, convert a 2D layout
grid to a curtain wall, or create a custom grid from 2D lines, arcs, and circles.
You can also convert standard walls to curtain walls.

Creating a Straight Curtain Wall


To create a straight curtain wall
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Add Curtain Wall.
2 In the Add Curtain Walls dialog box, select the curtain wall style.

NOTE If you want the curtain wall to use the default dimensions defined in
the style, select Use Style Defaults. For more information, see Setting Default
Dimensions for a Curtain Wall Style on page 471.
3 Click Straight to draw a straight curtain wall.
4 Specify a start point for the curtain wall.

NOTE You cannot undo the first point when creating a curtain wall. If you
started the curtain wall at the wrong point, either select another point or click
Cancel to close the dialog box, and then start the curtain wall again.
5 Specify another point to end this curtain wall.

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403

Drawing a straight curtain wall segment

A marker on top of the curtain wall indicates the direction the curtain wall
is being drawn.
6 Continue placing curtain walls to create, for example, a building exterior
or a room.
You can use the Ortho Close or Polyline Close options to finish the creation of your curtain wall.
Ortho Close: Closes the space by drawing two curtain walls based on the
direction you specify. The direction is extended until it meets a line perpendicular to the initial edge of the curtain wall.

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Using the Ortho Close option

Polyline Close: Closes the curtain wall by drawing a curtain wall from
the last point specified for the curtain walls to the first point specified in
this group of curtain walls.
7 Click Close to end the command.

NOTE On the toolbar in the Add Curtain Walls dialog box, you can:

Click Floating Viewer to view the curtain wall.


Click Properties to change any property of the curtain wall.
Click Match to match the property of another curtain wall object.
Click Undo to undo the curtain wall.

Creating a Curved Curtain Wall


To create curved curtain walls
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Add Curtain Wall.
2 In the Add Curtain Walls dialog box, select the curtain wall style.

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405

NOTE If you want the curtain wall to use the default dimensions defined in
the style, select Use Style Defaults. For more information, see Setting Default
Dimensions for a Curtain Wall Style on page 471.
3 Click Curved to draw a curved curtain wall.
4 Specify a start point for the curtain wall.

NOTE You cannot undo the first point when creating a curtain wall. If you
start the curtain wall at the wrong point, either select another point or click
Cancel to close the dialog box, and then start the curtain wall again.
5 Specify the midpoint of the curve.
6 Specify the endpoint of the curved curtain wall.

Drawing a curved curtain wall segment

A marker on top of the curtain wall indicates the direction the curtain wall
is being drawn.
7 Continue placing curtain walls to create, for example, a building exterior
or a room.
You can use the Ortho Close or Polyline Close options to finish the creation of an enclosed space. For an explanation of these options, see Creating a Straight Curtain Wall on page 403.
8 Press ENTER to end the command.

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NOTE On the toolbar in the Add Curtain Walls dialog box, you can:

Click Floating Viewer to view the curtain wall.


Click Properties to change any property of the curtain wall.
Click Match to match the property of another curtain wall object.
Click Undo to undo the curtain wall object.

Facet Deviation
The smoothness (tesselation) of curved edges is controlled by the FACETDEV
variable. This variable sets the number of facets to display on curved AEC
objects. This must be set before converting the polyline to slabs.
The facet deviation is available only on the command line by typing
AecFacetDev.
The number you set as the facet deviation defines the maximum distance
from the chord to the arc, the chord being an edge that is created from
faceting the curve, to the true mathematical arc. The facet deviation has a
range of greater than zero (0) and no upper limit.
The minimum number of facets is 8. For example, create a cylinder mass
element to have a 1 radius, and set the facetdev to 1, the cylinder has 8
faces.

Creating a Curtain Wall that References a Curve


If you want to create a curtain wall with a mixture of straight and curved segments, you can use the Add Curtain Wall command. However, for complicated designs, you might find it easier to draw the segments using lines, arcs,
and circles, and then reference that curve as the baseline for the curtain wall.
This method has an added advantage in that the curve remains in control of
the length and baseline of the curtain wall. Any changes you make to the
curve are reflected in changes to the curtain wall.

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Creating a curtain wall that references a curve

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Use any of the following entities to create the reference curve:

Line
Arc
Circle
Polyline
Spline
AEC objects (excluding stairs and multi-view blocks)

To create a curtain wall that references a curve


1 Draw a reference curve for the curtain wall.
2 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Reference Curtain Wall.
3 Select the curve.
A list of curtain wall styles is displayed.
4 Select a curtain wall style.

NOTE If you want the curtain wall to use the default dimensions defined in
the style, select Use Style Defaults. For more information, see Setting Default
Dimensions for a Curtain Wall Style on page 471.
5 Click OK.

Converting a Layout Grid to a Curtain Wall


You can create a curtain wall grid that is based on a 2D layout grid. If you
already have 2D layout grids in an existing drawing, you can easily convert
to curtain walls. Or if you are already familiar with layout grids, it is an efficient way to create a curtain wall, and then experiment with the curtain wall
commands to learn more about them.

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409

Converting a 2D layout grid to a curtain wall

The horizontal and vertical lines of the 2D layout grid define the divisions
for the curtain wall grids. The grid cells, frame, and mullions are assigned
default definitions. For more information, see Assigning Definitions to Curtain Wall Elements on page 450.
To convert a 2D layout grid to a curtain wall
1 From the Desktop menu, choose Layout Tools Add Layout Grid (2D).
2 Create a layout grid. For more information, see Layout Grids on page
1568.
3 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Convert Layout Grid to
Curtain Wall.
4 Select the layout grid.
You are prompted to erase the layout grid after the conversion.
5 To erase the layout grid, type y (Yes). To have the layout grid remain after
the curtain wall is created, type n (No).
Curtain wall grids are one dimensionaldivided either horizontally or
vertically. To create the horizontal and vertical patterns in the 2D layout
grid, the curtain wall uses a primary grid with a secondary grid nested
inside it. For more information about nested grids, see Working with
Nested Grids in Curtain Walls on page 414.
You are prompted for the direction of the primary grid in the curtain wall.
If you select horizontal, the primary grid has horizontal divisions that
cross over the vertical divisions of the secondary grid (see the following
illustration). If you select vertical, the primary grid has vertical divisions
that cross over the horizontal divisions of the secondary grid.

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Specifying primary division directions

6 Select vertical or horizontal as the orientation for the primary division.


You are prompted to enter a name for the new style. For more information
about curtain wall styles, see Working with Curtain Wall Styles on page
419.
7 Type a name for this new curtain wall style.
8 Click OK.

Creating a Curtain Wall with a Custom Grid


Curtain walls contain one or more grids. You can define a custom grid with
lines, arcs, and circles, and then convert that linework into a curtain wall.
After the conversion, the curtain wall is in Edit in Place so that you can make
modifications to it. At any point, you can save the resulting curtain wall as a
new curtain wall style. For more information, see Using Edit in Place for
Curtain Walls on page 483.

NOTE Curtain wall grids are either horizontal or vertical. To create a grid pattern with horizontal and vertical cells, like the previous example, nested grids are
used. For more information about nested grids, see Working with Nested Grids
in Curtain Walls on page 414.
To create a curtain wall with a custom grid
1 Use lines, arcs, and circles to draw a grid in the world coordinate system
(WCS).
2 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Convert Linework to
Curtain Wall.
3 Select the lines, arcs, or circles that define your grid, and press ENTER.
4 Select one of the grid lines as the baseline for the curtain wall or press
ENTER to use the line along the X axis as the baseline.

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411

Converting linework to curtain walls using the default baseline option

TIP If you draw your linework in the XY plane (in plan view) and accept the
default baseline, the resulting window assembly is displayed from the
Z direction.

Converting linework to curtain walls using the specified baseline option

You are prompted to erase the lines that define the grid.
5 To erase the lines, type y (Yes). To have the lines remain after the curtain
wall is created, type n (No).

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Each enclosed area is assigned the default cell infill. The lines between the
cells are assigned the default mullion definition, and the boundary
around the grid is assigned the default frame definition. For more information, see Assigning Definitions to Curtain Wall Elements on page
450.

NOTE You cannot modify the division definition of a custom grid created
from lines, arcs, and circles. You can, however, assign a different division definition to it. For more information, see Assigning Divisions to a Curtain Wall
Grid on page 450.

Converting a Wall to a Curtain Wall


You can create curtain walls based on existing standard walls. For each wall
segment, a separate curtain wall is created. During the conversion process,
you are prompted to select a curtain wall style that determines the number
and size of cells in the curtain wall grid as well as the appearance of the cells,
frame, and mullions. For more information, see the next section Working
with Curtain Wall Styles.

Converting a wall to a curtain wall

To convert a standard wall into a curtain wall


1 From the Design menu, choose Walls Add Wall and draw a standard
wall in the world coordinate system (WCS).
2 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Convert Wall to Curtain
Wall.
3 Select the wall, and press ENTER.

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413

You are prompted for the location of the curtain wall baseline. You can
align the baseline with the left, right, or center of the standard wall.

Specifying justification for converting walls to curtain walls

4 Select Left, Right, or Center as the alignment.


A list of curtain wall styles is displayed.
5 Select a Curtain Wall style and click OK.
You are prompted to erase the standard wall after the conversion.
6 To erase the wall, type y (Yes). To have the wall remain after the curtain
wall is created, type n (No). Press ENTER.

Working with Nested Grids in Curtain Walls


Each curtain wall grid is one dimensional with either a horizontal or vertical
division. By nesting grids, you can create a variety of patterns from simple to
complex.

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Specifying nested grids

When you nest grids, you start with one primary grid. Each cell in the primary grid can then be filled with another grid. For example, if your primary
grid is horizontal and has three cells, you can nest a vertical grid in each horizontal cell to create a simple 2D grid. This is the nesting configuration for
the Standard curtain wall style.

Specifying cell division definitions 1

The previous illustration shows all cells in the grid with the same cell assignmenta vertical division. However, each cell in a grid is independent and
can have a separate assignment. For example, the following illustration
shows a three cell horizontal grid with different assignments in each cell. The
bottom cell contains another horizontal division, the middle cell contains
vertical divisions of varying width, and the top cell contains a vertical divisions of a fixed width.

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415

Specifying cell division definitions 2

The previous example show a primary grid with one level of nested grids.
However, you can continue to nest grids to create multiple levels. For example, the following illustrations show the Standard curtain wall style, which is
a simple 2D grid, with one horizontal cell and three vertical cells. Another
grid is nested in the first cell of the secondary grid. This creates a tertiary grid.
A fourth level is created by nesting another grid in the top cell of the tertiary
grid. The final illustration shows the nested grids assigned to all cells.

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Specifying a sequence of nested grids

You can define nested grids by using the Design Rules tab of the Curtain Wall
Style dialog box. The tree on the left side of the tab lists of the grids. There is
always one primary grid. The primary grid can have one or more secondary
grids. Each secondary grid can have one or more tertiary grids, and so on.

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TIP To quickly create nested grids in all cells, change the default cell assignment to Nested Grid. If you want multiple levels of nesting, be sure to change
the default cell assignment for each grid. For more information, see Creating a
Nested Grid in a Curtain Wall on page 452.
Each grid has its own cell assignments. You assign cells to contain another
grid, a panel infill, or an object such as a door or window. For more information, see Assigning Infills to Curtain Wall Cells on page 451.

Primary grid and cell assignments

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Secondary grid and cell assignments

Working with Curtain Wall Styles


Curtain walls are style-based, meaning there are preset characteristics
assigned to each curtain wall that determine its appearance and function. By
changing from one style of curtain wall to another, you can quickly study
several different design options. Any changes you make to the style are
reflected throughout your building updating all curtain walls of that particular style. You can also apply overrides to a single curtain wall, without
changing other curtain walls of the same style.
A curtain wall style contains

Element definitions
Definition assignments for each element
Display properties for each element
Default dimensions
Notes about the style and any associated reference files

You can modify the Standard curtain wall style, or you can leave the Standard
style as it is and create a new style. For more information, see Creating a
New Curtain Wall Style on page 473.

Creating Element Definitions for a Curtain Wall


Style
Element definitions determine the appearance of the four basic curtain wall
elements. There is a different definition type for each element.

Element type

Default definitions

Divisions

Primary horizontal grid with a fixed cell dimension of 13


and secondary vertical grid with a fixed cell dimension of 5

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Element type

Default definitions

Cell Infills

Cells containing simple panels

Frames

Left, right, top, and bottom outer edges of grid 3" wide
and 3" deep

Mullions

Edges between cells 1" wide and 3" deep

Curtain wall grid element types

Each type of element can have multiple definitions. For example, you can
define a division to create a horizontal grid or a vertical grid, and you can
define the cells to contain a nested grid or a window assembly. To make reuse
easier, you can save the element definitions, and then assign them to grids,
cells, frames, or mullions as needed.
Element definitions are style-specific. When you create element definitions
for a specific curtain wall style, those definitions are available only for curtain
walls of that style. For example, if you define a window assembly infill for
one curtain wall style, that infill is not available as an option when you edit
a curtain wall of a different style.
For information about defining the color, linetype, or layer of curtain wall
elements, see Modifying the Display of Curtain Walls on page 465.

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Defining Divisions for Curtain Wall Grids


The divisions of a grid define the orientation, that determines the direction
of the grid cells and mullions, and they define a division type that determines the number and size of cells.

NOTE Creating a nested grid is not a division rule. To create a nested grid, add
a cell assignment. For more information, see Creating a Nested Grid in a Curtain Wall on page 452 and Working with Nested Grids in Curtain Walls on
page 414.
You can create a variety of division definitions under different names, and
then assign different divisions to each grid in your curtain wall. Although
you can create multiple definitions, there can be only one division assignment per grid. For more information about assigning divisions to a particular
grid, see Assigning Divisions to a Curtain Wall Grid on page 450.

NOTE You create division definitions for a specific curtain wall style and those
definitions can be assigned only to grids in curtain walls of that style.

Creating a Division Definition for a Curtain Wall


To create a division definition
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Curtain Wall Styles.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Styles, and choose Edit from the shortcut
menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select Divisions under
Element Definitions.
5 Click the New division icon.
6 Type a name for this division definition in Name.
7 Select either the Vertical Orientation icon or the Horizontal Orientation
icon.
8 Select one of the following division types and specify offsets if needed.

Fixed Cell Dimension. For more information, see Specifying a Fixed


Size for Cells in a Curtain Wall Grid on page 422.
Fixed Number of Cells. For more information, see Specifying a Fixed
Number of Cells for a Curtain Wall Grid on page 424.

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Manual. For more information, see Manually Defining the Number


and Size of Cells in a Curtain Wall Grid on page 426.
Baseline/ Base Height (horizontal grids only). For more information,
see Excluding Gables and Steps from a Curtain Wall Grid on page
427.
Polyline (vertical grids only). For more information, see Dividing a
Vertical Curtain Wall Grid at Each Vertex Along a Polyline on page
429.

After you create a division definition, you can assign the definition to a
specific grid in a curtain wall. For more information, see Assigning Divisions to a Curtain Wall Grid on page 450.
9 When you are finished creating division definitions, click OK to return to
the Style Manager.

Specifying a Fixed Size for Cells in a Curtain Wall Grid


You can define a specific size for the cells in a grid. In this case, the number
of cells is determined by the length or height of the grid, depending on the
orientation.
To specify a fixed size for cells
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Curtain Wall Styles.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Styles, and choose Edit from the shortcut
menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select Divisions under
Element Definitions.
5 Select a Divisions definition or create a new one.
6 Select Fixed Cell Dimension as the division type.

7 Type a size for the cells in Cell Dimension. If you are defining a vertical
division, then the cell dimension is the length of the cell from mullion to

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mullion. If you are defining a horizontal division, then the cell dimension
is the height of the cell.

Specifying a fixed size for cells

8 To specify an offset for the grid, type an offset distance in Start Offset or
End Offset. For more information, see Specifying an Offset for a Curtain
Wall Grid on page 429.

TIP The frame width is calculated as part of the cell size. Therefore, cells
adjacent to the frame can appear to be a different size than the other cells. If
you do not want the frame width included in the cell size, specify an offset for
the grid that is equal to the frame width.
When you draw a curtain wall using a fixed cell dimension, there is often
extra space between the last full-size cell and the end of the curtain wall.
9 To adjust the cells and accommodate this space automatically as you draw
curtain walls, select the Auto-Adjust Cells option.
10 Select the cells that you want to be adjusted.

For horizontal grids, select the Bottom, Middle, or Top icon


For vertical grids, select Start, Middle, or End icon
You can select any combination of these options. For example, bottom
only, bottom and top, middle and top, and so on.

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11 To increase the size of the specified cells to accommodate extra space,


select Grow as the cell adjustment. To decrease the size, select Shrink.
12 Click OK. Or, to make additional adjustments to the division you just
defined, click Convert to Manual Division.
To calculate the number of grid lines needed based on the size you specified, type a value for conversion height (for horizontal divisions) or conversion length (for vertical divisions).
The specified divisions are displayed in a table that you can easily modify.

For information about editing the division after the conversion, see,
Manually Defining the Number and Size of Cells in a Curtain Wall Grid
on page 426.
For information about assigning the division definition to a specific grid
in your curtain wall, see Assigning Divisions to a Curtain Wall Grid.

Specifying a Fixed Number of Cells for a Curtain Wall Grid


You can define a specific number of cells in a grid. In this case, the size of the
cells is determined by the length or height of the grid, depending on the
orientation.
To specify a fixed number of cells
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Curtain Wall Styles.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Styles, and choose Edit from the shortcut
menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select Divisions under
Element Definitions.
5 Select a Division definition or create a new one.
6 Select Fixed Number of Cells as the division type.
7 Type the desired number of cells in Number of Cells.

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Specifying a fixed number of cells

8 To specify an offset for the grid, type an offset distance in Start Offset or
End Offset. For more information, see the next section, Specifying an
Offset for a Curtain Wall Grid.
9

If you want to make additional adjustments to the grid you just defined,
click Convert to Manual Division and specify a conversion height or
length. For more information see, Manually Defining the Number and
Size of Cells in a Curtain Wall Grid on page 426.

