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EMPLOYEES AWARENESS OF CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY

PRACTICES OF UNIVERSAL BANKS IN KIDAPAWAN CITY

___________________________

An Undergraduate Thesis Presented to the


Faculty of College of Business Administration
Notre Dame of Kidapawan College

__________________________

In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements of the


Degree of Bachelor of Science in Business Administration

By

Buctuan, Stephanie B.
Derilo, Jenny H.
Dorado, Karla Abigail C.
Lumanog, Jenny Rose L.
Maloloy-on, Melvin C.
Panes, Cherrylyn C.
Ratilla, Leah Mae R.
Silorio, Amy Jeanne O.
_________________________
OCTOBER 2013

Marist Brothers
NOTRE DAME OF KIDAPAWAN COLLEGE
Kidapawan City
APPROVAL SHEET
The College of Business Administration Faculty of the Notre Dame of Kidapawan
College approves and accepts this thesis entitled:
EMPLOYEES AWARENESS OF CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY
PRACTICES OF UNIVERSAL BANKS IN KIDAPAWAN CITY
has been prepared and submitted by BUCTUAN, STEPHANIE B.,DERILO, JENNY H.,
DORADO, KARLA ABIGAIL C., LUMANOG, JENNY ROSE L., MALOLOY-ON, MELVIN
C., PANES, CHERRYLYN C., RATILLA, LEAH MAE R., SILORIO, AMY JEANNE O.
who are recommended for the corresponding ORAL EXAMINATION.
KLEMM RYAN BERNABE, M.B.A.
Adviser
APPROVED in partial fulfillment of the requirements for FM 409
By the Oral Examination Committee:

ANALIZA B. VALENCIA, Ed.D.


Member

DAISY P. LABADIA, Ed.D.


Member

EVELYN B. BONGCO, MAEd


Reader
ACCEPTED in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of
Bachelor of Science in Business Administration

KLEMM RYAN BERNABE, M.B.A.


College Dean

OCTOBER 2013
ii

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Title Page

Approval Sheet

ii

Acknowledgment

iii

Abstract

iv

List of Tables

CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION
Background of the Study

Statement of the problem

Theoretical Framework

Significance of the Study

Scope and Limitation of the Study

Definition of Terms

CHAPTER II REVIEW of RELATED LITERATURE

CHAPTER III RESEARCH METHODOLOGY


Research Design

15

Population and Sampling

15

Research Instrument

15

Data Gathering Procedure

16

Statistical Treatment

17

CHAPTER IV RESULTS and DISCUSSION

18

CHAPTER V SUMMARY OF FIDINGS,


CONCLUSIONS and RECOMMENDATIONS

30

BIBLIOGRAHY

34

APPENDICES

36

CURRICULUM VITAE

41
iii
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

The researchers would like to extend their thanks and appreciation to the people
behind the success of this research study. They are indebted to their Professor Mr.
Klemm Ryan Bernabe. MBA for giving them the opportunity to do this research and for
providing them with all the support and guidance which made this research study
complete on time. They are extremely grateful in giving them time, in guiding them
along the way, and in making this research, even though he also had a busy schedule
managing other school affairs.
The researchers are deeply grateful to their parents, who supported them
financially and for being very understandable in everything that they went through. To
their validators and panelists: Dr. Stella Flores and. Dr. Annaliza Valencia, for validating
their questionnaires and statement of the problem and also for sharing some insights
that had helped in developing a good output. To Engr. Gemma Famisan, for helping
them in the statistical analysis and interpretation of the data, to Mrs. Evelyn B. Bongco,
M.A.Ed. for looking into the grammar and mechanics of this research manuscript, and to
Dr. Daisy Labadia for being one of the panelists and for giving her valuable suggestions
which made this research output possible.
To their fellow researchers who always lend a helping hand, thank you so much.
The researcher also would like to thank the respondents for actively participating in their
study, especially the managers of the Banks for welcoming them. And above all, to the

Almighty Father, for His divine intervention which made this academic endeavor
successful.
ABSTRACT
This study aimed to assess the awareness of the employees regarding Corporate
Social Responsibility practices of selected Universal Banks in Kidapawan City. It sought
to determine the profile of the respondents in terms of gender, position, age, civil status,
length of service and the company; the extent of employees perceived awareness in
terms of Work Place Policy, Environmental Policy, Market Place Policy, Community
Policy and Company Values; and the significant difference on the perception of
respondents when analyzed according to gender, position, age, civil status, length of
service and company.
The results indicated that the employees have been aware of the
Corporate Social Responsibility in their respective companies. The results also
indicated that the respondents believed that they have good working conditions, fair
treatment and secure working environment. The employees are involved in the
company and they felt that they really belong in the organization. They have adequate
policies that are implemented with good intentions to the environment, with positive
impacts to both the company and their environment. The respondents also believed that
there company implemented and developed policies which helped build a relationship
between its customers and partners. The average result of the answer indicated that
something is lacking in their companys community policy, which means that the

company needs to develop policies that shall necessitate their involvement in the
community.
v

LIST OF TABLES
Table 1-Profile of the Respondents

Page

Table 1.1 Gender

18

Table 1.2 Position

18

Table 1.3Age

19

Table 1.4 Civil Status

19

Table 1.5 Length of Service

20

Table 1.6 Company

20

Table 2-The extent of employees perception of their Awareness of Corporate Social


Responsibility in terms of
Table 2.1 Work Place Policies

21

Table 2.2 Environmental Policies

22

Table 2.3 Market Place Policies

23

Table 2.4 Community Policies

24

Table 2.5 Company Values

25

Table 3- significant difference on the perception of the respondents when analyzed


according to
Table 3.1 Gender

26

Table 3.2 Position

26

Table 3.3 Age

27

Table 3.Civil Status

28

Table 3.5 Length of Service

28

Table 3.6 Company

29

vi
CHAPTER 1

THE PROBLEM AND ITS SETTING

Introduction
Corporate Social responsibility practices are disciplinary instrument in the
company that improves the behavior of the employees of various companies in the
society. It has the aspects of how the companys behavior of being good stewards of
investment, as an employer and as a member of the community. In this research paper,
it aims to study the awareness of the employees on the Corporate Social Responsibility
practices of their companies. Specifically, it seeks to find the answer on the extent of
employees awareness of their Corporate Social Responsibility in terms of Work Place
Policy, Environmental Policy, Market Place Policy, Community Policy and as well as
Company Values.

According to American Staffing Association, Corporate Social Responsibility is


managing business processes to produce an overall positive effect in the society and
extends beyond a companys basic obligation to comply with law and work to increase
profits. It can encompass and may exceed traditional corporate philanthropy. Corporate
social responsibility is a set of policies, practices, and programs that are integrated into
a staffing firm, business operations and decision-making processes.
Through this research, answers may be identified, especially in finding out the
perception of the employees performance in conducting Corporate Social
2
Responsibility. It also finds out if the company has the initiative to promote awareness
on their employees about the Corporate Social Responsibility of their organization.
Statement of the Problem
This study aimed to assess the awareness of the employees regarding the
Corporate Social Responsibility practices of the Universal Banks in Kidapawan City.
Specifically, it sought to answer the following questions:
1. What is the profile of the respondents in terms of:
1.1. Gender;
1.2. Position;
1.3. Age;

1.4. Civil Status;


1.5. Length of Service and;
1.6. Company?
2. To what extent do employees perceive their awareness of Corporate Social
Responsibility in terms of the following:
2.1. Work Place Policies,
2.2. Environmental Policies,
3
2.3. Market Place Policies,
2.4. Community Policies and
2.5. Company Values?
3. Is there a significant difference on the perception of the respondents when
analyzed according to;
3.1. Age,
3.2. Position,
3.3. Length of Service and
3.4. Company?
Theoretical Framework

The theoretical framework of this study was based on Directorate-General for


Enterprise Corporate Social Responsibility.
Workplace policies - The long-term success of your business and your ability as
an effective entrepreneur often depend on the knowledge, skills, talent, innovative
creativity and particularly the motivation of your employees. Workplace health and
safety issues can ensure that you provide for your workers basic needs, visible
commitment to the improvement of their job satisfaction, career development and
personal welfare.

