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MASTERS FINAL PROJECTS

CONFERENCE
Semester-1 2016
Aerospace, Mechanical & Manufacturing Engineering

Melbourne 2016

Published 2016.
Editor & OENG1088/OENG1089/OENG1090 Courses Coordinator Prof Pavel M. Trivailo
MASTERS FINAL PROJECTS CONFERENCE.
Semester-1 2016.
116 pp.;
100 illustrations;
4 indexes.
LATEX 2 system was used.
Printed and bound in Australia.
TRADEMARK INFORMATION
MATLAB is a registered trademark of the MathWorks, Inc
Front Cover: (a) Top figure: RMITs Swanston Academic Building; (b) Bottom figure: RMITs winning
design in the international Airbus Fly Your Ideas competition.
(Both images are Courtesy of the RMIT University)

University
RMIT
School of Engineering
Aerospace, Mechanical & Manufacturing Engineering Programs

Copies of copyright material in this compilation have been made in accordance with the provision of Section VB of the Copyright Act for the
teaching purposes of the University.

The Abstracts and images in this Brochure are provided by the Master students enrolled in
the OENG1088, OENG1089, OENG1090 and OENG1126 Master of Engineering Courses at
University.
RMIT
The compliance with the Copyright in using these texts and images rests with the
corresponding Master students.

Serial Number:

CURRENT VERSION NOTE:


May 18, 2016
Please note that the ORDER of the abstracts
in the current version of the brochure does
not reflect the order of the presentations at
the upcoming Masters Conference.
This current version is rather reflecting the
order, in which the projects were registered.
So, in the later versions of the document the
order may change.

RMIT University
3

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CONFIRMED ROOMS BOOKING


FOR THE S1-2016 MASTERS CONFERENCE
Several rooms in Bundoora East and City Campuses have already been booked for the Masters
Conference-S1-2016 via the RMIT University Property Services.
The actual schedule of Conference is to be advised at the later stage.
For those students, who have not registered yet their projects via the Google Form, it is advised to
do this as soon as possble to ensure their booking of the presentation slots.
The web link for the Google Registration Form is: Registration Google Form.
For details on the registration process, Master students are advised to refer to the Blackbaord.

Day-1
Monday, 06-June-2016
(Week-14)
9:00-15:30
Bundoora East Campus, 251.3.34 (Room Booking Ref #BKC086FA)
Day-2
Tuesday, 07-June-2016
(Week-14)
9:00-15:30
Bundoora East Campus, 251.3.34 (Room Booking Ref #BKC086FA)
Day-3
Wednesday, 08-June-2016
(Week-14)
9:00-15:30
Bundoora East Campus, 251.3.34 (Room Booking Ref #BKC086FA)
Day-4
Thursday, 09-June-2016
(Week-14)
9:00-15:30
City Campus, 56.3.87 (Room Booking Ref #BKC08704)
Day-5
Friday, 10-June-2016
(Week-14)
9:00-15:30
City Campus, 56.3.87 (Room Booking Ref #BKC08704)
Day-6
Wednesday, 15-June-2016
(Week-15)
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9:00-15:30
Bundoora East Campus, 251.3.34 (Room Booking Ref #BKC0870C)
Day-7
Thursday, 09-June-2016
(Week-15)
9:00-15:30
City Campus, 56.3.87 (Room Booking Ref Ref #BKC08712)
Sustainable Energy Sub-Conference Days
(Weeks-14-15)
Note: Sustainable Energy Sub-Conference will be organised and run
by Prof John Anrews. Please, refer to additional dates, schedule and
venues for this Sub-Conference.

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Contents
High Temperature Thermal Storage for Renewable Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . .

11

Exploring advancement in crowd sensing through automated pedestrians counter 12


Assessing the Technical and Financial Viability of Generating Solar PV Electricity at Melbourne Waters Small Scale Sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

13

Predicting Demand Charge Reduction for Commercial-scale Solar PV Systems


Coupled with Battery Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

14

Minimize Aero-load on bus in urban & in rural environment . . . . . . . . . . . .

15

Feasibility study of manufacturing wind turbine blades by employing 3D printing


to assist innovation in Cambodia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

16

Application of CCTV system for large enterprise monitoring, indoor and outdoor 17
Analysis of manufacturing process variability impacts on a concentrating solar
collector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

18

Low Cost Motion Capture Using Inertial Measurement Units . . . . . . . . . . . .

19

Synthesis of SnS Quantum Dots for Next Generation Solar Cells . . . . . . . . . .

20

Revealing the Hidden Characteristics of Soccer Players Curved Kicks with the
Use of the Smart Soccer Boot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

21

Aerodynamic Behaviour of the Badminton Shuttlecock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

22

Exploring Big Data on Road Accidents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

23

Development of air stable perovskite solar cell by solution method . . . . . . . . .

24

Conversion of Internal Combustion Engines to Operate with Ammonia . . . . . .

25

Compression properties of aligned Nano-crystal cellulose reinforced epoxy resin

26

Industrial Food Waste to Energy Part 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

27

The influence of loose and fluttering garments on the aerodynamic behaviour of


a skicross athlete . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

28

The Role of Strategic Management in Small to Medium sized Companies . . . .

29

The flight trajectory of drop punts in Australian football . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

30

3D Solid Modelling of a Humanoid Ankle-Foot System for Emulation of Human


Gait
Performing
Tasks
(Walk, Stair Ascend-Descend and Run) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

31

Hydrogen fuel from biomass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

32

Development of an instrumented boxing glove . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

33

Business case in Additive manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

34

The Role of Strategic Management in Small to Medium sized Beverage Company 35


Experimental study of an integrated solar-hydrogen CHP solar-thermal system

36

Industrial food waste to energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

37

Design of Prosthetic Fairings and Automation of Customisation Process . . . . .

38

Fibre-based Energy storage integration in Fabrics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

39

Quantification of Movement in Water Polo: A Live Feedback Tracking Device .

40

An analysis of the use of information technologies in automating and improving


logistic operations, strategic logistic management and supply chain management 41
Fire-Structural analysis of Modular Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

42

Application of Autonomous Systems in Infrastructure and Assets Management

43

Synthesis of Silver Sulphide Quantum Dots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

44

Application of Autonomous Systems in Infrastructure and Asset Management A Business Case Proposal of Monitoring of Fences in Tiverton Grasslands . . . .

45

To increase life of a spark plug in natural gas engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

46

Additive Manufacturing Business Case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

47

Develop a cost model for KUKA made CNC center installed at Capral aluminium
by considering machine capability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

48

Assess the suitability of domestic solar thermal energy applications in relation


to the seasonal output of a Scheffler fixed focus concentrator . . . . . . . . . . . .

49

INVESTIGATION, OPTIMISATION AND DESIGN OF WOMANS AUSTRALIAN


RULES FOOTBALL BALL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
The right to energy: Is a global standard possible . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

51

The Role of Strategic Management in Small to Medium sized Companies . . . .

52

Life cycle assessment of synthetic rubbers used in automotive applications . . .

53

Design and Optimisation of a Female AFL ball . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

54

Application of Autonomous Systems in Infrastructure and Assets Management


Throughput and Traffic Control Optimisation on Freeways . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

55

Customizing shoe sole fit through CAD-FEM modeling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

56

Additive Manufacturing in Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

57

An Affordable Device For Assessment Of Weight Distribution Throughout The


Golf Swing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

58

Mesh size effects of FEM models on damage and failure characteristics . . . . . .

59

Future of inflight entertainment system(literature review) . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

60

Exploring Post Disaster Relief Management Of Bushfires In Australia . . . . . .

61

Design of outer structure of bionic ankle foot and preparation for fabrication
using selective laser melting technique . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

62

Vehicle Body Structure Stiffness Influence on Diagonal Distortion and its Effects
on NVH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

63

System Dynamics Modelling of Australias Domestic Airline Passenger Demand

64

LIFT MECHANISM REDESIGN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

65

Surface modification via laser direct deposition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

66

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Opportunities and Challenges of Distributed Propulsion Configurations . . . . .

67

Comprehensive study on the Parcel Locker as the last mile delivery solution at
Melbourne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

68

CAMPERVAN RETRACTABLE STEP REDESIGN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

69

HYBRID BUS POWERED BY GAS TURBINE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

70

3D Solid Modelling of a Prostetic Leg for Transtibial Amputees for Human Gait
Emulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

71

USE OF SOCIAL MEDIA IN DISASTER AND CRISIS MANAGEMENT . . .

72

Characterization of Natural based Composites with Nano-Cellulose Fibers . . .

73

Development, construction and experimental testing of the control system for


a 2 kW power supply based on a Unitised Regenerative Fuel Cell and metal
hydride storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

74

Investigating the evolution of ICAO Annex 17 (Security) from 1974 to 2011 using
document analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

75

Design Thinking: Strategic Implementation of the Ten Tools in Engineering


Design and Project Execution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

76

Use of accelerometry for motion analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

77

Design and Manufacturing of the High-Speed Magnetic Spindle . . . . . . . . . .

78

Development of Semiconductor Quantum Dot Sensitised Solar Cells . . . . . . . .

79

Analysis & Optimisation of Poly ball valve through FEA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

80

Fracture Toughness of the Visco-elastic Cork Particle Reinforced Epoxy Composite 81


Laser processing of new biodegradable Zn-based alloys for medical implants

. .

82

Ideal Mathematical Modelling of the Szorenyi Rotary Engine . . . . . . . . . . . .

83

Laser processing of new biodegradable Zn-1X binary alloys with nutrient alloying
elements Mg, Ca and Sr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

84

Identification of the release of a bowled cricket ball from aero-torques recorded


with a smart cricket ball . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

85

Using thermocouples to determine the position of bat-ball impact in Cricket . .

86

Density functional theory study of organic sensitisers for dye sensitised solar cells 87
Shock Suspension Design Built

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

88

Study of energy storage polices in Australia and internationally with emphasis


on hydrogen and battery technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

89

Shock Suspension Design Built

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

90

Comparative study of grid-based energy storage vs electrochemical energy storage connected to a small microgrid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

91

Technical review and experimental investigation of options to improve the roundtrip


energy efficiency of Unitised Regenerative Fuel Cells (URFCs)with a focus on
using pulsed DC in charge mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92

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Trajectory Optimisation for Space Launch Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

93

Economics of Energy storage - The opportunity for energy storage investment .

94

Development of sustainable water desalination and thermoelectric power generation system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

95

Design and product selection of an electrolyser,hydrogen storage and PEM fuel


cell system for a micro-grid demonstration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

96

OPTIMIZATION OF THE CHASSIS/STRUCTURE OF AN URBAN ELECTRIC BUS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

97

Solar light - actuated electrothermal microfluidic motion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

98

A Proposed Photovoltaic Retrofit Of The External Glass Facade Of The RMIT


Design Hub . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

99

Scale aerodynamic testing of 3D printed bicycles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100


Efficient configurations of sustainable hybrid energy systems including bio-diesel
generators, photovoltaics, inverters and ultra-batteries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Finite Element Analysis of Drilling of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer . . . . . 102
Assessment and coaching of spin bowling performance, and classification of spin
bowling deliveries with a smart cricket ball . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Design, development and experimental testing of a metal hydride hydrogen storage system for a 1.2 kW power supply based on a Unitised Regenerative Fuel
Cell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Additive Manufacturing Business Case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Hole Transport Layer materials and replacement of P-type semiconductors in
Perovskite Solar Cells . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Engine Alternator noise components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Design and optimization of flywheels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
DESIGN & ANALYSIS OF A STRONG BACK FIXTURE FOR MACHINING
OF FLAT TRACK BEAM USED IN AIRCRAFTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Optimization of an angular semiautomatic rope break A mathematical approach
to enhance the design and the safety factor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Optimise stainless steel spaceframe chassis of a bus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Index-1: Master Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Index-2: Research Supervisors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Index-3: Key Words . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Index-4: Sponsors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119

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High Temperature Thermal Storage For Renewable Energy


Grbac, Nikola
Course: OENG1089 (24CP, Masters Research Project Part 1)
Program: Sustainable Energy (MC229)
First Research Supervisor: Rosengarten, Gary
Second Research Supervisor: Stanley, Cameron

Abstract #A-2016-S1-1
Solar thermal energy is limited to producing thermal energy during the days when there is sunlight as such there has
been a market identified for energy storage. This project aims to develop a low cost thermal storage system able to
produce heat for industrial applications. A solid or phase change material (PCM) would be suitable as it needs to
store heat at temperatures of 180oC. Several challenging tasks have been identified, yet the storage unit needs to be
cost effective. The heat is to be delivered to the load by a heat exchanger within the storage unit. The volume and
weight of the storage unit must be within an acceptable range as it needs to be suitable for installation. This project
requires a literature review which outlines the current available technologies and materials that are used. A possible
CFD analysis will be conducted followed by an economic evaluation to see if it is viable. Theres a possibility for a
prototype to be fabricated as an extra activity which uses the support of the MUSIC project team at RMIT University.
Keywords: Heat Transfer, Solar Energy, Industrial, Phase Change Material, CFD.

Figure 1: Swecos worlds largest thermal energy storage facility.


https://www.swecogroup.com/)

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(Courtesy:

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SWECO,

Page 11

Exploring Advancement In Crowd Sensing Through


Automated Pedestrians Counter
Alramadan, Hussein Taher
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: International Automotive Engineering (MC160, MC230)
First Research Supervisor: Shiwakoti, Nirajan
Second Research Supervisor: Taylor, David

Abstract #A-2016-S1-2
The word crowdsensing point to sharing data collected by pedestrians counters. This device is normally automatic,
and they do not require human effort to perform their tasks. Individuals can use the automated pedestrians counter,
organizations and majorly in transport and traffic. The current technical development in crowdsensing has exposed
new viewpoints for cost effective methods for managing the traffic congestion in addition to basic safety in critical
location like evacuation. Pedestrians counter can be a cheap and scalable way to implement static infrared sensor and
wireless networks for crowd sensing over a large area of coverage. The project will discover the progression in crowd
sensing especially in the direction of managing the crowds of people at main areas. In addition, it will offer a way to
focus on data collection and analysis which include crowd sensing via infrared sensor and other tools.
Keywords: Crowd Monitoring, Sensors, Data Analysis.

Figure 2: Shows the implemented system.

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Assessing The Technical And Financial Viability Of


Generating Solar PV Electricity At Melbourne Waters Small
Scale Sites
Brown, Ashley
Course: OENG1089 (24CP, Masters Research Project Part 1)
Program: Sustainable Energy (MC229)
First Research Supervisor: Stanley, Cameron
Second Research Supervisor: Shabani, Bahman
Sponsor: Melbourne Water

Abstract #A-2016-S1-3
Melbourne Water is an organization owned by the Victorian State Government that manages the supply, treatment,
recycling and removal of water for most of Greater Melbourne. The movement and treatment of large volumes of
water make Melbourne Water a major electricity consumer requiring approximately 280GWh per year. The majority
of this electricity is consumed at a small number of large sites. Melbourne Water also manages approximately 450
small sites that generally have higher unit costs of electricity compared to its large sites, for which sizable reductions
in tariffs can be negotiated. When combined with the dramatic fall in the cost of small solar PV in recent years, these
sites have the potential to produce good financial returns if a solar PV system can be installed.
This project aims to develop a robust method that will enable Melbourne Water to estimate the viability of PV
systems at all of its small scale sites. The resulting model will require less effort than individual site assessment due
to automated and simplified estimation processes. This will allow Melbourne Water to better understand the costs
and benefits of small solar. Visits to those sites selected by the model as most attractive will enable detailed
assessment and system design. A rollout schedule, testing and sensitivity analysis will also be conducted.
Keywords: Solar PV, Water, Small-Scale, Assessment Methodology.