10 Click OK. Or, to make additional adjustments to the division you just
defined, click Convert to Manual Division.
11 To calculate the distance between grid lines based on the specified number
of cells, type a value for conversion height (for horizontal divisions) or
conversion length (for vertical divisions).
The divisions you specified are displayed in a table that you can easily
modify.

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For information about editing the division after the conversion, see the
next section, Manually Defining the Number and Size of Cells in a Curtain Wall Grid.
For information about assigning the division definition to a specific grid
in your curtain wall, see Assigning Divisions to a Curtain Wall Grid.

Manually Defining the Number and Size of Cells in a Curtain


Wall Grid
You can manually add gridlines and specify an offset for each one when you
need to create a unique grid that does not fit into any of the other division
types. You can also start with a fixed cell dimension grid or a fixed number
of cells grid, and then manually adjust the grid lines to suit your needs.
To manually define the number and size of cells
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Curtain Wall Styles.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Styles, and choose Edit from the shortcut
menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select Divisions under
Element Definitions.
5 Select a Division definition or create a new one.
6 Select Manual as the division type.
7 Click the Add Grid Line icon to insert a grid line. Insert as many grid lines
as you need. If you need to remove a grid line, select it from the table and
click the Remove Grid Line icon.
8 Under Offset in the gridline table, type an offset distance for each grid
line.

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9 Under From in the grid line table, select the grid location from which the
grid line is offset.

10 To specify an offset for the grid, type an offset distance in Start Offset or
End Offset. For more information, see Specifying an Offset for a Curtain
Wall Grid on page 429.
11 Click OK when youve completed your manual grid definition to return to
the Style Manager.
For information about assigning the division definition to a specific grid in
your curtain wall, see Assigning Divisions to a Curtain Wall Grid.

Excluding Gables and Steps from a Curtain Wall Grid


If you are designing a curtain wall that has gables in the roof line or steps in
the floor line, there may be occasions when you do not want the grid to
extend into those areas. To define your curtain wall in this case, you can
define a single-cell horizontal grid that excludes those areas, and then use
that grid as a starting point for nested grids. For information about nested
grids, see Working with Nested Grids in Curtain Walls on page 414.

NOTE For information about adding steps or gables to your curtain wall, see
Changing the Roof Line and Floor Line of a Curtain Wall on page 497.
To exclude gables or steps from a grid
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Curtain Wall Styles.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Styles, and choose Edit from the shortcut
menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select Divisions under
Element Definitions.
5 Select a Division definition or create a new one.
6 Select the Horizontal icon as the orientation.
7 Select Baseline/Base Height as the division type.
8 Select Divide at Baseline or Divide at Base Height.

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Divide at Baseline: Forces a division at the baseline to exclude steps from


the grid.

Divide at Base Height: Forces a division at the base height to exclude


gables from the grid.

9 To offset the division from the baseline, specify a positive number in Baseline Offset.

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10 To offset the division from the base height, specify a positive number in
Base Height Offset.
11 Click OK to return to the Style Manager.
The resulting grid contains a single, horizontal cell. To add additional divisions, use nested grids. For more information, see Creating a Nested Grid
in a Curtain Wall on page 452.
For information about assigning the division definition to a specific grid
in your curtain wall, see Assigning Divisions to a Curtain Wall Grid.

Dividing a Vertical Curtain Wall Grid at Each Vertex Along a


Polyline
If you create a curtain wall by referencing a polyline, then you can define a
vertical grid for your curtain wall by placing grid lines at each vertex along
the polyline.
To divide a vertical curtain wall grid at each vertex along a referenced
polyline
1 Draw a polyline and use it as a reference curve to create a curtain wall. For
more information, see Creating a Curtain Wall that References a Curve
on page 407.
2 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Curtain Wall Styles.
3 Select a style under Curtain Wall Styles, and choose Edit from the shortcut
menu.
4 Click the Design Rules tab.
5 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select Divisions under
Element Definitions.
6 Select a Division definition or create a new one.
7 Select the Vertical icon as the orientation.
8 Select Polyline as the division type.
9 Click OK to exit the dialog box and return to the Style Manager.
For information about assigning the division definition to a specific grid
in your curtain wall, see Assigning Divisions to a Curtain Wall Grid.

Specifying an Offset for a Curtain Wall Grid


By default, grids cells are measured from the start and end points of the curtain wall baseline (for horizontal divisions) or from the floor line to the roof
line (for vertical divisions). The width of the grid frame is not considered in
calculating the size of the cell. For example, if you draw a curtain wall with
a 14' baseline and a 1' frame on the left and right, and you specify a fixed

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number of vertical cells, the cells do not appear equal in size. The first and
last cells appear smaller because they include the frame. To make the cells
equal in size, offset the start and end of the grid by the width of the frame.

NOTE You can offset the grid only when the division type is Fixed Cell
Dimension, Fixed Number of Cells, or Manual.
To offset the grid
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Curtain Wall Styles.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Styles, and choose Edit from the shortcut
menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select Divisions under
Element Definitions.
5 Select a Division definition or create a new one.
6 Select Fixed Cell Dimension, Fixed Number of Cells, or Manual as the
division type.
7 To offset the grid, type a positive value for any of the following options

For horizontal grids


Start Offset: Distance between the start point of the curtain wall
baseline to the start of the first cell.
End Offset: Distance between the end point of the curtain wall baseline to the end of the last cell.

For vertical grids


Bottom Offset: Distance between the floor line of the curtain wall to
the start of the first cell.
Top Offset: Distance between the roof line of the curtain wall to the
end of the top cell.

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Specifying grid offset directions

8 Click OK to exit the dialog box and return to the Style Manager.

Removing a Division Definition from a Curtain Wall Style


If you have a division definition that you no longer need, you can remove it
from the divisions definitions list. You cannot remove a division definition
when it is currently assigned to a grid. In addition, you cannot remove the
default division definition, but you can modify it as needed.
To remove a division definition
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Curtain Wall Styles.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Styles, and choose Edit from the shortcut
menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select Divisions under
Element Definitions.
5 Select a Division definition that you want to remove.
6 Click the Remove Division icon or select Remove from the shortcut menu.
7 Click OK to exit the dialog box and return to the Style Manager.

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Defining Infills for Curtain Wall Cells


An infill defines the contents of a curtain wall cell. A curtain wall cell can be
empty (no infill), it can contain a grid (nested grid), or it can contain one of
two infills: a panel or a style. Use the style infill for inserting doors, windows,
and other objects into a curtain wall.

Specifying different infills

NOTE Nested grids and no infill do not require element definitions. These are
options you select when assigning an infill to cell. For information, see Creating
a Nested Grid in a Curtain Wall on page 452 and Removing the Infill from a
Curtain Wall Cell on page 455.
You can define as many infills as you need, and then use cell assignments to
specify the cells that use each infill. You can modify, as needed, a default infill
that is used for all unassigned cells. For more information about cell assignments, see Assigning Definitions to Curtain Wall Elements on page 450.

NOTE Create infill definitions for a specific curtain wall style. Those definitions
can be assigned only to grid cells in curtain walls of that style.

Creating a Panel Infill for a Curtain Wall


Use a simple panel infill to represent basic cladding materials in the curtain
wall, such as a stone wall panel, concrete panel, metal panel, or glazing infill.

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To create a panel infill


1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Curtain Wall Styles.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Styles, and choose Edit from the shortcut
menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select Infills under Element Definitions.
5 Click the New Infill icon to create a new infill.
6 Type a descriptive name for the infill.
7 Select Simple Panel as the infill type.
8 Select an alignment for the infill. For more information, see Specifying
an Alignment for a Curtain Wall Infill on page 435.
9 Specify an offset for the infill. For more information, see Specifying an
Offset for a Curtain Wall Infill on page 436.
10 Type a thickness for the panel in the Panel Thickness text box.

Specifying infill panel thickness

11 Click OK to exit the dialog box and return to the Style Manager.
After you create an infill definition, you can assign it to any cell in a curtain wall grid. For more information, see Assigning Infills to Curtain Wall
Cells on page 451.

NOTE The layer, color, linetype, and other display properties of the default
infill are applied to all infills unless you create a custom display component
for each definition. You can then control the display of each infill definition
independently. For more information, see Modifying the Display of Curtain
Walls on page 465.

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Creating an Infill for Inserting an Object into a Curtain Wall


Use the Style infill to insert objects into a curtain wall. You can insert doors,
windows, window assemblies, curtain wall units, and AEC Polygons by
selecting a specific style of that object.

TIP After you insert an object in a cell, you can select that object independent
of the grid, and access editing options for the object from the shortcut menu.
To create an infill for inserting an object into a curtain wall
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Curtain Wall Styles.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Styles, and choose Edit from the shortcut
menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select Infills under Element Definitions.
5 Click the New Infill icon to create a new infill.
6 Type a descriptive name for the infill.
7 Select Style as the infill type.
The right side of the dialog box changes to display a tree view of the object
styles available for insertion into a curtain wall.
8 Select an object style.
There is a unique icon for each type of style. For example, the door style
icon
and the curtain wall unit icon
. These icons are also displayed next to the infill name at the top of the dialog to help you identify
the type of infill.
9 Select an alignment for the infill. For more information, see the next section Specifying an Alignment for a Curtain Wall Infill.
10 Specify an offset for the infill. For more information, see the next section,
Specifying an Offset for a Curtain Wall Infill.
11 Click OK to exit the dialog box and return to the Style Manager.
After you create an infill definition, you can assign it to any cell in a curtain wall grid. For more information, see Assigning Infills to Curtain Wall
Cells on page 451.

NOTE The layer, color, linetype, and other display properties of the default
infill are applied to all infills unless you create a custom display component
for each definition. You can then control the display of each infill definition

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independently. For more information, see Modifying the Display of Curtain


Walls on page 465.

Specifying an Alignment for a Curtain Wall Infill


You can align an infill so that it is centered with the baseline of the curtain
wall, in front of the baseline, or behind the baseline. In plan view, the front
of a curtain wall (drawn from left to right) is below the baseline and the back
is above the baseline.

NOTE To move the infill away from the baseline, see Specifying an Offset for
a Curtain Wall Infill on page 436.
To specify an alignment for an infill
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Curtain Wall Styles.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Styles, and choose Edit from the shortcut
menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select Infills under Element Definitions.
5 Select an infill, or create a new one.
6 Select an alignment: front, center, or back.
7 Click OK to exit the dialog box and return to the Style Manager.

Specifying infill alignments

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Specifying an Offset for a Curtain Wall Infill


By default, infills are centered on the curtain wall baseline. If your design
requires that the infill be aligned with frame edges or some other part of the
curtain wall, then you can specify an offset for the infill.
To specify an offset for an infill
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Curtain Wall Styles.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Styles, and choose Edit from the shortcut
menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select Infills under Element Definitions.
5 Select an infill, or create a new one.
6 Type a distance in the Offset text box. In plan view, positive numbers offset the infill above the baseline and negative numbers offset the infill
below the baseline.
7 As shown in the following illustrations, the offset is also affected by the
selected alignment for the infill.

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Specifying panel infill offsets

8 Click OK to exit the dialog box and return to the Style Manager.

Removing an Infill Definition from a Curtain Wall Style


If you have an infill definition that you no longer need, you can remove it
from the Infills definitions list. You cannot remove an infill definition when

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it is currently assigned to a cell. In addition, you cannot remove the default


infill definition, but you can modify it as needed.

NOTE For information about removing an infill from a cell, see Removing the
Infill from a Curtain Wall Cell on page 455.
To remove an infill definition
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Curtain Wall Styles.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Styles, and choose Edit from the shortcut
menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select Infills under Element Definitions.
5 Select the unneeded infill definition from the list.
6 Click the Remove Infill icon to remove the infill definition.
7 Click OK to exit the dialog box and return to the Style Manager.

Defining Curtain Wall Frames


The curtain wall frame is represented by the outer edges of the grid. The
overall frame size is determined by the length and height of the curtain wall
grid. You can define a frame by specifying a width and depth or by selecting
a profile. For more information about profiles, see Working with Profiles
on page 1656.

Specifying default and profile-based frames

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You can create as many frame definitions as you want, and then assign the
definitions to the frames as needed. If you have nested grids, then each grid
has its own frame. There is a default frame definition, that you can modify
as needed. Unassigned frames are not displayed. For more information, see
Assigning Definitions to Curtain Wall Frames on page 458.

TIP You can copy a mullion definition and use it as a frame definition. Select
the mullion definition and drag it to Frames in the tree on the left side of the
dialog box.

NOTE Create frame definitions for a specific curtain wall style. Those definitions can be assigned only to frames in curtain walls of that style.

Defining a Curtain Wall Frame by Width and Depth


You can define a frame by specifying its width and depth. The overall frame
size is determined by the length and height of the curtain wall grid.

Specifying frame width and depth

To define a frame by width and depth


1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Curtain Wall Styles.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Styles, and choose Edit from the shortcut
menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select Frames under Element Definitions.
5 Click the New Frame icon to create a new frame definition.
6 Type a descriptive name for the frame.
7 Type a width and depth for the frame.

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TIP To remove the frame edge and have the infill adjust to fill the space
occupied by the frame, create a frame definition with both width and depth
set to zero. Then, assign that definition to the frame edge that you want to
remove. For more information, see Removing a Frame Edge from a Curtain
Wall on page 459.
8 Specify any desired offsets. For more information, see Specifying Offsets
for a Curtain Wall Frame on page 442.
9 Click OK to exit the dialog box and return to the Style Manager.
After you create a frame definition, you can assign it to any frame in a curtain wall. For more information, see Assigning Definitions to Curtain
Wall Frames on page 458.

NOTE The layer, color, linetype, and other display properties of the default
frame are applied to all frames unless you create a custom display component
for each definition. You can then control the display of each frame definition
independently. For more information, see Modifying the Display of Curtain
Walls on page 465.

Defining a Curtain Wall Frame Using a Profile


If you do not want a straight edge to your frame, you can use a profile to
define edges with curves, jags, or any other shape you require.

Two profile-based frame examples

NOTE The insertion point of the profile is aligned with the centroid of the
frame.

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To define a frame using a profile


1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Curtain Wall Styles.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Styles, and choose Edit from the shortcut
menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select Frames under Element Definitions.
5 Click the New Frame icon to create a new frame definition.
6 Type a descriptive name for the frame.
7 Specify a width and depth for the frame edge. These dimensions are used
to calculate the center point of the edge for aligning the profile, and also
to specify a boundary for the adjacent infill.
8 Select Use Profile.

NOTE The Profile options are available only if you have existing profiles. For
information about creating a profile, see Working with Profiles on page
1656.
9 Select a profile from the list.
By default, the profile is inserted using the same width and depth with
which it was created.
10 To adjust the size of the profile to fit within the width or depth dimension
of the frame edge, select Auto-Adjust Profile Width or Depth.
11 To mirror the profile, select to mirror along the X or Y axis.
12 To rotate the profile, type a value in the Rotation text box.
13 Specify any desired offsets. For more information, see the next section,
Specifying Offsets for a Curtain Wall Frame.
14 Click OK to exit the dialog box and return to the Style Manager.
After you create a frame definition, you can assign it to any frame in a curtain wall. For more information, see Assigning Definitions to Curtain
Wall Frames on page 458.

NOTE The layer, color, linetype, and other display properties of the default
frame are applied to all frames unless you create a custom display component
for each definition. You can then control the display of each frame definition
independently. For more information, see Modifying the Display of Curtain
Walls on page 465.

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Specifying Offsets for a Curtain Wall Frame


By default, the outside edges of the frame align with start and end of the floor
line and the start and end of the roof line. When you adjust the width of the
frame, the frame expands inward. However, you can use offsets to expand or
contract the frame away from these default limits or to shift the frame away
from the baseline in either the X or Y direction.

Specifying frame offsets in the y direction

Specifying frame offsets in the x direction

To specify an offset for a curtain wall frame


1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Curtain Wall Styles.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Styles, and choose Edit from the shortcut
menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select Frames under Element Definitions.
5 Select a frame definition from the list.
6 Type an offset distance for any of the following options.

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X: Positive X offset moves the frame edge outward beyond the end of the
curtain wall, while a negative X offset moves the frame edge inward
toward the center of the curtain wall.
Y: In plan view, a positive Y offset moves the frame edge above the baseline, while a negative Y offset moves the frame below the baseline.
Start: Negative Start offset lengthens the frame beyond the start point
while a positive Start offset shortens the frame. The start point for vertical
edges, is the baseline, and for horizontal edges (drawn left to right), it is
the left side.
End: Negative End offset lengthens the frame beyond the end point while
a positive End offset shortens the frame. The end point for vertical edges,
is the base height, and for horizontal edges (drawn left to right), it is the
right side.

TIP To quickly identify the start and end of a curtain wall, select the curtain
wall and move one of the endpoints. A directional marker is displayed near
the center of the curtain wall and points toward the end of the curtain wall.
7 Click OK to exit the dialog box and return to the Style Manager.

Removing a Frame Definition from a Curtain Wall Style


If you have a frame definition that you no longer need, you can remove it
from the Frame definitions list. You cannot remove a frame definition if it is
currently assigned to a frame edge. In addition, you cannot remove the
default frame definition, but you can modify it as needed.

NOTE For information about removing a frame edge, see Removing a Frame
Edge from a Curtain Wall on page 459.
To remove a frame definition
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Curtain Wall Styles.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Styles, and choose Edit from the shortcut
menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select Frames under Element Definitions.
5 Select the unneeded frame definition from the list.
6 Click the Remove Frame icon to remove the frame definition.
7 Click OK to exit the dialog box and return to the Style Manager.

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Defining Curtain Wall Mullions


The mullions of a curtain wall are the edges between the grid cells. You can
define the mullions by specifying a width and depth or by selecting a profile.
For more information about profiles, see Working with Profiles on page
1656.

Specifying default and profile-based mullions

You can create as many mullion definitions as you want, and then assign the
definitions to mullions as needed. If you have nested grids, then each grid
has its own mullions. There is a default mullion definition, that you can
modify as needed, that is used for any unassigned mullions. For more information, see Assigning Definitions to the Mullions of a Curtain Wall on
page 462.

TIP You can copy a frame definition and use it as a mullion definition. Select
the frame definition and drag it to Mullions in the tree on the left side of the
dialog box.