4
Environmental policies - Environmental degradation is both a global and a local
problem of increasing concern throughout society and therefore also among your
customers. Further, good environmental performance often makes financial sense.
Energy efficiency, pollution prevention, waste minimization and recycling can all result in
significant cost-reductions for the business, as well as other benefits such as ensuring
compliance with environmental regulations, improving your relationship with the local
community, motivating your employees and making your customers more loyal.
Market Place Policies - Enterprises are basically human organizations that rely
on a web of internal and external relationships which are vital for mutual prosperity. The
way in which these working relationships are managed is often vital to the success of an
enterprise. Good relations with customers and suppliers bring gains for both sides. A
quick way to improve your companys performance is to share experiences with
suppliers, customers, other like-minded enterprises and local business organizations.

Community policies - There are a clear connection between a healthy and


profitable business and the wellbeing of the community around it. Most small
businesses are an integral part of their community and have an active involvement with
local aspirations and activities. Such enterprises enjoy benefits such as: valuable
networking and links with other local enterprises; increased customer recognition and
esteem; enhanced company reputation; an improved staff recruitment and retention.
Company values Enterprises put their values into a code of conduct, a statement
of good business practice or even a set of simple rules articulating the companys
vision, values, responsibilities and ambitions. Defining and communicating your values
5
will help you and your employees to remain true to what you believe in and help build
your companys reputation, by providing atoll and making a statement of intent to the
people and partners you deal with. People like to work for and with others who share
their values, so doing this may help you attract employees, customers, suppliers and
investors who approve of your principles.
Significance of the study
The result of this study can be used as basis for those universal banks in
Kidapawan City to focus on their Corporate Social Responsibility practices. The study
will help the bank to fill it up in case they have lapses in their implementation of
Corporate Social Responsibility practices.

This study will also help the employees to develop their knowledge about the
importance or significance and their awareness about the Corporate Social
Responsibility.
It will also help the company managers to be aware of the proper social
responsibility practices and its suitably in implementing it.
This study will help the depositor to be aware of some programs that the
organization is implementing.
This study will also help the future researchers who may wish to pursue the same
research topic.

6
Scope and Limitation of the Study
The study covered the four Universal banks in Kidapawan City identified as Bank
1, Bank 2, Bank 3 and Bank 4. It focused on the Awareness of Corporate Social
Responsibility practices of the Universal banks as perceived by its employees. The
study also focused on the regular employees who have served 2 years and above of
service.
Definition of Terms
The following terms are defined purposely for the study.

Corporate Social Responsibility it means that corporate initiative to assess and take
responsibility for the company's effects on the environment and impact on social
welfare. In this study, the variables were workplace police, environmental policy,
community policy, and company values.
Workplace Policy- it means that it is a formal policy which is instituted by the
management or owners of a business.
Environmental Policy it means that it is the commitment of an organization to the
laws, regulations, and other policy mechanisms concerning environmental issues and
sustainability.
Market Place Policy it refers to the responsible for the development and coordination
of policies, laws and regulations in the areas of corporate and insolvency law, foreign
7
investment, competition, copyright, trade-marks and industrial design, patents,
international intellectual property, and traditional knowledge.
Community Policy- it means that it is a philosophy that promotes organizational
strategies, which support the systematic use of partnerships and problem-solving
techniques, to proactively address the immediate conditions that give rise to public
safety issues such as crime, social disorder, and fear of crime.
Company Values it means that the operating philosophies or principles that guide an
organization's internal conduct as well as its relationship with its customers, partners,
and shareholders.

Employee it means that an individual who works part-time or full-time under a


contract of employment, whether oral or written, express or implied, and has recognized
rights and duties. In this study, it means the respondents with regular status.
Banks any financial institutions or financial intermediaries that accept deposits and
channel those deposits into lending activities, either directly by loaning or indirectly
through capital markets. In this study, it refers to the universal banks identified as Bank
1, Bank 2, Bank 3 and Bank 4.

CHAPTER II

REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE

In this chapter, the relevant literatures were reviewed to get a better


understanding of the importance of Corporate Social Responsibility.
Corporate Social Responsibility encompasses not only what companies do
with their profits, but also how they make them. It goes beyond philanthropy and
compliance and addresses how companies manage their economic, social, and
environmental impacts, as well as their relationships in all key spheres of influence: the

workplace, the marketplace, the supply chain, the community, and the public policy
realm (The Initiative, 2008).
CSR is relevant on different levels within and outside organizations and is
therefore difficult to measure. Wood (1991) distinguishes three principles of CSR which
each operate on a different level. (1) The principle of legitimacy. This principle operates
on an institutional level. (2) The principle of public responsibility. This principle operates
on an organizational level. (3) The principle of managerial discretion. This principle
operates on an individual level. Goll and Rasheed (2004) suggested that acting in a
socially responsible way is a consequence of a deliberate managerial choice that results
from internal decision processes, which are of a complex nature (Gossling 2008).
Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is also known by a number of other names.
These include corporate responsibility, corporate accountability, corporate ethics,
9
corporate citizenship or stewardship, responsible entrepreneurship, responsible
competitiveness or corporate sustainability.(Hohnen, 2007).
Corporate social responsibility is a companys sense of responsibility towards the
community and environment (both ecological and social) in which it operates.
Companies express this citizenship through their waste and pollution reduction
processes, by contributing educational and social programs, and by earning adequate
returns on the employed resources. See also corporate citizenship (Business dictionary,
2013).

In academic literature, formal writings on CSR are evident for the first
time in Bowen's (1953) Social Responsibilities of the Businessman. He defines CSR
as: The obligations of businessmen to pursue those policies, to make those decisions or
to follow those lines of action which are desirable in terms of the objectives and values
of our society (1953, p. 6). Bowen expected businesses to produce social goods such
as: 1) higher standards of living; 2) widespread economic progress and security; 3)
order, justice and freedom, and finally 4) the development of the individual person.
Therefore, he conceptualizes CSR as a social obligation with a broader perspective
than mere business responsibilities. In his view, CSR includes responsiveness,
stewardship, social audit, corporate citizenship and rudimentary stakeholder theory. As
Carroll (1999) claims, most academics believe that Bowens (1953) work marks
the beginning of the modern period literature on CSR and therefore he can be
accepted as the Father of Corporate Social Responsibility (SumanSen, 2011).
10
Workplace Policies define a company's responsibilities and obligations to its
employees and customers and vice versa. They also define company expectations and
standards. Policies are written for both legal and practical purposes. Some policies
explain how the company complies with certain laws and regulations. Some policies
delineate procedures and expectations. In most situations, you inherit the policies you
must comply with and enforce. Company policies cover a broad spectrum of topics, but
their bottom line is simple. Policies tell employees how to behave. Most company
policies are in place to ensure safety in the workplace as well as fair treatment for
employees. Most company policies evolve from efforts to interpret and apply laws and