Figure 3: A Map of Melbourne Waters Water Supply Network.


http://www.melbournewater.com.au)

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Predicting Demand Charge Reduction For Commercial-Scale


Solar PV Systems Coupled With Battery Storage
Park, Alexander James
Course: OENG1090 (24CP, Masters Research Project Part 2)
Program: Sustainable Energy (MC229)
First Research Supervisor: Lappas, Petros
Second Research Supervisor: Rosengarten, Gary

Abstract #A-2016-S1-4
Solar PV and battery storage technologies are known to provide savings to customers in the form of reduced electricity
charges. These reduced charges are, at present, only determined for the volume component (kWh) of charges, not the
demand component (kW or kVA). As interest grows and financial indicators improve for commercial solar PV and
battery storage installations, the need to accurately predict demand charge reductions is great. This research has
found that when simulated against a commercial-scale electricity consumption profile Solar PV was able to reduce the
maximum billable demand across five electricity networks in the National Energy Market of Australia by between
0.05-1.51%. When coupled with a 12 kWh battery storage and additional 1.31-2.02% reduction was experienced.
Battery utlisation strategy was shown to be of critical importance in yielding greater demand reduction from the
battery storage. Notably, it was shown that in the Ergon Energy electricity network that battery storage was able to
supply demand at a lower cost ($/kW) than the network was able to.
Keywords: Solar PV, Battery Storage, Electricity Demand, Network Charges.

Figure 4: Ability of Solar and Battery Storage to reduce Maximum Demand (kW).

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Minimize Aero-Load On Bus In Urban & In Rural


Environment
Acosta Manosalvas, Jorge Javier
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: International Automotive Engineering (MC160, MC230)
First Research Supervisor: Taylor, David
Second Research Supervisor: Cheung, Chi Pok
Sponsor: Bustech

Abstract #A-2016-S1-5
Minimize Aero-load on bus in urban & in rural environment.
The project Minimize Aero-load on bus in urban & in rural environment seeks to identify aerodynamic loses and to
reduce the consumption of fuel or energy needed in a public transport; all this by designing the exterior of a city bus
and aerodynamically make it more efficient and in consequence, also reducing air contaminants which are harmful for
the environment. In addition, the project also aims to cut operative costs and manufacturing costs for the company.
In aerodynamics, the drag is a force that acts in opposite direction of the movement of the body, resisting it; therefore,
it limits the max velocity the vehicle can achieve; in consequence, it affects fuel consumption and energy management.
The drag resultant will determine, among other things, the energy the bus has to use against this force, in other
words, the greater the drag coefficient, more fuel consumption and energy management will be used; approximately
around 24% of fuel savings is associated to a proper aerodynamic drag reduce (Limited 2012).
The project will center in the study and development of different techniques to improve the aerodynamics of the bus
and to reduce loses. The use of a simulation CFD software is needed in order to find the most appropriate method of
reducing drag on the bus.
Keywords: Aero-Load, Bus, CFD, Aerodynamics, Drag.

Figure 5: Turbulence zones of the original model of the bus. (Courtesy: own property, created using
ANSYS Workbench Fluid Flow CFX)

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Feasibility Study Of Manufacturing Wind Turbine Blades By


Employing 3D Printing To Assist Innovation In Cambodia
Meng, Chanvibol
Course: OENG1090 (24CP, Masters Research Project Part 2)
Program: Sustainable Energy (MC229)
First Research Supervisor: Watkins, Simon
Second Research Supervisor: Cheung, Chi Pok
Sponsor: Engineers Without Borders Australia (EWB) RMIT

Abstract #A-2016-S1-6
Electricity demand in Cambodia has been estimated to grow on an average of 18% annually from 2012 to 2020 (Open
Development 2014). However, 90% of the total electricity is consumed in Phnom Penh, capital city of Cambodia,
leaving the rural areas to remain in the dark (Open Development 2014). Therefore, it is vital to look at the alternative
technologies to light up those rural areas where electricity supply depends mainly on high cost private diesel
generators and batteries. It is obvious that renewable energy such as biomass, micro-hydropower, solar and wind
energy could play important roles in meeting this energy demand. It is observed that wind energy could be a potential
source of energy which has been untapped due to its upfront investment cost, lack of policy and technical support and
specific site demand.
Recognising these hindrances, the proposed research is to conduct a feasibility study of manufacturing wind turbine
blades by employing a cutting edge technology, three dimensional printing (3D printing). 3D printing is about
fabricating any shape of 3D solid objects using plastic or other material from a digital file (Evans 2012). This
technology has been gaining momentum in various sectors including medical, aerospace, and automotive products in
the recent past (Tucker et al. 2014). Therefore, it is worthwhile to look at its viability in supporting the development
of small scale technology like that of community wind turbine systems in Cambodia.
The aim of this project is to conduct a feasibility study of manufacturing wind turbine blades by employing 3D
printing technology to support innovation in Cambodia. First the review of the wind resource and the current
situation of wind turbine development in Cambodia will be conducted. Then, the review of 3D printing technology
which include its history, advantages and disadvantages and its application to wind turbine will be discussed. Next, a
review of wind turbine blade design is carried out before the overview of Hugh Piggott wind turbine design and blade
manufacturing section are described. The project requires also manufacturing and assembling 3D printed blades,
testing wind turbine in the wind tunnel, conducting computer simulation using ANSYS software. Finally, the triple
bottom line study of the project will be conducted to evaluate the project feasibility from economic, social and
environmental aspect.
Keywords: Wind Turbine Blades, 3D Printing Blades, Domestic Wind Turbine, Wind Turbine In Cambodia.

Figure 6: Small scale wind turbine with diameter of 1.2 m.

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Page 16

Application Of CCTV System For Large Enterprise


Monitoring, Indoor And Outdoor
Alsheheri, Mohammad Awad Khalufa
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: Management (MC226)
First Research Supervisor: Simic, Milan
Second Research Supervisor: Simic, Milan

Abstract #A-2016-S1-7
CCTV has conventional use in Australia today. As the use of CCTV in surveillance continues to grow exponentially,
this paper looks at its application for large enterprise monitoring, indoor, and outdoor. The thesis will look at the
current state of CCTV application in the world with special focus on its use in Australia. Besides, the thesis considers
cultural, security-based, societal, and economic factors that concern the application of CCTV in large enterprises.
Research for this study includes interviews with enterprise managers, CCTV system suppliers, and technicians as well
as analysis of the available literature on CCTV application. The research indicates that CCTV is effective for
surveillance in large enterprises. However, it must be used alongside other measures. Where there is a definite purpose
of the application, CCTV has various benefits and may be useful in combating crime. The thesis also makes
recommendations on how to improve surveillance practice in large enterprises through CCTV.
Keywords: Application Of CCTV System For Large Enterprise Monitoring, Indoor And Outdoor.

Figure 7: Application of CCTV system on a large company. (Courtesy: http://goo.gl/2CtlNt)

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Page 17

Analysis Of Manufacturing Process Variability Impacts On A


Concentrating Solar Collector
Bhavsar, Vedang
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: Manufacturing (MC224)
First Research Supervisor: Ferrari, David
Second Research Supervisor: Ding, Songlin

Abstract #A-2016-S1-8
In Australia and globally, thermal requirements of buildings accounts for majority of its energy consumption, which is
met either by supply of gas or electricity. In addition, Australias manufacturing sector accounts for almost 20% of the
countrys total energy usage. Most of the demand of this thermal energy is in the range of 65 C to 400 C.
Concentrated solar power has the potential to supply the thermal energy in this temperature range and would further
help reduce carbon dioxide emissions. This project is based on a major initiative, Micro Urban Solar Integrated
Concentrator (MUSIC) project, led by RMIT University and supported by Australian Renewable Agency (ARENA)
whose goal is to develop the integrated concentrating solar collector platform. There have been successful attempts of
designing such thermal collector under MUSIC project. Also, few prototypes have been prepared through different
manufacturing processes for testing. The project aims to carry out finite element analysis based on sheet metal
forming process accompanied by the commercial viability study. Finite element analysis would help the study of how
different mechanical properties propagate and influence the component performance and finally evaluate the end part.
Keywords: Solar Energy, Solar Compound Parabolic Collector (CPC), Manufacturing, Finite Element Analysis
(FEA), Commercial Viability Study.

Figure 8: (1) 3d render of Compund parabolic collector (CPC) using Solidworks PhotoView 360.
(2) Model of CPC collector (Image courtesy: M. Gajic, N. Karwa, A. Mojiri, and G. Rosengarten,
Modeling reflection loss from an evacuated tube inside a compound parabolic concentrator with a
cylindrical receiver, Opt. Express 23, A493-A501 (2015))

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Page 18

Low Cost Motion Capture Using Inertial Measurement Units


Gale, Jordan Charles Francis
Course: OENG1089 (24CP, Masters Research Project Part 1)
Program: International Sports Technology (MC190)
First Research Supervisor: Fuss, Franz
Second Research Supervisor: Weizman, Udi

Abstract #A-2016-S1-9
Whilst various forms of 3D Motion Capture (MOCAP) has been possible for some time, the majority of devices are
difficult to implement outside of a lab or workshop setting and can be limiting in their application. A significant
problem with other current systems utilising Inertial Measurement Units (IMU) is their high cost and bulky design
that makes them less than appropriate for most users.
The intent of this project was to design and create a low cost device that can recreate Kinematic movements of the
body in a virtual environment. Specifically using widely accessible 9-axial IMUs that contain a tri-axial
accelerometer, gyroscope and magnetometer. Combinations of each sensor can be used to determine relevant
orientations and accelerations of each limb in their relative state of motion .
The use of these devices can also be used to accurately represent displacement of the wearer and can provide an
alternative to GPS devices which are limited to outdoor use with clear visibility. Furthermore, due to the relatively
small size of the IMU sensors the proposed method can be implemented with little to no obstruction to the wearer.
Most IMU units are widely accessible and quite reasonably priced for their function.
The study will focus on producing a lower limb MOCAP system as a proof of concept prototype as well as using
readily available hardware to reflect accurate consumer cost considerations. To accurately recreate lower limb motion
9-axis IMUs will be used for both of the upper and lower segments of the legs as well as single device located around
the waist. A single microcontroller will be used for data acquisition for all the devices and a single wireless Bluetooth
transceiver will be used to send the data for data storage and translation. Simulation of the human model will be
constructed using Unity 3D. Kinematic models will be designed to estimate angles of the lower limbs, with a single
IMU worn around the waist as well as each of the upper and lower leg segments.
Validation of the performance of the Kinematic tracking system and the methods used will require repeated testing
and comparison with a gold standard optical tracking system counterpart.
Keywords: Inertial Measurement Unit, Motion Capture, Low Cost.

Figure 9: Invensense 9-axis IMU used for 3D Visulisation of Motion Capture in the Unity Game
Engine. (Courtesy: Invensense, http://www.invensense.com/; Unity 3D, https://www.unity3d.com/)

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Page 19

Synthesis Of SnS Quantum Dots For Next Generation Solar


Cells
Zhang, Weinan
Course: OENG1089 (24CP, Masters Research Project Part 1)
Program: Sustainable Energy (MC229)
First Research Supervisor: Tachibana, Yasuhiro
Second Research Supervisor: Shabani, Bahman
Sponsor: ARC, RMIT, Japan Science and Technology Agency

Abstract #A-2016-S1-10
According to growing concerns over climate change and current dependency on fossil fuels, photovoltaic devices(solar
cells)have delivered promising technologies for alternative energy.While traditional silicon crystalline solar cells have
long been in the market for a wide range of applications, their high costs of manufacturing and installation have
driven focus towards a next generation of solar cells for greater efficiency and performance at lower cost. Owe to the
absorption efficiency and stability of dye sensitisers can not satisfied the developing requirement, the synthesis of high
quality chalcogenide semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) has attracted much attention over the past two
decades,because of its unique size-dependent optoelectronic properties. Currently,there is considerable interest in the
synthesis of semiconductor NCs that are either non-toxic or have been modified to reduce toxicity with emphasis on
fabrication of environmentally benign materials using green chemical approaches. Bulk SnS is AIV-VI low toxicity
semiconductor with an optical indirect band gap value of 1.1eV , and a large optical absorption coefficient of10 4 cm
-1. Combined with a high photoelectric conversion efficiency (up to 25%) it makes SnS NCs an excellent choice for the
production of environment friendly photoelectric energy conversion and VIS/NIR detector materials with tuned
optoelectronic properties.
Keywords: Quantum Dots, Solar Cells, SnS.

Figure 10: Enhanced Performance of PbS-quantum-dot-sensitized Solar Cells via Optimizing Precursor
Solution and Electrolytes. (Courtesy: Scientific Reports, http://www.nature.com/articles/srep23094)

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Page 20

Revealing The Hidden Characteristics Of Soccer Players


Curved Kicks With The Use Of The Smart Soccer Boot
Dueking, Peter Anatoli
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: International Sports Technology (MC190)
First Research Supervisor: Fuss, Franz
Second Research Supervisor: Weizman, Udi

Abstract #A-2016-S1-11
Soccer is the most popular sport worldwide, and in order to win this game players have to score more goals then their
opponent. Consequently, the kicking action to score a goal is a major factor determining the winner of a game, and
improving players kicking technique is a main aim in soccer practice (Kellis & Katis, 2007). There are several types of
kicks in soccer, from which the curved kick is most often used in a free kick situation which is sometimes considered as
a golden opportunity for scoring (Wang & Griffin, 1997). Thereby, the curved kick is of high importance and can
make the difference between winning and losing. With this high importance it seems surprising that only very little
research has been conducted to evaluate underlying important biomechanical characteristics of this type of kick
(especially at the foot-to-ball impact phase), which could be in turn used to improve players kicking quality. To
address this issue, researchers at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT) invented a promising new
wearable sensor system which can be implemented in a soccer shoe and termed this technology Smart Soccer Boot
(Weizman & Fuss, 2015a, 2015b). Even though being a promising new wearable technology, the Smart Soccer Boot
has some minor technical issues, and has not yet been used in practice in valid situations. Consequently, it is of great
interest to improve and use the Smart Soccer Boot under valid conditions, and thereby filling the research gap existing
for characteristics of accurate curved soccer kicks.
Main aims of the thesis: 1) To improve the Smart Soccer Boot where necessary and possible 2) To analyze curved
kicks with the Smart Soccer Boot and to reveal their unknown biomechanical characteristics.
Keywords: Biomechanics, Wearable Technology, Foot-To-Ball Impact Phase.

Figure 11: The Smart Soccer Boot Unveils Hidden Biomechanical Characteristics of Soccer Kicks.
(Courtesy: Pixabay, https://pixabay.com/)

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Page 21

Aerodynamic Behaviour Of The Badminton Shuttlecock


Woo, Terence
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: International Sports Technology (MC190)
First Research Supervisor: Alam, Firoz
Second Research Supervisor: Chowdhury, Harun

Abstract #A-2016-S1-12
The purpose of this thesis project was to review the current knowledge regarding feather and synthetic shuttlecocks
through retest of wind tunnel testing at various speeds. This study involved a wind tunnel experiment and a real-time
observation of the shuttlecock skirt deformation process to simulate the gameplay scenario. With regards to the wind
tunnel experiment procedure, the initial speed tested was 30km/h and increased at 15km/h incrementswith the
exception of between 135 and 145km/h due to limitation of the aero tunnel. Each shuttlecock sample was sampled
three times for the duration of 20 seconds using the RMIT Wind Tunnel; for each shuttlecock type, three samples were
tested. The samples used included 9 shuttlecock samples: three feather shuttlecocks, three synthetic shuttlecocks of
the typical injection mould design and three synthetic shuttlecocks implementing a new two-part design. The wind
tunnel testing procedure was repeated 5 times, with each samples initial positioning marked to ensure each
independent test was able to assume the same position. The distance between the mounted sample and the sting was
set to be 10cm apart so as to ensure airflow at the rear end was not disturbed due to insufficient spacing between the
samples and the supporting surface.
The aerodynamic data generated would then be supplemented by high-speed video analysis to capture the actual
deformation around the skirt region of both feather and synthetic shuttlecock samples in the real-time gameplay
environment. This information would provide a visual representation of how the projectile behaves when being struck
by the string-bed, as well as used to explain the underlying aerodynamic factor that separates the synthetic
shuttlecock from the feather shuttle. Subsequently, the project will lead into the review of the current design
challenges of synthetic shuttlecock and discuss the potential to redesign synthetic shuttlecock based on current
academic knowledge of feather shuttlecocks which is favoured by the majority of the badminton community.
The primary aim of this thesis is also to contribute to the current body of knowledge by understanding the badminton
shuttlecock as an aerodynamic behaviour. An improved understanding in the field would assist with the development
on all levels including: players, coaches, manufacturers, sports community and the academic and research community
as additional points of interest would be added to the field in terms of potential directions of research in the future.
Keywords: Aerodynamics, Feather, Synthetic, Badminton, Shuttlecock Design, Wind Tunnel.