NOTE You create mullion definitions for a specific curtain wall style and those
definitions can be assigned only to mullions in curtain walls of that style.

Defining Curtain Wall Mullions by Width and Depth


You can define mullions by specifying a width and a depth.

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Specifying mullion width and depth

To define mullions by width and depth


1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Curtain Wall Styles.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Styles, and choose Edit from the shortcut
menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select Mullions under
Element Definitions.
5 Click the New Mullion icon to create a new mullion definition.
6 Type a descriptive name for the mullion.
7 Type a width and depth for the mullion.

TIP To remove mullions for butt glazing, create a definition with both width
and depth set to zero. Then, assign that definition to the mullions that you
want to remove. For more information, see Removing Mullions from a Curtain Wall Grid on page 464.
8 Specify the offsets you want. For more information, see Specifying Offsets for the Mullions of a Curtain Wall on page 447.
9 Click OK to exit the dialog box and return to the Style Manager.
After you create a mullion definition, you can assign it to any mullion in
a curtain wall. For more information, see Assigning Definitions to the
Mullions of a Curtain Wall on page 462.

NOTE The layer, color, linetype, and other display properties of the default
mullion are applied to all mullions unless you create a custom display component for each definition. You can then control the display of each mullion def-

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inition independently. For more information, see Modifying the Display of


Curtain Walls on page 465.

Defining the Mullions of a Curtain Wall Using a Profile


If you do not want a straight edge to your mullions, you can use a profile to
define mullions with curves, jags, or any other shape you require.

NOTE The insertion point of the profile is aligned with the centroid of the
mullion.
To define mullions using a profile
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Curtain Wall Styles.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Styles, and choose Edit from the shortcut
menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select Mullions under
Element Definitions.
5 Click the New Mullion icon to create a new mullion definition.
6 Type a descriptive name for the mullion.
7 Specify a width and depth for the mullion. These dimensions are used to
calculate the center point of the mullion for aligning the profile, and also
to specify a boundary for the adjacent infill.

Infill alignments with default and profile-based mullions

8 Select Use Profile.

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NOTE The Profile options are available only if you have existing profiles. For
information about creating a profile, see Working with Profiles on page
1656.
9 Select a profile from the list.
By default, the profile is inserted using the same width and depth with
which it was created.
10 To adjust the size of the profile to fit within the width or depth dimension
of the mullion, select Auto-Adjust Profile Width or Depth.
11 To mirror the profile, select to mirror along the X or Y axis.
12 To rotate the profile, type a value in the Rotation text box.
13 Specify any desired offsets. For more information, see the next section,
Specifying Offsets for the Mullions of a Curtain Wall.
14 Click OK to exit the dialog box and return to the Style Manager.
After you create a mullion definition, you can assign it to any mullion in
a curtain wall. For more information, see Assigning Definitions to the
Mullions of a Curtain Wall on page 462.

NOTE The layer, color, linetype, and other display properties of the default
mullion are applied to all mullions unless you create a custom display component for each definition. You can then control the display of each mullion definition independently. For more information, see Modifying the Display of
Curtain Walls on page 465.

Specifying Offsets for the Mullions of a Curtain Wall


You can define mullions that are offset from the start or end of the curtain
wall to lengthen or shorten the edge or offset in the X or Y direction to shift
the edge. For example, you might want to represent butt glazing by offsetting
the mullions to be behind glass panel infills.

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Specifying mullion offsets in the x direction

Specifying mullion offsets in the y direction

To specify an offset for the mullions


1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Curtain Wall Styles.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Styles, and choose Edit from the shortcut
menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select Mullions under
Element Definitions.
5 Select a mullion definition from the list.
6 Type an offset distance for any of the following options:

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X: For vertical mullions, a positive X offset moves the mullions toward


the end of the curtain wall, while a negative X offset moves the mullions
toward the start of the curtain wall. For horizontal mullions, a positive
X offset moves the mullions toward the top of the curtain wall, while a
negative X offset moves the mullions toward the bottom of the curtain
wall.

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Y: In plan view, a positive Y offset moves the mullions above the baseline,
while a negative Y offset moves the mullions below the baseline
Start: Negative Start offset lengthens the mullions beyond the start point,
while a positive Start offset shortens the mullions.
End: Negative End offset lengthens the mullions beyond the end point,
while a positive End offset shortens the mullions.

TIP To quickly identify the start and end of a curtain wall, select the curtain
wall and move one of the endpoints. A directional marker is displayed near
the center of the curtain wall and points toward the end of the curtain wall.
7 Click OK to exit the dialog box and return to the Style Manager.

Removing a Mullion Definition from a Curtain Wall Style


If you have a mullion definition that you no longer need, you can remove it
from the Mullions definitions list. You cannot remove a mullion definition
if it is assigned to a mullion. In addition, you cannot remove the default mullion definition, but you can modify it as needed.

NOTE For information about removing mullions from between cells, see
Removing Mullions from a Curtain Wall Grid on page 464.
To remove a mullion definition
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Curtain Wall Styles.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Styles, and choose Edit from the shortcut
menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select Mullions under
Element Definitions.
5 Select the unneeded mullion definition from the list.
6 Click the Remove Mullion icon to remove the mullion definition.
7 Click OK to exit the dialog box and return to the Style Manager.

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Assigning Definitions to Curtain Wall Elements


After youve created element definitions for a curtain wall style, you can
assign those definitions to each of the curtain wall element types: divisions,
cell infills, frames, and mullions.
By default, one definition is assigned to all elements of a particular type.
However, you can assign definitions to individual elements as well. For
example, all cells in the grid are assigned the default infill. You can, however,
create a new cell assignment, select a different infill, and then specify the
cells to use that infill.

For more information about element definitions, see Creating Element Definitions for a Curtain Wall Style on page 419.

Assigning Divisions to a Curtain Wall Grid


Divisions define the grid orientation (direction of the grid cells and mullions)
and the division type (number and size of cells).
After you define a division, you can assign it to the primary grid or to nested
grids. Nested grids are created by selecting Nested Grid as the cell assignment.
For more information, see Working with Nested Grids in Curtain Walls on
page 414.
To assign divisions to a grid
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Curtain Wall Styles.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Styles, and choose Edit from the shortcut
menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select the grid you want
to assign a division to. The name of the grid you select is displayed in the
table under the Division Assignment row.

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TIP To rename a grid, select it, and choose Rename from the shortcut
menu. Type a new name.
5 Click the Element column for that grid and select a division definition
from the list. To create a new division definition, select New Division, and
then define the division in the fields below the assignment list.
6 Click OK to return to the Style Manager.

Assigning Infills to Curtain Wall Cells


An infill defines the contents of a curtain wall cell. A curtain wall cell can be
empty (none), it can contain a grid (nested grid), or it can contain one of two
infills: a panel or a style. The style infill is for inserting doors, windows, and
other objects into a curtain wall.
A cell assignment defines the infill definition used for the cells. You can use
one cell assignment to assign the same infill to all cells, or you can create
multiple cell assignments to assign different infills to different cells.

Do not assign multiple definitions to the same cell because the last assigned
definition to the cell is used.
There is a default cell assignment used by all unassigned cells. You can modify the default assignment to be any type of infill, but you cannot delete the
default cell assignment.

NOTE The layer, color, linetype, and other display properties of the default
infill are applied to all infills unless you create a custom display component for
each definition. You can then control the display of each infill definition independently. For more information, see Modifying the Display of Curtain Walls on
page 465.

Adding a New Cell Assignment to a Curtain Wall


To assign different infills to different cells, you need multiple cell
assignments.
To add a new cell assignment
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Curtain Wall Styles.

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2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Styles, and choose Edit from the shortcut
menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select the grid in which
you want to create a new cell assignment.
5 Click the New Cell Assignment icon.
A new cell assignment is displayed in the list of cell assignments.

6 Click New Cell Assignment, and type a descriptive name for the assignment.
7 Under the Element column, select an infill definition that you created or
select one of the following options.

Nested Grid: Fill specified cells with additional divisions. For more information, see Creating a Nested Grid in a Curtain Wall on page 452.
Default Infill: Fill specified cells with the default infill. By default, any
cell without an assignment uses the default infill.
None: Remove the infill from the specified cells. Also removes adjacent
frames. For more information, see Removing the Infill from a Curtain
Wall Cell on page 455.
New Infill: Create a new infill definition for the specified cells. For more
information, see Defining Infills for Curtain Wall Cells on page 432.

8 Specify the cells to use this cell assignment. For more information, see
Specifying Which Curtain Wall Cells Use a Cell Assignment on page
456.
9 Click OK to exit the dialog box and return to the Style Manager.

Creating a Nested Grid in a Curtain Wall


A nested grid is a grid within a grid. Each nested grid has its own division,
cell assignments, frame, and mullions. By default, the frame is turned off for
nested grids.
For more information, see Working with Nested Grids in Curtain Walls on
page 414.
To create a nested grid
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Curtain Wall Styles.

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2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Styles, and choose Edit from the shortcut
menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select the grid in which
you want to create a nested grid.
5 Create a new cell assignment or select an existing one.
6 Select Nested Grid in the Element column.
A new grid is added to the list of grids in the tree view to the left of the
dialog box. If you are editing the primary grid, then the new grid is added
at the secondary level. If you are editing a grid at the secondary level, then
the additional grid is placed at the tertiary level.

Create a nested grid

New nested grid in tree

NOTE To rename a grid, select it, and choose Rename from the shortcut
menu. Type a new name.
7 Specify the cells to contain this nested grid. For more information, see
Specifying Which Curtain Wall Cells Use a Cell Assignment on page
456.
8 Click OK to exit the dialog box and return to the Style Manager.

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Filling a Curtain Wall Cell with a Simple Panel


Simple panels are generally used to represent basic cladding materials in the
curtain wall, such as a stone wall panel or a concrete panel.
To assign a simple panel to a cell
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Curtain Wall Styles.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Styles, and choose Edit from the shortcut
menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select the grid in which
you want to assign a simple panel.
5 Create a new cell assignment and select an infill that defines a simple
panel.
If you do not have a simple panel infill defined, then select New Infill and
define one. For more information, see Creating a Panel Infill for a Curtain Wall on page 432.
6 Specify the cells to contain this simple panel. For more information, see
Specifying Which Curtain Wall Cells Use a Cell Assignment on page
456.
7 Click OK to exit the dialog box and return to the Style Manager.

Inserting an Object into a Curtain Wall Cell


Curtain wall cells can contain doors, windows, window assemblies, curtain
wall units, and AEC Polygons.

TIP After you insert an object in a cell, you can select that object independent
of the grid, right-click and access editing options for the object.
To insert an object into a cell
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Curtain Wall Styles.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Styles, and choose Edit from the shortcut
menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select the grid in which
you want to insert objects.
5 Create a new cell assignment and select an infill that defines an object
style.

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If you do not have an object style infill defined, then select New Infill and
define one. For more information, see Creating an Infill for Inserting an
Object into a Curtain Wall on page 434.
6 Specify the cells to contain this object. For more information, see Specifying Which Curtain Wall Cells Use a Cell Assignment on page 456.
7 Click OK to exit the dialog box and return to the Style Manager.

Removing the Infill from a Curtain Wall Cell


To remove the infill of a cell and leave the cell empty, use None as the element definition. Using None also removes any frame edges that border the
cell, but it does not affect the mullions.

Removing an infiull assignment from a cell

To remove the infill of a cell


1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Curtain Wall Styles.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Styles, and choose Edit from the shortcut
menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select the grid that contains the cells you want to assign to None.
5 Create a new cell assignment or select an existing assignment.
6 Select NONE under the Element column.
7 Specify the cells to contain the None infill. For more information, see the
next section, Specifying Which Curtain Wall Cells Use a Cell Assignment.

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8 Click OK to exit the dialog box and return to the Style Manager.

Specifying Which Curtain Wall Cells Use a Cell Assignment


When you create a cell assignment you need to specify the cells in the grid
to use that assignment. There are two options for selecting cells: Location
and Index.
Use Location to insert the infill into the start, middle, or end cells of a vertical
grid or into the bottom, middle, or top cells of a horizontal grid. If there is
an even number of cells (four or more), then Middle refers to the two cells in
the middle of the grid. If there is an odd number of cells (three or more), then
middle refers to one cell in the middle of the grid.

Specifying cell assignments by location

Use Index to insert the infill into specific cells based on cell numbers. Cells
are numbered from left to right or bottom to top. For example, typing 1, 3, 5
would place the infill in the first, third, and fifth cells.

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Specifying cell assignment by index

Any cells that are not assigned a specific cell assignment use the default infill.
To specify the cells to use a cell assignment
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Curtain Wall Styles.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Styles, and choose Edit from the shortcut
menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select a grid.
5 Create a new cell assignment or select an existing assignment.
6 Under the Type column, select Location or Index.
7 If you selected Location, click the Used In column, then click the button
at the far right of the row to display the Cell Location Assignment dialog
box. Select the cells you want to use this assignment, then click OK.
If you selected Index, type the cell numbers separated by commas in the
Used In column. For vertical grids, cells are numbered from start to end
and for horizontal grids, cells are numbered from bottom to top.

NOTE Do not assign multiple definitions to a cell because the last definition
assigned to the cell is used.

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8 Click OK to exit the dialog box and return to the Style Manager.

Removing an Assignment from a Curtain Wall Style


You can remove cell assignments, frame assignments, and mullion assignments. You cannot remove default assignments, but you can modify them to
suit your needs.

NOTE Each grid requires only one division assignment. Therefore, you cannot
add or remove the division assignment.
To remove an assignment
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Curtain Wall Styles.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Styles, and choose Edit from the shortcut
menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select the grid from which
you want to remove an assignment.
5 Select a cell assignment, frame assignment, or a mullion assignment.
6 Click the Remove Assignment icon.
7 Click OK to exit the dialog box and return to the Style Manager.

Assigning Definitions to Curtain Wall Frames


The curtain wall frame is represented by the outer edges of the grid. Each
nested grid has its own frame that is defined separately from the primary grid
frame. By default, nested grid frames are turned off. For more information
about nested grids, see Working with Nested Grids in Curtain Walls on
page 414.
A frame assignment defines the definition that is used by each frame edge.
You can use one frame assignment to assign the same definition to all four
edges of the frame, or you can create multiple frame assignments to assign
different definitions to different edges of the frame.
Do not assign multiple definitions to the frame edge because the last definition assigned to the edge is used.
There is a default frame assignment and you can select the frame edges it
applies to. Unassigned edges are not displayed. You can modify the default
assignment to use any frame definition, but you cannot delete the default
frame assignment.

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NOTE The layer, color, linetype, and other display properties of the default
frame are applied to all frame edges unless you create a custom display component for each definition. You can then control the display of each frame definition independently. For more information, see Modifying the Display of Curtain
Walls on page 465.

Adding a New Frame Assignment to a Curtain Wall


To assign different definitions to different frame edges, you need multiple
frame assignments.
To add a new frame assignment
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Curtain Wall Styles.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Styles, and choose Edit from the shortcut
menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select the grid in which
you want to create a new frame assignment.
5 Click the New Frame Assignment icon.
A new frame assignment is displayed in the list of frame assignments.

6 Click New Frame Assignment and type a descriptive name for the
assignment.
7 Select a frame definition from the Element column.

TIP You can create a frame definition by selecting New from the Element
list.
8 Specify the sides of the frame to use this frame assignment. For more information, see Specifying Which Curtain Wall Edges Use a Frame Assignment on page 461.
9 Click OK to exit the dialog box and return to the Style Manager.

Removing a Frame Edge from a Curtain Wall


There are three ways to remove a frame edge from a curtain wall:

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Set the width and depth of the edge to zero


Leave the edge unassigned
Specify None as an override to the edge assignment

The first two methods remove the frame edge and expand the adjacent infills
into the space occupied by the edge.

Specifying a frame width and depth of zero

By specifying None as an override, the frame edge is not displayed, but the
adjacent infill is not expanded into the space the edge occupied.

Overriding a frame edge definition

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For information about setting the width and depth to zero, see Defining a
Curtain Wall Frame by Width and Depth on page 439.
For information about leaving the edge unassigned, see Specifying Which
Curtain Wall Edges Use a Frame Assignment on page 461.
For information about overriding the edge, see Overriding a Curtain Wall
Edge Assignment on page 481.

Specifying Which Curtain Wall Edges Use a Frame Assignment


When you create a frame assignment, you need to specify the edges of the
frame to use that assignment.
To specify the frame edges to use a frame assignment
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Curtain Wall Styles.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Styles, and choose Edit from the shortcut
menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select a grid.
5 Create a new frame assignment or select an existing assignment.
Location is the only way to specify the frame edges using this assignment.
6 Click the Used In column, then click the button at the far right of the row
to display the Frame Location Assignment dialog box.

7 Select the edges that you want to use this assignment: Left, Right, Top, or
Bottom and click OK.

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Assigning frames to nested grids

NOTE Do not assign multiple definitions to the same frame edge because
the last definition assigned to the edge is used.
8 Click OK to exit the dialog box and return to the Style Manager.
Frame edges that are not assigned a frame definition are not displayed.

Assigning Definitions to the Mullions of a Curtain Wall


The mullions of a curtain wall are the edges between the grid cells. Each
nested grid has its own mullions that are defined separately from the primary
grid. For more information about nested grids, see Working with Nested
Grids in Curtain Walls on page 414.

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Assign mullions to a nested grid

A mullion assignment defines the definition used by each mullion. You can
use one assignment to define all mullions, or you can create multiple assignments and assign different definitions to different mullions.
Do not assign multiple definitions to the same mullion because the last definition assigned to the mullion is used.
There is a default mullion assignment used by all unassigned mullions. You
can modify the default assignment to be any mullion definition, but you
cannot delete the default mullion assignment.

Adding a New Mullion Assignment to a Curtain Wall Style


To add a new mullion assignment
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Curtain Wall Styles.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Styles, and choose Edit from the shortcut
menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select the grid in which
you want to create a new mullion assignment.
5 Click the New Mullion Assignment icon.
A new mullion assignment is displayed in the list of mullion assignments.

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6 Click New Mullion Assignment and type a descriptive name for the
assignment.
7 Select a mullion definition from the Element column.

