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ELC590

SAMPLE PREPARATION OUTLINE


PERSUASIVE SPEECH
Students Name

: Muhamad Azwar Bin Anwar

Matric Number

: 2016674032

Group

: BM2313N

Title

: Why people should become a blood donor

Organisational Pattern

: Monroes Motivated Sequence

Visual Aid

: Power point slides

General Purpose

: To persuade

Specific Purpose

: To persuade my audience to become blood donors.

Central Idea

: A blood donor can overcome the number of shortage in blood

donation. Not just for this reason. What are the other 2 reasons?summarise them here.
Introduction

I.

Do you know how many times has UiTM Puncak Alam organized a blood
donation program?
A. Already twice this semester and the last one was on 8 October 2016

II.

at Surau Ibnu Sina


Remember every drop of your blood could save one life or it would it would
surprise you if I told you that each and every one of you could save 18 lives
every year?
A. Well this statement is true. Today I am going to persuade you to
become a blood donor.
B. I try to donate blood every times I can and its already fourth times I
donate my blood because it makes me feel good to know that I am
involving an active role in saving people lives. Separate the points!
C. Did you know that every minute someone might need blood to live?

D.

Former Deputy Prime Minister Tan Sri Muhyiddin Yassin recently


stated that only 2.5% of Malaysians were blood donor, well below than

III.
IV.

international average of 5%.


Do you will donate your blood to someone you know that are needed it ?
Today I am going to blow your mind about blood donation and persuade all of
you to start donate your blood.

(Transition : Lets look more closely at the reasons why we must donate our blood)

Body
Need
I.

You can save people life with donate your blood and one pint of blood will save three
lives.
A. People afraid of needles, fear of the sight of blood and fear to gaining weight.
1. Two most common reasons people dont give blood are, I never
thought about it and I dont like needles. Well, were thinking
about it right now! And, lets face it,. Plus, blood donation is an
opportunity to volunteer to help save lives, rather than just talked.
Wouldnt it feel good to give your blood to save someone that are
really need blood. Such as people that involve accident, treat
people with medical condition such as anaemia, cancer blood
disorder, and those having surgery.
2. Some people have a misconception that they will eat more after
donating blood but this is so untrue so donor should not worry Dr
Norasrina, head of National Blood Bank blood procurement
division.
A. Four to five hundred units of blood are needed in a day.
1. One unit is about 450ml of blood. The National Blood bank collect
3,200units of blood in a week. The collection supplied to
government and private hospitals in Klang Valley.
2. 8% of donation come from mobile clinics and others organisations.
3. Hospital Pantai Dalam Kuala Lumpur only have 15 pint of blood a
day supply from National Blood to patch the surgeries and births.

(Transition move to benefits : Believe it or not, there are benefits of become blood donors)

II.

Able to reduce body weight.


1. Believe it or not, donating blood increases you calorie burn! It is estimated
that one pint of donated blood results in about 650 calories burned.
2. Of course its not a sustainable weight loss plan, but its an added bonus if
you happen to be trying to lose weight. Lose a little weight while saving
lives not bad.
Your blood may flow better.
1. If blood has a high viscosity, or resistance to flow, it will flow like molasses,

III.

says Phillip DeChristopher, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Loyola University


Health System blood bank.
2. Blood donations may help the blood flow in a way thats less damaging to the
lining of the blood vessels and could result in fewer arterial blockages.
3. That may explain why the American Journal of Epidemiology found that blood
IV.

donors are 88% less likely to suffer a heart attack.


Free Health Check-up
1. You can donate blood only if you are fit enough to do so. Before every blood
donation process, a series of health check-ups are performed on the donor
totally free of cost.
2. This will be of great benefit to you. For example, you will come to know of any
blood pressure abnormalities.
3. That will help diagnose some of the indolent diseases at the early stage
before they get flared up and present with multiple medical problems.
Conclusion

I.
II.
III.

Closing, I urge you to start be a part of blood donor.


A simple way to safe life with one drop of your blood.
Blood is the most precious gift that anyone can give to another person, the gift of

IV.
V.
VI.

life.
A decision to donate your blood can save a life, or maybe your family life.
Our biggest fear is the fear of the unknown.
Giving blood is a simple procedure that never will bring harm to your body but

VII.
VIII.

give such a big impact the one who needed.