Figure 12: Badminton shuttlecock experiment setup at the RMIT Aerodynamic wind tunnel.

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Page 22

Exploring Big Data On Road Accidents


Li, Rixin
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: International Automotive Engineering (MC160, MC230)
First Research Supervisor: Shiwakoti, Nirajan
Second Research Supervisor: Stasinopoulos, Peter

Abstract #A-2016-S1-13
Over the last decade, big data sources on road accidents have emerged as a very promising source for researchers and
practitioners to study the variables that can lead to road accidents. In this project, first the existing literature on road
safety and accidents are critically reviewed. Following up with the critical analysis of literature, the existing big data
on road accidents are used to identify and analyse different variables that may contribute to road accidents.
Keywords: Data Analytics, Road Safety, Statistical Analysis, Accidents.

Figure 13: Raining Driving. (Courtesy: FOX5 News, http://fox5sandiego.com/2014/02/28/rainwreaks-havoc-with-morning-commute/)

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Page 23

Development Of Air Stable Perovskite Solar Cell By Solution


Method
Qu, Shuai
Course: OENG1090 (24CP, Masters Research Project Part 2)
Program: Sustainable Energy (MC229)
First Research Supervisor: Tachibana, Yasuhiro
Second Research Supervisor: Shabani, Bahman
Sponsor: RMIT, Japan Science and Technology Agency

Abstract #A-2016-S1-14
The rapid improvement of perovskite solar cells has made them the rising star of the photovoltaics world and of huge
interest to the academic community. Since their operational methods are still relatively new, there is great opportunity
for further research into the basic physics and chemistry around perovskites. Furthermore, there is huge potential for
engineering better, more efficient solar cells which are expected to reach in excess of 20% power conversion efficiency.
Perovskite solar cells show a great potential. Their fabrication is much cheaper and easier than fabrication of their
predecessors, they are capable to absorb a solar energy in a very broad spectrum. But among numerous of benefits
there are some disadvantages and key challenges to be solved. Long-term stability is among of the most critical issues
especially if we are talking about Perovskite solar cells since CH3NH3PbI3 compound dissolves with a very rapid
speed in the presence of moisture. Even a few drops of fluid can destroy the solar cells material completely. Also there
are some issues connected with the potential environmental impact since there is a lead as one of the component of the
Perovskite material. As a result, It is very important to develop air stable perovskite solar cell.
Keywords: The Development Of Air Stable Perovskite Solar Cell.

Figure 14: RMITs first perovskite solar cell.

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Page 24

Conversion Of Internal Combustion Engines To Operate With


Ammonia
Ziyaeiasl, Siyamak
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: International Automotive Engineering (MC160, MC230)
First Research Supervisor: Lappas, Petros
Second Research Supervisor: Edsell, Jon
Sponsor: Auto CRC and Car Servicing and You

Abstract #A-2016-S1-15
Abstract-Ammonia (NH3) is a Hydrogen (H) carrier that can be used as an alternative fuel in Internal Combustion
Engines (ICEs). In fact, Hydrogen has been demonstrated to be used in fuel cells and ICEs in order to reduce
Hydrocarbon (CnH2n+2) emission and dependency to fossil fuels in last few decades. Advantages of using ammonia
instead of hydrogen are higher energy density of ammonia, easy storage and use of current infrastructure without
costly conversion. Researches shown that with continuous compound rate and computes fossil fuel reserve depletion
times, fossil fuel resources will be finish in near future. Also, there are studies conducted to reduce Green House Gas
Emissions (GHG), as one of the main reasons to increase global temperature, by reducing usage of hydrocarbon fuels.
Therefore, ammonia sounds promising as a feasible candidate to replace hydrocarbon fuels considering future of fossil
fuel and GHG with just small modification required on engine components to operate with ammonia. Despite of
encouraging signs of consuming ammonia in ICEs, there are some difficulties to operate engines efficiently with
ammonia as well as reduction of hydrocarbon emissions. This research will demonstrate possibility of conversion of
internal combustion engines to operate with Ammonia via findings from experiments done on CIEs, SIEs and fuel
blend consist of ammonia and hydrocarbon fuels with focusing on ICEs operation behaviour with just NH3 in SIEs.
From the numerical findings and the fact of lower heating value of the Ammonia in comparison with gasoline and
diesel, the compression ratio of the internal combustion engine needs to be above 19:1 to start the ignition. Therefore,
the engine used to carried out numerical estimates and practical work, will be single cylinder direct injected diesel
engine. The engine has been modified by electronic system control called MegaSquirt to control injection timing as
well as ignition timing.
Keywords: Keywords-Hydrogen Fuelled ICEs, Ammonia-Hydrocarbon Fuel Blends, Ammonia Added In CIEs &
SIEs, Ammonia Directly Used In SIEs; Conversion Of Direct Injected ICE To SIE.

Figure 15: Ammonia as an alternative fuel for internal combustion engines.


hptts://www.greennh3.com/convert)

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(Courtesy:

Page 25

Compression Properties Of Aligned Nano-Crystal Cellulose


Reinforced Epoxy Resin
Poornachandra,
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: International Automotive Engineering (MC160, MC230)
First Research Supervisor: Daliri, Ali
Second Research Supervisor: Kandare, Everson

Abstract #A-2016-S1-16
The aim of this project is to develop and characterise novel wood-nanocomposites, through the incorporation of
nano-crystalline cellulose (NCC) into fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) composites. Presently aerospace, maritime and
Defence industries are not major customers of wood industry (except for marginal aesthetic applications) due to the
inferior mechanical properties of wood products (including natural fibre composites containing micro-cellulose fibres)
compared with engineered fibres (e.g. glass fibres and carbon fibres) and metal alloys These exceptional mechanical
properties have prompted the development of NCC nano-composites in recent years. For example, by adding small
quantities of NCC, the tensile strength and modulus of polymer-based composites can be significantly improved.
However, the properties and applications of these nano-composites have not been investigated for use in high-end
applications such as aerospace, maritime and Defence industries that have certain stringent requirements. Therefore,
this project aims to characterise NCC nano-composites to develop commercial products with superior mechanical
properties and multifunctional capabilities compared to conventional engineered alloys and FRP composites
Keywords: NCC, Nano-Crystalline Cellulose, Compression.

Figure 16: Determining the Compression properties of aligned Nano-crystal cellulose reinforced epoxy
resin using Instron testing rig.

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Page 26

Industrial Food Waste To Energy Part 2


Mangubat, Robie
Course: OENG1089 (24CP, Masters Research Project Part 1)
Program: Management (MC226)
First Research Supervisor: Ferrari, David
Second Research Supervisor: Othman, Maazuza
Sponsor: Sustainability Victoria

Abstract #A-2016-S1-17
In Girgarre, Victoria (West of Shepparton), a dairy farming company has started a waste management facility. The
facility is located in an abandoned Heinz factory. The main aim of the facility is to turn food waste into farm food to
assist in drought ravaged farms in Greater Shepparton. The site employs casual staff to break down the food waste
manually, extract contents and capture packaging to sell to recyclers . The facility has about 20,000 - 30,000 tonnes of
waste materials.
The processes within the Girgarre waste management facility are complex and have a number of side streams that can
be utilized in a sustainable manner. The waste to energy desktop research will review potential energy technologies
that can be cost effective and add value to the waste management facility (see Figure 1). It also aims to build a
generalized financial/environmental case for utilizing conversion of waste to energy as opposed to disposing these to
landfill.
In a wider sense, the desktop research will also look at markets in Southeast Asia and New Zealand for the energy
technologies, in particular its by-products. The aim of this section is to identify a by-product (e.g. digestate from
anaerobic digestion, biochar from pyrolysis etc), market or cost per tonne in New Zealand and South East Asia and its
impact on the financial viability of the energy technologies if the facility were to export these by-products overseas.
Keywords: W2E Industry Community.

Figure 17: Industrial Food Waste to Energy Process.

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Page 27

The Influence Of Loose And Fluttering Garments On The


Aerodynamic Behaviour Of A Skicross Athlete
Pachernegg, Stefan
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: International Sports Technology (MC190)
First Research Supervisor: Fuss, Franz
Second Research Supervisor: Troynikov, Olga

Abstract #A-2016-S1-18
The main goal of this study is to develop a low drag racing suit for Skicross athletes. In contrast to other high speed
sports like alpine skiing, ski jumping or speed skating where skinsuits are common to use, loose and fluttering
garments are compulsory in Skicross. For the development of the racing suit, fabrics have to be found, which reveal in
flutter conditions low aerodynamic resistance as a result of a minimization of the Coefficient of Drag CD. Based on
preliminary laboratory - tests of different fabrics, which state that - in contrast to generally adopted guidelines which
say that everything that flutters increase drag - loose fabrics can vary by up to 25% depending on their properties,
wind tunnel tests of generated small 3D printed scale models in downhill position are carried out with different fabrics
dressed. The textile specifications which are taken into consideration are area density and flexural rigidity. The results
obtained from the scale model testing reveal that the thicker and stiffer the material the higher are the drag as well as
lift forces. In order to put the drag and lift forces from the scale model testing into perspective and to indicate
advantage or disadvantage regarding distance and time, full size garments of several tested fabrics were generated and
finally tested on a human subject in the RMIT industrial wind tunnel.
Keywords: Skicross, Fabrics, Garments, Aerodynamic, Wind Tunnel.

Figure 18: Dressed scale model testing in the RMIT small wind tunnel.

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Page 28

The Role Of Strategic Management In Small To Medium


Sized Companies
Huang, Xin
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: International Automotive Engineering (MC160, MC230)
First Research Supervisor: John, Sabu
Second Research Supervisor: Bil, Cees

Abstract #A-2016-S1-19
While large corporations often embark on strategic analyses of their businesses, the benefit (financially, operationally
and otherwise) of such an exercise is not always clear. This project will involve the investigation of the processes in
strategic analyses undertaken by smaller-to-medium sized organisations. The objective will be assessment of the
benefit or otherwise to these organisations of doing their own strategic analysis. A mapping of the benefits (financial
or otherwise) to the type of strategic analysis done will be made.
Keywords: Strategy, Management, Balanced Score Card Approach.

Figure 19: Strategic Management. (Courtesy: simplilearn, http://www.simplilearn.com)

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The Flight Trajectory Of Drop Punts In Australian Football


Stegmann, Andreas Siegfried
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: International Sports Technology (MC190)
First Research Supervisor: Fuss, Franz
Second Research Supervisor: Weizman, Udi

Abstract #A-2016-S1-20
The results of this study clearly demonstrate the complexity of modelling the flight trajectories for footballs, as used
in the Australian Football League (AFL). An extensive literature research was carried out in order to develop a model
with respect to the kinematic attributes of a maximum distance drop punt as well as to the aerodynamic
characteristics of the official AFL balls. The motivation behind this was to eliminate or distinguish gender-related
physical differences by increasing the kicking distance of female players, which should be achieved through downsizing
of the ball. Eventually, whether this approach is feasible or not could not be clarified. Due to uncertainties in the
validation of the model, the definition of the kinematics of females and the aerodynamics of AFL footballs, the
limitations of this study were regarded as too strong in order to draw a reliable conclusion towards advantaged ball
properties of the official AFL ball for women. Future research should validate the model with data obtained from
physical experiments and measure the kinematics of male as well as female athletes. Furthermore, dynamic wind
tunnel tests at the desired wind speeds and spin rates should be conducted. Hereby the use of real-size specimen is
suggested in order to determine the exact aerodynamic properties of AFL balls.
Keywords: AFL, Australian Football, Maximum Distance, Drop Punt, Ball Aerodynamics.

Figure 20: Simulation of the flight trajectory of different sized Australian footballs - From a free
body diagram to a mathematical model. (https://pixabay.com/de/american-football-fuball-ei-spiel309795/, https://pixabay.com/de/american-football-kugel-sport-spiel-311817/)

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3D Solid Modelling Of A Humanoid Ankle-Foot System For


Emulation Of Human Gait Performing Tasks
(Walk, Stair Ascend-Descend And Run)
Sadoghirad, Mohammad
Course: OENG1126 (24CP, Masters Engineering Project Part 1)
Program: Computer Aided Engineering and Design (MC244)
First Research Supervisor: Trivailo, Pavel
Second Research Supervisor: Tariq, Madiha

Abstract #A-2016-S1-21
This project aims at designing a 3D solid model of a human-like ankle-foot system primarily for amputees, which
would serve as a prosthetic substitute to facilitate their affected and abnormal life. The ankle-foot system design will
be based on the average (general) characteristics of a healthy human being, i.e. its size, weight and anatomical
structure also the angles of plantar flexion and dorsiflexion will be based on the data of a healthy human gait pattern,
for each of the four tasks angles will change and designed accordingly. The degrees of freedom of the system model
will be based on the selected planes of gait and number of joints incorporated. The 3D modelling will be implemented
through CATIA software. Therefore, accurate data based on healthy human ankle biomechanics for both level ground
and stair-descent gaits are required prior the designing of the powered ankle mechanism. In order to obtain the
necessary gait data for the conceptual design, information such as the angles of both knee and ankle joints as well as
the ankle toque can be collected from human subjects. Moreover, an animation based on the human subjects walking
performance will be generated. Computer soft-wares like Kinovea and Motus can be employed to produce animations
based on human gaits performance and extracting important data such as, the displacement, torque, the energy
consumption and the angles of the joints. The mentioned gait data help with evaluation of the conceptual design.
Keywords: Humanoid, 3D Modelling, Emulation, Gait Analysis, CATIA, Prosthetic Ankle-Foot, Biomechanics.

Figure 21: Biomechanics experiment for gait analysis (left), prosthetic ankle 3d model (right): Powered Ankle-Foot Prosthesis for the Improvement of Amputee Ambulation by Samuel Au & Hugh
Herr.

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Hydrogen Fuel From Biomass


Pattla, Nia
Course: OENG1089 (24CP, Masters Research Project Part 1)
Program: Sustainable Energy (MC229)
First Research Supervisor: Andrews, John
Second Research Supervisor: Shabani, Bahman

Abstract #A-2016-S1-22
Hydrogen is the lightest and simplest element in universe. Hydrogen in its molecular form, H2, has the highest energy
content of 142MJ/kg compared to the known fuels. But the problem with Hydrogen is that it never occurs on its own.
Hydrogen is available either via water (H20) or Hydrocarbons and coal. This means that Hydrogen needs to be
produced, not on its own, but as an energy carrier, which can be used in combination with, for example electricity to
create an innovative and viable energy system. Until now major source of production of hydrogen uses fossil fuels,
therefore this sustainable source has been produced with the help of unsustainable sources, which doesnt make any
sense. However there are some recent developments which show that it can be produced from sustainable sources such
as biomass.
Recent developments have very promising results, and these developments can end our dependence on fossil fuels.
Some biomass such as algae does not release any greenhouse gasses and also it is cost effective. This project will
review the various sources of biomass available for producing hydrogen fuel, the different chemical processes used to
produce the hydrogen, and compare the various options using a triple bottom line evaluation, with particular
emphasis on algae as the primary biomass resource.
Keywords: Hydrogen, Biomass, Algae, Fossil Fuels.