regulations, and they thus have a component of compliance that has legal undertones.
(McClain & Romaine, 2013).
Employees want fair, respectful, healthy and democratic workplaces that value
their participation. Employees also look for excellent employee benefits, competitive
salaries, flexible schedules, and a focus on placing employees personal well-being front
and centre. They include recruitment and promotion, discipline and grievance,
termination, compensation, and practices that affect working conditions, such as
employee participation. While governments have the primary responsibility for ensuring
fair treatment, businesses that seek to be good employers will go further than required
by legislation to foster a quality working environment (Industry Canada, 2013).
Environmental Policy is a statement by the organization of its intentions and
principles in relation to its overall environmental performance which provides a
11
framework for action and for the setting of its environmental objectives and targets
(Environmental Protection Department [ISO], 2005).
In environmental Policies there is criteria to be used and this are the efficiency,
cost of effectiveness,

fairness, and

incentives

for technological

innovations,

enforceability and agreement with moral precepts (Field, 2009).


The goal of CSR is to embrace responsibility for the company's actions and
encourage a positive impact through its activities on the environment, consumers,
employees, communities, stakeholders and all other members of the public sphere who

may also be considered as stakeholders. Environmental CSR initiatives play a key role
for major corporations to impact climate change, water use footprint and energy use
effectiveness. Some of the leading corporations that have achieved CSR success with
environmental initiatives can motivate the competitive landscape of the marketplace to
improve operational efficiency, rethink product designs, and seek out new and
innovative technology. Effective resource management and energy efficiency are major
environmental CSR goals that are relevant for the present times. This leads to
opportunities for cost savings, revenue generation, and can even influence overall
brand strength through positive environmental reputation. Environmental CSR initiatives
can affect the following levels of corporate structure: environmental disclosure,
environmental policy, environmental impact, and environmental performance. (Agarwal,
2013)

12
Market Place Policy was responsible for the development and coordination of
policies, laws and regulations in the areas of corporate and insolvency law, foreign
investment, competition, copyright, trade-marks and industrial design, patents,
international intellectual property, and traditional knowledge.
Corporate Social Responsibility is helping the community to encourage employee
volunteering in the community and with financial contributions and help in kind. Make
some of the business' product or services available for free or at cost to charities and
community groups. Look for opportunities to make surplus product and redundant

equipment available to local schools, charities and community groups. Buy from local
suppliers and strive to hire locally. Offer quality work experience for students (job
shadowing). Collaborate with local teachers to make the business the subject of a
school project. Use the business' experience to help a local school, charity or
community group become more efficient and entrepreneurial. Use some of the
marketing budget to associate the business or brand with a social cause (Industry
Canada, 2012).
Community Policy Improving human resource management practices by
establishing policies to ensure the health and safety of all employees and make the
policies known to employees. Involve employees in business decisions that affect them
and will improve the work environment. Provide training opportunities and mentoring to
maximize promotion from within the organization. Extend training to life management,

13
retirement planning and care of dependents. Be open to job splitting, flextime and other
work-life balance policies (Industry Canada, 2012).
Community Policies benefit either the community as a whole or its citizens as
individuals and groups. They work to strengthen the bonds that hold the community
together and stimulate it to develop and grow in positive ways. In some communities,
community-friendly policies may also be those that help the community keep its
character and historic structures and traditions, rather than forcing it into a different
mold. In others, community-friendly policies may help the community change or adapt

to change. They are, in the final analysis, policies that make the community healthier
and benefit its quality of life. The attention paid to community-friendly policies should
make the community a better place to live, and improve the lives and situations of
everyone in the community over time (Rabinowitz, 2013).
Company Values are a companys ethical and moral compass and decision
making foundation. They are the ideals and ethics that management holds dear. They
drive decision making in that they are constantly referred to in the decision making
process. That is, when in a tough spot, the answer needs, first and foremost, to be
consistent with the company values. They are generally for both internal and external
consumption. They tell those in the company how things are done and those outside
the company why they want to be associated with this company. Corporate values
represent what your company stands for as a business operating in the marketplace, as

14
a corporate citizen or employer, a community player, as well as its environmental
commitment (Mission, Vision and Values Definition, 2013).
Making sure all managers and employees understand and demonstrate those
values are keyto success in the 21st century global marketplace. It represents a
significant opportunity to differentiate your business to customers who are attracted to
those values. Very importantly, corporate values must be more than rhetoric -- printed or
spoken; they must be demonstrated every day (Brandi, 2007).

Corporate values, usually chosen by senior executives, are adapted to prevailing


business circumstances and are not rooted in fundamental philosophical convictions,
morality or ethics. In this sense, corporate values are often selected as a strategy to
"rally the troops," and therefore, manipulative in nature. Morality and ethics too are
central to the issue of meaning in corporate values. Too often, corporate executives
justify a breach of ethics and morality on the basis of financial profit. While profits are
the fuel that feeds the economic engine, it is not the sole essence of the corporation.
Profits are at other times sacrificed for new product or production innovation. It is a
choice, not an imperative. Values do not drive the business; they drive the people within
the business. Values must be internalized by the people in the organization to have
meaning. It's time to stop playing around with cute slogans and tag lines masquerading
as corporate values (Williams, 2010).

CHAPTER III

METHODOLOGY
Research Design
This paper basically aimed to gather information on Employees Awareness of
Corporate Social Responsibility Practices of Universal Banks in Kidapawan City. This
study used a survey questionnaire to collect data and the research design was
descriptive in form.

Population and Sampling


This research used the Slovins Formula in getting the sample from the
employees of selected Universal Banks in Kidapawan City as provided by the bank. The
respondent of this research are all regular employees who have rendered 2 years and
above length of service in the selected Universal Banks in Kidapawan City, identified as
Bank 1, Bank 2, Bank 3 and Bank 4.
Research Instrument
A survey questionnaire was used in gathering the needed data. The said
questionnaire was divided into three parts. Part I includes the demographic profile of the
respondents. Part II of the questionnaire focused on the modified questionnaire of the
Initiative of the European Commission Directorate-General of Enterprise. It aimed to
describe and determine the Employees Awareness of Corporate Social Responsibility
Practices of the Universal Banks in Kidapawan City.
16
The following mean range was assigned to the scales from Awareness of
Corporate Social Responsibility Questionnaire
Range

Scale

Interpretation

1.0-1.7

Strongly Agree (SA)

Very High Level of Awareness

1.8-2.59

Agree (A)

High Level of Awareness

2.6-3.39

Somewhat Agree (SW-A)

Average Level of Awareness

3.4-4.19

Disagree (D)

Low Level of Awareness

4.2-5.0

Strongly Disagree (SD)

Very Low Level of Awareness

Data Gathering Procedure

The researchers observed the following steps in the gathering of data:


1. The researchers modified the questionnaires of the Initiative of the European
Commission Directorate-General of Enterprise based on the recommendations
and suggestions of the panel of evaluators.
2. A request for permission to conduct the study was addressed to the different
branch managers of the selected Commercial Banks in Kidapawan City.
3. The questionnaire was distributed and answered by the identified respondents of
the study.