Its your choice donate or not and its also your choice safe people or not.
I hope all of you mark in your mind that become a blood donor able to prevent a
death. That all thank you

Reference :
-

http://www.thestar.com.my/news/community/2014/08/02/things-you-didnt-knowabout-blood-donation-only-25-malaysians-are-donors/ (Choo Woon Lim, The star, 2

aug 2014, Top 10 thing you didnt know about blood donation)
http://time.com/2907415/4-unexpected-benefits-of-donating-blood/ (Health.com, 22
june 2014, 4 unexpected benefits of donating blood)

http://www.lifehack.org/articles/lifestyle/5-health-benefits-donatingblood.html (Abialbon Paul, Lifehack.org, 5 health benefits of donating

blood)
http://www.maxworkouts.com/articles/entry/how-donating-blood-boostsyour-weight-loss-and-overall-health (Shin Ohtake, maxworkout.com, How

Donating Blood Boosts Your Weight Loss and Overall Health)


https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/1-percenters-we-can-all-love-david-leitch (David
Leitch, linkedin.com, 17 may 2016, 1 percenters we can all love)

ARTICLE

Saturday, 2 August 2014

Top 10 things you didn't know


about blood donation
BY CHOO WOON LIM

A blood chart to determine each donor's blood type before they proceed to the donation.

Despite the increase in the number of blood donors in Malaysia, Deputy Prime
Minister Tan Sri Muhyiddin Yassin recently stated that only 2.5% of Malaysians
were blood donors, well below the international average of five percent. MOB
takes a look at some facts and figures about blood donation.
1) There are two types of blood donation whole blood and apheresis.

Whole blood involves donating blood in its full form. Apheresis separates
platelets and plasma from the blood while the donor is hooked up to a
machine. The remaining blood is pumped back into the donor.
Apheresis is costly but effective as we are able to separate the components
for specific purposes, said Dr Norasrina Ishak, head of National Blood Bank
blood procurement division.
The whole blood donation takes 30 minutes and can only be done once in
three months.
In comparison, apheresis donation takes over an hour and can only be done
at the centre due to machine availability, but an apheresis donor can donate
once every two weeks.
2) Altruism is the top reason driving Malaysians to donate blood.
According to a survey by the National Blood Bank, many come forward
because of a genuine desire to help others.
Retiree Low Cheng Har, 60, was doing an apheresis donation when MOB
visited the National Blood Bank.
It was Lows 331st apheresis donation, having been a blood donor since 1994.
She takes the bus from her home in Bandar Sri Damansara, Petaling Jaya, to
get to the centre in Kuala Lumpur.
Im motivated by a sense of wanting to help others. If I were in the patients
shoes, I hope others would do the same for me, she said, adding that her
husband and sons were also regular blood donors.
3) There are many benefits to being a blood donor.
Apart from helping others, regular blood donors also receive benefits in return.
Malaysians who donate twice in a period of 12 months are entitled to a free
Hepatitis B vaccine shot.
Those who donate more than 50 times (whole blood) and 150 times
(apheresis) are entitled to free outpatient treatment at any government
hospital.

Should they be warded, they will be entitled to a free first-class ward for the
first 10 years, and second-class ward after.
Regular blood donors also enjoy free health screenings every six months.
4) Misconceptions about blood donation.
Dr Norasrina said some of the reasons cited by the public for not donating
blood were fear of needles, fear of the sight of blood and, surprisingly, fear of
gaining weight.
Some people have a misconception that they will eat more after donating
blood because the body needs to be replenished, but this is untrue so donors
should not worry, she said.
We sterilise our needles properly so there shouldnt be a fear of infectious
diseases, she said.
5) Four to five hundred units of blood are needed in a day.
One unit is about 450ml of blood. The National Blood Bank collects 3,200
units of blood in a week.
The collected blood is supplied to government and private hospitals in the
Klang Valley, while in other states it is provided by the respective state blood
banks.
Eighty percent of donations come from mobile clinics. Apart from our own
donation drives, we also work with various corporations, schools, nongovernmental organisations and other government bodies.
The amount of blood one can donate depends on the donors weight.
If you are below 50kg, you either donate 250ml or 350ml; and 450ml if you
are 50kg and above, said Dr Norasrina.
The donated blood is quarantined and sent to screen for hepatitis B, hepatitis
C, HIV and syphillis.
Once the green light is given, the blood is processed into components
plasma, platelets and packed cells (red blood cells), which are then distributed
to hospitals or stored.

6) One blood donation can save three lives.