TIP You can create a mullion definition by selecting New from the Element
list.
8 Specify the mullions to use this assignment. For more information, see
Specifying Which Curtain Wall Mullions Use an Assignment on page
464.
9 Click OK to exit the dialog box and return to the Style Manager.

Removing Mullions from a Curtain Wall Grid


If you want to remove a mullion from the curtain wall, set the edge width
and depth to zero. Adjacent infill expands to fill in the space that was occupied by the mullion. This is an effective way to represent butt glazing.
To remove a mullion from a curtain wall
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Curtain Wall Styles.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Styles, and choose Edit from the shortcut
menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select the grid in which
you want to remove a mullion.
5 Create a new mullion assignment and type 0 (zero) as the width and
depth. For more information, see Defining Curtain Wall Mullions by
Width and Depth on page 444.
6 Specify the mullions to use the zero width and depth definition. For more
information, see Specifying Which Curtain Wall Mullions Use an Assignment on page 464.
7 Click OK to exit the dialog box and return to the Style Manager.

Specifying Which Curtain Wall Mullions Use an Assignment


When you create a mullion assignment you need to specify the mullions in
the grid to use that assignment. There are two options for selecting
mullions: Location and Index.
Use Location to assign a definition to the start, middle, or end mullions of a
vertical grid or the bottom, middle, or top mullions of a horizontal grid. If
there is an even number of mullions (four or more), then Middle refers to the

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two mullions in the middle of the grid. If there is an odd number of mullions
(three or more), then middle refers to one mullion in the middle of the grid.
Use Index to assign a definition to specific mullions based on mullion
numbers. Mullions are numbered from left to right or bottom to top. For
example, typing 1, 2, 3 would assign the definition to the first, second, and
third mullions.
To specify the mullions that use an assignment
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Curtain Wall Styles.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Styles, and choose Edit from the shortcut
menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select a grid.
5 Create a new mullion assignment or select an existing assignment.
6 Under the Type column, select Location or Index.
7 If you selected Location, click the Used In column, then click the button
at the far right of the row to display the Mullion Location Assignment dialog box. Select the cells you want to use this assignment, then click OK.
If you selected Index, type the mullion numbers separated by commas in
the Used In column. For vertical grids, mullions are numbers start to end
and for horizontal grids, mullions are number from bottom to top.

NOTE Do not assign multiple definitions to the same mullion because the
last definition assigned to the mullion is used.
8 Click OK to exit the dialog box and return to the Style Manager.
Any mullions that are not assigned a specific mullion assignment use the
default mullion definition.

Modifying the Display of Curtain Walls


The display of a curtain wall object depends on the direction from which you
view the curtain wall. In plan view, the curtain wall object is displayed as parallel lines with vertices marking the grid lines, as an architect would typically
draw a curtain wall. In 3D view, the curtain wall object is displayed as it
would appear in the real world, with surfaces showing length, thickness, and
height. You control what you want to display in each particular view.
By default, the display of all infills, frames, and mullions are controlled by
the display properties of the default infill, default frame, and default mul-

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465

lions. However, you can add individual element definitions as components


with separate display properties. For example, if you define two infills called
stone panel and glass panel, by default they are both controlled by the same
default infill display properties. However, you can add each definition as a
new display component, and then control the display properties separately.

NOTE The component name (in the Custom Display Component dialog box)
must match the name of element definition (in the DesignRules tab). Otherwise
it wont display properly.
For more information about the display system, see Display System on
page 99.

Adding Curtain Wall Element Definitions as Display


Components
Before you can control the display of curtain wall elements according to the
definition assigned to the element, you must create display components for
each element definition.
To add a curtain wall element definition as new display component
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Curtain Wall Styles.
2 Select the curtain wall style that you want to change, and choose Edit
from the shortcut menu.
3 Click the Display Props tab in the Curtain Wall Style Properties dialog box.
4 Select Model as the display representation.

NOTE If you select the Custom Plan Component tab, the Custom Display
Component dialog box is similar, except that you do not specify the Z insertion point and Z offset for the custom graphic.
5 Click Edit Display Props. The default list of components includes only the
three basic elements and cell markers.

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6 Click the Custom Model Components tab, and then click Add.
7 Select Infill, Frame, or Mullion as the element type.
8 Select the specific element from the list.
9 Click OK.
10 Click the Layer/Color/Linetype tab.
The element definition that you added is displayed.
11 Click the Custom Model Components tab to continue adding element
definitions, or click OK to exit all dialog boxes and return to the Style
Manager.

Modifying the Display of Curtain Wall Elements


You can change the display properties of the elements for one curtain wall or
for a group of curtain walls.
To set the display properties for the default curtain wall elements
1 Select the curtain wall or walls that you want to change, and choose Edit
Curtain Wall Style from the shortcut menu.
2 Click the Display Props tab in the Curtain Wall Style Properties dialog box.
3 You can select a different representation for the curtain wall style from the
list. The current viewport display is the default display representation. An
asterisk (*) is displayed next to the default.
4 Do any of the following:

Select the curtain wall style from the property source, and click Attach
Override to change how the object is displayed in the current viewport.

NOTE You can either select Attach Override or click the Attached column
to attach an override. Attach Override is available only when you select a
property source that is attached to the display representation.
The System Default is the default display representation. When a Display

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467

Contribution is overridden, a red X and the word Overridden is displayed


in the list.

Click Remove Override to reset the display representation to the next


property source in the list.
Click Edit Display Properties to change the display for the representation of the curtain wall style. This includes visibility, layer, color,
linetype, lineweight, and linetype scale. To edit each property, click its
field. These changes are only for the curtain wall style.
Click Edit Display Properties, then the Hatching tab to set what hatch
is displayed in each display representation for the curtain wall style.
The Hatching tab is displayed only in some display representations,
such as Plan. For more information, see Creating and Editing Display
Systems on page 121.

5 Click OK to set the display for the curtain wall style.

Setting the Hatch Pattern for a Curtain Wall Element


To set the hatch pattern for a curtain wall element
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Curtain Wall Styles.
2 Select the curtain wall style that you want to change, and choose Edit
from the shortcut menu.
3 In the Curtain Wall Style Properties dialog box, click the Display Props tab.
4 Select Plan as the display representation.

NOTE The Hatching tab is displayed only in some display representations,


such as Plan.
5 Click Edit Display Properties, and then click the Hatching tab to set the
hatch to be displayed in each display representation for the curtain wall
style.
6 Select a hatch to change in the Pattern list.
7 In the Hatch Pattern dialog box, select the type of hatch for the selected
component.

468

If you select Predefined in the Type field, select a pattern from the Pattern Name list.
If you select Custom in the Type field, type the custom pattern name
in the Custom Pattern box.

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If you select User-Defined in the Type field, turn Double Hatch on or


off.
You can select Solid Fill.

8 Click OK.
9 Click Scale/Spacing to change the value for the selected component.
10 Click Angle to type a new angle for the hatch pattern.
11 Click Orientation to change from making the change global or for the
selected object.
12 When you finish changing the wall style properties, click OK to return to
the Style Manager.
13 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Adding Custom Graphics as a Display Component of a Curtain


Wall
There may be instances where an infill, frame, or mullion requires a custom
2D or 3D graphic. For example, you might need a highly detailed threedimensional truss as the mullions or a decorative light fixture applied to an
infill. In cases like these, you can create a custom block, add a display component with the block attached, and associate that component with an element definition. When you assign that definition to an element, the block is
also displayed.
To create a custom curtain wall component
1 Draw your custom component and save it as a block.
2 Select a curtain wall and choose Edit Curtain Wall Style from the shortcut
menu.
3 Click the Display Props tab.
4 Click Edit Display Props.
5 Click the Custom Model Component tab in the Entity Properties dialog
box.
6 Click Add.
7 Select Infill, Frame, or Mullion as the element type.
8 Select the specific element from the list.
9 Select Draw Custom Graphics.
10 To display the block instead of the associated curtain wall element, select
Replace Graphics. If you want to superimpose the block over the window

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469

assembly element so that both are displayed, then do not select Replace
Graphics.
11 Click Select Block, and select the custom block that you created.
12 Click OK to return to the Custom Display Component dialog box.
13 To scale the block to fit a particular dimension, select Width, Height, or
Depth. To prevent the block from losing its proportions, select Lock XY
Ratio.
14 If you want to mirror the block, determine if it should mirror in the X, Y,
or Z direction.
15 Specify how the block is inserted into the grid in the X, Y, and Z directions.
16 If you want to offset the block from the grid, specify the offset in the X, Y,
or Z direction.
17 Click OK to exit all dialog boxes.

Creating Cut Planes for a Curtain Wall


To better visualize the elements of a curtain wall in plan view, you can create
cut planes.
To set the cut planes for a curtain wall element
1 Select a curtain wall and choose Edit Curtain Wall Style from the shortcut
menu.
2 Click the Display Props tab in the Curtain Wall Style Properties dialog box.
3 Select Plan as the display representation.

NOTE The Cut Plane tab is displayed only in some display representations,
such as Plan.
4 Click Edit Display Properties, and then click the Cut Plane tab to set the
cut plane to be displayed in each display representation for the curtain
wall style.
5 Type a height in the Cut Plane Height text box to specify the cut plane at
which hatching takes effect.
6 To add a cut plane, click Add.
If you add a cut plane at a height lower than the Cut Plane Height, objects
are displayed using the properties specified for the Below component on
the Layer/Color/Linetype tab.
If you add a cut plane at a height higher than the Cut Plane Height,
objects are displayed using the properties specified for the Above component on the Layer/Color/Linetype tab.

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7 Click OK to exit all dialog boxes.

Setting Default Dimensions for a Curtain Wall


Style
You can set default dimensions for each curtain wall style and decide if you
want to use those defaults when you draw a curtain wall. In the Add Curtain
Wall dialog box, there is an option to Use Style Defaults. If you select this
option, then the curtain wall is drawn using the defaults that you specified
in the curtain wall style.
To set the default dimensions for a curtain wall
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Curtain Wall Styles.
2 Select the style under Curtain Wall Styles, and choose Edit from the shortcut menu.
3 Click the Defaults tab.

4 To define a default, select the option, and then type a value to the right of
it. You can define defaults for Base Height, Floor Line Offset, and Roof Line
Offset.

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471

Base Height: Distance from the baseline of the curtain wall to the base
height, excluding steps, gables, or other extensions of the floor line and
roof line.
Floor Line Offset: Distance the floor line is offset from the baseline.
Floor Line Offset: Distance the roof line is offset from the base height.
5 Click OK to return to the Style Manager.
6 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Attaching Notes and Files to a Curtain Wall Style


To attach notes and files to a curtain wall style
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Curtain Wall Styles.
2 With the curtain wall style type selected, and choose Edit from the shortcut menu.
3 In the Curtain Wall Style Properties dialog box, click the General tab.
4 To add a description to the curtain wall style, type it in the Description
field.
5 To add a note to the curtain wall style, or to attach, edit, or detach a reference file, click Notes.
6 In the Notes dialog box, to add a note, type the note on the Text Notes tab.
7 To attach, edit, or detach a reference file, click the Reference Docs tab, and
do any of the following:

To attach a reference file, click Add, select a document in the Select File
dialog box, and click OK. You can type a description of the reference.
To edit a reference file, select the file name in the list, click Edit, and
change the document or the description in the Reference Document
dialog box. To edit the file itself, double-click the reference file name to
start its application.
To detach a reference file, select the file name in the list, and click
Delete.

8 To attach or edit schedule data, click Property Sets. For more information,
see Attaching Schedule Data and Editing Schedule Data in the online
Autodesk Architectural Desktop Users Guide.
9 Click OK to return to the Style Manager.
10 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

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Managing Curtain Wall Styles


When you import, export, or edit styles, you access the Style Manager. The
Style Manager provides a central location in Autodesk Architectural Desktop
where you can work with styles from multiple drawings and templates. For
more information about the Style Manager, see Getting Started with the
Style Manager on page 1527.

Creating a New Curtain Wall Style


You can create a new curtain wall style. After you create the new curtain wall
style, you can edit the style properties of the curtain wall.
To create a new curtain wall style
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Curtain Wall Styles.
2 With the curtain wall style type selected, choose New from the shortcut
menu.
3 Type a name for the new curtain wall style, and press ENTER.
4 To edit the style properties of your new curtain wall style, select the style,
and choose Edit from the shortcut menu.
The Curtain Wall Style Properties dialog box is displayed. From this dialog
box, you can

Define dimension defaults. For more information, see Setting Default


Dimensions for a Curtain Wall Style on page 471.
Define the elements within a curtain wall unit. For more information,
see Creating Element Definitions for a Curtain Wall Style on page
419.
Define the display properties. For more information, see Modifying
the Display of Curtain Walls on page 465.
Attach notes and reference files. For more information, see Attaching
Notes and Files to a Curtain Wall Style on page 472.

5 When you finish changing the curtain wall style properties, click OK to
return to the Style Manager.
6 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Creating a New Curtain Wall Style from an Existing Style


You can create a new curtain wall style from a style in the current drawing.

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473

To create a new curtain wall style from an existing style


1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Curtain Wall Styles.
2 Under Curtain Wall Style, select an existing style to copy, and choose
Copy from the shortcut menu.
3 Select Paste from the shortcut menu.
A copy of the existing style is created.
4 To rename the style, select the style, and choose Rename from the shortcut menu. Type a name for the new style, and press ENTER.
5 To edit the style properties of your new curtain wall style, select the style
and choose Edit from the shortcut menu.
The Curtain Wall Style Properties dialog box is displayed. From this dialog
box you can

Define dimension defaults. For more information, see Setting Default


Dimensions for a Curtain Wall Style on page 471.
Define the elements within a curtain wall unit. For more information,
see Creating Element Definitions for a Curtain Wall Style on page
419.
Define the display properties. For more information, see Modifying
the Display of Curtain Walls on page 465.
Attach notes and reference files. For more information, see Attaching
Notes and Files to a Curtain Wall Style on page 472.

6 When you finish changing the curtain wall style properties, click OK to
return to the Style Manager.
7 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Purging a Curtain Wall Style


You can delete curtain wall styles that are not being used in the current drawing. You can delete a single unused curtain wall style, or all the curtain wall
styles in your drawing.
To purge a curtain wall style
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Curtain Wall Styles.
2 Do one of the following:

474

To purge a single unused curtain wall style in your current drawing,


select the style under Curtain Wall Styles, and choose Purge from the
shortcut menu.

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To purge all the unused curtain wall styles in your current drawing,
select the Curtain Wall Style type, and choose Purge from the shortcut
menu.

A confirmation dialog box with the styles that you selected to purge is displayed.
3 Click OK to purge the styles.

NOTE To display the confirmation dialog box only when you press the
SHIFT key as you purge the styles, select Only Show this Confirmation Dialog
When the Shift Key is Down.
4 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Importing Curtain Wall Styles


You can copy curtain wall styles from an existing drawing and use them in
your current drawing. You can manage all your object styles more efficiently
by storing them in a single drawing or template and copying them into new
drawings.
To import a curtain wall style
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Curtain Wall Styles.
2 In the Style Manager, choose File Open Drawing to browse for the drawing that contains the style that you want to copy to your current drawing.
3 Select the drawing with the style that you want to copy, and click Open.
The new drawing opens in the Style Manager tree view, filtered to display
only the curtain wall style type.
4 Click the plus sign (+) next to Curtain Wall Styles to display the curtain
wall styles in the drawing.
5 Select the curtain wall style that you want to import, and drag it over the
name of the current drawing in the tree.
The style is copied into the current drawing. If the current drawing already
contains a style with the same name, the duplicate names are displayed in
the Import/Export - Duplicate Names Found dialog box.
6 To resolve any duplicate style names, select one of the following options:

Leave Existing: Do not replace the existing style in the drawing with
the new style of the same name.
Overwrite Existing: Replace the existing style in the drawing with the
new style.

Working with Curtain Wall Styles

475

Rename to Unique: Rename the new style so both styles exist in the
drawing. New style names are appended with a numeral in the Style
Manager.

7 Click OK to exit the Import/Export Duplicate Names Found dialog box.


8 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Exporting Curtain Wall Styles to a New Drawing


You can copy curtain wall styles from your current drawing to a new drawing.
To export a curtain wall style to a new drawing
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Curtain Wall Styles.
2 In the Style Manager, choose File New drawing to create the new drawing to copy the style to.
3 Type a name for the new drawing, and click Save.
The new drawing opens in the Style Manager tree view, filtered to display
only the curtain wall style type.
4 Select the style in the current drawing that you want to copy to the new
drawing.
5 Drag the style over the name of the new drawing in the tree.
The style is copied to the new drawing.
6 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Exporting Curtain Wall Styles to an Existing Drawing


You can copy curtain wall styles from your current drawing to another
drawing.
To export a curtain wall style to an existing drawing
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Curtain Wall Styles.
2 In the Style Manager, choose File Open drawing to browse for the existing drawing that you want to copy the style to.
3 Select the drawing that you want to copy the style to, and click Open.
The drawing opens in the Style Manager tree view, filtered to display only
the curtain wall style type.
4 Select the style in the current drawing that you want to copy to the second
drawing.
5 Drag the style over the name of the second drawing in the tree.

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The style is copied into the second drawing. If the drawing already contains a style with the same name, the duplicate names are displayed in the
Import/Export - Duplicate Names Found dialog box.
6 To resolve any duplicate style names, select one of the following options:

Leave Existing: Do not replace the existing style in the drawing with
the new style of the same name.
Overwrite Existing: Replace the existing style in the drawing with
the new style.
Rename to Unique: Rename the new style so both styles exist in the
drawing. New style names are appended with a numeral in the Style
Manager.

7 Click OK to exit the Import/Export Duplicate Names Found dialog box.


8 Click Apply to save your changes and continue working in the Style Manager, or click OK to save your changes and exit the Style Manager.