Figure 22: Carbon dioxide bio-fixation and wastewater treatment via algae photochemical synthesis for biofuels production - RSC Advances (RSC Publishing) DOI:10.1039/ ...
(http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlelanding/2014/ra/c4ra06441k#!divAbstract )

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Development Of An Instrumented Boxing Glove


Menzel, Tobias
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: International Sports Technology (MC190)
First Research Supervisor: Fuss, Franz
Second Research Supervisor: Weizman, Udi

Abstract #A-2016-S1-23
Boxers participating in one of the most vigorous disciplines of all sports because the sport causes injuries as a purpose
rather than accidentally. Therefore, a boxing specific monitoring system can be more than helpful to observe boxing
related injuries, due to the evaluation of punch forces, to provide suitable information to the medical staff, judges and
coaches during a fight. There is a limitation in the range of studies that are able to identify punch forces in a
non-laboratory environment and to monitor an athletes health during a boxing bout by using instrumented sport
equipment. During the master project, a instrumented boxing glove device was developed, to quantify the punch
forces, movement of the Center of Pressure (COP) on the glove and most importantly a head injury criterion (HIC) as
a direct warning system to protect athletes health by predicting the injury severity. Therefore, a highly accurate and
fully compatible piezo-resistive sensor matrix was developed. The results of the development process are intended to
provide information about the forces occurring during a boxing match. The information gained out of this boxing
glove providing an innovative perspective into the impact magnitude and the risk of injuries exposed to the boxer
during a boxing fight. The results gathered by the boxing glove can be important for the theory to create new
procedures and rules for the sport of boxing to enhance the safety factor in the ring for the athletes. Furthermore, the
understandings of forces created by the boxer effect the development of boxing equipment and protective equipment
that could help to develop advanced equipment for the sport of boxing.
Keywords: Instrumented Boxing Glove, Head Injury Criterion, Center Of Pressure, Piezo-Resistive Sensitive
Sensor.

Figure 23: Test setup for HIC measurements.

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Page 33

Business Case In Additive Manufacturing


Sharma, Nikhil
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: Manufacturing (MC224)
First Research Supervisor: Taylor, David
Second Research Supervisor: Easton, Mark

Abstract #A-2016-S1-24
There are quite a few cost wastage in manufacturing a product, which can be reduced if proper methods applied. Cost
can be considered as one of most important criteria for decision making. Cost modelling has changed a lot in the
recent times, traditional manufacturing methods such as cost model is used to mainly emphasise on material or
labour cost. Whereas modern manufacturing techniques also wants investment and overheads impact to be considered
in their cost model. In this project different methods such as cost modelling techniques, error detection etc. are used
to find the cost associated with manufacturing a product using Additive manufacturing and Subtractive
manufacturing techniques . Cost modelling techniques provide a certain type of approval to the product or project.
Cost modelling techniques uses mathematical algorithm to provide cost of a product or project which is used as the
standard for further calculations. In this thesis report few different types of machines i.e. Projet 7000 (Stereo
lithography technique), Connex 3000 (Inkjet 3D printing) and etc. are used to find out the cost of manufacturing part
a using them. Cost model prepared is based on various phenomena; Raw material cost, Labour rate, Build time,
Preparation time and etc. This thesis report will provide a clear idea on the cost and variable factors associated with
the manufacturing of a part using Additive manufacturing and Subtractive manufacturing techniques.
Keywords: Cost Modelling, Additve Manufacturing, Subtractive Manufacturing.

Figure 24: Basic cost model for a Fused Deposition Modelling machine.

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Page 34

The Role Of Strategic Management In Small To Medium


Sized Beverage Company
Ram, Raghavender
Course: OENG1089 (24CP, Masters Research Project Part 1)
Program: Management (MC226)
First Research Supervisor: John, Sabu
Second Research Supervisor: Bil, Cees

Abstract #A-2016-S1-25
This research paper focuses on the effects of strategic management in a small to medium sized company. Often
strategic Management is shown to be implemented by large enterprises through lecture and text book examples rather
than how or if small or medium sized enterprises utilizes strategic management techniques to help their companies
grown. In this case we are primarily focusing on the beverage industry. Strategic Management is largely used for long
term planning, typically 3 - 5 years plan or roadmap for a companys growth or target direction. In this research we
analyse to see how strategic management can affect the growth of a small/ medium beverage company. The structure
of this research will be split into 3 parts. First literature reviews will be done to understand various Strategic
Management techniques that are currently utilized commonly in the industry. Second a benchmarking exercise is to
take place where large successful companies (for example Asahi, Coca-Cola, Nestle...) will be used as case study and
interview subjects to understand how or if strategic management had a part in the companys success. Third, through
the findings from benchmarking large companies we can potentially devise some common strategic management
techniques that can be leveraged in small to medium beverage company to create a clear direction for how
small/medium companies can achieve their long term goals effectively.
Keywords: Strategic Management, Enterprise, Beverage Industry.

Figure 25:
Strategic Management of SME.
http://www.spnorthamericagroup.com/projects/)

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(Courtesy:

SPNorthAmericaGroup,

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Page 35

Experimental Study Of An Integrated Solar-Hydrogen CHP


Solar-Thermal System
Ahmed, Nuzuhath
Course: OENG1089 (24CP, Masters Research Project Part 1)
Program: Sustainable Energy (MC229)
First Research Supervisor: Shabani, Bahman
Second Research Supervisor: Andrews, John

Abstract #A-2016-S1-26
Hydrogen storage (HS) is a promising technology in improving the reliability of renewable energy systems. The most
common energy storage option in use is battery systems. However, its short comings such as high cost, lower overall
efficiencies in long term storage, and also issues of end life disposal calls for alternative storage options. In this
respect, HS is identified as a potential technology which can overcome the stated shortcomings. However, their low
round trip efficiencies compared to batteries in short term applications is a major disadvantage. Nevertheless,
operating such hydrogen systems in a combined heat and power (CHP) mode is identified as an effective way to
improve the overall efficiency of the system. This because fuel cells in its power generation process produce a
considerable amount of heat. Another complementary renewable technology which can utilize the heat generated in
renewable hydrogen systems is solar thermal water heating, as such systems on its own cannot completely satisfy the
hot water needs of a household. As several studies have analysed the capability of hydrogen systems in power
generation, this project will focus on the heat extraction. Thus an experimental research will be undertaken to study
the heat recovery from a solar hydrogen system and its integration to a solar thermal water heating system and
investigate the resulting improvements in overall efficiency of the hydrogen storage system. This case study is for a
representative household of Melbourne and its results will indicate the level to which the annual power and hot water
demands for such a household will be satisfied with an integrated renewable energy system as described.
Keywords: Solar Hydrogen Systems, Solar Thermal Systems, CHP, Experimental Study, Remote Area Power
Supply.

PV panels
DC current

Electrolyser
H2

Storage

AC current

Hot water
Solar thermal
collector

DC/AC converter

Air
Heat

Fuel cell
Water

Coolant
Heat Exchager

Hot water tank

Figure 26: Solar hydrogen system integrated with a solar thermal water heating system for fuel cell
CHP application.

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Page 36

Industrial Food Waste To Energy


Sowmya Holaly Nagaraj,
Course: OENG1089 (24CP, Masters Research Project Part 1)
Program: Sustainable Energy (MC229)
First Research Supervisor: Rosengarten, Gary
Second Research Supervisor: Stanley, Cameron
Sponsor: Sustainability Victoria

Abstract #A-2016-S1-27
An ex dairy farmer manages a large area of land in Girgarre, Central Victoria where waste food products from
supermarket chains are brought in and presently, most of which are being utilized to feed livestock as an alternative to
filling up landfills. There is abundant opportunity to utilize other waste materials as useful resources by
implementation of different W2E methodologies at the site. The main objective is to research upon and design an
efficient anaerobic digester to make use of the food waste to produce bio gas which can further be used as a source of
energy. Possible applications for bio gas include generation of electricity and heat (applicable for use in green houses
or for space heating). It is important to work out the economics of the whole waste management process to promote
this technology further. Finally, the approach (waste to energy) will be assessed in terms of its broader contribution to
environmental sustainability of Australias waste management practices.
Keywords: W2E Energy Industry Community.

Figure 27: A generic illustration of turning food waste into useful energy by implementing an anaerobic
digester system. (Courtesy: NMRL, https://www.biocycle.net/)

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Page 37

Design Of Prosthetic Fairings And Automation Of


Customisation Process
Chege, Timothy Kuria
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: Manufacturing (MC224)
First Research Supervisor: Mazur, Maciej
Second Research Supervisor: Leary, Martin
Sponsor: AJKP PTY LTD

Abstract #A-2016-S1-28
Over the recent decades, prostheses have experienced significant development in their technical functionality. However,
the benefit of prostheses to amputees depends on more than just their technical functionality. The aesthetics and
resulting appearance of the prosthesis impact the wearer, specifically their psychological well-being. In addition, each
amputee has unique anthropometric attributes. Each amputee therefore requires a customised prosthesis. In this
project, prosthetic fairings for lower limb prosthesis have been designed to improve the appearance of prostheses by
concealing their mechanical components. They have been designed to mirror the form of the wearers intact limb and
utilise a selection of artistic elements to provide aesthetic appeal. The customisation process of the designs for future
cases will be automated through a software application. The key parameters for rapid manipulation of the 3D model
of a standard fairing have been established. Rapid customisation to suit each new amputee case will achieve reduced
development costs and lead times.
Keywords: Prosthetic, Prosthesis, Fairings, Customisation, Automation.

Figure 28:
Prosthetic fairing
http://www.Sliced3D.com.au)

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by

T.

Chege,

Sliced3D

(Courtesy:

DRAFT: Masters Final Projects Conference, Semester-1 2016

Sliced3D,

Page 38

Fibre-Based Energy Storage Integration In Fabrics


Lee, Tyrone
Course: OENG1089 (24CP, Masters Research Project Part 1)
Program: International Sports Technology (MC190)
First Research Supervisor: John, Sabu
Second Research Supervisor: Imtiaz, Ahmed Khan
Sponsor: FCST Pty Ltd

Abstract #A-2016-S1-29
The aim of this research project is to explore the current difficulties in relation to energy storage in the form of smart
garments or Multi-functional fabrics (MFs). This will be approached scientifically investigating the technological
obstructions in such energy storage in fabrics. Increasing innovation in consumer products for on person devices,
whether it be smart watches, portable Global Positioning Systems, communications and military use all has seen the
need for power on-person without the encumbrance of weight and harmfulness of conventional batteries. Furthermore
the increasing cost and expenditure of fuels see a future for the development of new energy sources and storage
technology. This project is to research and possibly develop features that are desirable towards integration of super
capacitors into fibres and into wearable garments through the use of a fibre sized piezoelectric generators, essentially
creating a new source of power. The research involves delving into topics of super capacitors that are flexible for the
incorporation into fibres and wearable garments, and also touch onto cyclic voltammetry. The research and
experiments will determine the optimal fibre type to be applied and the application of the flexible super-capacitors.
Parameters will include the functionality of the fibre based energy storage utilising the Fabric Integration Index,
toughness and wear comfort.
Keywords: Super-Capacitors, Fibres, Capacitance.

Figure 29: Yarn made of niobium nanowires by coating of a conductive polymer shown in pink.
(Courtesy: MIT News, https://news.mit.edu/)

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Page 39

Quantification Of Movement In Water Polo: A Live Feedback


Tracking Device
Whipp, Sean Christopher
Course: OENG1089 (24CP, Masters Research Project Part 1)
Program: International Sports Technology (MC190)
First Research Supervisor: Fuss, Franz
Second Research Supervisor: Weizman, Udi

Abstract #A-2016-S1-30
Quantification of Movement in Water Polo: A Live Feedback Tracking Device
Water Polo is a team water sport, first introduced to Modern Olympic competition in 1900, in which two teams of
seven players attempt to place one ball in the oppositions goal with their hands. The sport has been dominated
historically by Eastern European nations such as Hungary, Serbia, Croatia and (formerly) Yugoslavia. Barring
notational analysis of positional movement patterns and studies of anthropometric data in professional players, study
in this sport is particularly limited. The sport is limited by the water-based environment the sport exists in, limiting
the use of some technological devices, as players wear small bathers and are regularly involved in violent game-based
confrontations, subsequently limiting the areas a delicate tracking device may be placed. Following consultation with
members of the Mens and Womens Australian Water Polo team, specifically, the Victorian Seals, members of the
National Water Polo League, it has become increasingly apparent that a device to monitor movement distance and
speed in real time is required. Substitutions are often made due to tactical reasons, with coaches limited to
conversational feedback from players to gain an insight on each players fatigue or distance covered. In a sport where
players are not permitted to touch the bottom of the pool, a constant state of movement occurs, with player fatigue a
major factor in team performance outcomes. Drawing on the Global Positioning System (GPS) tracking of sports such
as Australian Rules, Soccer and Basketball, tracking of in-water movement is essential, allowing coaches to make more
informed decisions during training and gameplay regarding fatigue, intensity and total movement load.
The proposed device, following initial discussions with Professor Franz Fuss would be waterproof and piezoelectric in
nature, very small, attachable to a player via tape or a small pocket in the water polo cap. No such device exists in
water polo, an Olympic funded sport. With the exception of bulky outdoor swimming products manufactured by
Garmin, or indoor devices that rely on a known pool length for lap-swimming, a waterproof indoor movement tracking
device does not exist. Key operational barriers hinge on making a product with an error reading accurate enough for a
water polo pool (30 x 20 metres). Collection of accurate movement data during game play or training camp periods
would have a significant impact on the understanding of load, intensity, fatigue and performance outcomes in a highly
professional sport. With a finalised product goal of a commercially available device, free to be purchased and operated
by amateur to professional teams.
Note: In very early contact stages with tech companies and Franz Fuss, unsure of timeline for International Sports
Technology students, thus the above is a draft to give an early description of the proposed product concept
Keywords: Water Polo, Movement, Tracking, Load.

Figure 30: Water Polo player in baulking action. (Courtesy: VIS, http://www.vis.org.au/athletessports/sports/water-polo/).

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Page 40

An Analysis Of The Use Of Information Technologies In


Automating And Improving Logistic Operations, Strategic
Logistic Management And Supply Chain Management
Haulder, Neelesh
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: Integrated Logistics Management (MC227)
First Research Supervisor: Kumar, Arun
Second Research Supervisor: Shiwakoti, Nirajan

Abstract #A-2016-S1-31
The aim of this project is to have an in depth analysis of the increasing use and potential of information technologies
and automated systems, such a specialized logistics software, for logistic operations, strategic logistics management
and supply chain management. The current uses of information technologies (IT) and potential future uses will both
be studied for a range of logistics operations along the supply chain which would include, but not limit to, the use of
information technologies for: * Supply chain design processes * Supply chain logistical operations * Decision making
tools along the supply chain (e.g. predictive technologies) * Coordination of logistical operations across the supply
chain * Logistical data management across supply chain * Integrating Uncertainty and risk assessments into supply
chain design processes through the assistance of IT technologies * Automation of logistics operation across the supply
chain (e.g. in packaging) In order to study the uses of information technologies for these various aspects, data would
be obtained from literature reviews on the topic, research papers and books but also from some companies using a
range of these type of technologies and from the companies which provides these technologies (e.g. software
manufacturers for logistic operations in the shipping industry). The data studied would include, but may not limit to:
* The range of software and IT resources available for the various type of logistical operations * The type of software,
IT resources and technologies in demand across the supply chains * The degree of integration between each logistic
software& technologies which can be used for various logistical operations across the supply chain * An analysis of a
range of performance matrices offered by IT technologies catering for the same type of logistical operations * Current
trends in the Information Technologies E-logistics catering industries (e.g. more reliance on technologies requiring
internet communication over other form of communication) * The implication of rapidly expanding Information
technologies capabilities in logistic industries The following data, would hence be used to provide an in-depth case
study of the usage of IT resources for the logistic industry, with focus on performance matrices measured with respect
notably to: * Cost reduction of operations * Time management of operations * Enhanced supply& storage
management across supply chain * Increased flexibility& integration of different parties involved across the supply
chain The last few chapters of the thesis will then focus not only on how the use of information technologies is
affecting the performance of logistic operations across supply chains, but how they can further improve in certain key
areas, where, through analysis of obtained data, areas in need of improvement will also be identified and, where
possible, through the use of various problem solving methodologies, such as soft system methodologies, new solutions
can be explored and proposed to further enhance the range of solutions and assistance offered by the use of
information technologies for the logistic industry.
Keywords: Logistics Engineering, Information Technology, Supply Chain Management, Logistic Technologies,
Logistics Automation, Strategic Logistic Management.