This is a tagline used by the National Blood Bank to encourage blood
donation. The reason is because there are three components in the blood
which serve different functions.
For example, platelets help dengue patients who are low on platelet count. It
is also used for patients undergoing chemotherapy.
Red blood cells carry oxygen and are important for blood transfusion in cases
of accidents, operations, thalassemia and heavy bleeding; whereas plasma,
which contain blood-clotting factors, can help burn victims.
This is one of the reasons why we encourage apheresis donation because it
is more specific, Dr Norasrina explained.
It takes four to six random whole blood units to extract the same amount of
plasma or platelets used for one patients treatment. In apheresis, the ratio is
one donor to one patient. This reduces the risk of adverse reactions, she
added.
7) Blood type A tends to run short.
Despite about 25% of the population having A blood type, it often runs short in
the blood bank. Registration division head Rosalind Choo said it was possible
that many A-blood type donors were not aware or were not coming forward to
donate.
Blood donation levels tend to see a drop during festivals and school holidays,
but we have a forecasting system and we plan ahead to make sure there are
always stocks in hand, she said.
8) Blood banks need a continuous supply of donations.
Red blood cells can last 42 days maximum, while platelets can only be kept
for five to seven days. Plasma can be frozen and if kept in the right conditions,
can keep well for years.
The short lifespan of some components is the reason why the blood bank is
constantly in need of supply.

Red blood cells have a lifespan of about 122 days in the body, of which then
they will die and be replenished. Instead of letting it go to waste, donating it
can help to save lives, said Dr Norasrina.
Many of our donors also report feeling fresher after donating blood, she
added.
9) The largest demographic of donors in Malaysia are between the ages
18 and 30.
Dr Norasrani said most donation drives were currently focused in urban areas.
If we reach out to the rural areas, the number of donors will definitely rise.
In 2013, we collected 670,000 units nationwide. Our aim is to get a consistent
supply throughout the year, she added.
Other outreach programmes include regular campaigns in schools and
universities to instill awareness from a young age.
10) I want to be a blood donor.
Now that youre all pumped up to do your part for charity, here is what you
need to fulfill to get started.
A donor has to be between 18 and 60 years old, healthy and weigh 45kg and
above. They must not have been on medication recently or have any
congenital diseases.
The night before donation, they must get a minimum of five hours of sleep. A
healthy lifestyle is essential.
Those aged below 18 must get parental consent.
For more information, visit www.sedarahmalaysia.org

4 Unexpected Benefits of
Donating Blood
Recommended by

Whens the last time you stopped to appreciate all the good stuff your blood does for
you? Without it, oxygen would never reach your cells and carbon dioxide would be
filling your blood vessels as we speak.
Every two seconds, someone in the United States needs blood and more than 41,000
blood donations are needed every day, according to the American Red Cross. So
while you may never worry about having enough blood to function, plenty of others
arent as fortunate. World Blood Donor Day may have passed on June 14, but theres
still more reason than ever to get out and donate.
Health.com:11 Ways to Boost Your Energy With Food
While giving blood should be all about helping those in need, there are a few things
in it for you. Here are four health perks to becoming a blood donor:
Your blood may flow better
If blood has a high viscosity, or resistance to flow, it will flow like molasses, says
Phillip DeChristopher, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Loyola University Health System
blood bank. Repeated blood donations may help the blood flow in a way thats less
damaging to the lining of the blood vessels and could result in fewer arterial
blockages. That may explain why the American Journal of Epidemiology found that
blood donors are 88% less likely to suffer a heart attack.
Its not clear if there are lasting health benefits associated with better blood flow.
(These kinds of studies cant prove cause and effectfor example, blood donors
might lead healthier lifestyles than the general population.)What is clear is that
blood donors seem to not be hospitalized so often and if they are, they have shorter
lengths of stay, Dr. DeChristopher says. And theyre less likely to get heart attacks,
strokes, and cancers.
Health.com:10 Natural Ways to Lower Blood Pressure
Youll get a mini check-up