17
Statistical Treatment
In order to gather, the researchers used survey questionnaires and analyzed the
data gathered through Descriptive Statistics such as weighted mean and frequency
distribution to describe the profile of the respondents. An Inferential Statistics was
utilized to describe the perception of the employees on their Awareness of Corporate
Social Responsibility in the five variables; workplace policy, environmental policy,
marketplace policy, community policy and company values.

CHAPTER IV

PRESENTATION, ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

This chapter contains the data being interpreted based on the responses of the
employees on their awareness of Corporate Social Responsibility.
Profile of the Respondents

The first research problem is focused on the demographic profile of the


respondents in terms of gender, position, age, civil status, length of service and
company.
Table 1 shows the profile of the respondents in terms of gender. As shown,
51.9% of the respondents were males while only 48.1% comprised the female
respondents of the population. This can be explained that more male employees are
working in Banks.
Table 1.1 Profile of the Respondents in terms of Gender
Variables

Frequency

Percentage

Male
Female

14
13
27

51.9
48.1
100

Gender
Total

Table 1.1 shows the profile of the respondents in terms of position. It can be
observed that 51.9% of the respondents were in Position 1. The 7.4% of respondents

19
were in Position 2. The Position 3 indicated 25.9% while Position 4 was at 11.1 % of the
respondents.
Table 1.2 Profile of the Respondents in terms of Position
Position

Frequenc
y

Percentage

Position 1
(Service, Sales Associate, Accounting Assistant, Pick-up
Teller and C.S.O)

14

51.9

Position 2
(Senior Teller)

7.4

Position 3
(Sales Officer, Branch Operation, Branch Accountant and
Service Officer )

25.9

Position 4
(Bank Manager)

11.1

No Answer
Total

1
27

3.7
100

The data in table 1.2 indicates that majority of the respondents are occupying the
position of service, sales associate, accounting assistant, pick up teller and C.S.O.,
while there were only three who had been occupying the position as branch manager.
Table 1.3 shows the profile of the respondents in terms of age. As presented in
frequency and percentage distribution of the respondents, a greater number belong to
the age bracket of 21-25 years old with 25.9%, the second highest frequency are aged
26-30,41-45, and 46-50 with a 14.8% followed by 31-35 and36-40 with 11.1%. And the
least frequency were at the age bracket of 18-20 and 56-60 with a 3.7%.
20
Table 1.3 Profile of the Respondents in terms of Age
Age
18-20
21-25
26-30

Frequency
1
7
4

Percentage
3.7
25.9
14.8

31-35
36-40
41-45
46-50
51-55
56-60
Total

3
3
4
4
0
1
27

11.1
11.1
14.8
14.8
0
3.7
100

The data in table 1.3 imply that theres none in the bank who falls under the age
bracket of 51-55 years old and only one was identified to be the youngest at 18-20 and
the oldest at 56-60 years old.
Table 1.4 shows the profile of the respondents in terms of civil status. It can be
gleaned that single employees were 44.4% of the respondents while married employees
were 55.6%.
Table 1.4 Profile of the Respondents in terms of Civil Status
Civil Status
Single
Married
Total

Frequency
12
15
27

Percentage
44.4
55.6
100

The data in table 1.4 indicates that majority of the bank employees are already
married.
21
Table 1.5 shows the respondents profile in terms of their length of service. It
indicates that 51.9% of the respondents were at the 1-5 years of service, 7.4% were at
their 6-10 years and 40.7% were at their 11 above years of service.

Table 1.5 Profile of the Respondents in terms of Length of Service


Length of Service
1-5
6-10
11-above
Total

Frequency
14
2
11
27

Percentage
51.9
7.4
40.7
100

The data in table 1.5 imply that the greater majority of the respondents have
rendered one to five years in the bank, but most of them have already worked for eleven
years or more.
Table 1.6 shows the respondents profile in terms of company. As shown, the
highest number of respondents came from Bank 1 with 37.9%. The second highest is
Bank 2 with 29.6%. The 14.8% were in Bank 3 and Bank 4 has the frequency
percentage of 18.5%.
Table 1.6 Profile of the Respondents in terms of Company
Company
Bank 1
Bank 2
Bank 3
Bank 4
Total

Frequency
10
8
4
5
27

Percentage
37
29.6
14.8
18.5
100

22
The data in table 1.6 signify that most of the respondents are employed in Banks
1 and 2.

The extent of employees perception of their Awareness of Corporate Social


Responsibility
The second research problem is focused on the extent of the employees
perception of their awareness of Corporate Social Responsibility.
Table 2.1 presents the extent of the employees perception of their Awareness of
Corporate Social Responsibility in terms of Work Place Policies. As gleaned on the
table, the over-all mean of 4.47 (Strongly Agree) is interpreted as Very High Level of
Awareness. This result implies that the respondents answered Strongly Agree in the
variable of Work Place Policy.
Table 2.1. The extent of employees perception of their Awareness of Corporate
Social Responsibility in terms of Company Policies
Variables
Employees are encouraged to develop real skills and long-term
careers (e.g. via a performance appraisal process, a training plan).

Mean
4.78

Description
Strongly Agree

There is a process to ensure adequate steps against all forms of


discrimination, both in the workplace and at the time of recruitment
(e.g. against women, ethnic groups, disabled people, etc.).

4.37

Strongly Agree

Employees are consulted on important issues.

4.37

Strongly Agree

The company/bank has arrangements for health, safety and


welfare that provide sufficient protection for employees.

4.89

Strongly Agree

The company/bank actively offers a good work-life balance for its


employees, for example, by considering flexible working hours or
allowing employees to work from home.
Over-all Mean

3.93

Agree

4.47

Strongly Agree

LEGEND:
Range

Scale

Interpretation

23
4.2-5.0
3.4-4.19
2.6-3.39
1.8-2.59

Strongly Agree (SA)


Agree (A)
Somewhat Agree (SW-A)
Disagree (D)

Very High Level of Awareness


High Level of Awareness
Average Level of Awareness
Low Level of Awareness

1.0-1.7

Strongly Disagree (SD)

Very Low Level of Awareness

The result further implied that the employees have perceived a very high level of
awareness in terms of the workplace policies. Moreover, this finding was supported by
the definition of Industry Canada, 2013 which states that Employees want fair,
respectful, healthy and democratic workplaces that value their participation. Employees
also look for excellent employee benefits, competitive salaries, flexible schedules, and a
focus on placing employees personal well-being front and center. They include
recruitment and promotion, discipline and grievance, termination, compensation, and
practices that affect working conditions, such as employee participation
Table 2.2 presents the employees perception of their Awareness of Corporate
Social Responsibility in terms of Environmental Policies. The over-all mean of 4.28
(Strongly Agree) is interpreted as Very High Level of Awareness.
Table 2.2. The extent of employees perception of their Awareness of Corporate
Social Responsibility in terms of Environmental Policies
Variables
Mea Description
n
The company/bank has tried to reduce environmental impact
4.3 Strongly Agree
in terms of energy conservation.
The company/bank has tried to reduce environmental impact
in terms of waste minimization and recycling.

4.2

Strongly Agree

The company/bank has tried to reduce environmental impact


in terms of pollution prevention (e.g. emissions to air and
water, effluent discharges, noise).

4.3

Strongly Agree

The company/bank has tried to reduce environmental impact


in terms of protection of the natural environment.