Figure 31: Caption has not been provided by the Master student.

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Page 41

Fire-Structural Analysis Of Modular Construction


Zhao, Nan
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: Management (MC226)
First Research Supervisor: Khatibi, Akbar Afaghi
Second Research Supervisor: Kandare, Everson
Sponsor: Wood&Frieve Engineers

Abstract #A-2016-S1-32
The potential of modular construction is not currently being fully exploited due to the lack of research on the effect of
fire on the structural elements forming the modules. It is expected that the modules have a significant inherent fire
resistance, however as there is no data on the subject, fire rated plasterboard is extensively used to meet the fire
rating requirements of the relevant building code. This project will investigate the fire-structural behaviour of
modular construction. The finite element analysis will be conducted using previously developed numerical
methodology. Abaqus finite element program will be utilised in this study. The project has got an industrial partner
and will provide a real world engineering experience.
Keywords: Finite Element, Fire, Structural Analysis.

Figure 32: Caption has not been provided by the Master student.

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Page 42

Application Of Autonomous Systems In Infrastructure And


Assets Management
Banerjee, Shashank
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: Management (MC226)
First Research Supervisor: Simic, Milan
Second Research Supervisor: Elbanhawi, Mohamad

Abstract #A-2016-S1-33
In the world we live in today, there is no speculation on the fact that technology is an ever growing platform.
However, while there has been more than significant development on that front, we also witness ecosystem and habitat
loss occurring on a large scale across the globe. However, in recent times, we observe an environmentally conscious
trend that attempts to implement technological feats to help arrest this depletion. Addressing the apparent issue of
rapidly decreasing habitat types and consequently the risk of species extinction in Australia, this project focuses on
the construction and monitoring of predator proof fences by means of autonomous systems. A mere 2.5 hours west of
Melbourne, the volcanic plains grasslands is where the organisation in question proposes to build a predator proof
enclosure for native animals that are currently extinct in the wild. While predator proof fences have come a long way
over the years in terms of effectiveness, evidence suggests that they may most definitely be infiltrated. Thus it is
unambiguous that regular monitoring of fences to check for damaged / breached areas is crucial in ensuring the safety
of an enclosure. Fence monitoring in Australia is predominantly carried out by means of manual monitoring wherein
respective personnel physically inspect the fences for damages and breaches in the enclosure. This process has proven
to be not only tedious, but also significantly expensive, manpower dependent, time consuming and most of all, is
subject to human error. In lieu of existing systems, it is seen that fence monitoring may resort to autonomous systems
that implement remote sensing technology. By detecting the energy reflected from the ground surface, remote sensors
mounted on Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) may be used in scanning to collect real-time data / imagery over a
fairly wide area span. UAVs may be programmed to fly autonomously through software-controlled flight plans of the
specified area which operate in conjunction with an on-board GPS, video transmitters and wireless routers. Although,
the implementation of UAVs, depending on their type and application, can also present certain constraints in terms of
range, capacity and their inability to be unobtrusive / inconspicuous to a wildlife environment. The project, presented
as a business case, shall strive towards developing and implementing an autonomous fence monitoring system for the
Australian volcanic grasslands that would primarily prove to reduce the manpower and cost input required to keep
feral animals out of the enclosed area. This may be achieved by reviewing of existing technology in the field,
identifying key constraints and thereby proving solutions that would satisfy all criteria. Particular focus shall also be
placed on analyzing how best these autonomous systems may be managed by the respective organisation / authorities
to prove their feasibility on a long-term basis.
Keywords: Autonomous Systems, Fence Monitoring, Remote Sensing, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV), Asset
Management.

Figure 33: An example of a UAV Quadcopter being used in Fence Monitoring Systems. (Courtesy:
iHLS, http://i-hls.com/)

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Page 43

Synthesis Of Silver Sulphide Quantum Dots


Sanchez Ochoa, Cesar Manuel
Course: OENG1090 (24CP, Masters Research Project Part 2)
Program: Sustainable Energy (MC229)
First Research Supervisor: Tachibana, Yasuhiro
Second Research Supervisor: Shabani, Bahman

Abstract #A-2016-S1-34
Solar power is one of the most popular renewable energy sources at the moment. It allows the incident solar radiation
to be transformed into electricity, so it can be used fulfil our necessities. The energy conversion is achieved by the use
of semiconductors. These materials form what is called p-n junction, which provides an electrical field that allows the
exited electrons to move from the p-type semiconductor to the n-type, leaving behind a vacancy or hole. After that,
the panel is capable of send the electrons through an external circuit to generate electricity and finally fill the
vacancies left earlier in the process (Srensen, 2007).
The semiconductor used in these panels can be made from different materials. The most popular solar cells in the
market are made of silicon, one of the most abundant elements on earth. Crystalline silicon, multi or mono crystalline,
solar cells have achieved efficiencies up to 25% but, unfortunately, commercially available units just reach values
between 15%-18%. One of the main problems that this technology faces is its production cost because the process
involved is very energy demanding (Reddy, 2012).
On the other hand, thin film technology present a suitable alternative to crystalline silicon solar cells. Cadmium
Telluride and CGIS solar cells are the main technologies representing this type of solar cells. CdTe solar cells have a
band gap of 1.45 eV which allows it to adapt very well to the sunlight spectrum, also it can be deposited with simple
techniques that lower the cost of the solar panel. However, these technologies also have their consequences: Cadmium
is toxic for humans and Indium is a very rare element which will (probably) increase the cost of CGIS panels in the
future (McEvoy et al., 2012).
Over the past years, nanostructures have been in the spotlight of scientists because of their electrical, mechanical,
optical and thermal properties that surpass their bulk counterparts (Mishra et al., 2014). For that reason, these
nanostructures or nanocrystals show a great potential for photovoltaics solar cells. Various compounds, like
Cu2ZnSnS4, Cu2SnSe3, Cu2ZnxSnySe1+x+2y, Fe2S, Cu2FeSnS4, and SnS, have shown promising results to find a
new materials with appropriate physical properties for photovoltaics (van Embden et al., 2013).
Project Objectives
* To synthetise silver sulphide quantum dots in the laboratory * To measure the absorption coefficient the silver
sulphide quantum dots * To determine the band gap of the silver sulphide quantum dots * To study the possibility of
using silver sulphide as a semiconductor for photovoltaic purposes
The methodology used in this project will be mainly an experimental analysis of the synthesis of the quantum dots,
but will also be used a theoretical analysis to check and compare the results obtained.
Experimental analysis of the synthesis of the antimony sulphide quantum dots will be held in the laboratories of RMIT
City Campus. The characterisation of the semiconductors will be made by microscopy measurements to determine the
size of the dots and UV-Vis Absorption Measurements to determine the absorption coefficient of the material.
On the other hand, the theoretical analysis will made by, comparing the results with the literature. Tools like the
library search of the RMIT and Scifinder to find previous and/or related works that could help to validate and identify
the discrepancies of the project.
Keywords: Quantum Dots, Nanoparticles, Lead Sulphide, Silver Sulphide, UV-Vis.

Figure 34:
Quantum Dots samples.
(Courtesy:
Royal Society
http://www.rsc.org/chemistryworld/News/2005/September/19090501.asp)

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of

Chemistry,

Page 44

Application Of Autonomous Systems In Infrastructure And


Asset Management - A Business Case Proposal Of
Monitoring Of Fences In Tiverton Grasslands
Arumugam, Dushyanthan
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: Management (MC226)
First Research Supervisor: Simic, Milan
Second Research Supervisor: Elbanhawi, Mohamad

Abstract #A-2016-S1-35
Inhabited continents on a large scale are facing the problems of ecosystems and habitat loss which has lead to
environmental concerns on how to solve this problem by means of more sophisticated technological solutions. In
Australia there has been a rapid decrease of the natural range of remaining habitat types, there is a rising threat to
extinction of certain species and plants that are occupying those habitats. Volcanic Plains Grasslands which is located
at 2.5 hours west of Melbourne is facing a similar problem due to feral cats and foxes entering into the current
enclosure and pose a threat to native species in that area. The project focus on a suitable solution to prevent this
extinction by construction safe and cost efficient predator proof fences and also monitoring systems for it using
autonomous systems. Predator proof fencing has been implemented in recent years in Australia but its effectiveness
has been questioned due to recent events and also regular monitoring of these fences is being done by manual
manpower which is more time consuming and also is expensive. This project presented as a case study will focus on
how to develop a cost effective fencing system and also implement suitable autonomous systems such Unmanned
Aerial Vehicles (UAV) for monitoring these fences by reviewing the existing literature and identifying the key issues
that could help in resolving and satisfying our criteria.Importance will be given on how these proposed systems can
prove to be more feasible to manage for the respective organisations on a long term basis taking into considerations
the risks involved.
Keywords: Autonomous Systems, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV), Unmanned Aerial Systems, Fence Monitoring,
Remote Sensing, Asset Management.

Figure 35: A typical Unmanned Aerial Vehicle used for monitoring purposes. (Courtesy: Airdrone
Technology, http://droneq.blogspot.com.au)

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Page 45

To Increase Life Of A Spark Plug In Natural Gas Engine


Borse, Rohit Nimbadas
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: Manufacturing (MC224)
First Research Supervisor: Lappas, Petros
Second Research Supervisor: Edsell, Jon
Sponsor: RMIT UNIVERSITY

Abstract #A-2016-S1-36
In natural gas engines, erosion of spark plug occurs more frequently in thousand kilometers as compared to internal
combustion engine. Failure of spark plug occurs due to number of factors such as oil which is used in natural gas
engine, incomplete combustion of fuel and material used in a spark plug electrode. our aim is to test different types of
spark plugs on an engine. The engine on which we are going to perform tests is natural gas engine with single
cylinder. Tests are to be performed at 2000 rpm with power output 15 kilo watt. The test engine is situated in Green
Engine Laboratory at Bandoora campus RMIT.
Keywords: Life Of Spark Plug, Complete Combustion.

Figure 36: Ignition of spark plug

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Page 46

Additive Manufacturing Business Case


Modh, Shreyas Ramakantbhai
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: Manufacturing (MC224)
First Research Supervisor: Taylor, David
Second Research Supervisor: Easton, Mark

Abstract #A-2016-S1-37
The project is about the calculating and producing cost model of a output product from the Additive Manufacturing
machine, involving all the details such as labour cost, maintenance cost, energy cost, and so on. The project will also
deal with how the profit of the final part can be maximize by taking various different variables such as production
waste, raw material, etc. in consideration. We will try to implement various different techniques under the guidance of
our supervisors which can aid in increasing the profit of the parts and reducing cost of other variables.
Keywords: Cost Modeling, Profit, Cost Reduction.

Figure 37: Basic cost model for a Fused Deposition Modelling machine

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Page 47

Develop A Cost Model For KUKA Made CNC Center


Installed At Capral Aluminium By Considering Machine
Capability
Saraf, Siddhesh Shripad
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: Manufacturing (MC224)
First Research Supervisor: Taylor, David
Second Research Supervisor: Ding, Songlin
Sponsor: CAPRAL

Abstract #A-2016-S1-38
Capral is manufacturer and distributor for various types of aluminium extrusion throughout Australia. Recently
Capral has installed a CNC machine centre with the use of KUKA KR 120 R2700 extra HA robotic arm with a linear
bed of 19.5meters length of the same company. The primary purpose of this CNC is to mill the extruded product to
achieve value adding. During its operation, till day, it has been observed Capral is losing some amount of revenue
either by under quoting the price or loss of contract due to over-quoting. Currently, the pricing of KUKA CNC
machine centre is decided based on SAP transaction. Hence, Capral insists that there should be a more sophisticated
cost model which could minimise the error as compared to SAP. The request was also received to generate a detailed
view of the estimate which would preferably determine the time and value of each activity occurring in the
manufacturing.
Keywords: Aluminium Extrusion, KUKA KR 120 R2700 Extra HA Robotic Arm, KUKA KL 2000 Linear Bed.

Figure 38: Developing Cost Estimation Model For CNC Machining Center (Photo Credits: KUKA
robotics)

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Page 48

Assess The Suitability Of Domestic Solar Thermal Energy


Applications In Relation To The Seasonal Output Of A
Scheffler Fixed Focus Concentrator
Berry, Daniel Simon
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: Sustainable Energy (MC229)
First Research Supervisor: Paul, Biddyut
Second Research Supervisor: Castelletto, Stefania

Abstract #A-2016-S1-39
This premise of this masters research project is that the Scheffler Reflector is able to provide sufficient heat output
throughout the year to be a beneficial source of renewable energy (as evaluated at Melbourne, Australia) for domestic
applications. Applications for the Scheffler heat output can be tailored to various regions environment and
community needs if the climate and context is well mapped. There is limited quantitative performance data for
commercial Scheffler Reflector systems. As a result one of the key elements missing from published studies is the
variation of usable solar thermal output from a Scheffler concentrator due to seasonal change. By utilizing climate
data, theoretical models and experimental data, the research project aims to better match applications to differing
levels of solar output. Key research objectives include: *Assess the capacity of a Scheffler Reflector located at inner
Melbourne (CERES Environment Park, Brunswick East) to provide a usable solar heat source for various domestic
and commercial applications *Map experimental thermal output values with climate data *To assess the application
options throughout the annual climate conditions *Utilize model to recommend potential applications for different
global sites
Keywords: Solar Thermal; Scheffler Reflector; Concentrating Solar;.

Figure 39: Scheffler Reflector at CERES Environment Park, Brunswick East. (Image by Author)

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Page 49

INVESTIGATION, OPTIMISATION AND DESIGN OF


WOMANS AUSTRALIAN RULES FOOTBALL BALL
Kally, Ridgleigh
Course: OENG1089 (24CP, Masters Research Project Part 1)
Program: International Sports Technology (MC190)
First Research Supervisor: Fuss, Franz
Second Research Supervisor: Fuss, Franz

Abstract #A-2016-S1-40
This project will desire to ultimately provide the AFLs womens division with a unique and optimal football that will
suit their characteristics and traits within the sport, rather than using a downsized football scaled from the
professional male division. This study will also provide an insight as well as critical data and analysis into optimal ball
design for the sport of AFL specifically regarding the Womens AFL division. The analysis will involve data collection
of the general population as well as the athletes themselves. Each prototype football will be meticulously tested within
the RMT wind tunnel for an optimal high end product. It is expected that through this detailed research, design and
production that a platform will be created for future research within the industry and therefore greater product
development across the AFL in the future. Finally it is hoped this research will also provide a platform, justification
and lead to significant further development within female sports equipment, not only within the female AFL division
but the wider professional female environment.
Keywords: Womans Football, AFL, Australian Football League, Optimisation , Design.

Figure 40: 3D Model of Female AFL Ball Prototype.

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Page 50

The Right To Energy: Is A Global Standard Possible


Moyo, Sibonginkosi Abigail
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: Management (MC226)
First Research Supervisor: Stasinopoulos, Peter
Second Research Supervisor: NOT SPECIFIED BY THE MASTER STUDENT
Sponsor: Engineers Without Borders Australia

Abstract #A-2016-S1-41
This project is a humanitarian engineering project,one that will analyse the provision of energy in refugee camps.
There will be various objectives addressed in this project.The first objective is to find the social factors that affect
energy demand in different regions of the world. The second objective is studying global energy use to be able to
determine differences in pattern of energy use. Another objective of the project is try and establish a minimum
standard that an individual is entitled to in a refugee camp. Also, to provide an increased understanding of the
current state of energy provision in refugee camps.
All the data collected will be used to create a model that can be used by the United Nations Human Rights Council to
forecast energy demand when planning refugee camps in the future. Additionally, there will a case study of two
refugee camps Dadaab in Kenya and Zaatari in Jordan.
The research methodology will be a mixture of data analysis and theoretical experimentation. This research will look
at energy demand of households worldwide with a special focus on Somalia and Syria,where most of the refugees in
Dadaab and Zaatari were before they were displaced by the conflicts that arose in those countries. Additionally there
will be some research questions addressed. Research questions such as: 1. Are there security concerns in regards to
energy provision? 2. Does UNHRC provide their own devices such a computers for refugees to use?
Keywords: Energy, Refugees, Objective, Data Analysis.