Before you give blood, youll first have to complete a quick physical that measures
your temperature, pulse, blood pressure, and hemoglobin levels. After your blood is
collected, its sent off to a lab where it will undergo 13 different tests for infectious
diseases, like HIV and West Nile virus. If anything comes back positive, youll be
notified immediately.
If year after year your tests come back negative, then youll know for sure theres
nothing youve been exposed to, Dr. DeChristopher says. The physical and blood
tests are no reason to skip your annual doctor visit, but theyre good for peace of
mind. But you should never donate blood if you suspect you might actually be sick or
have been exposed to HIV or another virus.
Health.com:20 Things You Need to Know About HIV
Your iron levels will stay balanced
Healthy adults usually have about 5 grams of iron in their bodies, mostly in red blood
cells but also in bone marrow. When you donate a unit of blood, you lose about a
quarter of a gram of iron, which gets replenished from the food you eat in the weeks
after donation, Dr. DeChristopher says. This regulation of iron levels is a good thing,
because having too much iron could be bad news for your blood vessels.
The statistics appear to show that decreasing the amount of iron in otherwise
healthy people over the long run is beneficial to their blood vessels, and diseases
related to abnormalities in blood vessels, such as heart attack and stroke, he says.
Still, data from The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that nearly 10%
of women in the U.S. suffer from anemia, a condition where your body lacks red
blood cells or hemoglobin (most commonly due to an iron deficiency). In that case,
its best not to give blood until the anemia is resolved, he says.
Health.com:15 Signs You May Have an Iron Deficiency
Women who havent hit menopause yet may find it hard to donate blood, too. Premenopausal females can be somewhat iron depleted with blood counts just under the
lower limit, Dr. DeChristopher says. If you have low iron and you still want to be a
donor, taking an oral iron supplement may help you re-qualify, he says.
You could live longer
Doing good for others is one way to live a longer life. A study in Health
Psychology found that people who volunteered for altruistic reasons had a
significantly reduced risk of mortality four years later than those who volunteered for
themselves alone. While the health benefits of donating blood are nice, dont forget
who youre really helping: A single donation can save the lives of up to three people,
according to the Red Cross. The need for blood is always there, Dr. DeChristopher
says. Its important to recognize how important willing donors are.

5 Health Benefits of Donating


Blood

Abialbon Paul

A spider bite might not transform you into a superhero, but a small
needle prick and a little of your time sure can. Yes, by donating blood
youll be saving up to three human lives each time. And here is even
more awesome news: not only is donating blood extremely beneficial
to those on the receiving end, it also has proven benefits to the person
donating blood.Here are some of the benefits you gain for you
humanitarian efforts.

1. The Joy of Saving Human Lives


It is such a wonderful feeling being able to help doctors save human
lives. There are no perfect substitutes for human blood. The blood you
donate is divided into various components according to the needs of
patients. Each component can be used by different recipients for

various purposes. Many newborn babies may benefit from a single


blood donor as their blood requirements are smaller. Every time you
donate blood, you can help up to 3 or 4 individual recipients. Be a hero
by donating blood.

2. Free Health Check-up


You can donate blood only if you are fit enough to do so. Before every
blood donation process, a series of health check-ups are performed on
the donor totally free of cost. This will be of great benefit to you. For
example, you will come to know of any blood pressure abnormalities.
That will help diagnose some of the indolent diseases at the early stage
before they get flared up and present with multiple medical problems.
Further, after the blood is donated, the blood and blood products that
are derived from them are screened for certain infections. You can
choose to be informed if they find any abnormality in those screening
tests. Frequent blood donations are good free health check-ups that
will help you stay healthy. Here is an interesting story of how blood
donation saved a grandmothers life.

3. Reduces Risk of Heart Disease


Regular blood donations help to keep the levels of iron in the body in
check, especially in males. This has shown to reduce heart disease.
Though iron is an essential element for the proper functioning of the
body, excessive iron build up can result in excessive oxidative damage.
Oxidative damage is the major culprit implicated in accelerated

ageing, heart attacks, strokes etc. You can read more of the scientific
information on the American Journal of Epidemiology.

4. Burns Calories
One time blood donation helps you shed 650 Kcal. This can aid you in
your body weight control measures. However, blood can be donated
safely once in two or three months and not more frequently. This will
depend on your health status and your blood hemoglobin and iron
levels.

5. Reduces the Risk of Cancer


High levels of iron have been implicated in cancer. Theoretically,
donating blood frequently will reduce the risk of cancers. More
research is going on to find strong evidence on this one. However, the
old myth that blood donations may lead to cancer has been put to the
grave.
Still having doubts and excuses that prevent you from donating blood?
Watch this video.
Donating blood is a very safe procedure and is not harmful to you. You
will be assessed for your eligibility by medical personnel before you
can donate blood. The bare minimum: A healthy 16 year old weighing
at least 110 lbs.
Need motivation? Read about this Florida guy who has donated about
100 gallons of blood in his entire life. Read more stories of students
who volunteer to donate blood.

First time blood donors? Check the American Red Cross to know the
entire procedure of donating blood. And you can pass this message on
and motivate others too.