4.2

Strongly Agree

The company/bank saves money by reducing its


environmental impact (e.g. by recycling, reducing energy

4.4

Strongly Agree

consumption, and preventing pollution).


Over all Mean

4.28

Strongly Agree

LEGEND:
Range
1.0-1.7
1.8-2.59
2.6-3.39
3.4-4.19
4.2-5.0

Scale
Strongly Agree (SA)
Agree (A)
Somewhat Agree (SW-A)
Disagree (D)
Strongly Disagree (SD)

Interpretation
Very High Level of Awareness
High Level of Awareness
Average Level of Awareness
Low Level of Awareness
Very Low Level of Awareness

The result furhter implied that the employees have perceived a very high level of
awareness in their Corporate Social Responsibility in terms of environmental policies.
This has been

supported by the definition of Agarwal (2013), stating that the goal of

CSR is to embrace responsibility for the companys actions and encourage a positive
impact through its activities on the environment, consumers, employees, communities,
stakeholders and all other members of the public sphere who may also be considered
as stakeholders. This leads to opportunities for cost savings, revenue generation, and
can even influence overall brand strength through positive environmental reputation.
Environmental CSR initiatives can affect the following level of corporate structure:
environmental

disclosure,

environmental

policy,

environmental

impact

and

environmental performance.
Table 2.3 presents the employees perception of their Awareness of Corporate
Social Responsibility in terms of Market Place Policies. The over-all mean of
4.61(Strongly Agree) is interpreted as Very High Level of Awareness.

25
Table 2.3 The extent of employees perception of their Awareness of Corporate
Social Responsibility in terms of Market Place Policies.
Variables
Mea Description
n
The company/bank has a policy to ensure honesty and
4.78 Strongly Agree
quality in all its contracts, dealings and advertising (e.g. a fair
purchasing policy, provisions for consumer protection, etc.)
The company/bank supplies clear and accurate information
about products and services.

4.74

Strongly Agree

The company/bank has a process to ensure effective


feedback, consultation and/or dialogue with customers and
the other people it does business with.

4.44

Strongly Agree

The company/bank has registered and resolved complaints


from customers and business partners.

4.7

Strongly Agree

The company/bank works together with other companies or


other organisations to address issues raised by responsible
citizen.
Over all Mean

4.41

Strongly Agree

4.61

Strongly Agree

LEGEND:
Range
1.0-1.7
1.8-2.59
2.6-3.39
3.4-4.19
4.2-5.0

Scale
Strongly Agree (SA)
Agree (A)
Somewhat Agree (SW-A)
Disagree (D)
Strongly Disagree (SD)

Interpretation
Very High Level of Awareness
High Level of Awareness
Average Level of Awareness
Low Level of Awareness
Very Low Level of Awareness

The findings in table 2.3 implied that the employees have perceived a very high
level of awareness of their corporate social responsibility in term of market place
policies. Hence, this result was supported by the definition of Industry Canada, 2012
stating that Corporate Social Responsibility is helping the community to encourage
employee volunteering in the community and with financial contributions and help in
kind. Make some of the business' products or services available for free or at cost to

charities and community groups. Look for opportunities to make surplus product and
redundant equipment available to local schools, charities and community groups. Buy
26
from local suppliers and strive to hire locally. Offer quality work experience for students
(job shadowing). Collaborate with local teachers to make the business the subject of a
school project. Use the business' experience to help a local school, charity or
community group become more efficient and entrepreneurial. Use some of the
marketing budget to associate the business or brand with a social cause.
Table 2.4 presents the employees perception of their corporate social
responsibility in terms of Community Policies. The over-all mean of 3.90 showed that m
respondents Agree in all the items, except for the last item which they have strongly
agreed upon. Hence, the overall mean is interpreted as High Level of Awareness.
Table 2.4.The extent of employees perception of their Awareness of Corporate
Social Responsibility in terms of Community Policies
Variables
Mea Description
n
The company/bank offers training opportunities to people from the
3.7 Agree
local community (e.g. apprenticeships or work experiences for the
young or for disadvantaged groups.
The company/bank has an open dialogue with the local
community on adverse, controversial or sensitive issues that
involved their enterprise (e.g. accumulation of waste outside your
premises, vehicles obstructing roads or footpaths).

3.85

Agree

The employees are encouraged to participate in local community


activities (e.g. sharing employee time and expertise, or other
practical help).

3.85

Agree

The company/bank gives regular financial support to local

3.93

Agree

community activities and projects (e.g. charitable donations or


sponsorship).
The company/bank supports innovative programs in health,
education, social services and the environment as well as cultural
and civic projects.
Over all Mean

4.19

Strongly
Agree

3.90

Agree
27

LEGEND:
Range
1.0-1.7
1.8-2.59
2.6-3.39
3.4-4.19
4.2-5.0

Scale
Strongly Agree (SA)
Agree (A)
Somewhat Agree (SW-A)
Disagree (D)
Strongly Disagree (SD)

Interpretation
Very High Level of Awareness
High Level of Awareness
Average Level of Awareness
Low Level of Awareness
Very Low Level of Awareness

The result implied that the employees have perceived a high level of awareness
of their corporate social responsibility in terms of community policies, and this was
supported by the Industry Canada, 2012 stating that involvement of the employees in
business decisions can affect them and will improve the work environment. Provide
training opportunities and mentoring to maximize promotion from within the
organization. Extend training to life management, retirement planning and care of
dependents. Be open to job splitting, flextime and other work-life balance policies. Also
by Rabinowitz, 2013, they work to strengthen the bonds that hold the community
together and stimulate it to develop and grow in positive ways. In some communities,
community-friendly policies may also be those that help the community keep its
character and historic structures and traditions, rather than forcing it into a different
mold. In others, community-friendly policies may help the community change or adapt
to change. They are in the final analysis, policies that make the community healthier
and benefit its quality of life. The attention paid to community-friendly policies should

make the community a better place to live, and improve the lives and situations of
everyone in the community over time.

28
Table 2.5 presents the employees perception of Awareness of their Corporate
Social Responsibility in terms of Company Values. The over-all mean of 4.68 (Strongly
Agree) is interpreted as Very High Level of Awareness.
Table 2.5. The extent of employees perception of their Awareness of Corporate
Social Responsibility in terms of Company Values
Variables
Mea Description
n
The company/bank has a clearly defined values and rules of
4.89 Strongly Agree
conduct.
The company/bank communicates its values to customers,
business partners and other interested parties.

4.7

Strongly Agree

The customers are aware of the banks values and rules of


conduct.

4.48

Strongly Agree

The employees are aware of the banks enterprise values


and rules of conduct.