Modifying the Elements in a Curtain Wall


After youve created a curtain wall, you can modify the divisions, cells,
frames, and mullions in one of three ways:

Override: The quickest and easiest way to assign a different definition to


a single cell or edge without changing the Design Rules. For example, if
there is a cell with a simple panel infill and you want to insert a door in
that cell without affecting the other cells in the grid, then you should use
Override. The door infill must already be defined for the style. For more
information, see Overriding Cell and Edge Assignments in Curtain
Walls on page 478.
Edit in Place: The best way to experiment with changing the components of a selected curtain wall without changing the curtain wall style.
You can create and modify element definitions and make new assignments. When you have finished, you can update the style with your
changes, create a new style, discard your changes, or leave the changes to
the curtain wall. For more information, see Using Edit in Place for Curtain Walls on page 483.
Edit Curtain Wall Style: The easiest way to make specific changes to
all curtain walls of a specific style. For example, if youve defined a curtain
wall style that alternates cell infills between windows and panels and you
decide to use windows in all the cells, then you can edit the curtain wall
style and change the cell assignment from the panel infill to the window

Modifying the Elements in a Curtain Wall

477

infill. For more information, see Modifying Curtain Wall Styles on page
491.

Overriding Cell and Edge Assignments in Curtain


Walls
Using the Override options, you can merge cells, assign a different definition
to a selected cell, frame, or mullion, and assign a profile to a frame or mullion
edge. The definition or profile must already exist before you can use it as an
override.

NOTE You cannot modify a definition using the Override method. For information about modifying definitions, see Using Edit in Place for Curtain Walls
on page 483 or Modifying Curtain Wall Styles on page 491.
Overrides do not affect the Design Rules for the curtain wall style. However,
you can transfer overrides to a curtain wall style if you want all curtain walls
of that style to have the same overrides.
You can view a list of overrides that are currently assigned to a curtain wall
from the Overrides tab of the Curtain Wall Properties dialog box. For more
information, see Removing Curtain Wall Overrides on page 483.

NOTE Overrides are also listed on the Overrides tab in the Curtain Wall Style
Properties dialog box.

Turning on Cell Markers in a Curtain Wall


Before you can select a cell to merge or override an assignment, you need to
turn on the cell markers. A cell marker is displayed in the center of each cell
and acts as a selection point for the cell. The cell marker changes depending
on the direction of the grid and the cell assignment.

Horizontal grids: The cell marker points upward to indicate that cells
are numbered from the bottom to the top.
Vertical grids: The cell marker points to the right to indicate that cells
are numbered from left to right.
Cells assigned a nested grid: The grid icon is used as the cell marker.
Cells assigned any type of infill: The panel infill icon is used as the
cell marker.

When working with nested grids, each grid has its own set of cell markers.
And because the cell markers from different grid levels can overlap, you need

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to specify the grid level you want the markers in. The primary grid is the first
level and any grids nested within the primary grid are second level grids.
Grids nested in the second level are third level grids, and so on. For more
information about nested grids, see Working with Nested Grids in Curtain
Walls on page 414.
To turn on cell markers
1 Select a curtain wall and display the shortcut menu.
2 Select Cell Markers and one of the following options:

Option

Turn cell markers ...

Grids

Off

off

all

All Visible

on

all lowest level

1st Grid

on

primary

2nd Grid

on

all secondary

3rd Grid

on

all tertiary

Other

on

all on a level that you


specify on the command
line, 4, 5, etc.

Viewing cell markers

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479

TIP To change the size of the cell markers, click the Display Props tab on the
Curtain Wall Style Properties dialog box. Click Edit Display Props, and select
the Custom Model Components tab. Type a new size for the cell markers.

Merging Two Curtain Wall Cells


You can merge cells to customize the grid as needed.

Merging two cells

To merge cells
1 Select a curtain wall and display the shortcut menu.
2 Select Cell Markers, and select the grid level of the cells you want to merge.
For more information, see Turning on Cell Markers in a Curtain Wall on
page 478.
3 Select the curtain wall and display the shortcut menu.
4 Select Overrides Merge Cells.
5 Select the first cell.
6 Select the second cell.

Overriding a Curtain Wall Cell Assignment


You can select a different infill definition for a selected cell by using a cell
assignment override.

NOTE If you want to assign a grid to a cell that currently has an infill, turn on
Edit in Place, and then use Modify Cell Assignment. For more information, see
Using Edit in Place for Curtain Walls on page 483.

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To override a cell assignment


1 Select a curtain wall and display the shortcut menu.
2 Select Cell Markers, and select the grid level of the cell you want to edit.
For more information, see Turning on Cell Markers in a Curtain Wall on
page 478.
3 Select the curtain wall and display the shortcut menu.
4 Select Overrides Override Cell Assignment.
5 Select a cell.
A list of infill definitions is displayed.
6 Type the number that corresponds to the infill you want, or type none to
remove the infill and the cell edges.

Overriding a Curtain Wall Edge Assignment


You can select a different element definition for a selected frame edge or mullion edge by using an edge assignment override.
To override an edge assignment
1 Select a curtain wall and display the shortcut menu.
2 Select Overrides Override Edge Assignment.
3 Select a frame edge or a mullion.
If you selected a frame edge, a list of frame definitions is displayed.
If you selected a mullion, a list of mullion definitions is displayed.
4 Type the number that corresponds to the definition that you want or type
none to remove the edge.

NOTE Removing the edge does not affect the width of the cell. To remove
the edge and have the adjacent cell resize, create an edge definition with a
width and depth of zero. For more information, see Defining a Curtain Wall
Frame by Width and Depth on page 439 or Defining Curtain Wall Mullions
by Width and Depth on page 444.

Overriding a Curtain Wall Edge Profile


You can assign a profile to any vertical edgeframe or mullion. The profile
can be an AEC profile or any closed polyline that you specify. You can use a
profile edge to create a unique corner in situations where a simple miter is
not sufficient.

Modifying the Elements in a Curtain Wall

481

To override an edge profile


1 Draw a closed polyline in plan view in the location where you want it to
display in the curtain wall.
2 Select a curtain wall and display the shortcut menu.
3 Select Overrides Override Edge Profile.
4 Select a vertical frame edge or a vertical mullion.
5 Select the closed polyline you just drew, or press ENTER and select an
AEC profile from the list displayed.
6 If you selected the closed polyline, type a name for this profile.

Overriding Edge Profile

7 If you selected an AEC profile, the profiles insertion point is aligned with
the center of the edge that was overwritten.

NOTE Adjacent infills are not trimmed or expanded to accommodate the


new edge. To adjust the infill, change the width of the frame edge. For more
information, see Defining a Curtain Wall Frame by Width and Depth on
page 439.

Changing a Curtain Wall Style to Incorporate Overrides


By default, overrides do not affect curtain wall styles. However, there might
be circumstances when you want to apply your overrides to all curtain walls
of the same style. You can then incorporate the overrides into the curtain
wall style.
You can view a list of overrides currently assigned to a curtain wall from the
Overrides tab of the Curtain Wall Properties dialog box. For more information, see Removing Curtain Wall Overrides on page 483.

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To incorporate overrides into a curtain wall style


1 Select the curtain wall that has the overrides.
2 Select Edit in place from the shortcut menu. For more information about
Edit in Place, see Using Edit in Place for Curtain Walls on page 483.
3 Select the curtain wall again, and from the shortcut menu, select Edit in
Place Save Changes.
4 Select an existing style or create a new one.
5 Select the type of overrides that you want to transfer to the curtain wall
style.
6 Click OK.
To see a list of the overrides that are now assigned to the curtain wall style,
click the Overrides tab of the Curtain Wall Style Properties dialog box.

Removing Curtain Wall Overrides


To remove an override from a curtain wall cell or edge
1 Select the curtain wall.
2 Select Curtain Wall Properties from the shortcut menu.
To remove the override from all curtain walls of the same style, select Edit
Curtain Wall Style instead.
3 Click Overrides.
4 Select an override from the list and click Remove.
5 Click OK to exit the dialog box.

Using Edit in Place for Curtain Walls


Use the Edit in Place command to edit a curtain wall without modifying all
the curtain walls that share the same style. In this way, you can experiment
with changes to a single curtain wall without constantly updating the entire
building with each design modification. When you find a design that works,
you can save the changes to the curtain wall style and update all the curtain
walls of that style. You can also discard your changes or leave the curtain wall
as is without updating the style. Until you save or discard the changes, Edit
in Place remains active for that curtain wall.

NOTE Changes made with Edit in Place affect only the selected curtain wall.
Although you can leave a curtain wall in Edit in Place and select a different curtain wall, changes you make to the second wall do not affect the first one.

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483

When you turn Edit in Place on, the following options are added to the
shortcut menu:

New menus

New commands

Edit in Place

Discard changes
Save Changes

Element Definitions

Divisions
Infills
Frames
Mullions

Assignments

Add Cell Assignment


Remove Cell Assignment
Modify Cell Assignment
Add Edge Assignment
Remove Edge Assignment
Modify Edge Assignment

In addition, a Design Rules tab is added to the Curtain Wall Properties dialog
box. Ordinarily, the Design Rules tab is available only from the Curtain Wall
Style Properties dialog box.

Turning on Edit in Place for a Curtain Wall


To turn on Edit in Place
1 Select a curtain wall.
2 Select Edit in Place from the shortcut menu.

Modifying a Curtain Wall Element Definitions Using Edit in


Place
While using Edit in Place, an Element Definitions menu is added to the curtain wall shortcut menu. From this menu, you can create and modify division definitions, infill definitions, frame definitions, and mullion definitions
by accessing the Design Rules tab of the Curtain Wall Properties dialog box.

NOTE The Design Rules tab is available only from the Curtain Wall Properties
dialog box when Edit in Place is active.
To modify element definitions while using Edit in Place
1 Select a curtain wall.

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2 Select Element Definitions from the shortcut menu.


3 Select one of the following options

Divisions. For more information, see Defining Divisions for Curtain


Wall Grids on page 421.
Infills. For more information, see Defining Infills for Curtain Wall
Cells on page 432.
Frames. For more information, see Defining Curtain Wall Frames on
page 438.
Mullions. For more information, see Defining Curtain Wall Mullions
on page 444.

Modifying Curtain Wall Assignments Using Edit in Place


While using Edit in Place, an Assignments menu is added to the curtain wall
shortcut menu. From this menu, you can create and remove cell, frame, and
mullion assignments. You can also modify assignments by selecting a new
element definition or changing the specific elements the definition is
assigned to.
You specify the assignment changes on the command line so that you can
easily select cells and edges from the drawing.

NOTE If you want to use the Design Rules tab to make these changes, instead
of the command line, then select Curtain Wall Properties from the shortcut
menu.

Adding a Curtain Wall Cell Assignment Using Edit in Place


While using Edit in Place, you can create new cell assignments for any grid
in the curtain wall. When you create the assignment, you can use your pointing device to select from the curtain wall the cells that you want to use this
assignment.
For more information about cell assignments, see Assigning Infills to Curtain Wall Cells on page 451.
To add a cell assignment while using Edit in Place
1 Select a curtain wall.
2 Turn on the cell markers for the grid level that you want to add the assignment to. For more information, see Turning on Cell Markers in a Curtain
Wall on page 478.
3 Select Assignments Add Cell Assignment from the curtain wall shortcut
menu.

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NOTE If you do not see Assignments in the shortcut menu, then Edit in
Place is not active. To activate it, select Edit in Place from the shortcut menu.
4 Select a cell marker to specify the grid you want to add the assignment to.
Each curtain wall grid has its own assignments.
5 Type one of the following:

Index, and then type pick. Use your pointing device to select the cells
that you want to use this assignment, and then press ENTER.
Location, and then specify whether the new assignment is to be used
in the start cell, middle cell, or end cell of the selected grid.

NOTE If you are adding an assignment to a vertical grid, you are prompted
to assign the grid to the bottom, middle, or top cells.
6 To insert a nested grid in the selected cells, type grid. Then, specify a vertical or horizontal division.
To insert an infill, type infill, and then type the number associated with
the infill definition that you want.

Removing a Curtain Wall Cell Assignment Using Edit in Place


While using Edit in Place, you can remove a cell assignment that you no
longer need. Any cells using that assignment uses the default cell assignment
instead.
For more information about cell assignments, see Assigning Infills to Curtain Wall Cells on page 451.
To remove a cell assignment while using Edit in Place
1 Select a curtain wall.
2 Turn on the cell markers for the grid level that you want to remove the
assignment from. For more information, see Turning on Cell Markers in
a Curtain Wall on page 478.
3 Select the curtain wall and select Assignments Remove Cell Assignment
from the curtain wall shortcut menu.

NOTE If you do not see Assignments in the shortcut menu, then Edit in
Place is not active. To activate it, select Edit in Place from the shortcut menu.
4 Select a cell that has the assignment you want to remove.

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The cell assignment is removed and all cells using that assignment are
assigned the default cell assignment instead.
If you selected a cell that was already using the default cell assignment, a
message is displayed indicating that the cell is already using the default
assignment. For information about modifying the default assignment, see
Defining Infills for Curtain Wall Cells on page 432.

Modifying a Curtain Wall Cell Assignment Using Edit in Place


While using Edit in Place, you can modify cell assignments for any grid in
the curtain wall. When you modify the assignment, you can use your pointing device to select from the curtain wall the cells that you want to use this
assignment.
For more information about cell assignments, see Assigning Infills to Curtain Wall Cells on page 451.
To modify a cell assignment while using Edit in Place
1 Select a curtain wall.
2 Turn on the cell markers for the grid level that you want to add the assignment to. For more information, see Turning on Cell Markers in a Curtain
Wall on page 478.
3 Select the curtain wall and select Assignments Modify Cell Assignment
from the curtain wall shortcut menu.

NOTE If you do not see Assignments in the shortcut menu, then Edit in
Place is not active. To activate it, select Edit in Place from the shortcut menu.
4 Select a cell marker that has the assignment you want to modify.
5 To change the cells that are using this assignment, type used.
To specify the contents of the cell (infill or grid), type element.

NOTE If you select a cell that is using the default cell assignment, you are
not prompted to choose between Used In or Element. You cannot change the
cells using the default assignment, because all unassigned cells use the default
cell assignment.
6 If you selected Used In, type:

Index, and then type p (pick). Use your pointing device to select the
cells that you want to use this assignment.

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Location, and then specify whether the new assignment is used in the
start cell, middle cell, or end cell (for horizontal grids) or the bottom,
middle, or top cell (for vertical grids).

If you selected Element, type:

Grid to change the assignment to include a nested grid, and then specify a vertical or horizontal division.
Infill to change the assignment to include an infill, and then type the
number associated with the infill definition that you want.

Adding an Edge Assignment to a Curtain Wall Using Edit in


Place
While using Edit in Place, you can create new assignments for frame edges or
mullion edges. When you create an assignment, you can use your pointing
device to select from the curtain wall the edges that you want to use this
assignment.
For more information about frame and mullion assignments, see Assigning
Definitions to Curtain Wall Frames on page 458 and Assigning Definitions
to the Mullions of a Curtain Wall on page 462.
To add an edge assignment while using Edit in Place
1 Select a curtain wall.
2 Select Assignments Add Edge Assignment from the curtain wall shortcut menu.

NOTE If you do not see Assignments in the shortcut menu, then Edit in
Place is not active. To activate it, select Edit in Place from the shortcut menu.
3 Select an edge to specify the grid you want to add the assignment to. Each
curtain wall grid has its own assignments.
4 Type one of the following:

Index, and then type p (pick). Use your pointing device to select the
mullions that you want to use this assignment, and then press ENTER.
Location, and specify the edge to be used in the new assignment. If you
selected a frame edge in step 3, then you are prompted for left, right,
top, and bottom edges. If you selected a mullion, you are prompted for
start, middle, or end (for horizontal grids) or bottom, middle or top (for
vertical grids).

5 Type the number associated with the edge definition that you want.

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Removing an Edge Assignment from a Curtain Wall Using Edit


in Place
While using Edit in Place, you can remove a frame edge or mullion edge
assignment that you no longer need. Any edges using the assignment you
remove use the default edge assignment instead.
For more information about frame and mullion assignments, see Assigning
Definitions to Curtain Wall Frames on page 458 and Assigning Definitions
to the Mullions of a Curtain Wall on page 462.
To remove an edge assignment while using Edit in Place
1 Select a curtain wall.
2 Select Assignments Remove Edge Assignment from the curtain wall
shortcut menu.

NOTE If you do not see Assignments in the shortcut menu, then Edit in
Place is not active. To activate it, select Edit in Place from the shortcut menu.
3 Select an edge that has the assignment you want to remove.
The edge assignment is removed and all edges using that assignment are
assigned the default assignment instead.
If you selected an edge that was already using the default cell assignment,
a message is displayed indicating that the cell is aready using the default
assignment. For information about modifying the default assignment, see
Defining Curtain Wall Frames on page 438 or Defining Curtain Wall
Mullions on page 444.

Modifying an Edge Assignment from a Curtain Wall Using Edit


in Place
While using Edit in Place, you can modify frame edge and mullion edge
assignments for any grid in the curtain wall. When you modify the assignment, you can use your pointing device to select from the curtain wall the
edges that you want to use this assignment.
For more information about edge assignments, see Assigning Definitions to
Curtain Wall Frames on page 458 and Assigning Definitions to the Mullions of a Curtain Wall on page 462.
To modify an edge assignment while using Edit in Place
1 Select a curtain wall.

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2 Select Assignments Modify Edge Assignment from the curtain wall


shortcut menu.

NOTE If you do not see Assignments in the shortcut menu, then Edit in
Place is not active. To activate it, select Edit in Place from the shortcut menu.
3 Select an edge that has the assignment you want to modify.
4 To change the edges that are using this assignment, type used.
To change the definition of the edge, type element.

NOTE If you select a mullion that is using the default assignment, you are
not prompted to choose between Used In or Element. You cannot change the
mullions used in the default assignment, because all unassigned mullions use
the default assignment.
5 If you selected Used In, type

Index, and then type pick. Use your pointing device to select the
edges that you want to use this assignment.
Location, and then specify whether the new assignment is to be used
for the left, right, top or bottom frame edge. (This option is not available for mullion edges.)

If you selected Element, type the number associated with the edge definition that you want.

Saving Edit in Place Changes to a Curtain Wall Style


After making changes with Edit in Place, you can save the changes to a curtain wall style and update all the curtain walls of that style.
To save Edit in Place changes to a curtain wall style
1 Select the curtain wall.
2 Select Edit in Place Save changes from the shortcut menu.
3 Select the style that you want to incorporate the edits in or create a new
style.
4 Select any override to include that override in the style.