Figure 41: Picture of Earth with socket with unplugged plug. (Courtesy:ELBLOGVERDE website
,http://elblogverde.com/ahorrar-energia/)

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Page 51

The Role Of Strategic Management In Small To Medium


Sized Companies
Lyu, Chenchao
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: Management (MC226)
First Research Supervisor: John, Sabu
Second Research Supervisor: Bil, Cees

Abstract #A-2016-S1-42
Large corporations always embark the analyse of strategic management in order to run more successful. However,
there are less small business managers embarking on strategic analyses of their small business, because the benefits
(financially, operationally and otherwise)are not always clear. In addition, they dont know how to do strategic
management to improve themselves. This project will involve to discuss the different models of strategic analyses, for
example, the ESC (environment, strategy and capability) and etc. Also, it will investigate the gap from smaller sized
organisation to medium sized organisation, like environment, capacity and so on. Then, it will do the investigation of
a case study about a small business. It will find the gap of smaller-to-medium for this specific small business and
discuss them, like financial, human resources, training and so on. Then, it will build a model of strategy management
for the development of business. In addition, there are some recommendations provided for the smaller company to
expand its business for being medium sized. The purpose of this project will be assessment of the benefit or otherwise
to these organisations of doing their own strategic analysis. Also, it will provide a model of strategic management for
these smaller organisations to develop their business. A mapping of the benefits (financial or otherwise) to the type of
strategic analysis done will be made.
Keywords: Strategy, Management, Balanced Score Card Approach.

Figure
42:
The
basic
concepts
of
Strategic
management.
https://ronnyfch.files.worldpress.com/2008/04/manajemen-strategik-p1.pdf)

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(Courtesy:

Page 52

Life Cycle Assessment Of Synthetic Rubbers Used In


Automotive Applications
Alharbi, Mohammed Abdullah H
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: Manufacturing (MC224)
First Research Supervisor: Stasinopoulos, Peter
Second Research Supervisor: Shiwakoti, Nirajan

Abstract #A-2016-S1-43
Synthetic rubbers are commonly used materials in the automotive industry applications such as cables, hoses, drive
belts and tires. These Materials stand out as an interesting area of research due to their ability to be fabricated via
wide variety of methods and delivering a number of physical properties. Synthetic rubbers in general are always used
in composite parts; therefore separation from other parts is needed before recycling. This often requires a manual
dismantling and separating from composites, which can be a complex and a costly process. As a result, expect for
tires, recycling is neglected and the components end up at the landfills. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the
environmental impact of synthetic rubbers application in automotive applications via applying Life cycle assessment
(LCA) technique. A specific synthetic rubber or more would be used as primary example. SRs fall under
non-Biodegradable materials and are by- product of raw materials derived from petroleum, coal, oil, natural gas, and
acetylene, thus it has a potential impact on environment throughout different stages of its life cycle. Therefore, The
LCA study using LCA software will contribute to current literature by quantifying the environmental impact of SRs.
Keywords: Life Cycle Assessments, LCA, Synthetic Rubbers, Automotive.

Figure 43: Life Cycle assessment of a Synthetic Rubber component

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Page 53

Design And Optimisation Of A Female AFL Ball


Marshall, Jordan Elliot
Course: OENG1089 (24CP, Masters Research Project Part 1)
Program: International Sports Technology (MC190)
First Research Supervisor: Fuss, Franz
Second Research Supervisor: Fuss, Franz

Abstract #A-2016-S1-44
This project will desire to ultimately provide the AFLs womens division with a unique and optimal football that will
suit their characteristics and traits within the sport, rather than using a downsized football scaled from the
professional male division. This study will also provide an insight as well as critical data and analysis into optimal ball
design for the sport of AFL specifically regarding the Womens AFL division. The analysis will involve data collection
of the general population as well as the athletes themselves. Each prototype football will be meticulously tested within
the RMT wind tunnel for an optimal high end product. It is expected that through this detailed research, design and
production that a standardised platform will be created for future research within the industry and therefore greater
product development across the AFL in the future. Finally it is hoped this research will also provide a platform,
justification and lead to significant further development within female sports equipment, not only within the female
AFL division but the wider professional female environment.
Keywords: Design Optimisation, Female, Football, AFL.

Figure 44: 3D Model of Female AFL Ball Prototype.

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Page 54

Application Of Autonomous Systems In Infrastructure And


Assets Management Throughput And Traffic Control
Optimisation On Freeways
Rampinelli Rota, Bruno Carlo
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: Integrated Logistics Management (MC227)
First Research Supervisor: Simic, Milan
Second Research Supervisor: Elbanhawi, Mohamad

Abstract #A-2016-S1-45
The project focuses on Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITSs) and future applications in Freeways. In particular,
the thesis will cover state of the art technologies for traffic control in highways with the specific aim of studying
vehicles throughput at toll plazas. In order to create a real study case, the paper uses as a model, the new Italian
freeway BREBEMI, which connects the city of Brescia and Milan. Using quantitative data collected in previous
years, the paper discusses three different toll plaza designs. The first model reflects the present design, the second and
the third ones present technological improvements associated with RFID technologies and Autonomous Systems. In
particular, the third case proposes the design of a Free Flow Freeway, characterised of unmanned vehicles . The paper
shows different vehicles throughputs associated with these three cases. In order to present a mathematical model and
write an optimisation algorithm, the study uses the software IBM ILOG CPLEX Optimization Studio, which points
out the advantages of Open Road Tolling (ORT). Due to the fact that UGVs can create a constant traffic flow, which
is also useful to create the mathematical model, the thesis discusses communication between UGVs with other vehicles
and infrastructures in transportation networks, such as VANET. Finally, the project shows the advantages of
integrating the technologies discussed, in order to mitigate congestions, maximise throughput and avoid accidents.
Keywords: Autonomous Systems, Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV), Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV), Unmanned
Floating Vehicle (UFV), Unmanned Underwater Vehicle (UUV), Infrastructure, Power Lines, Industrial Sites,
Agriculture Complex.

Figure 45: Open road tolling (ORT) in freeways. (Courtesy: VITRONIC, http://www.vitronic.com/)

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Page 55

Customizing Shoe Sole Fit Through CAD-FEM Modeling


Kloster, Jerrit
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: International Sports Technology (MC190)
First Research Supervisor: Pang, Toh Yen
Second Research Supervisor: Fuss, Franz

Abstract #A-2016-S1-46
Project description: Shoe sole is one of the most important components of footwear. The proposed project will be
focused on customizing the shoe sole design based on foot user-centered shape/size, structural design and materials to
improve fit, perceive comfort and performance. The project involves: - setting up the scanning studio (photography
techniques), - repairing the scanned data (reverse engineering) - developing FE model of the foot using scan images conducting FEA Equipment/Software - CATIA, Abaqus - 3D scanner Through this project, the student will: Conduct research and identify the requirements to optimize the shoe sole design to achieve the highest performance,
quality, and eco-efficiency. - Predict and evaluate the mechanical performance of product design using a range of
computer-aided engineering tools, taking into consideration the limitations of the modelling techniques.
Keywords: Customized Equipment; Sports Shoes.

Figure 46: Finite element modeling of the human foot and footwear. (Courtesy: Cheung, J. T. M., &
Zhang, M. (2006, May), In ABAQUS users Conference, pp. 145-159).

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Page 56

Additive Manufacturing In Production


Grisanti Bravo, Maria Elena
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: Management (MC226)
First Research Supervisor: Bateman, Stuart
Second Research Supervisor: Dilag, Jessirie

Abstract #A-2016-S1-47
Additive Manufacturing (AM) is a technology that allows the fabrication of a component or product via a layer by
layer process based on a three dimensional computer model (3D CAD model). Furthermore, the use of this technology
allows more design flexibility, reproduction of complex shapes, use of different raw materials, reduction of tooling and
fixtures, decrease in product life cycle times, among other advantages. Consequently, additive manufacturing
techniques have long been used for prototyping and is now growing in use for the production of personalised and niche
products (mass customisation). Moreover, recent research has shown that additive manufacturing technology for
production of small volumes is more effective from a cost perspective. Firstly, this project will review the current
literature describing the different costs involved in the implementation of additive manufacturing. This work will make
an emphasis in cases extracted from the literature where the use of additive manufacturing for production has proved
to be cost-effective. Then, this project will explore the challenges, advantages and pitfalls faced by a company
considering using additive manufacturing for production in the context of different industry segments. Finally, the
project will attempt to develop a strategic framework for producing products by additive manufacturing including a
cost benefit analysis.
Keywords: Additive Manufacturing, Production, Prototyping.

Figure 47: Stratasys Industrial scale 3D printing factory Minnesota, USA. (Courtesy: 3D Printing
Industry, https://3dprintingindustry.com/)

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Page 57

An Affordable Device For Assessment Of Weight Distribution


Throughout The Golf Swing
Cron, Samuel Frederick
Course: OENG1089 (24CP, Masters Research Project Part 1)
Program: International Sports Technology (MC190)
First Research Supervisor: Fuss, Franz
Second Research Supervisor: Weizman, Udi

Abstract #A-2016-S1-48
To describe the sport of Golf as a sequence of compounded intricacies would be a colossal understatement. The game
is meticulous and awfully unforgiving in nature. The smallest changes in the most minute details of a Golfers swing
can have dire consequences on the quality of the shot and its outcome. A 2012 study confirmed postural setup, namely
weight distribution, and the transfer of weight throughout a golf swing as two variables of the highest importance to
Professional Golf Coaches when coaching athletes of all skill levels.
Therefor, a device for the assessment of weight distribution throughout a golf swing that is affordable for coaches of all
golf demographics would serve a great purpose.
Unfortunately, current technologies that serve a similar function present a cost to the consumer upwards of 3000USD.
Using new technologies, this project was created to birth a device capable of quantifying the amount of pressure
exerted on the ground by the front and rear of both of the users feet, for a significantly lower cost (estimated to be less
than 150USD)
A total of 4 pressure sensors comprised of piezoelectric material, placed inside synthetic turf (aimed at mimicking a
golf mat) will be implemented for the athlete to stand on top of. A single microcontroller and Bluetooth transceiver
will be coded to give the following visual outputs to the user: - The percentage of weight being placed in the front foot
versus the rear foot. - The percentage of weight being placed in the front of each individual foot versus its rear, for
both feet.
Initial testing is to be conducted in a laboratory setting, in which a collection of professional golfers will perform full
golf swings. Ground Reaction Force (GRF) data will be captured using a 3-Dimensional Kistler Force Plate
throughout these swings. This GRF data will be used as dry data, which will be used to formulate the desirable
readings for the new device.
The new device will then be engineered and manufactured. Its testing will consist of ensuring calibration is correct
and data output is desirably accurate.
*Please Note: As the project is still in its absolute early phases, the aforementioned details are likely to change over
the course of the coming year*
Keywords: Piezoelectric, Pressure Sensor, Microcontroller, Kistler, Golf, Weight Transfer, Balance.

Figure 48: Jason Day in action at the 2015 Augusta Masters, displaying the intensely descriptive relationship between the feet and ground throughout the golf swing.
(Courtesy:
Gazette, http://www.post-gazette.com/sports/golf/2015/04/19/Golf-notebook-Jason-Day-jumpingfeet-first-into-shoe-technology/stories/201504190123)

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Page 58

Mesh Size Effects Of FEM Models On Damage And Failure


Characteristics
Koerfer, Felix
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: International Automotive Engineering (MC160, MC230)
First Research Supervisor: Takla, Monir
Second Research Supervisor: Bulla, Marian
Sponsor: Altair Engineering GmbH

Abstract #A-2016-S1-49
Project Justification/vision: A literature review has shown that there is a research gap for a suitable length regulation
method concerning finite element failure and damage modeling. There is the need for an approach which hits the
target of being not too much focused on microstructural effects by taking different states of stress into account. As
Computer aided design (CAE) is nowadays the main tool in product development processes, because it provides time
and cost reduction and a huge amount of lightweight potential, the scope of the project is highly related to the needs
of the industry. Especially the automotive industry, where in the field of passive safety the explicit Finite Element
Method (FEM) is used to fulfil the legal requirements and to optimize Crash performance, will have a profit of an
improved regulation of the mesh dependency. Project Aims and Objectives: The aim of the project is to investigate
the mesh dependency effect of strain dependent FE failure models to come up with an improved method for length
regulation which is suitable for element sizes which are currently used in the automotive industry. The new regulation
approach will be tested by the two explicit crash solvers Abaqus/Explicit and Radioss, as both solvers providing the
users the possibility of programming own material models in the programming language FORTRAN. Research
Question: The research question is how the mesh dependency interacts with the state of stress elements are
experiencing during their fracture, especially under shear and biaxial tension stress. Research Hypotheses: To
minimize the mesh dependency by a length regulation method, a reference characteristic element length as parameter
to scale the failure curve is not sufficient enough; the state of stress has to be taken into account as an additional
parameter to improve failure behavior of a strain dependent failure criteria. Experimental Approach/Data Collection:
The base for the investigation are experiments which needs to been done to generate valid data to investigate the
research questions and to proof the research hypothesis.
Keywords: Finite Element Method; FE-Failure-Criteria; Mesh-Dependency; Element-Length-Regularisation.

Figure 49: Aluminium Bi-Failure curve lenght regulated by triaxiality weight function.

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Page 59

Future Of Inflight Entertainment System(Literature Review)


Yedhukulesh, Vineesh
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: Aerospace and Aviation (MC225)
First Research Supervisor: Wild, Graham
Second Research Supervisor: NOT SPECIFIED BY THE MASTER STUDENT

Abstract #A-2016-S1-50
This research aims to study the present day inflight entertainment system and analyse the drawbacks (e.g. wifi,
movies, games, shopping, etc.). The main idea in this research is to give the passenger what exactly he/she wants.
Considering different age groups and sex examine the optimum trajectories for access-to-space with various objectives
and constraints (e.g. payload, flight time, dynamic pressure) via various propulsion options (e.g. turbojets, scramjets,
rockets). It will identify control strategies and key design factors for various missions to enable economical and
reusable space transport systems such as RBCC spaceplanes of JAXA and launch vehicles with aerodynamic
manoeuvre. The study is to be primarily performed analytically with pseudo-spectral methods (in conjunction with
evolutionary algorithms) on MATLAB.
Keywords: Inflight Entertainment, Future Of Inflight Entertainment, Travel Pleasure.

Figure 50: Future of IFE.

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Page 60

Exploring Post Disaster Relief Management Of Bushfires In


Australia
Pandit, Nikhil
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: Management (MC226)
First Research Supervisor: Kumar, Arun
Second Research Supervisor: Shiwakoti, Nirajan

Abstract #A-2016-S1-51
The project involves emerging topic of humanitarian logistics and supply chain, focussing on quick delivery of correct
amounts of people, monetary resources and goods to the right location to gain success of relief efforts in natural
disaster such as Bush Fires in Australia. The thesis focusses on how to exploring post disaster relief management of
Bushfires in Australia. Providing effective relief methods attributing to the blend of logistic expertise and proactive
response. Emergency transportation with logistical approach with planning problems that encapsulate multiple
objectives, uncertainty and dynamic constraints. The proposed project will deliver effective, robust and efficient
platform to major the performance of emergency transportation planning in disaster management in Australia during
bushfire disaster. Comparing the previous records to reform the new system of logistical approach in order to
determine the cause of inefficiency in the logistical approach, the project will eradicate the loose ends and provide
better solution and be well prepared for future disaster. The proactive response such as increase in net benefits from
delivering a material convergence of maximizing high priority and low priority flows and to determine how to maintain
impacts of non priority supplies. The challenges involved in the project is the local distribution of important goods,
supplies and equipments at the point of distribution. Developing a decision during disaster of relocating or evacuating
from the affected area considering internal factors that are part of the process.
Keywords: Humanitarian Logistics, Post Disaster Relief Management.

Figure 51: The impact of bushfire in Victoria, the role of disaster response and relief through logistics
and operation management.