4.7

Strongly Agree

The employees are trained on the importance of the


enterprises values and rules of conduct.
Over all Mean

4.62

Strongly Agree

4.68

Strongly Agree

LEGEND:
Range
1.0-1.7
1.8-2.59
2.6-3.39
3.4-4.19
4.2-5.0

Scale
Strongly Agree (SA)
Agree (A)
Somewhat Agree (SW-A)
Disagree (D)
Strongly Disagree (SD)

Interpretation
Very High Level of Awareness
High Level of Awareness
Average Level of Awareness
Low Level of Awareness
Very Low Level of Awareness

The result implied that the employees have perceived a very high level of
awareness of their corporate social responsibility in terms of company values. This
finding was supported by the definition of Mission, Vision and values Definition, 2013
which stated that a companys ethical and moral compass is the foundation of their
decision making. They are the ideals and ethics that management holds dear. They
drive decision making in that they are constantly referred to in the decision making
29
process. That is, when in a tough spot, the answer needs, first and foremost, to be
consistent with the company values. They are generally for both internal and external
consumption. They tell those in the company how things are done and those outside
the company why they want to be associated with this company. Corporate values
represent what your company stands for as a business operating in the marketplace, as
a corporate citizen or employer, a community player, as well as its environmental
commitment.
Significant Difference in the Perception of the Respondents when analyzed
according to their Demographic Profile
The third research problem is focused on the significant difference in the
perception of the respondents when analyzed according of gender, position, age, civil
status, length of service and company.
Table 3.1 presents the significant difference in the perception of the respondents
when analyzed according to gender. It can be gleaned from the table that the computed
p-value of .564 for workplace policies, .168 for environmental policies, .075 for
marketplace policies, .162 for community policies, and .654 for company values, are all

greater than the .05 level of significance. Hence, it implied that there is no significant
difference in the employees perception of their awareness of Corporate Social
Responsibility when analyzed according to gender.

30
Table 3.1. Significant Difference on the perception of the respondents when
analyzed according to Gender
Source of Variation

Sum of
Square
.090

Df

P-value

Mean
Square
.090

.341

.564

Not Significant

Environmental policies

.834

.834

2.013

.168

Not Significant

Marketplace policy

.685

.685

3.461

.075

Not Significant

Community policies

1.368

1.368

2.075

.162

Not Significant

Company values

.059

.059

.206

.654

Not Significant

Workplace policies

Remarks

The findings in table 3.1 further implies that irregardless of gender, be it male or
female, both have the same perception of their awareness of corporate Social
Responsibilities.
Table 3.2 shows the significant difference on the perception of the respondents of
their awareness of corporate social responsibility when analyzed according to position.
As shown, the computed p-value of .575 for the workplace policies, .681 for the
environmental policies, .644 for the marketplace policies, .939 for the community
policies and .672 for the company values are all greater than .05 level of significance.
Thus, the employees perception on their awareness of corporate social responsibility is
not significant when they are analyzed according to position.

31
Table 3.2. Significant Difference in the perception of the respondents when
analyzed according to Position
Source of Variation
Sum of
Df
Mean
F
PRemarks
Square
Squar
value
e
Workplace policies
.537
3
.179
.677
.575
Not Significant
Environmental policies

.687

.229

.507

.681

Not Significant

Marketplace policy

.396

.132

.564

.644

Not Significant

Community policies

.297

.099

.133

.939

Not Significant

Company values

.473

.158

.522

.672

Not Significant

Furthermore, the findings in table 3.2 indicated that regardless of position, the
perception of the respondents on their Awareness of Corporate Social Responsibility
does not differ significantly.
Table 3.3 shows the significant difference on the employees perception of their
Awareness of Corporate Social Responsibility when analyzed according to age. As
presented, the Workplace Policy has the computed p-value of .788, the Environmental
Policy has .988, the Marketplace Policy .338, the Community Policy has .813, and the
Company Values have .710, all of which are greater than .05 level of significance.

Hence, there is no significant difference in the of the employees perception of their


awareness of corporate social responsibility when analyzed according to age.

32
Table 3.3. Significant Difference on the perception of the respondents when
analyzed according to Age
Source of Variation Sum of
Df
Mean
F
P-value
Remarks
Square
Square
Workplace policies
1.119
7
.160
.548
.788
Not Significant
Environmental
policies

.673

.096

.174

.988

Not Significant

Marketplace policy

1.749

.250

1.223

.338

Not Significant

Community policies

2.840

.406

.513

.813

Not Significant

Company values

1.388

.198

.650

.710

Not Significant

The findings in table 3.3 further implied that irregardless of the respondents age,
the perception of their Awareness of Corporate Social Responsibility does not differ
significantly.
Table 3.4 shows the significant difference on the employees perception of their
Awareness of Corporate Social Responsibility when analyzed according to Civil Status.
The Workplace policy has the computed p-value of .209, the Environmental Policy has .
609 indicated, the Marketplace policy .653, Community Policy has .960, and the
Company Value has .424, all of which are greater than the .05 level of significance.

33
Table 3.4. Significant Difference on the perception of the respondents when
analyzed according to Civil Status
Source of Variation Sum of
Df
Mean
F
P-value
Remarks
Squar
Squar
e
e
Workplace policies
.417
1
.417
1.66
.209
Not Significant
7
Environmental
policies

.119

.119

.268

.609

Not Significant

Marketplace policy

.046

.046

.207

.653

Not Significant

Community policies

.002

.002

.003

.960

Not Significant

Company values

.185

.185

.661

.424

Not Significant

The data in table 3.4 implied that there is no significant difference on the
employees perception of their Awareness of Corporate Social Responsibility when
analyzed according to civil status.
Table 3.5 shows the significant difference on the employees perception of their
Awareness of Corporate Social Responsibility when analyzed according to Length of
Service. As shown, the Workplace Policy has the computed p-value of .981,

Environmental Policy has .854, the Marketplace Policy has .543, the Community Policy
has .607, and the company value has .723, all of which are greater than the .05 level of
significance.

34
Table 3.5. Significant Difference on the perception of the respondents when
analyzed according to Length of Service
Source of Variation Sum of Df
Mean
F
P-value
Remarks
Squar
Square
e
Workplace policies
.011
2
.005
.020
.981
Not Significant
Environmental
policies

.146

.073

.159

.854

Not Significant

Marketplace
policies

.279

.139

.626

.543

Not Significant

Community policies

.728

.364

.511

.607

Not Significant

Company values

.192

.096

.329

.723

Not Significant

The data in table 3.5 indicated that it is not statistically significant. Therefore, it
implied that there is no significant difference on the employees perception of their
Awareness of Corporate Social Responsibility when analyzed according to the length of
service.

Table 3.6 shows the significant difference on the employees perception of their
Awareness of Corporate Social Responsibility when analyzed according to Company. It
can be gleaned from the table that the Workplace Policy has the computed p- value of .
877, the Environmental Policy has .610, the Marketplace Policy has .625, the
Community Policy ha .450, and the Company Value has .630, all of which are greater
than the 0.05 level of significance. Hence, it is indicated in the table that it is not
statistically significant.