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Transfer Merge Operations to Style


Transfer Cell Overrides to Style
Transfer Edge Overrides to Style
Transfer Edge Profile Overrides to Style

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An override option is unavailable when that type of override has not been
applied to the curtain wall. For more information about overrides, see
Overriding Cell and Edge Assignments in Curtain Walls on page 478.
5 Click OK to exit the dialog box and save the changes.

Discarding Edit in Place Changes to a Curtain Wall


After working with Edit in Place, if you decide that you want to restore the
original style settings, then you can discard your changes.
To discard the Edit in Place changes
1 Select the curtain wall.
2 Select Edit in Place Discard changes from the shortcut menu.

Modifying Curtain Wall Styles


You can easily modify all curtain walls of the same style by making changes
to the style itself.

NOTE For information about modifying the components of a single curtain


wall see Using Edit in Place for Curtain Walls on page 483. For information
about modifying the shape and size of a single curtain wall, see Modifying Curtain Walls on page 494.
To modify a curtain wall style
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Curtain Wall Styles.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Styles, and choose Edit from the shortcut
menu.

TIP You can also access the Curtain Wall Style Properties dialog box by
selecting a curtain wall of the style you want to edit, and select Edit Curtain
Wall Style from the shortcut menu.
3 Do any of the following

Define new divisions, infills, frames, or mullions. For more information, see Creating Element Definitions for a Curtain Wall Style on
page 419.
Change an existing division, infill, frame or mullion definition. For
more information, see Modifying Existing Element Definitions for
Curtain Wall Styles on page 492.

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491

Assign different definitions to grids, cells, frames, or mullions. For


more information, see Assigning Definitions to Curtain Wall Elements on page 450.
Remove overrides. For more information, see Removing Curtain Wall
Overrides on page 483.
Change the visibility, layer, color, linetype, lineweight, or linetype scale
of curtain wall components. For more information, see Modifying the
Display of Curtain Walls on page 465.
Add custom components to a curtain wall. For more information, see
Adding Custom Graphics as a Display Component of a Curtain Wall
on page 469.
Change the dimension defaults for the curtain wall. For more information, see Setting Default Dimensions for a Curtain Wall Style on page
471.
Attach notes and reference files to the curtain wall style. For more
information, see Attaching Notes and Files to a Curtain Wall Style on
page 472.

4 Click OK to exit the dialog box when you have completed the changes.

Modifying Existing Element Definitions for Curtain Wall Styles


You can modify element definitions using the edit boxes on the Design Rules
tab of the Curtain Wall Style Properties dialog box. There are two ways you
can access these definitions: from the assignments list and from the
definitions list.

492

From the assignments list: Select a grid from the tree view to display
the assignments list. Then, select an element assignment that uses that
definition. Make your changes below the assignment list.

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From the definitions list: Select an element type from the tree view
to display all the definitions for that element type. Select a definition and
make your changes below the definitions list.

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Any changes you make, including changes to the definition name, overwrite
the existing definition. To create a new definition from the assignments list,
select New from the Element list. To create a new definition from the definitions list, click the New Division icon, the New Infill icon, the New Frame
icon or the New Mullion icon.

Modifying Curtain Walls


There are three different methods for changing the shape and size of a curtain wall. To access any of these methods, select a curtain wall, and select one
of the following options from the shortcut menu.

494

Curtain Wall Modify: Changes the height of the curtain wall, selects a
different style, or matches the properties of another existing curtain wall.
Tools menu: Changes the roof line or floor line, adds an interference, or
sets the miter angles between two curtain walls.

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Curtain Wall Properties: Attaches notes and reference files, selects a


different style, changes dimensions, and alters the roof line or floor line
for selected curtain walls.

NOTE For information about changing the elements within a curtain wall,
see Modifying the Elements in a Curtain Wall on page 477. For information
about changing the display of the curtain walls, see Modifying the Display
of Curtain Walls on page 465.
The method you want to use depends on what you want to accomplish.
For example, to change the height of the curtain wall, you can use

Curtain Wall Modify, when the height is the only property you need to
change. You can then change height quickly from the dashboard more
precisely than using grips.
Curtain Wall Properties, when you want to change the height in addition
to other properties of selected curtain walls. The Curtain Wall Properties
dialog box gives you easy access to numerous properties.

Changing the Base Height of a Curtain Wall


To change the base height of a curtain wall
1 Select one or more curtain walls.
2 From the shortcut menu, select Curtain Wall Modify, or select Curtain
Wall Properties, then the Dimensions tab.
3 Type a new value for Base Height.
4 Click OK.

Selecting a Different Curtain Wall Style


To select a different style for a curtain wall
1 Select one or more curtain walls.
2 From the shortcut menu, select Curtain Wall Modify, or select Curtain
Wall Properties, then the Style tab.
3 Select a different style from the list.
4 Click OK to apply the new style.

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495

Matching the Style or Base Height of an Existing


Curtain Wall
To match the style or base height of an existing curtain wall
1 Select one or more curtain walls.
2 Select Curtain Wall Modify from the shortcut menu.
3 In the Modify Curtain Wall dialog box, click the Match icon.
4 Click in the drawing, then select the curtain wall that has the style or
height you want to match.
5 Type one of the following options on the command line

Style to match only the curtain wall style


Base Height to match only the curtain wall base height
All to match both the style and height

6 Select another curtain wall to modify, or press ENTER to apply the changes.

Changing the Curtain Wall Dimensions


You can change the following dimensions of a curtain wall.
To change the curtain wall dimension properties
1 Select a curtain wall.
2 Select Curtain Wall Properties from the shortcut menu.
3 Click Dimensions.
4 Change any of the following dimensions

Base Height: Height of the curtain wall from the baseline


Length: Length of a straight curtain wall from the start grip on the
baseline to the end grip
Radius: Radius of a curved curtain wall from the start grip on the
baseline to the end grip
Start Miter Angle: Angle of all infills and horizontal edges (frame or
mullion) at the start of the curtain wall.
End Miter Angle: Angle of all infills and horizontal edges (frame or
mullion) at the end of the curtain wall.

For more information about miter angles, see Cleaning up Curtain Wall
Corners on page 506.
5 Click OK to exit the dialog box.

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Changing the Roof Line and Floor Line of a


Curtain Wall
You can use the wall roof and floor lines to create nonrectangular curtain
walls. The Roof/Floor Line tab is available only when you select a single curtain wall to edit.

NOTE You can also modify the roof line and floor line using the commands in
the Tools menu on the shortcut menu. For more information, see Changing the
Roof Line of a Curtain Wall, Changing the Floor Line of a Curtain Wall, and
Reversing Curtain Wall Start/End in the online Autodesk Architectural Desktop
Users Guide.

Modifying a curtain wall roof line

You edit vertex locations on the floor and roof lines to create steps, gables,
and other floor and roof conditions.

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497

Modifying a curtain wall floor line

To set the curtain wall roof and floor line properties


1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Modify Curtain Wall.
2 Select the curtain wall, and press ENTER.
3 In the Modify Curtain Walls dialog box, click the Properties icon.
4 In the Curtain Wall Properties dialog box, click the Roof/Floor Line tab.
5 Do any of the following:

Add a gable to the roof line of a curtain wall.


Add a step.
Insert a vertex.
Delete a vertex.
Edit a vertex.
Reverse the floor or roof line.

Adding a Gable to the Roof Line of a Curtain Wall


To add a gable to the roof line of a curtain wall
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Modify Curtain Wall.
2 Select the curtain wall, and press ENTER.
3 In the Modify Curtain Walls dialog box, click the Properties icon.
4 In the Curtain Wall Properties dialog box, click the Roof/Floor Line tab.
5 After selecting Edit Roof Line, click Add Gable.

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Modifying a curtain wall roof line by adding a gable

NOTE This option is available only if the roof line has not been edited. After
the roof line changes, you cannot automatically add a gable using this option.
A third vertex is added to the roof line set halfway between the two ends
of the roof line and eight feet up from the roof line.

NOTE The table at the top of the dialog box displays information about
each vertex in the wall. You can also select the vertex to edit from the list.
6 Continue editing the roof or floor line, and then click OK.
7 Click Apply to see your changes applied to the curtain wall in the drawing.
Continue editing your roof and floor lines, or click OK to exit the dialog
box.

Adding a Step to the Roof Line or Floor Line of a Curtain Wall


To add a step to the roof line or floor line of a curtain wall
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Modify Curtain Wall.
2 Select the curtain wall, and press ENTER.
3 In the Modify Curtain Walls dialog box, click the Properties icon.
4 In the Curtain Wall Properties dialog box, click the Roof/Floor Line tab.

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499

5 After selecting either Edit Roof Line or Edit Floor Line, click Add Step.

Modifying a curtain wall floor line by adding a step

NOTE This option is available only if the roof line or floor line has not been
edited. After the line has been changed, you cannot automatically add a step
using this option.
A third vertex is added to the line set halfway between the two ends of the
line and four feet from the line, and a step is created from the selected vertex to the second vertex.
The active vertex in the dialog box illustration changes when you select a
different line to edit. Any changes you make to the wall are reflected in
the illustration.
The table at the top of the dialog box displays information about each vertex in the curtain wall. You can also select the vertex to edit from the list.
6 Continue editing the roof or floor line, and then click OK.
7 Click Apply to see your changes applied to the curtain wall in the drawing.
Continue editing the roof and floor lines, or click OK to exit the dialog
box.

Changing Vertices in the Roof Line or Floor Line of a Curtain


Wall
To change vertices in the roof line or floor line of a curtain wall
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Modify Curtain Wall.
2 Select the curtain wall, and press ENTER.

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3 In the Modify Curtain Walls dialog box, click the Properties icon.
4 In the Curtain Wall Properties dialog box, click the Roof/Floor Line tab.
The active vertex in the illustration changes when you select a different
line to edit. Any changes you make to the curtain wall are reflected in the
Vertex Editing illustration.
5 With either Edit Roof Line or Edit Floor Line selected, do any of the
following:

To add a vertex, click Insert Vertex. In the Wall Roof/Floor Line Vertex
dialog box, specify the horizontal offset and vertical offset for the new
vertex, type a distance, and click OK. The new vertex is displayed in the
vertex editing illustration at the end of this task.
Horizontal Offset: Specifies the existing vertex from which to
measure the placement of the next vertex and how far away from the
existing vertex to place the new one. Distance is measured in the
direction the curtain wall is drawn. You can enter a negative number to
set the vertex in the reverse direction.
From Wall Start: Measures distance from the curtain wall start
point.
From Wall End: Measures distance from the curtain wall endpoint.
From Wall Midpoint: Measures distance from the curtain wall
midpoint.
From Previous Point: Measures distance from the vertex one closer
to the curtain wall start point.
From Next Point: Measures distance from the vertex one closer to
the curtain wall endpoint.
From Midpoint of Neighbors: Measures distance from the
midpoint of the selected vertex and the next one closer to the curtain
wall endpoint.
Distance: Sets the distance from the specified point to create the
new vertex.

Vertical Offset: Specifies the location from which to measure the


height of the next vertex and how far away from the existing location
to place the new vertex. You can enter a negative number to set the vertex toward the ground.
From Wall Base Height: Sets height from the base height of the
curtain wall.
From Next Point: Sets height from the height of the next point.

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501

From Previous Point: Sets height from the height of the previous
point.
From Baseline: Sets height from the baseline of the curtain wall.
Distance: Sets the distance from the specified location to create the
new vertex.

To move a vertex, select a vertex from the list or select a vertex in the
vertex editing illustration, then click Edit Vertex. In the Wall Roof/
Floor Line Vertex dialog box, specify Horizontal Offset and Vertical Offset for the vertex, type a new distance, and click OK. The change to the
vertex is displayed in the vertex editing illustration.
To delete a vertex, click Delete Vertex and select a vertex from the list
or from the vertex editing illustration. The selected vertex is deleted,
and the line automatically connects the two adjacent vertices.

6 Continue editing the roof line or floor line, and then click OK.
7 Click Apply to see the changes applied to the curtain wall in the drawing.
Continue editing roof and floor lines, or click OK to exit the dialog box.

Reversing the Roof Line or Floor Line of a Curtain Wall


To reverse the roof line or floor line of a wall
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Modify Curtain Wall.
2 Select the curtain wall, and press ENTER.
3 In the Modify Curtain Walls dialog box, click the Properties icon.
4 In the Curtain Wall Properties dialog box, click the Roof/Floor Line tab.
5 With either Edit Roof Line or Edit Floor Line selected, click Reverse.
The selected line is reversed; the condition is applied to the opposite end
of the line. The list and illustration change to reflect the reversal of vertices.
6 Continue editing the roof or floor line, and then click OK.
7 Click Apply to see your changes applied to the curtain wall in the drawing.
Continue editing the roof and floor lines, or click OK to exit the dialog
box.

Changing the Roof Line of a Curtain Wall


You can change the height of the roof line of an existing curtain wall. You
can also create a polyline that represents the current roof line of selected
curtain walls.

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To change the roof line


1 Select a curtain wall.
2 Select Tools Roof Line from the shortcut menu.
3 Type o (Offset), select the curtain walls to change, and then type a value
to offset the roof line from the current height of the curtain wall.
4 Type p (Project) to project the roof line to a selected polyline, select the
curtain walls to change, and then select the polyline to project the roof
line to.

NOTE The polyline does not need to be in the same plane as the selected
curtain walls, but it should be parallel to the curtain walls for the best results.
5 Type g (Generate polyline) to generate a polyline, and then select the curtain walls for the polyline to be created from.
6 Type a (Auto project) to project the curtain wall roof line to another
object, select the curtain walls, and then select the object to project to.

NOTE Auto project is useful when projecting curtain walls to roofs.


7 Type r (Reset) to remove any roof line changes made to the curtain wall.
8 Press ENTER to end the command.

Changing the Floor Line of a Curtain Wall


You can change the height of the floor line of an existing curtain wall. You
can also create a polyline that represents the current floor line of a selected
curtain wall.
To change the floor line
1 Select a curtain wall.
2 Select Tools Floor Line from the shortcut menu.
3 Type o (Offset), select the curtain walls to change, and then type a value
to offset the floor line from the current height of the curtain wall.
4 Type p (Project) to project the floor line to a selected polyline, select the
curtain walls to change, and then select the polyline to project the floor
line to.

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503

NOTE The polyline does not need to be in the same plane as the selected
curtain walls, but it should be parallel to the curtain walls for the best results.
5 Type g (Generate polyline) to generate a polyline, and then select the curtain walls for the polyline to be created from.
6 Type a (Auto project) to project the wall floor line to another object, select
the curtain walls, and then select the object to project to.
7 Type r (Reset) to remove any floor line changes made to the curtain wall.
8 Press ENTER to end the command.

Reversing Curtain Wall Start/End


Curtain walls are drawn from a first point to a last point, and some commands and properties are affected by that order (for example, offsets).
If you need to apply commands in the opposite order, you can switch the
direction curtain walls are drawn. This command affects each curtain wall
you select.
To change the starting point of a curtain wall
1 Select the curtain wall.
2 Select Tools Reverse from the shortcut menu.

Changing the Curtain Wall Location Properties


You can relocate an existing curtain wall by changing the coordinate values
of its insertion point. The curtain wall also has an orientation with respect to
the world coordinate system (WCS) or the current user coordinate system
(UCS). For example, if the top and bottom of the wall are parallel to the XY
plane, its normal is parallel to the Z axis. You can change the orientation of
the curtain wall by aligning its normal with another axis. You can also rotate
the curtain wall on its plane by changing the rotation angle.
For more information about the world coordinate system, see Use Coordinates and Coordinate Systems in the online AutoCAD 2002 Users Guide.
To change the location properties of a curtain wall
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Modify Curtain Wall.
2 Select the curtain wall, and press ENTER.
3 In the Modify Curtain Walls dialog box, click the Properties icon.
4 In the Curtain Wall Properties dialog box, click the Location tab.

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5 Do any of the following:

To relocate the curtain wall, change the coordinate values under Insertion Point.
To reorient the curtain wall, change the axis where the normal is parallel. To locate the curtain wall on the XY plane, make the normal of the
wall parallel to the Z axis: under Normal, type 1 in the Z box, and type
0 in the X and Y boxes. To locate the curtain wall on the YZ plane, type
1 in the X box and type 0 in the Y and Z boxes. To locate the curtain
wall on the XZ plane, type 1 in the Y box and type 0 in the X and Z
boxes.
To change the rotation of the curtain wall, type a new value for Rotation Angle.

6 Click OK to close the Curtain Wall Properties dialog box, and then click
Apply to see the changes to the curtain wall without leaving the Modify
Curtain Walls dialog box.
7 When you finish making changes, click OK to exit the dialog box.

Adding an Interference Condition to a Curtain


Wall
You can place AEC objects, such as mass elements, in curtain walls to create
custom openings or cutouts.
To add an interference condition to a curtain wall
1 Place any AEC object in the location where you want the opening or cutout.
2 Select the curtain wall.
3 Select Tools Interference from the shortcut menu.
4 Type a (Add) to add the interference object to the curtain wall, or type r
(Remove) to remove the interference object from the curtain wall.
5 Select the interference object.
You are prompted to determine the elements affected by the interference.
6 Type y (Yes) to apply the interference to the infill of the curtain wall cells,
or type n (No) to leave the infills as is.
7 Type y (Yes) to apply the interference to the frame of the curtain wall, or
type n (No) to leave the frame as is.
8 Type y (Yes) to apply the interference to the mullions of the curtain wall,
or type n (No) to leave the mullions as is.

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9 Select another interference object, or press ENTER to end the command.

Cleaning up Curtain Wall Corners


There are two methods of cleaning up curtain wall corners.

Calculate Miter Angles Automatically: Automatically determines


the necessary miter angles between two curtain walls.
Specify Miter Angles Manually: You can specify the miter angle for a
curtain wall that is adjacent to a standard wall or other AEC object.

Calculating the Miter Angles Between Curtain Walls


The corner where adjacent curtain walls meet is not mitered by default.
However, you can determine the necessary angles automatically.