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Page 61

Design Of Outer Structure Of Bionic Ankle Foot And


Preparation For Fabrication Using Selective Laser Melting
Technique
Ngamphaiboon, Hattaphol
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: Manufacturing (MC224)
First Research Supervisor: Trivailo, Pavel
Second Research Supervisor: Tariq, Madiha

Abstract #A-2016-S1-52
The project presents design of outer structure of bionic ankle foot and preparation for fabrication. The outer structure
of bionic ankle foot is open design for the purpose of leaving some space for other components such as motor, battery,
transmission, spring which will be added in future work. The outer structure of bionic ankle foot has complex
geometry which is difficult to fabricate by conventional manufacturing routes. Selective Laser Melting is a
manufacturing process to create three-dimensional parts by using laser to fuse powdered materials together in the
form of layer-by-layer stacking. Using layer-by-layer method allows SLM to create complex structure. The preparation
for fabrication using selective laser melting technique involves process of creating 3D model, export stl file, reparation,
slicing, material and process parameters selection. All processes have effects on mechanical properties of the fabricated
part. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the proper way and preparation for fabrication of the outer structure of
bionic ankle foot.
Keywords: Selective Laser Melting (SLM), Process Parameters, 3D Modelling, Humanoid.

Figure 52: Process of the design of outer structure of bionic ankle foot and preparation for fabrication.

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Page 62

Vehicle Body Structure Stiffness Influence On Diagonal


Distortion And Its Effects On NVH
Nobile Padron, Athos
Course: OENG1089 (24CP, Masters Research Project Part 1)
Program: International Automotive Engineering (MC160, MC230)
First Research Supervisor: Fard, Mohammad
Second Research Supervisor: Taube, Richard
Sponsor: Ford Motor Company Australia

Abstract #A-2016-S1-53
The purpose of the project is to study the effect that vehicle body torsion stiffness has on diagonal distortion and it
relation to known NVH issues. The objective is to find the relationship between the structure deformation and the
generation of chucking noise on one of the body openings.
To achieve this, a research will be conducted on vehicle structure and NVH fundamentals, as well as previous work, to
understand the variables involved and how they contribute to generate the issue.
With this information, a design of experiment (DOE) will be proposed. The DOE intends to determine possible
solutions, firstly in an analytical way by using different types of CAE models and then confirm the obtained results
physically by applying the solutions to an actual vehicle body.
The results will be analysed and compared to determine:
a) What is the contribution of some sections of the body structure to the torsional stiffness and how they influence on
the openings diagonal deformation b) Which variables contribute the most to create NVH issues c) What kind of
countermeasures or design actions can be implemented to improve the structure stiffness in certain parts of the body
d) How the applied measures affect the structure stiffness and whether or not they help to avoid the NVH issue or
aggravate it
Keywords: Vehicle, Body, Structure, Stiffness, Distortion, Diagonal, Noise, Static, Dynamic.

Figure 53: Example of D-Ring opening in CUV. (Taken from: Pol, A. and Naganoor, P., Torsion
Mode Achievement on BIW of Next Generation Land Rover - Freelander, SAE Technical Paper
2014-01-0005).

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Page 63

System Dynamics Modelling Of Australias Domestic Airline


Passenger Demand
Eapen, Ajay Thomas
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: Aerospace and Aviation (MC225)
First Research Supervisor: Wild, Graham
Second Research Supervisor: Stasinopoulos, Peter

Abstract #A-2016-S1-54
Air transport industry is the backbone of economic prosperity as it integrates both domestic and global marketplace.
Passengers travelling by air are increasing across Australia every year, and air travels relative affordability has allowed
it to become an integral part of peoples lives.
Forecasting airline passenger demand is essential for various decision-making, planning and operations in the airline
sector. For example, purchasing of an aircraft, assigning a flight crew, revenue management and so on, require reliable
information to support and make right decisions. Airline operation is a complex and dynamic system, which is
affected by various internal and external factors. Therefore, an efficient tool is required which takes all these factors
into consideration while forecasting air passenger demand.
System Dynamics is known for its rigorous approach in capturing interrelationships among variables and in handling
dynamic aspects of the system behaviour using stocks, flows, internal feedback loops, and time delays. It is also used
to model and generate scenarios for forecasting demand and evaluating policy scenarios, which will enable us to
understand the nonlinear dynamics behaviour in uncertain conditions.
This research will focus on developing a system dynamic model to forecast Australias domestic airline passenger
demand and identify the various factors affecting it.
Keywords: System Dynamics, Modelling, Forecasting, Domestic Airlines, Air Transport, Passenger Demand,
Australia.

Figure 54: Busiest domestic air routes in australia by passenger traffic . (Courtesy: gspvisualizer,
http://www.gpsvisualizer.com/)

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Page 64

LIFT MECHANISM REDESIGN


Panchal, Nikunj Dilipkumar
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: Manufacturing (MC224)
First Research Supervisor: Marzbani, Hormoz
Second Research Supervisor: Leary, Martin
Sponsor: Jayco

Abstract #A-2016-S1-55
Jayco, Inc. is Australias most recognised brand for quality and affordable recreational vehicles. The Jayco expanding
caravan uses a linkage with over-center locking to lift and lock the extension part of the caravan. There are two lifting
mechanisms, one at front end and other at rear end. Both linkages must be unfolded separately in order to completely
lift the extension part of the caravan. The mechanism is functional, but considerable force is require to completely lift
the extension part of the caravan. There are two lifting mechanisms and the clamps are provided to lock the extension
part of the caravan while the mechanism linkages are folded. There is a problem of misalignment of clamps after some
operation of folding and unfolding the linkages, which makes difficult to lock the the extension part of the caravan,
which in turn creates safety issues. This presents opportunities to reduce lifting effort and safety while meeting targets
for allowable spatial constraint and cost. The company is looking for the design concepts to satisfy these requirements,
improve customer perception while meeting safety and durability requirement and develop working prototypes to
prove the function of preferred concepts if possible.
Keywords: Design, Linkage, Mechanism.

Figure
55:
Jaycos
pop
top
model:
http://www.jayco.com.au/range/pop-tops/journey/).

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RMIT University, SENG 2016

Journey.

(Courtesy:

DRAFT: Masters Final Projects Conference, Semester-1 2016

JAYCO,

Page 65

Surface Modification Via Laser Direct Deposition


Chen, Long
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: Management (MC226)
First Research Supervisor: Qiu, Dong
Second Research Supervisor: Easton, Mark

Abstract #A-2016-S1-56
This project generally bases on an important, rapidly emerging, manufacturing technology that is alternatively called
additive manufacturing (AM). AM has the potential to revolutionize the global parts manufacturing and logistics
landscape. It enables distributed manufacturing and the productions of parts-on-demand while offering the potential
to reduce cost, energy consumption, and carbon footprint. Manufacturing systems are divided into many broad
categories, and this project will mainly base on the powder feed system which is one of them. In this system, powders
are conveyed through a nozzle onto the build surface. A laser is used to melt a monolayer or more of the powder into
the shape desired. This process is repeated to create a solid three dimensional components. The advantages of this
type of system include its larger build volume and its ability to be used to refurbish worn or damaged components or
biomedical applications. The tasks will be to optimise the manufacturing process and materials for a given end
property, such as: hardness, temperature resistance and strength. Evaluation and assessment of these properties will
also be expected.
Keywords: Additive Manufacturing, Surface Modification.

Figure 56: Generic illustration of an AM powder feed system. (Metal Additive Manufacturing: A
Review, by W.E. Frazier, 2014, Vol. 23 (6)).

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Page 66

Opportunities And Challenges Of Distributed Propulsion


Configurations
Burston, Martin Thorne
Course: OENG1089 (24CP, Masters Research Project Part 1)
Program: Aerospace and Aviation (MC225)
First Research Supervisor: Sabatini, Roberto
Second Research Supervisor: Gardi, Alessandro

Abstract #A-2016-S1-57
In efforts to increase aircraft fuel efficiency, lower emissions and reduced field lengths conventional discrete propulsion
systems can offer only incremental improvements. On the other hand, integration of the propulsion system with the
airframe - enabled by modern analysis tools, materials technology and control systems - holds the potential to greatly
increase aircraft performance by taking advantage of the positive interactions between the propulsion system and the
aerodynamics of the aircraft. Synergy between these two systems is maximised when the propulsion system is
distributed about the aircraft through the use of jet flaps, cross-flow fans, multiple discrete engines or using multiple
distributed fans driven by few engine cores. Recent advances in electric propulsion have encouraged the investigation
of airliners with multiple electric fans but powered by one or two gas turbine engines. This project provides a critical
review of the existing literature on the subject of distributed propulsion, identifying the benefits and drawback of the
technology, as well as the proposed applications for it. A method for quantitatively assessing these configurations will
be developed and tested on a notional representative aircraft configuration. From this, conclusions will be drawn
about the suitability of distributed propulsion for various applications and recommendations for future research and
development will be made.
Keywords: Advanced Propulsion, Aeroengines, Distributed Propulsion, MATLAB.

Figure 57: Conceptual blended wing body (BWB) aircraft utilising distributed hybrid-electric propulsion.

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Page 67

Comprehensive Study On The Parcel Locker As The Last


Mile Delivery Solution At Melbourne
Wilson Prabaharan, Elisha Dhanapaul
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: Manufacturing (MC224)
First Research Supervisor: Shiwakoti, Nirajan
Second Research Supervisor: Stasinopoulos, Peter

Abstract #A-2016-S1-58
When goods arrive at a freight station or port, they must then be transported to their final destination such as the
central business district. This last leg of the supply chain is often less efficient, comprising up to nearly 30% of the
total cost to move goods from manufacturer to freight station or port. This particular concern is known as the last
mile problem. Given the prediction that the Australian road freight task will be more than double between 2000 and
2020, it is important to consider the last mile problem in the context of city logistics. Due to e-commerces generic
specificity, its functioning on B2C market is based on home deliveries. In recent years very interesting and popular
solution became the parcel lockers as the efficient last mile delivery system. This thesis is focused on the analysis of
usability and efficiency of this measure based on the example of Australian post parcel lockers.
This research project will involve critically reviewing the existing literature on parcel lockers addressing last mile
problem in the context of city logistics. A synthesis of research findings followed by a case study with appropriate
model selection for this project.
Keywords: Urban Logistics; Supply Chain; Freight Distribution; And Parcel Lockers.

Figure 58: Parcel Lockers at Australia Post available 24/7 to collect parcels. (Courtesy: Auspost.com.au, 2016).

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Page 68

CAMPERVAN RETRACTABLE STEP REDESIGN


Nasir, Murtaza
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: Manufacturing (MC224)
First Research Supervisor: Marzbani, Hormoz
Second Research Supervisor: Leary, Martin
Sponsor: Jayco

Abstract #A-2016-S1-59
Jayco, Inc. is Australias most recognized brand for quality and affordable recreational vehicles. The Jayco camper
includes an extendable step that can be retracted during transport to improve ground clearance. The current design is
a robust galvanized steel construction that has been successful for many years, however the design is heavy and may
be difficult for some users to operate. User required to use considerable force to retract the extendable step and it
doesnt have a fail proof system which could inform the user if the step is completely out or still stuck. User also
required to pay attention while stepping on the extendable step as the edges of the extendable step are slippery. Also,
the step width is considerably small which also creates safety concerns for the user. Since, the extendable steps is
mounted rigidly on the chases of the camper, sometime there is an issue of misalignment of step with the door, which
is not appealing to the user. The company is looking for the design concepts where a step could be designed in such a
way which reduces the weight of the step, increases the width of the step and prevent the user from slip. This would
improve customer perception while meeting safety and durability requirement and develop working prototypes to
prove the function of preferred concepts if possible.
Keywords: Design, Linkage, Mechanism.

Figure 59:
JAYCO Camper van.
trailers/camper-trailer-details/)

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(Courtesy:

http://www.jayco.com.au/range/camper-

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Page 69

HYBRID BUS POWERED BY GAS TURBINE


Nanur Rameshwar, Arun Kumar
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: Manufacturing (MC224)
First Research Supervisor: Taylor, David
Second Research Supervisor: Trivailo, Pavel

Abstract #A-2016-S1-60
Emissions, Noise, Efficiency and power are the main concerns of different organizations and manufacturers all over the
globe. One such concern is in the field of transportation of mass which is the bus. The domestic passenger bus uses
the conventional diesel engine in which * It is subjected to varying loads (frequent start and stop) * It Utilizes lots of
space on chassis. * It has noise, vibrations and also emissions which is of primary concern Numerous research has been
conducted considering all the above factors to find alternate ways to drive the wheels, one such approach is the
Gas-turbine. The concept of gas turbine is a relic of the past however since world war its research and development till
date led in the application of jet engines and power generation. The conventional gas turbine has a compressor,
turbine and a combustion chamber. Initially atmospheric air is compressed and heated (usually by introducing and
burning fuel); these hot gases then drive an expansion turbine that drives both the inlet compressor and a drive shaft.
One end of the shaft is used to run a generator which intern drives the wheel using batteries. The main advantages of
using Gas-turbine in passenger bus is * The use of different kinds of fuel like CNG, LNG, landfill gases, biodiesel,
kerosene, propane, heating oil, and others to power a Gas turbine. * The weight and volume of the bus reduces
considerably. * In addition, the gas turbine will make for a smooth, comfortable ride for drivers and a quiet, clean
experience for neighbours because of its ultra-low vibration. The efficiency of the gas turbine is further increased by
the reuse of exhaust gases with the help of recuperator. The cost of maintenance for a gas turbine is less compared to
conventional diesel engines which will help both manufacturers and costumers likewise to step into greener tomorrow.
In future days the paper aims to validate the above theory with research to support the same.
Keywords: GAS TURBINE.

Figure 60: Caption has not been provided by the Master student.

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Page 70

3D Solid Modelling Of A Prostetic Leg For Transtibial


Amputees For Human Gait Emulation
Wang, Yuechen
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: International Automotive Engineering (MC160, MC230)
First Research Supervisor: Trivailo, Pavel
Second Research Supervisor: Tariq, Madiha

Abstract #A-2016-S1-61
This project aims at designing a 3D solid model of a human-like ankle-foot system primarily for amputees, which
would serve as a prosthetic substitute to facilitate their affected and abnormal life. The ankle-foot system design will
be based on the average (general) characteristics of a healthy human being, i.e. its size, weight and anatomical
structure also the angles of plantar flexion and dorsiflexion will be based on the data of a healthy human gait pattern,
for each of the four tasks angles will change and designed accordingly. The degrees of freedom of the system model
will be based on the selected planes of gait and number of joints incorporated
Keywords: Humanoid, 3D Modelling, Emulation, Gait.

Figure 61:
Volitional Control of a Powered Ankle-Foot Prosthesis.
http://kannape.com/projects/volitional-control-of-a-powered-ankle-foot-prosthesis/).

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(Courtesy:

Page 71

USE OF SOCIAL MEDIA IN DISASTER AND CRISIS


MANAGEMENT
Paturi, Ravi Teja
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: Management (MC226)
First Research Supervisor: Kumar, Arun
Second Research Supervisor: Shiwakoti, Nirajan

Abstract #A-2016-S1-62
This project looks to enhance information sharing crosswise over crisis administration associations about the powerful
employments of online networking for emergency correspondence. It recommends the foundation of a suport
framework that gives direction and heading on techniques to advance and keep up powerful data streams, to meet
crisis management associations objectives in times of emergency, for the advantage of the more wider population at
national, state and neighborhood levels.Social networking platforms, for example, Facebook and Twitter are currently
generally recognised as assuming an undeniably critical part in the scattering of data amid emergency occasions. They
are utilized by crisis administration associations and in addition by the general population to share data and counsel.
Be that as it may, the official utilization of online networking for emergency correspondence inside of crisis
administration associations is still generally new and specially appointed, as opposed to being efficiently installed
inside or adequately planned crosswise over organizations. This strategy report proposes an all the more successfully
planned way to deal with influence online networking use, including more grounded systems administration between
social networking staff inside of crisis administration associations. Encounters and bits of knowledge into the viable
utilization of online networking for emergency correspondence are yet to be shared efficiently crosswise over crisis
administration associations; such methodical maximizing so as to share could encourage better administration
reactions online networking adequacy in comparative circumstances
Keywords: PROJECT MANAGEMENT.