35
Table 3.6. Significant Difference on the perception of the respondents when
analyzed according to Company
Source of Variation Sum of Df
Mean
F
P-value
Remarks
Squar
Squar
e
e
Workplace policies
.192
3
.064
.227
.877
Not Significant
Environmental
policies

.835

.278

.619

.610

Not Significant

Marketplace values

.405

.135

.594

.625

Not Significant

Community policies

1.902

.634

.914

.450

Not Significant

Company values

.510

.170

.586

.630

Not Significant

The findings in table 3.6 implied that there is no significant difference on the
employees perception of their Awareness of Corporate Social Responsibility when
analyzed according to company

CHAPTER V

SUMMARY OF FINDINGS, CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS


This

chapter

presents

the

summary

of

findings,

conclusions,

and

recommendation about the result of the data analyzed in the previous chapter.
Summary of Findings:
The following were the findings of the study:
1. The male respondents dominated at 51.9% than the female respondents at
48.1%. In terms of the position, Position 1, comprising the service, sales
associate, accounting assistant, pick up teller and C.S.O. were dominant at
51.9%. The greater number of the respondents was at the aged bracket of 21.25
years old, and 55.6% were married. In terms of length of service, majority

(51.9%) of the employees are at their 1-5 years of service. The highest number
of respondents came from Bank 1 with 37.9%.
2. The employees perception of their Awareness of Corporate Social Responsibility
in terms of Work Place Policies has its over-all mean of 4.47, interpreted as Very
High Level of Awareness In terms of Environmental Policies it has the over-all
mean of 4.28, interpreted as Very High Level of Awareness. As to Market Place
Policies, the over-all mean was 4.61 interpreted as Very High Level of
Awareness. For Community policy, the over-all mean is 3.90 interpreted as High
Level of Awareness. In terms of Company Values, the over-all mean is 4.68,
interpreted as Very High Level of Awareness.
37
3. The employees perception of their Awareness of Corporate Social Responsibility
is not statistically significant when analyzed according to gender, position, age,
length of service, and company

Conclusions

Based on the findings of the study, the following conclusions are formulated:
The employees of the Universal Banks in Kidapawan City have perceived a very
high level of awareness of their Corporate Social Responsibility, specifically in terms of
workplace policies, environmental policies, marketplace policies, community policies
and company values.
However, it was found out that there is no significant difference in the employees
perception of their awareness of Corporate Social Responsibilities when analyzed
according to the respondents profile.

Recommendations
After the review of the findings and analysis of the data, the following
recommendations are presented:
The company should continue what they have started, but develop those that
were identified to have been lacking/missing, so that it can bring great people and great
organizations together in implementing their Corporate Social Responsibility.

38
Continuous trainings and employees development programs must be conducted
to insure an excellent implementation of the companys Corporate Social Responsibility.

39
BIBLIOGRAPHY
Agarwal, S. (2013).Green Column. Retrieved from http://www.go-green.ae/greencolumn.php?aid=148
Beurden, P. v., & Go ssling, T. (2008). The Worth of Values A Literature Review
on the Relation Between Corporate Social and Financial Performance. Springer 2008:
Journal of Business Ethics. Retrieved from http://arno.uvt.nl/show.cgi?fid=80846
Brandi,

J.

(2007).

Corporate

values

definition.

Retrieved

from

http://www.askjim.biz/answers/corporate-values-definition_1724.php
Business

Dictionary,

(2013).

Retrieved

http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/corporate-social-responsibility.html

from

Environmental

Protection

Department

[ISO],

2005.

Retrieved

from

http://www.epd.gov.hk/epd/english/how_help/tools_ems/ems_5.html
Hohnen, P. (2007). Corporate Social Responsibility:An Implementation Guide for
Business. 2007,International Institute for Sustainable Development. Retrieved from
http://www.iisd.org/pdf/2007/csr_guide.pdf
Industry Canada (2012).Corporate Social Responsibility. Retrieved from
http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/csr-rse.nsf/eng/rs00591.html
Industry Canada (2012).Corporate Social Responsibility. Retrieved from
http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/csr-rse.nsf/eng/rs00132.html
40
Industry Canada (2012).Marketplace Framework Policy Branch. Retrieved from
http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/693.nsf/eng/h_00024.html
McClain, G. & Romaine, D. (2013).Why Workplace Policies Are Important.
Retrieved

from

http://www.netplaces.com/managing-people/following-the-rules/why-

workplace-policies-are-important.htm
Mission,

Vision,

and

Values

Definition

(2013).

Retrieved

from

http://www.bellevuechamber.org/links/pdf/mission_vision_and_values_template.pdf
Rabinowitz, P. (2013). Promoting Community-Friendly Policies in Business and
Government.

Retrieved

http://ctb.ku.edu/en/tablecontents/sub_section_main_1282.aspx

from

The Initiative, (2008).Defining Corporate Social Responsibility. 2008 The


President

and

Fellows

of

Harvard

University.

Retrieved

from

http://www.hks.harvard.edu/m-rcbg/CSRI/init_define_p.html
Williams, R. (2010). What Do Corporate Values Really Mean? Retrieved from
http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/wired-success/201002/what-do-corporate-valuesreally-mean

41
APPENDICES
Marist Brothers
Notre Dame of Kidapawan College
Kidapawan City

Dear Respondent,

The students the College of Business Administration are conducting a research


study entitled Employees Awareness of Corporate Social Responsibility Practices
of Commercial Banks in Kidapawan City.

In line with this, we are requesting your help in accomplishing the attached
questionnaire by supplying the needed data as honestly as you can. Your answers will
serve as reliable information for the said study. Rest assured that the confidentiality of
your answers would be observed.
Thank you for your cooperation.

Sincerely,

The Researcher

42
QUESTIONNAIRE
EMPLOYEES AWARENESS OF CORPORATE SOCIAL
RESPONSIBILITY PRACTICES OF COMMERCIAL BANKS
IN KIDAPAWAN CITY
Direction: Please mark a check (/) on the item that best describes your answer.
1 .Demographic Profile of Respondent
1.1 Gender
( ) Female

( ) Male

1.2 Position
( ) Branch Manager

( ) Sales Officer

( ) Senior Teller

( ) Sales Associate

( ) Service Associate

( ) Branch Operation Officer

( ) Others: Specify:

1.3 Age
( ) 18-20

( ) 21-25

( ) 26-30

( ) 31-35

( ) 36-40

( ) 41-45

( ) 46-50

( ) 51-55

( ) 56-60
1.4 Civil Status
( ) Single

( ) Married

( ) Separated

( ) Widow/ Widower

1.5 Length of Service?


( ) 1-5 years

( ) 6-10 years

( ) 11 years above

1.6 Company
( ) United Coconut Planters Bank
( ) Banco de Oro
( ) Bank of the Philippine Islands
43
( ) Rizal Commercial Banking Corporation
II. Direction: Kindly check the item that corresponds to your answer.
(SA)Strongly Agree

which means that the respondent is amenable to


everything expressed in the statement.

(A)Agree

which means that the respondent is amenable to the


major part of what isexpressed in the statement.

(SW-A)Somewhat Agree

which means that the respondents is not sure of


whether to accept or reject what is expressed in the
statement.

(D)Disagree

- which means that the respondent is not amenable to


the major part of what is expressed in the statement.

(SD)Strongly Disagree

- which means that the respondent is not amenable to


the entire statement.

Source: An Initiative of the European Commission Directorate-General Enterprise

44
Environmental Policies
1. The company/bank has tried to reduce
environmental impact in terms of energy
conservation.
2. The company/bank has tried to reduce
environmental impact in terms of waste
minimization and recycling.
3. The company/bank has tried to reduce
environmental impact in terms of pollution
prevention (e.g. emissions to air and water,
effluent discharges, noise).
4. The company/bank has tried to reduce
environmental impact in terms of protection
of the natural environment.
5. The company/bank saves money by
reducing its environmental impact (e.g. by

SA

SW-A

SD

recycling, reducing energy consumption,


and preventing pollution).
6. The company/bank considers the potential
environmental impacts when developing
new products and services (e.g. assessing
energy usage, recyclability or pollution
generation).
7. The company/banksupplies clear and
accurate environmental information on its
products, services and activities to
customers, suppliers, local community, etc.
Market
SA
A
SW-A
Place
Policies
1. The company/bank has a policy to ensure honesty
and quality in all its contracts, dealings and
advertising (e.g. a fair purchasing policy, provisions
for consumer protection, etc.)
2. The company/bank supplies clear and accurate
information about products and services.
3. The company/bankhas a process to ensure effective
feedback, consultation and/or dialogue with
customers and the other people it does business
with.
4. The company/bank has registered and resolved
complaints from customers and business partners.
5. The company/bank works together with other
companies or other organisations to address issues
raised by responsible citizen.