How Donating Blood Boosts Your Weight Loss and Overall


Health
by: Shin Ohtake, Fitness & Fat-Loss Expert
Author of MAX Workouts, The Ultimate Lean Body Fitness Program
The motivation to donate blood is usually about helping others and not
yourself. Being selfless and thinking of others is a great quality of have
and I think we should all strive to be more giving. And donating blood is
one of the most helpful things you can do in fact, one blood donation
can be enough to help as many as three people!
And heres more good news, by giving blood youre not only helping
others BUT youre helping improve your health as well!
Here are a few ways blood donation improves your health:
Weight Loss
Believe it or not, donating blood increases you calorie burn! It is
estimated that one pint of donated blood results in about 650 calories
burned.
Of course its not a sustainable weight loss plan, but its an added bonus if
you happen to be trying to lose weight. Lose a little weight while saving
lives not bad.
Mini Health Check-up
Before you can donate blood, it is required that you have a small check-up
from a medical professional in order to determine if you are in good
health. During this checkup, several health factors will be examined, such
as your hemoglobin count, blood pressure, and temperature. Additionally,
your blood is tested for infectious diseases, such as syphilis, West Nile
Virus, hepatitis B & C, and HIV.

Of course, this small checkup is not a replacement for regular medical


care, but it does provide you the opportunity to check-in with your health
stats. If you are approved to donate blood, then it means that you are in
relatively good health!
Improved Circulation and Blood Flow
Things that negatively impact your health like chronic stress and anxiety,
poor diet - especially high amounts of refined sugar and trans fats, and
harmful chemicals in the environment can ALL cause your blood to
thicken. Exposure to these negative factors can make your blood
hypercoagulable - thickens blood - and increase your risk of stroke and
blood clots.
Thick blood doesnt flow well which makes it more difficult to carry oxygen
to various tissues in your body. Hypercoaguable blood has also been
linked to chronic inflammation which can cause many serious health
problems such as cancer, heart diseases and diabetes. In addition, when
your blood is too thick, it increase friction between the blood and the
lining of the blood vessels. This can cause damage to lining of the blood
vessel and eventually lead to heart disease.
When you donate blood, it decreases the viscosity of the blood and helps
increase blood flow. This decreases potential damage to the blood vessel
and helps lower chances of arterial blockages.
Balancing Iron Levels in the Body Lowers Risk of Disease
Iron loss is one health factor some people are concerned about when
donating blood. Low iron levels can lead to anemia, decreased immune
function, and fatigue. But too much iron can also be bad for your health.
In fact, too much iron is more common than iron deficiency, and its much
worse for your health.
Higher levels of iron can increase oxidative stress and cause damage to
your cardiovascular system. In fact, the Journal of the American Medical
Association (JAMA) found that people who donated blood every six months
had lower rates of heart attacks and strokes due to lower oxidative stress
placed on the cardiovascular system.
Studies have also shown that high iron levels have been linked to
increased free-radical damage which can cause various chronic diseases
including cancer. And research shows that donating blood lowers iron
levels and reduce your risk of cancer.
Exercise Helps Balance Iron Levels

Since high iron levels are linked to increased heart attacks, strokes and
cancer it would be a good idea to check your iron levels just so you know
what they are. If you have high iron levels, you should consult with you
doctor before doing anything however exercise has been shown to lower
iron levels.
Although the relationship between iron levels and exercising isnt clear,
exercising on a regular basis has shown to lower the risk of many diseases
including heart disease, diabetes and cancer. Exercise has also been
shown to lower blood pressure which would decrease friction to the blood
vessel lining and lessen potential damage to the blood vessel lining.

1 Percenters We Can All Love


May 17, 2016

Im going to let you in on a little secret: Hardly anyone really


wants to donate blood. Despite the fact that this noble act takes
place about 35,000 times each day across the country, almost all
blood donations are mostly given by people who would, well,
probably rather be doing something, almost anything else.
A point of clarification: Notwithstanding this internal struggle
to not donate, millions of generous people still do give blood year
after year (over 13 million donations annually), and we should be

grateful that so many of them do so despite an understandable


inclination not to.
Who Gives?
Lets start with the numbers: About 6% of the entire US
population gives blood each year. Only 38% of the population is
eligible to give blood (others cant for many reasons -- not old
enough, sick, chronic medical conditions, health or travel history,
etc.) So that leaves about 32% of the population that
currently could give blood, but who choose not to donate.
Now lets focus on those brave, motivated souls who do give
blood. An eligible donor can give up to six times per year. Based
upon blood donor base analysis research conducted by Branch,
we typically see average whole blood donors giving blood from
1.5 times to up to 2.1 times a year. That seems like a reasonable
expectation for people with busy lives: giving twice a year, maybe
once every 8 months or so. But there is something truly
interesting about the top tier of regular donors.
Essentially there is a special group of people who are Super
Donors. They love to donate blood, and they donate far more
than twice a year -- averaging 4 or more times a year. They
account for about 40% or more of all donations in any specific
region.

Now if we measure this group as a percentage of people who give


blood (6%) we come up with a small, remarkable number: 1% of
the population supplies the country with 40% of its blood
supply.