Mitered curtain walls

NOTE The miter angle is applied to all infills and horizontal edges (frame or
mullion) that are adjacent to the corner. Vertical edges are not affected.
To automatically calculate the miter angles between two curtain walls
1 Select one of the curtain walls.
2 Select Tools Set Miter Angles from the shortcut menu.
3 Select the other curtain wall.
If you change the angle of either curtain wall, use Set Miter Angles again
to calculate the angles again.

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Specifying frame miter angles

TIP If you want to create a custom corner condition between two curtain
walls, you can replace the edge of one curtain wall with an AEC profile and
remove the edge of the other curtain wall by setting the frame width and
depth to zero for the adjacent edge.
For more information, see Overriding a Curtain Wall Edge Profile on page
481 and Defining Curtain Wall Frames on page 438.

Setting a Miter Angle for a Curtain Wall Adjacent to Another


Object
If you want to create a mitered corner between a curtain wall and another
object such as a standard wall or a mass element, then you must set the miter
angle manually. For example, if your curtain wall connects with a standard
wall that is at 60-degree angle from the curtain wall, then you would set the
miter angle to 30.

NOTE The miter angle is applied to all infills and horizontal edges that are
adjacent to the corner. Vertical edges are not affected.
To set the miter angle of a curtain wall
1 Select the curtain wall.
2 Select Curtain Wall Properties from the shortcut menu.
3 Click Dimensions.

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507

4 To miter the curtain wall at its start point, type an angle for Start Miter
Angle. To miter the curtain wall at its end point, type an angle for End
Miter Angle.

TIP To quickly identify the start and end of a curtain wall, select the curtain
wall and move one of the endpoints. A directional marker is displayed near
the center of the curtain wall and points toward the end of the curtain wall.
5 Click OK.

Attaching Notes and Files to a Curtain Wall


To attach notes and files to curtain walls
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Walls Modify Curtain Wall.
2 Select the wall, and press ENTER.
3 In the Modify Curtain Walls dialog box, click the Properties icon.
4 In the Curtain Wall Properties dialog box, click the General tab.
5 To add a description to the wall, type it in the Description field.
6 To add a note to the wall, or to attach, edit, or detach a reference file, click
Notes.
7 In the Notes dialog box, to add a note, type the note on the Text Notes tab.
8 To attach, edit, or detach a reference file, click the Reference Docs tab, and
do any of the following:

To attach a reference file, click Add, select a document in the Select File
dialog box, and click OK. You can type a description of the reference.
To edit a reference file, select the file name in the list, click Edit, and
change the document or the description in the Reference Document
dialog box. To edit the file itself, double-click the reference file name to
start its application.
To detach a reference file, select the file name in the list and click
Delete.

9 To attach or edit schedule data, click Property Sets. For more information,
see Attaching Schedule Data and Editing Schedule Data in the online
Autodesk Architectural Desktop Users Guide.
10 Click OK to exit each dialog box. To apply the changes and remain in the
dialog box, click Apply.

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Editing Objects Anchored in Curtain Walls


When you fill a curtain wall cell with an object, such as a door or window,
you can edit that object independently from the curtain wall. For example,
you can select a door from a curtain wall and choose Door Properties from
the shortcut menu. The Door Properties dialog box is similar to the Door
Properties dialog box that is displayed when you edit a freestanding door,
except that the Location tab is replaced by an Anchor tab. From the Anchor
tab, you change the orientation of the door and the alignment or offset of
the door in relation to the curtain wall.
You can also swap objects from one cell to another or release the object
anchor so that the object moves independently from the curtain wall.

NOTE When you swap or release an object or edit its properties, you are creating a variation from the infill cell assignment for the curtain wall style. By
default, these variations (except release) are allowed to persist in the drawing
when you reapply the style to a curtain wall. However, if you want these variations to be overridden when you reapply a curtain wall style, then turn off the
Allow Variation from Infill Element Definition option on the Anchor tab of the
objects Properties dialog box. This option is set on a per object basis.

Changing the Orientation of an Object Anchored


in a Curtain Wall
To change the orientation of an object anchored in curtain wall
1 Select the object from the curtain wall and choose that objects Properties
option from the shortcut menu. (For example, Door Properties.)
2 In the Properties dialog box, click the Anchor tab.

NOTE This tab is available only for objects that are anchored to another
object, such as a curtain wall.
3 On the Anchor tab, do any of the following:

Click Flip X to flip the object in the X direction.


Click Flip Y to flip the object in the Y direction.
Click Flip Z to flip the object in the Z direction.

4 Click OK.

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509

Changing the Alignment of an Object Anchored


in a Curtain Wall
To change the alignment of an object anchored in curtain wall
1 Select the object from the curtain wall and choose that objects Properties
option from the shortcut menu. (For example, Door Properties.)
2 In the Properties dialog box, click the Anchor tab.

NOTE This tab is available only for objects that are anchored to another
object, such as a curtain wall.
3 On the Anchor tab, select Allow Variation from Infill Element Definition.
4 Choose a new alignment for the object. For more information, see Specifying an Alignment for a Curtain Wall Infill on page 435.
5 Click OK.

Changing the Offset of an Object Anchored in a


Curtain Wall
To change the offset of an object anchored in curtain wall
1 Select the object from the curtain wall and choose that objects Properties
option from the shortcut menu. (For example, Door Properties.)
2 In the Properties dialog box, click the Anchor tab.

NOTE This tab is available only for objects that are anchored to another
object, such as a curtain wall.
3 On the Anchor tab, select Allow Variation from Infill Element Definition.
4 Specify a new offset for the object. For more information, see Specifying
an Offset for a Curtain Wall Infill on page 436.
5 Click OK.

Swapping Two Objects Anchored in a Curtain


Wall
When you fill a curtain wall cell with an object, such as a door or window,
you can swap that object with another object in the curtain wall.

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To swap two objects anchored in curtain wall


1 Select one of the objects from the curtain wall and choose Infill
Anchor Swap Objects from the shortcut menu.
2 Select the object you want to swap with.

Releasing an Object Anchored in a Curtain Wall


When you fill a curtain wall cell with an object, such as a door or window,
that object is anchored to the curtain wall. While the anchor is in place, the
object moves when you move the curtain wall, and is removed when you
erase the curtain wall. If you want to move or erase an object independently
from the curtain wall, then you can release the anchor.

NOTE You can also move or erase the object by changing the element definition for the cell that contains the object. For more information, see Defining
Infills for Curtain Wall Cells on page 432.
To release an object anchored in curtain wall

Select one of the objects from the curtain wall and choose Infill
Anchor Release from the shortcut menu.

Curtain Wall Units


Curtain wall units are very similar to curtain walls except that the grid cells
can only contain panel infills, not objects. Curtain wall units are designed to
represent elements that are repeated within your main curtain wall.
You assign curtain wall units to specific cells within the curtain wall grid. For
more information, see Inserting an Object into a Curtain Wall Cell on page
454.
Curtain wall units are style-based, meaning there are preset characteristics
assigned to each curtain wall that determine its appearance. As with curtain
walls, you can override style settings for a single curtain wall unit or use Edit
in Place to experiment with changes, and then choose to either discard those
changes or save them to the style and update all the curtain wall units of that
style.
Like curtain walls, curtain wall units are made up of one or more grids. Each
grid has either a horizontal division or a vertical division, but you can nest
the grids to create a variety of patterns.

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511

TIP Using curtain wall units in a curtain wall can help you avoid the complexities of too many nested grids in the curtain wall.
Grids are the foundation of curtain walls and curtain wall units. Every grid
has four element types:

Divisions: Define the direction of the grid (horizontal or vertical) and


the number of cells
Cell Infills: Contain another grid, a panel infill, or an object such as a
window or a door
Frames: Define the edge around the outside of the primary grid and
nested grids
Mullions: Define the edges between the cells

NOTE Division is an abstract element, in contrast to the other three element


types that represent physical elements of the curtain wall unit.
Each element type is assigned a default definition that describes what elements
of that type look like.

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Element type

Default definitions

Divisions

Horizontal grid with two manual divisions offset from the


top and bottom of the grid

Cell Infills

Cells containing simple panels

Frames

Outer edges of grid 3" wide and 3" deep

Mullions

Edges between cells 1" wide and 3" deep

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Curtain wall units default element definitions

However, you can also create new definitions and assign those definitions to
specific elements within the curtain wall unit. For example, you can create
multiple infill definitions, and then assign different infills to specific cells in
the grid. Likewise, you can create multiple frame definitions, and then assign
a different definition to each frame edge (top, bottom, left, right).
You create element definitions from the Design Rules tab of the Curtain Wall
Unit Style Properties dialog box. Select an element from the tree to display a
list of definitions for that element, icons for adding and removing definitions, and text boxes for creating the definitions.
From the same Design Rules tab, you can assign the definitions to specific
elements in a grid. Select a grid from the tree to display a list of assignments
for that grid, icons for creating new assignments and columns in the assignment table for specifying the definition to use and where. You can also edit
the definitions at the bottom of the dialog box.
To get started with curtain wall units, draw a curtain wall unit using one of
the methods described in the next section, Creating Curtain Wall Units.
Try a variety of the existing curtain wall unit styles, find a style you like and
make a copy of it. Then, modify the element definitions and assignments to
suit your own needs. For more information, see Modifying the Elements in
a Curtain Wall Unit on page 557.
Element definitions and assignments for curtain wall units are identical to
those for curtain walls. For more information, see Creating Element Definitions for a Curtain Wall Style on page 419 or see Creating Element Defini-

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513

tions for a Curtain Wall Unit Style in the online Autodesk Architectural
Desktop Users Guide.
For more information about element definitions and assignments, see Creating Element Definitions for a Curtain Wall Unit Style and Assigning Definitions to Curtain Wall Unit Elements.

Creating Curtain Wall Units


Curtain wall units are created in much the same way as curtain walls. You
specify a style, a height, and start and endpoints. You can also create curtain
wall units by converting a 2D layout grid to a curtain wall or create a custom
grid from 2D lines, arcs, and circles. Unlike curtain walls, you cannot create
a curtain wall unit based on a curve. Curtain wall units can only be planar.

Creating a Curtain Wall Unit


To create a curtain wall unit
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Wall Units Add Curtain Wall
Unit.
2 Select a start point and an end point.
3 Specify a height for the curtain wall unit.
4 Select a style and click OK.

Drawing a curtain wall unit

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For information about curtain wall unit styles, see Working with Curtain
Wall Unit Styles on page 518.

Converting a Layout Grid to a Curtain Wall Unit


You can create a curtain wall unit that is based on a 2D layout grid. If you
already have 2D layout grids in an existing drawing, you can easily convert
to curtain wall units. Or, if you are already familiar with layout grids, it is a
quick and easy way to create a curtain wall unit, and then experiment with
the curtain wall unit commands to learn more about them.
To convert a 2D layout grid to a curtain wall unit
1 From the Desktop menu, choose Layout Tools Add Layout Grid (2D).
2 Create a layout grid. For more information, see Layout Grids on page
1568.
3 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Wall Units Convert Layout Grid
to Curtain Wall Unit.
4 Select the layout grid.

Converting a 2D layout grid to a curtain wall unit

Curtain wall units are divided either horizontally or vertically. To create


the horizontal and vertical patterns in the 2D layout grid, the curtain wall
unit uses nested grids. You define a primary division, either horizontal or
vertical, and then each cell within that grid is assigned a nested grid with
a division in the opposite direction.

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515

Specifying horizontal and vertical grid divisions

For more information about nested grids, see Working with Nested Grids
in Curtain Walls on page 414.
You are prompted to erase the layout grid after the conversion.
5 To erase the layout grid, type y (Yes). To have the layout grid remain after
the curtain wall unit is created, type n (No).
6 Select vertical or horizontal as the orientation for the primary division.
You are prompted to enter a name for the new style. For more information
about curtain wall unit styles, see Working with Curtain Wall Unit
Styles on page 518.
7 Type a name for this new curtain wall unit style.
8 Click OK.
The horizontal and vertical lines of the 2D layout grid define the divisions
for the curtain wall unit grids and the grid cells, frame, and mullions are
assigned default definitions. For more information, see Assigning Definitions to Curtain Wall Unit Elements on page 537.

Creating a Curtain Wall Unit with a Custom Grid


Curtain wall units contain one or more grids. You can create a custom grid
by drawing the grid using lines, arcs and circles, and then convert that linework into a curtain wall unit. After the conversion, the curtain wall unit is in
Edit in Place so that you can make modifications to it. At any point, you can
save the resulting curtain wall unit as a new curtain wall unit style. For more
information, see Using Edit in Place with Curtain Wall Units on page 562.

NOTE Curtain wall unit grids are one dimensionaleither horizontal or vertical. To create a grid pattern with horizontal and vertical divisions, like the example above, nested grids are used. For more information about nested grids, see
Working with Nested Grids in Curtain Walls on page 414.

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To create a curtain wall unit with a custom grid


1 Use lines, arcs, and circles to draw a grid in the world coordinate system
(WCS).
2 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Wall Units Convert Linework
to Curtain Wall Unit.
3 Select the lines, arcs, or circles that define your grid, and press ENTER.
4 Select one of the grid lines as the baseline for the curtain wall unit, or press
ENTER to use the line along the X axis as the baseline.

Converting linework to a curtain wall unit with a default baseline

TIP If you draw your linework in the XY plane (in plan view) and accept the
default baseline, the resulting window assembly is displayed from the
Z direction.
You are prompted to erase the lines that you drew to define the grid.
5 To erase the lines, type y (Yes). To have the lines remain after the curtain
wall unit is created, type n (No).
Each enclosed area is assigned the default cell infill. The lines between the
cells are assigned the default mullion definition, and the boundary
around the grid is assigned the default frame definition. For more information, see Assigning Definitions to Curtain Wall Unit Elements on
page 537.

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517

Converting linework to a curtain wall unit with a specified baseline

NOTE You cannot modify the division definition of a custom grid created
from lines, arcs, and circles. You can, however, assign a different division definition to it. For more information, see Assigning Divisions to a Curtain Wall
Unit Grid on page 537.

Working with Curtain Wall Unit Styles


Curtain wall units are style-based, meaning there are preset characteristics
assigned to each curtain wall unit that determine its appearance and function. By changing from one style of curtain wall unit to another, you can
quickly study several different design options. Any changes you make to the
style are reflected throughout your building, updating all curtain wall units
of that particular style. You can also apply overrides to a single curtain wall
unit, without changing other curtain wall units of the same style.
A curtain wall unit style contains:

518

Element definitions
Definition assignments for each element
Display properties for each element

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Notes about the style and any associated reference files

You can modify the Standard curtain wall unit style, or you can leave the
Standard style as it is and create a new style.
Curtain wall unit styles are very similar to curtain wall styles. For more information about styles, see Working with Curtain Wall Styles on page 419 or
Working with Curtain Wall Unit Styles in the online Autodesk Architectural
Desktop Users Guide.

Creating Element Definitions for a Curtain Wall


Unit Style
Element definitions determine the appearance of the four basic curtain wall
unit elements. There is a different definition type for each element.
Each type of element can have multiple definitions. For example, you can
define a division to create a horizontal grid or a vertical grid and you can
define the cells to contain a nested grid or a window assembly. To make reuse
easier, you can save the element definitions, and then assign them to grids,
cells, frames, or mullions as needed.
Element definitions are style-specific. When you create element definitions
for a specific curtain wall unit style, those definitions are available only for
curtain wall units of that style. For example, if you define a window assembly
infill for one curtain wall unit style, that infill is not available as an option
when you edit a curtain wall unit of a different style.
For information about defining the color, linetype, or layer of curtain wall
unit elements, see Modifying the Display of Curtain Wall Units.

Defining Divisions for Curtain Wall Unit Grids


The divisions of a grid define the orientation, that determines the direction
of the grid cells, and mullions, and they define a division type that determines the number and size of cells.

NOTE Creating a nested grid is not a division rule. To create a nested grid, add
a cell assignment. For more information, see Creating a Nested Grid in a Curtain Wall Unit and Working with Nested Grids in Curtain Walls.
You can create a variety of division definitions under different names, and
then assign different divisions to each grid in your curtain wall unit. For
more information about assigning divisions to a particular grid, see Assigning Divisions to a Curtain Wall Unit Grid.

Working with Curtain Wall Unit Styles

519

NOTE You create division definitions for a specific curtain wall unit style and
those definitions can be assigned only to grids in curtain wall units of that style.

Creating a Division Definition for a Curtain Wall Unit Style


To create a division definition
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Wall Units Curtain Wall Unit
Styles, or from the Curtain Walls toolbar, click
.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Unit Styles, and choose Edit from the
shortcut menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select Divisions under
Element Definitions.
5 Click the New Division icon.
6 Type a name for this division in Name.
7 Select either the vertical orientation icon or a horizontal orientation icon.
8 Select one of the following division type, and specify offsets if needed.

Fixed Cell Dimensions. For more information, see Specifying a Fixed


Size for Cells in a Curtain Wall Unit Grid.
Fixed Number of Cells. For more information, see Specifying a Fixed
Number of Cells for a Curtain Wall Unit Grid.
Manual. For more information, see Manually Defining the Number
and Size of Cells in a Curtain Wall Unit Grid.

After you create a division definition, you can assign the definition to a
specific grid in a curtain wall unit. For more information, see Assigning
Divisions to a Curtain Wall Unit Grid.
9 When you are finished creating division definitions, click OK to return to
the Style Manager.
For information about assigning the division definition to a specific grid
in your curtain wall, see Assigning Divisions to a Curtain Wall Grid

Specifying a Fixed Size for Cells in a Curtain Wall Unit Grid


You can define a specific size for the cells in a grid. In this case, the number
of cells is determined by the length or height of the grid, depending on the
orientation.

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To specify a fixed size for cells


1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Wall Units Curtain Wall Unit
Styles, or from the Curtain Walls toolbar, click
.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Unit Styles, and choose Edit from the
shortcut menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select Divisions under
Element Definitions.
5 Select a Divisions definition or create a new one.
6 Select Fixed Cell Dimension as the division type.
7 Type a size for the cells in Cell Dimension. If you are defining a horizontal
grid, then the cell dimension is the length of the cell from mullion to mullion. If you are defining a vertical grid, then the cell dimension is the
height of the cell.
8 To specify an offset for the grid, type an offset distance in Start Offset or
End Offset. For more information, see Specifying an Offset for a Curtain
Wall Unit Grid.
When you draw a curtain wall unit using a fixed cell dimension, there is
often extra space between the last full-size cell and the end of the curtain
wall unit.
9 To adjust the cells and accommodate this space automatically as you draw
curtain wall units, select Auto-Adjust Cells.
10 Select the cells that you want to be adjusted.