SD

45
Community Policies
1. The company/bank offers training opportunities to
people from the local community (e.g.
apprenticeships or work experiences for the young
or for disadvantaged groups.
2. The company/bank has an open dialogue with the
local community on adverse, controversial or
sensitive issues that involved their enterprise (e.g.
accumulation of waste outside your premises,
vehicles obstructing roads or footpaths).

SA

SW-A

SD

3. The employees are encouraged to participate in


local community activities (e.g. sharing employee
time and expertise, or other practical help).
4. The company/bank gives regular financial support
to local community activities and projects (e.g.
charitable donations or sponsorship).
5. The company/bank supports innovative programs in
health, education, social services and the
environment as well as cultural sciric projects.

Company values
1. The company/bank has a clearly defined
values and rules of conduct.
2. The company/bankcommunicates its values
to customers, business partners and other
interested parties.
3. The customers are aware of the banks values
and rules of conduct.
4. The employees are aware of the banks
enterprise values and rules of conduct.
5. The employees are trained on the importance of
the enterprises values and rules of conduct.

S A

SW-A

S D

46
CURRICULUM VITAE
Stephanie B. Buctuan
Quezon Blvd., Kidapawan City
steph.141611@yahoo.com

Mobile: 09469764098
Personal Information
Birth date: May 11, 1994

Gender: Female

Age: 19 years old

Status: Single

Religion: Roman Catholic

Height: 4.11

Nationality: Filipino Citizen

Language: Cebuano, Tagalog, English

KEY SKILLS
Computer Literate

Dancing

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
1999-2000

Kindergaten

UCCP, Kidapawan City

2000-2006

Primary Education

Kidapawan City Pilot Elementary School

2006-2010

Secondary Education

Kidapawan City National High School

2010-2013

BS in Business Administration

Notre Dame of Kidapawan College

Major: Financial Management


47
Jenny H.Derilo
Jose Dans St., Kidapawan City
jennyderilo@yahoo.com
Mobile: 09489752648
Personal Information
Birth date: December 28, 1993

Gender: Female

Age: 19 years old

Status: Single

Religion: Roman Catholic

Height: 5.3

Nationality: Filipino Citizen

Language: Cebuano, Tagalog, English

KEY SKILLS
Dancing

Singing

Reading

Computer Literate
EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
1999-2006

Primary Education

Mateo Elementary School

2006-2010

Secondary Education

Kidapawan City National High School

2010-2013

BS in Business Administration - Notre Dame of Kidapawan College


Major: Financial Management

48
Karla Abigail C. Dorado
Bautista St., Kidapawan City
karlaabigaildorado@yahoo.com
Mobile: 09429199525
Personal Information
Birth date: August 7, 1994

Gender: Female

Age: 19 years old

Status: Single

Religion: Roman Catholic

Height: 5

Nationality: Filipino Citizen

Language: Cebuano, Tagalog, English

KEY SKILLS
With Good Verbal and Written Communication Skill
Dancing

Singing

Reading

Filling

Follows Instruction Easily

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
2006

Primary Education

Kidapawan City Pilot Elementary School

2010

Secondary Education

Kidapawan City National High School

2013

BS in Business Administration

Notre Dame of Kidapawan College

Major: Financial Management


49
Jenny Rose L. Lumanog
Mariano CuencoSt., Kidapawan City
Rollose@yahoo.com
Mobile: 09124782120
Personal Information
Birth date: October 18, 1993

Gender: Female

Age: 19 years old

Status: Single

Religion: Roman Catholic

Height: 4.11

Nationality: Filipino Citizen

Language: Cebuano, Tagalog, English, Illongo

KEY SKILLS

Encoding

Dancing

Selling

Auditing

Singing

Playing Softball

Filling

Sales Talk

Bookkeeping

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
1999-2006

Primary Education

Alibayon, Magpet Elementary School

2006-2010

Secondary Education

Notre Dame of Magpet

2010-2013

BS in Business Administration Notre Dame of Kidapawan College


Major: Financial Management
50
Melvin C. Maloloy-on
Brgy.Onica, Kidapawan City
beyonce_melvz@yahoo.com
Mobile: 09073045124

Personal Information
Birth date: May 4, 1994

Gender: Male

Age: 19 years old

Status: Single

Religion: Roman Catholic

Height: 5.2

Nationality: Filipino Citizen

Language: Cebuano, Tagalog, English, Ilonggo

KEY SKILLS
Computer Literate

Hosting

Follows Instruction Easily

Singing

Dancing

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
2000-2006

Primary Education

Onica Elementary School

2006-2010

Secondary Education

Kidapawan City National High School

2010-2013

BS in Business Administration

Notre Dame of Kidapawan College

Major: Financial Management

51
Cheerylyn C. Panes
Blck. 16 Lt. 13, Apo Sandawa Homes Phase 2, Kidapawan City
che.panes@yahoo.com

Personal Information
Birth date: July 28, 1994

Gender: Female

Age: 19 years old

Status: Single

Religion: Roman Catholic

Height: 5.4

Nationality: Filipino Citizen

Language: Cebuano, Tagalog, English

KEY SKILLS
Computer Literate

Dancing

Singing

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND

Cooking

2006

Primary Education

Kidapawan City Pilot Elementary School

2010

Secondary Education

Magpet National High School

2013

BS in Business Administration

Notre Dame of Kidapawan College

Major: Financial Management

52
Leah Mae R. Ratilla
New Bohol, Balindog, Kidapawan City
rackler_15@yahoo.com
Mobile: 09469762275
Personal Information
Birth date: February 3, 1994

Gender: Female

Age: 19 years old

Status: Single

Religion: Roman Catholic

Height: 5.2

Nationality: Filipino Citizen

Language: Cebuano, Tagalog, English

KEY SKILLS
Dancing

Playing Basketball

Computer Literate

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
1997-1999

Kindergaten

Brgy. New Bohol, Kidapawan City

1999-2006

Primary Education

New Bohol, Kidapawan City

2006-2010

Secondary Education

Kidapawan City National High School

2010-2013

BS in Business Administration - Notre Dame of Kidapawan College


Major: Financial Management
53
Amy Jeanne O. Siliorio
Purok 6, Lanao, Kidapawan City
Aj_silorio@yahoo.com
Mobile: 09463722427

Personal Information
Birth date: December 17, 1993

Gender: Female

Age: 19 years old

Status: Single

Religion: Roman Catholic

Height: 5.2

Nationality: Filipino Citizen

Language: Cebuano, Tagalog, English

KEY SKILLS
Encoding

Dancing

Playing Volleyball

Auditing

Singing

Playing Softball

Filling

Listening

Reading

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
1997-1999

Kindergarten

Bliss, Balindog, Kidapawan City

1999-2006

Primary Education

Marciano Mancera Memorial


Integrated School

2006-2010

Secondary Education

Kidapawan City National High School

2010-2013

BS in Business Administration - Notre Dame of Kidapawan College


Major: Financial Management