For horizontal grids, select the Bottom, Middle, or Top icon


For vertical grids, select the Start, Middle, or End icon
You can select any combination of these options. For example, bottom
only, bottom and top, middle and top, and so on.

11 To increase the size of the specified cells to accommodate extra space,


select Grow as the cell adjustment. To decrease the size, select Shrink.
12 Click OK, or to make additional adjustments to the division you just
defined, click Convert to Manual Division.
13 To calculate the number of grid lines needed based on the size you specified, type a value for conversion height (for horizontal divisions) or conversion length (for vertical divisions).
The divisions you specified are displayed in a table that you can easily
modify.
For information about editing the division after the conversion, see Manually Defining the Number and Size of Cells in a Curtain Wall Unit Grid.

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521

For information about assigning the division definition to a specific grid


in your curtain wall unit, see Assigning Divisions to a Curtain Wall Unit
Grid

Specifying a Fixed Number of Cells for a Curtain Wall Unit


Grid
You can define a specific number of cells in a grid. In this case, the size of the
cells is determined by the length or height of the grid, depending on the orientation.
To specify a fixed number of cells
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Wall Units Curtain Wall Unit
Styles, or from the Curtain Walls toolbar, click
.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Unit Styles, and choose Edit from the
shortcut menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select Divisions under
Element Definitions.
5 Select a division definition or create a new one.
6 Select Fixed Number of Cells as the division type.
7 Type the desired number of cells in Number of Cells. If you are defining a
horizontal grid, then you are specifying the number of horizontal cells. If
you are defining a vertical grid, then you are specifying the number of vertical cells.
8 To specify an offset for the grid, type an offset distance in Start Offset or
End Offset. For more information, see Specifying an Offset for a Curtain
Wall Unit Grid.
9 If you want to make additional adjustments to the grid you just defined,
click Convert to Manual Division and specify a Conversion Height or
Length. For more information, see Manually Defining the Number and
Size of Cells in a Curtain Wall Unit Grid.
10 Click OK or, to make additional adjustments to the division you just
defined, click Convert to Manual Division.
11 To calculate the distance between grid lines based on the number of cells
you specified, type a value for conversion height (for horizontal divisions)
or conversion length (for vertical divisions).
The divisions you specified are displayed in a table that you can easily
modify.

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For information about editing the division after the conversion, see Manually Defining the Number and Size of Cells in a Curtain Wall Unit Grid.
For information about assigning the division definition to a specific grid in
your curtain wall unit, see Assigning Divisions to a Curtain Wall Unit Grid.

Manually Defining the Number and Size of Cells in a Curtain


Wall Unit Grid
You can manually add grid lines and specify an offset for each one if you need
to create a unique grid that does not fit into any of the other division types.
You can also start with a Fixed Cell Dimension grid or a Fixed Number of
Cells grid, and then manually adjust the grid lines to suit your needs.
To manually define the number and size of cells
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Wall Units Curtain Wall Unit
Styles, or from the Curtain Walls toolbar, click
.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Unit Styles, and choose Edit from the
shortcut menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select Divisions under
Element Definitions.
5 Select a Divisions definition or create a new one.
6 Select Manual as the division type.
7 Click the Add Grid Line icon to insert a grid line. Insert as many grid lines
as you need. If you need to remove a grid line, select it from the table and
click the Remove Grid Line icon.
8 Under Offset in the grid line table, type an offset distance for each grid
line.
9 Under From in the grid line table, select the grid location from which the
grid line is offset.
10 To specify an offset for the grid, type an offset distance in Start Offset or
End Offset. For more information, see Specifying an Offset for a Curtain
Wall Unit Grid.
11 Click OK when youve completed your manual grid definition.
For information about assigning the division definition to a specific grid
in your curtain wall unit, see Assigning Divisions to a Curtain Wall Unit
Grid.

Specifying an Offset for a Curtain Wall Unit Grid


By default, grids cells are measured from the start and end points of the curtain wall unit baseline (for horizontal divisions) or from the floor line to the

Working with Curtain Wall Unit Styles

523

roof line (for vertical divisions). The width of the grid frame is not considered
in calculating the size of the cell. For example, if you draw a curtain wall unit
with a 14 baseline and a 1 frame on the left and right and you specify a fixed
number of vertical cells, the cells do not appear equal in size. The first and
last cells appear smaller because they include the frame. To make the cells
equal in size, offset the start and end of the grid by the width of the frame.

NOTE You can offset the grid only when the division type is Fixed Cell
Dimension, Fixed Number of Cells, or Manual.
To offset the grid
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Wall Units Curtain Wall Unit
Styles, or from the Curtain Walls toolbar, click
.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Unit Styles, and choose Edit from the
shortcut menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select Divisions under
Element Definitions.
5 Select a division definition or create a new one.
6 Select Fixed Cell Dimension, Fixed Number of Cells, or Manual as the division type.
7 To offset the grid, type a positive value for any of the following options:

For horizontal grids


Start Offset: Distance between the start point of the curtain wall unit
baseline to the start of the first cell
End Offset: Distance between the end point of the curtain wall unit
baseline to the end of the last cell.

For vertical grids


Bottom Offset: Distance between the floor line of the curtain wall
unit to the start of the first cell.
Top Offset: Distance between the roof line of the curtain wall unit to
the end of the top cell.

8 Click OK to exit the dialog box.

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Removing a Division Definition from a Curtain Wall Unit Style


If you have a division definition that you no longer need, you can remove it
from the Divisions definitions list. You cannot remove a definition if it is currently assigned to a grid.
To remove a division definition
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Wall Units Curtain Wall Unit
Styles, or from the Curtain Walls toolbar, click
.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Unit Styles, and choose Edit from the
shortcut menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select Divisions under
Element Definitions.
5 Select the division definition that you want to remove.
6 Click the Remove Division icon or choose Remove from the shortcut
menu.
7 Click OK to exit the dialog box.

Defining Infills for Curtain Wall Unit Cells


An infill defines the contents of a curtain wall unit cell. A curtain wall unit
cell can be empty (no infill), it can contain a grid (nested grid), or it can contain a panel. Unlike curtain wall units, there is no style infill for inserting
doors, windows and other objects.

NOTE Nested grids and no infill do not require element definitions. These are
options you select when assigning an infill to cell. For information, see Creating
a Nested Grid in a Curtain Wall Unit and Removing the Infill of a Cell in a Curtain Wall Unit.
You can define as many infills as you need, and then use cell assignments to
specify the cells used in each infill. There is a default infill, that you can modify as needed, that is used for all unassigned cells. For more information
about cell assignments, see Assigning Definitions to Curtain Wall Unit Elements.

NOTE You create Infill definitions for a specific curtain wall unit style, and
those definitions can be assigned only to grid cells in curtain wall units of that
style.

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525

Creating a Panel Infill for a Curtain Wall Unit


Use the Simple Panel infill to represent basic cladding materials in the curtain
wall unit, such as a stone wall panel, concrete panel, metal panel, or glazing
infill.
To create a panel infill
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Wall Units Curtain Wall Unit
Styles, or from the Curtain Walls toolbar, click
.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Unit Styles, and choose Edit from the
shortcut menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select Infills under Element Definitions.
5 Click the New Infill icon to create a new infill.
6 Type a descriptive name for the infill.
7 Select Simple Panel as the infill type.
8 Select an alignment for the infill. For more information, see Specifying
an Alignment for an Infill of a Curtain Wall Unit.
9 Specify an offset for the infill. For more information, see Specifying an
Offset for an Infill of a Curtain Wall Unit.
10 Type a thickness for the panel in the Panel Thickness text box.
11 Click OK to exit the dialog box.
After you create an infill definition, you can assign it to any cell in a curtain wall unit grid. For more information, see Assigning Infills to Curtain
Wall Unit Cells.

NOTE The layer, color, linetype, and other display properties of the default
infill are applied to all infills unless you create a custom display component
for each definition. You can then control the display of each infill definition
independently. For more information, see Modifying the Display of Curtain
Wall Units.

Specifying an Alignment for an Infill of a Curtain Wall Unit


You can align an infill so that it is centered with the baseline of the curtain
wall unit, in front of the baseline, or behind the baseline. in plan view, the
front of a curtain wall unit (drawn from left to right) is below the baseline
and the back is above the baseline.

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NOTE To move the infill away from the baseline, see Specifying an Offset for
an Infill of a Curtain Wall Unit.
To specify an alignment for an infill
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Wall Units Curtain Wall Unit
Styles, or from the Curtain Walls toolbar, click
.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Unit Styles, and choose Edit from the
shortcut menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select Infills under Element Definitions.
5 Select an infill or create a new one.
6 Select an alignment: front, center, or back.
7 Click OK to exit the dialog box.

Specifying an Offset for an Infill of a Curtain Wall Unit


By default, infills are centered on the curtain wall unit baseline. If your
design requires that the infill be aligned with frame edges or some other part
of the curtain wall unit, then you can specify an offset for the infill.
To specify an offset for an infill
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Wall Units Curtain Wall Unit
Styles, or from the Curtain Walls toolbar, click
.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Unit Styles, and choose Edit from the
shortcut menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select Infills under Element Definitions.
5 Select an infill or create a new one.
6 Type a distance in the Offset text box. in plan view, positive numbers offset the infill above the baseline and negative numbers offset the infill
below the baseline.
7 Click OK to exit the dialog box.

Removing an Infill Definition from a Curtain Wall Unit Style


If you have an infill definition that you no longer need, you can remove it
from the Infills definitions list. You cannot remove a definition if it is cur-

Working with Curtain Wall Unit Styles

527

rently assigned to a cell. In addition, you cannot remove the default infill
definition, but you can modify it as needed.

NOTE For information about removing an infill from a cell, see Removing the
Infill of a Cell in a Curtain Wall Unit.
To remove an infill definition
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Wall Units Curtain Wall Unit
Styles, or from the Curtain Walls toolbar, click
.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Unit Styles, and choose Edit from the
shortcut menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select Infills under Element Definitions.
5 Select the unneeded infill definition from the list.
6 Click the Remove Infill icon to remove the infill definition.
7 Click OK to exit the dialog box.

Defining Curtain Wall Unit Frames


The curtain wall unit frame is represented by the outer edges of the grid. The
overall frame size is determined by the length and height of the curtain wall
unit grid. You can define a frame by specifying a width and depth or by
selecting a profile. For more information about profiles, see Working with
Profiles.
You can create as many frame definitions as you want, and then assign the
definitions to the frames as needed. If you have nested grids, then each grid
has its own frame. There is a default frame definition, that you can modify
as needed. Unassigned frames are not displayed. For more information, see
Assigning Definitions to Curtain Wall Unit Frames.

TIP You can copy a mullion definition and use it as a frame definition. Select
the mullion definition and drag it to Frames in the tree on the left side of the dialog box.

NOTE You create frame definitions for a specific curtain wall unit style and
those definitions can be assigned only to frames in curtain wall units of that style.

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Defining the Frame of a Curtain Wall Unit by Width and Depth


You can define a frame by specifying its width and depth. The overall frame
size is determined by the length and height of the curtain wall unit grid.
To define a frame by width and depth
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Wall Units Curtain Wall Unit
Styles, or from the Curtain Walls toolbar, click
.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Unit Styles, and choose Edit from the
shortcut menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select Frames under Element Definitions.
5 Click the New Frame icon to create a new frame definition.
6 Type a descriptive name for the frame.
7 Type a width and depth for the frame.

TIP To remove the frame edge and have the infill adjust to fill the space
occupied by the frame, create a frame definition with both width and depth
set to zero. Then, assign that definition to the frame edge that you want to
remove. For more information, see Removing a Frame Edge from a Curtain
Wall Unit on page 543.
8 Specify any desired offsets. For more information, see Specifying Offsets
for the Frame of a Curtain Wall Unit.
9 Click OK to exit the dialog box.
After you create a frame definition, you can assign it to any frame in a curtain wall unit. For more information, see Assigning Definitions to Curtain Wall Unit Frames.

NOTE The layer, color, linetype, and other display properties of the default
frame are applied to all frames unless you create a custom display component
for each definition. You can then control the display of each frame definition
independently. For more information, see Modifying the Display of Curtain
Wall Units.

Defining the Frame of a Curtain Wall Unit Using a Profile


If you do not want a straight edge to your frame, you can use a profile to
define edges with curves, jags, or any other shape you require.

Working with Curtain Wall Unit Styles

529

NOTE The insertion point of the profile is aligned with the centroid of the
frame.
To define a frame using a profile
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Wall Units Curtain Wall Unit
Styles, or from the Curtain Walls toolbar, click
.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Unit Styles, and choose Edit from the
shortcut menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select Frames under Element Definitions.
5 Click the New Frame icon to create a new frame definition.
6 Type a descriptive name for the frame.
7 Specify a width and depth for the frame edge. These dimensions are used
to calculate the center point of the edge for aligning the profile and also
to specify a boundary for the adjacent infill.
8 Select Use Profile.

NOTE The Profile options are available only if you have existing profiles. For
information about creating a profile, see Working with Profiles.
9 Select a profile from the list.
By default, the profile is inserted using the same width and depth with
which it was created.
10 To adjust the size of the profile to fit within the width or depth dimension
of the frame edge, select Auto-Adjust Profile Width or Depth.
11 To mirror the profile, select to mirror along the X or Y axis.
12 To rotate the profile, type a value in the Rotation text box.
13 Specify any desired offsets. For more information, see the next section
Specifying Offsets for the Frame of a Curtain Wall Unit.
14 Click OK to exit the dialog box.
After you create a frame definition, you can assign it to any frame in a curtain wall unit. For more information, see Assigning Definitions to Curtain Wall Unit Frames.

NOTE The layer, color, linetype, and other display properties of the default
frame are applied to all frames unless you create a custom display component

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for each definition. You can then control the display of each frame definition
independently. For more information, see Modifying the Display of Curtain
Wall Units.

Specifying Offsets for the Frame of a Curtain Wall Unit


By default, the outside edges of the frame align with start and end of the floor
line and the start and end of the roof line. When you adjust the width of the
frame, the frame expands inward. However, you can use offsets to expand or
contract the frame away from these default limits or to shift the frame away
from the baseline in either the X or Y direction.
To specify an offset for a curtain wall unit frame
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Wall Units Curtain Wall Unit
Styles, or from the Curtain Walls toolbar, click
.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Unit Styles, and choose Edit from the
shortcut menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select Frames under Element Definitions.
5 Select a frame definition from the list.
6 Type an offset distance for Offset Frame in X Direction, Offset Frame in Y
Direction, Offset Frame at Start, or Offset Frame at End.

Offset Frame in X Direction: A positive X offset moves the frame


edge outward beyond the end of the curtain wall unit, while a negative
X offset moves the frame edge inward toward the center of the curtain
wall unit.
Offset Frame in Y Direction: In plan view, a positive Y offset moves
the frame edge above the baseline, while a negative Y offset moves the
frame below the baseline.
Offset Frame at Start: A negative Start offset lengthens the frame
beyond the start point while a positive Start offset shortens the frame.
The start point for vertical edges is the baseline and for horizontal edges
(drawn left to right), it is the left side.
Offset Frame at End: A negative End offset lengthens the frame
beyond the end point while a positive End offset shortens the frame.
The end point for vertical edges is the base height and for horizontal
edges (drawn left to right), it is the right side.

TIP To quickly identify the start and end of a curtain wall unit, select the curtain wall unit and move one of the endpoints. A directional marker is dis-

Working with Curtain Wall Unit Styles

531

played near the center of the curtain wall unit and points toward the end of
the curtain wall unit.
7 Click OK to exit the dialog box.

Removing a Frame Definition from a Curtain Wall Unit Style


If you have a frame definition that you no longer need, you can remove it
from the Frame definitions list. You cannot remove a frame definition if it is
currently assigned to a frame edge. In addition, you cannot remove the
default frame definition, but you can modify it as needed.

NOTE For information about removing a frame edge, see Removing a Frame
Edge from a Curtain Wall Unit.
To remove a frame definition
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Wall Units Curtain Wall Unit
Styles, or from the Curtain Walls toolbar, click
.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Unit Styles, and choose Edit from the
shortcut menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select Frames under Element Definitions.
5 Select the unneeded frame definition from the list.
6 Click the Remove Frame icon to remove the frame definition.
7 Click OK to exit the dialog box.

Defining Curtain Wall Unit Mullions


The mullions of a curtain wall unit are the edges between the grid cells. You
can define the mullions by specifying a width and depth or by selecting a
profile. For more information about profiles, see Working with Profiles.
You can create as many mullion definitions as you want, and then assign the
definitions to mullions as needed. If you have nested grids, then each grid
has its own mullions. You can modify a default mullion definition, as
needed, for any unassigned mullions. For more information, see Assigning
Definitions to the Mullions of a Curtain Wall Unit.

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TIP You can copy a frame definition and use it as a mullion definition. Select
the frame definition and drag it to Mullions in the tree on the left side of the dialog box.

NOTE You create mullion definitions for a specific curtain wall unit style, and
those definitions can be assigned only to mullions in curtain wall units of that
style.

Defining the Mullions of a Curtain Wall Unit by Width and


Depth
You can define mullions by specify a width and a depth.
To define mullions by width and depth
1 From the Design menu, choose Curtain Wall Units Curtain Wall Unit
Styles, or from the Curtain Walls toolbar, click
.
2 Select a style under Curtain Wall Unit Styles, and choose Edit from the
shortcut menu.
3 Click the Design Rules tab.
4 From the tree on the left side of the dialog box, select Mullions under Element Definitions.
5 Click the New Mullion icon to create a new mullion definition.
6 Type a descriptive name for the mullions.
7 Type a width and depth for the mullions.

TIP To remove mullions for butt glazing, create a definition with both width
and depth set to zero. Then, assign that definition to the mullions that you
want to remove. For more information, see Removing Mullions from a Curtain Wall Unit.
8 Specify any desired offsets. For more information, see Specifying Offsets
for the Mullions of a Curtain W