SMS

@ SMS
SMS

@
SMS

Figure 62: The Role of Social Media in Disaster & Crisis Management.

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Page 72

Characterization Of Natural Based Composites With


Nano-Cellulose Fibers
Periakali, Vaishnav
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: Aerospace and Aviation (MC225)
First Research Supervisor: Silva, Jose
Second Research Supervisor: Khatibi, Akbar Afaghi

Abstract #A-2016-S1-63
Title: Characterization of Natural based Composites with Nano-Cellulose Fibers
Because of their large scale abundance, their environmentally benign and renewable nature, and their extraordinary
physiochemical properties, the Cellulosic nanofibrillar structures has drawn huge amount of interest on their
integration into composite materials. The primary challenge consists in identifying an effective means of liberating
these cellulosic fibers from a variety of sources such as wood, bacterial cellulose, or agricultural residues. The second
challenge involves the compatibility of the cellulosic materials to that of the plastic material. The water-absorbing
characteristic of the cellulose, can also be serious concern in their composite material adhesion.
Project Objectives * To successfully extract the nano-cellulose fibers from a variety of plant sources. * To study the
characteristics of the nano-cellulose fibers by means of TEM, SEM, AFM, X-ray Diffraction and, several other
characterization techniques. * To control and understand the water-cellulose interactions of nanoscale particles, for
product properties modification. * To perform special treatments in order to improve the physiochemical properties of
the extracted Nano-cellulose fibers. * To develop a new nano composite material by successfully integrating the
Cellulose-nano fibers as reinforcements within the composite matrix. * To test the above obtained composite material
for its feasibility. * To examine the characteristics and properties of the resultant composite material. * To achieve
improved strength to weight ratio, increase their interfacial adhesion with matrix, reduce moisture absorption, and to
develop long-term stability * Reduce the cost of manufacturing, by reducing the amount of energy consumed and, the
cost associated in processing.
A survey of the recent works shows that, eventhough Cellulose based Nano-composites can be used in a vairety range
of applications, they have not been successfully able to find a replacement to the commercially available polymer
composites. So, in our research, we aim to develop a composite material with superior mechanical properties, which
can be a replacement to many of the commercially available synthetic composites.
Keywords: Composites, Nano-Cellulose Fibers, Characterization, Morphology, Swelling Properties.

Figure 63: Natural based Composites with Cellulose Nano-Fibers.

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Page 73

Development, Construction And Experimental Testing Of


The Control System For A 2 KW Power Supply Based On A
Unitised Regenerative Fuel Cell And Metal Hydride Storage
Gauta Burgos, John Edicson
Course: OENG1089 (24CP, Masters Research Project Part 1)
Program: Sustainable Energy (MC229)
First Research Supervisor: Andrews, John
Second Research Supervisor: Mafinejad, Yasser
Sponsor: DSTO

Abstract #A-2016-S1-64
This project is based on the design, construction and experimental testing for a 2Kw power supply using reversible
hydrogen fuel cell. The control system will be in charge of monitoring all the components of the project and control
their proper functioning. To control all the parameters involved in this project, it is necessary to measure every single
variable that may affect the result of the power supply. In this case sensors and actuators will be the electronic devices
that will be controlling and measuring the respective parameters to keep an ideal energy output. The control unit will
be based on a touch screen LCD and Arduino mega controller board which will send and receive all the signals and
measurements taken during the process. This project aims to have different operational modes in which the control
system will act in a different way. The Arduino mega controller board will also make possible the communication
between the power supply system and the operator. All the parameters measured will appear in the LCD as well as
the functioning mode.
Keywords: Control And Instrumentations System.

Figure 64: Hydrogen fuel cell. (Courtesy: : Warren Gretz - NREL Staff Photographer, United States
Department of Labor, https://www.osha.gov/)

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Page 74

Investigating The Evolution Of ICAO Annex 17 (Security)


From 1974 To 2011 Using Document Analysis
Jayasundara Pathirennehalage, Pubudu Rukshan Jayasu
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: Aerospace and Aviation (MC225)
First Research Supervisor: Wild, Graham
Second Research Supervisor: Baxter, Glenn

Abstract #A-2016-S1-65
Commercial aviation plays a crucial role in our daily lives and is an essential part of the global economy. The risk of
terrorism to aviation targets, aviation security has grown to become a substantial commercial, political, and social
influence in all over the World(5). Terrorist incidents-most notably 9/11, but also subsequent attempted attacks
throughout the world-have produced significant influence global civil aviation safety. Aviation safety measures and
policies have tightened significantly past decade and security cost of commercial aviation rising sharply over the past
years. This report review International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) and its Standard of Recommended
Practices (SARPs) and policies which are prepared by ICAO to establish and maintain safe, efficient, secure civil
aviation sector within its member states. Aviation security SARPs are mainly contained in Annex 17 and it has been
revised eight times from 1974 to 2006 in terms of unlawful interference in global aviation. This project focuses to
importance of aviation security and investigates how security measures and policies help to establish safe commercial
aviation system globally. Through this research investigate the evolution of annex 17-Security and analyze eight
editions of annex 17 from document analysis. Identify and analyze major amendments with regard to unlawful
interference which caused to make amendments.
Keywords: ICAO Annex 17, Security, Investigation.

Figure 65: Safeguarding Civil Aviation against Acts of Unlawful Interference. (Courtesy: ICAO,
http://www.icao.int/;https://opisworld.com/)

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Page 75

Design Thinking: Strategic Implementation Of The Ten


Tools In Engineering Design And Project Execution
Waterson, Dale Brendan
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: Management (MC226)
First Research Supervisor: Kootsookos, Alex
Second Research Supervisor: Leary, Martin

Abstract #A-2016-S1-66
Design Thinking is the paradigm under which true designers operate; they ideate, innovate, and iterate. It is the
process which turns a dream into a reality - often achieving far superior final results, leading to disruptive innovation,
and creating the products which will change the way a generation interacts with the outside world. Ten Design
Thinking Tools were identified which have broader applications beyond the realm of product design, and can have
positive influences in numerous situations from business management, to wicked problems including humanitarian
support efforts. This project investigates current engineering practices in the context of Design Thinking, and
identifies analogies of the Design Thinking Tools which have been implemented. Analysis of the application of Design
Thinking tools to engineering design and execution projects will be undertaken to determine if they provide the best
engineering solution and deliver the most cost effective outcome for the end user.
Keywords: Design Thinking Tools Engineering Project Construction Execution.

Figure
66:
Design
Thinking
Tools,
Stages
and
Processes.
www.class-central.com/mooc/649/coursera-design-thinking-for-business-innovation,
www.designthinking.co.nz)

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(Courtesy:
and

Page 76

Use Of Accelerometry For Motion Analysis


Minto, Cameron
Course: OENG1089 (24CP, Masters Research Project Part 1)
Program: International Sports Technology (MC190)
First Research Supervisor: Dabnichki, Peter
Second Research Supervisor: Pang, Toh Yen

Abstract #A-2016-S1-67
We have purchased a new system which uses three dimensional accelerometry and gravity sensors. The system needs
to be calibrated against gold standard motion analysis system(s). The project will involve data collection from moving
bodies and the data will be cross-validated against trajectory data in order to develop robust algorithms for trajectory
reconstruction. The project is a part of a larger research programme and will be robustly supported.
Keywords: Motion Analysis, Accelerometers, Sensors.

Figure 67: The Supercompensation Phenomenon curve. (Courtesy: John Freeslow, Physics of Life,
http://www.physicsoflife.pl/book/recenzje/fz-20091105-qbn-notkatechn-eng.html)

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Page 77

Design And Manufacturing Of The High-Speed Magnetic


Spindle
Bafkar, Omid
Course: OENG1089 (24CP, Masters Research Project Part 1)
Program: Manufacturing (MC224)
First Research Supervisor: Ding, Songlin
Second Research Supervisor: Ding, Songlin
Sponsor: Simplex - CNC company

Abstract #A-2016-S1-68
For magnetical control of the spindle, some factors need to be considered; Axial/radial forces, stiffness, and damping.
In this project, for the design purpose, some inspections about the axial/radial forces, displacement, and the natural
frequency have been considered. The finite element analysis method matured on four different Radial/Axial passive
magnetic bearings (PMB). According to the FEM, there is a direct relationship between the profile size of the passive
magnets and the generated force between the air gap of the stator and the rotor.
Keywords: High-Speed Spindle, Magnetic Bearing, Stiffness, FEM.

Figure 68: (Courtesy: COMSOL, https://www.comsol.com/blogs/modeling-magnetic-bearings-incomsol-multiphysics/ and TEKNIKER, F., http://www.tekniker.es/en/high-speed-milling-head-withmagnetic-fixing)

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Page 78

Development Of Semiconductor Quantum Dot Sensitised


Solar Cells
Lou, Jingjie
Course: OENG1089 (24CP, Masters Research Project Part 1)
Program: Sustainable Energy (MC229)
First Research Supervisor: Tachibana, Yasuhiro
Second Research Supervisor: Shabani, Bahman

Abstract #A-2016-S1-69
Increasing environmental problems have changed the peoples focus in terms of energy source selection. More and
more people show their interests in sustainable energy. Solar energy indicates a huge potential due to the energy
intensity of solar radiation. It is enough to meet one years human energy demand through only harvesting the energy
received by earth from solar radiation in one hour. Correspondingly, solar cell has been considered as a promising
solution. Quantum dots sensitized solar cell is the third generation of solar cell technology.This type of solar cells
break the limitation of silicon solar cells in respect to energy level. QDSSCs have changeable energy level.This
characteristic could highly improve the light absorption coefficient as a large part of light from the spectrum can not
be absorbed by traditional solar cells.Moreover, these kind of cells need less energy in terms of manufacturing and
fabrication processes can be simpler. These features make QDSSCs require lower cost in manufacturing procedures
comparing to traditional semi-conductor solar cells (based on P-N junction)and thin film solar cells.
However, the performance of current QDSSCs still can not compete with solid state solar cells.Improving the overall
efficiency of QDSSCs requires long-time efforts. In my case, preparation of film would be my first mission. This film is
basically composed of FTO glasses with TiO2 attached on its surface. FTO glasses are also worked as a electrode.
Measurements should be followed after fabrication, IPCE (incident photon conversion efficiency) and J-V Curve are
considered as important parameters when judging the performance of solar cells.
Keywords: Quantum Dots, Solar Cells.

Figure 69: Quantum dot sensitized solar cell .

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Page 79

Analysis & Optimisation Of Poly Ball Valve Through FEA


Daniel Alex, George
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: Manufacturing (MC224)
First Research Supervisor: Taylor, David
Second Research Supervisor: Mazur, Maciej
Sponsor: Philmac , South Australia

Abstract #A-2016-S1-70
Philmac is a global leader in the design and manufacture of specialist fittings and valves,The Philmac blue handled
ball valve has been servicing the Rural, Irrigation and Plumbing industries for over 20 years.The Philmac ball valve
offers 1600kPa pressure rating with the added benefits of a shouldered spindle and double o-rings this project The aim
of this project to reduce the amount of plastic used to make the manufacturing process more cost effective .The
technique that we are deploying for the same is by modifying the valve parameters especially thickness and ribs for
which we will be using FEA softwares for creating a model and analysis them followed by running simulations and
thereafter finding a correlation between the test environment with actual working environment followed by finalising
the optimised parameters for the final model.Softwares used will be abacus and auto cad,Time frame 12 weeks
Keywords: Poly Ball Valve , Reduction Of Raw Materials , Optimisation , FEA , Simuation.

Figure 70: Polyball valve. (Curtesy of Philmac, http://www.philmac.com.au/)

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Page 80

Fracture Toughness Of The Visco-Elastic Cork Particle


Reinforced Epoxy Composite
Saldanha, Keppler
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: Aerospace and Aviation (MC225)
First Research Supervisor: Silva, Jose
Second Research Supervisor: Blacklock, Matthew

Abstract #A-2016-S1-71
Cork is a natural product obtained every 9 years from the bark of an oak tree. Its unique properties such as
light-weight, rot resistant, fire resistant, softness, buoyancy and renewability have led to experiments with cork
composite materials for variety of applications, from wine bottles to aeronautics. Due to the properties of cork, the
behaviour of cork-epoxy composites is a matter of interest. The inclusion of visco-elastic cork particles improves the
fracture toughness of the epoxy resin, however the fracture toughness of this composite is inferior to that of carbon
fibre sandwich composites with cork core. Since strength to weight ratio is a major concern in the aerospace industry,
carbon-cork epoxy composites seem to promise a lot.
Keywords: Fracture Toughness, Visco-Elastic Cork Particle, Epoxy Adhesive, Carbon Fibre Sandwich Composite.

Figure 71: CFRP with Viscoelastic Cork Incusions. (Courtesy: http://www.nauticexpo.com/boatmanufacturer/core-material-22738.html)

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Page 81

Laser Processing Of New Biodegradable Zn-Based Alloys For


Medical Implants
Yu, Jiaqi
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: Manufacturing (MC224)
First Research Supervisor: Xu, Wei
Second Research Supervisor: Ding, Songlin

Abstract #A-2016-S1-72
Biodegradable metal (BM) has been widely applied to both scientific studies and medical applications for more than
decades. In order to meet the requirements of new generation biodegradable metallic implants for medical
applications, which require suitable corrosion rate and high mechanical strength of biodegradable metallic piece to
function under harsh biological environment that further study, is proposed. This project is focus on improvements of
pure zinc (Zn) and zinc-based alloys for future development in medical implantation due to the zinc experimental
results display soft and brittle characters. As potential BM, Zn-based alloy can be dissolved completely in host body
over period of time without residues, meanwhile support the local tissues during the early degradation stage without
compromise mechanical strength before it is fully metabolized by human body. The zinc is also an essential nutrient
for maintaining appropriate human body function and Zn-based alloys shown great ability over traditional Magnesium
(Mg) and Iron (Fe) based implants in terms of suitable corrosion rate, and biocompatibility. The Zn-based implants
were recently studied by few researches and potential sub-elements for alloying are considered including Magnesium
(Mg), Calcium (Ca) and strontium (Sr). This project is more focus on the impacts of laser processing on mechanical
properties and corrosion rate of different Zn-based alloys and pure zinc. The analysis of pure zinc and zinc-binary
alloys behavior in mechanical property, corrosion rate that associate with intermetallic phase under laser processing
will gives the comprehensive knowledge on future development of Zn-based BM. The study of laser processing in this
project mainly focus on two parts: One is pure Zn plate laser processing, which is to modify the scanning strategies to
enhance sample mechanical properties by using selective laser melting that allows rapid cooling rate during the
fabrication. The second part is to obtain the detailed comparisons between pure zinc and Zn-based alloys (Zn-Mg;
Zn-Ca; Zn-Sr) from tests. And the relationship between intermetallic phase and corrosion rate will be investigated as
an essential factor through entire processes. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) will be used to analyses data of
microstructures from samples and the project will be followed by XRD and corrosion testes to verify objectives and
hypothesis. In the end of the project the sample mechanical property, corrosion rate and manufacturing aspects will
be analyzed along with intermetallic phase and degradation rate, which will help future development of Zinc based
alloys for medical implantation.
Keywords: Key Words: Biodegradable Materials (BMs), Medical Implant, Zn-Based Alloys, Pure Zn, Zn-1X( Mg,
Ca, Sr) Alloys, Laser Processing, SLM, SEM.

Figure 72: The brief development processes of Laser processing of new biodegradable Zn-based alloys
for medical implants.

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Page 82

Ideal Mathematical Modelling Of The Szorenyi Rotary Engine


Espinosa Delgado, Luis Felipe
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: International Automotive Engineering (MC160, MC230)
First Research Supervisor: Lappas, Petros
Second Research Supervisor: Dorrington, Graham

Abstract #A-2016-S1-73
The Szorenyi Rotary Engine A four-chamber Otto cycle rotary engine, the Szorenyi Rotary Engine, has been patented
and is currently in the development stage. The geometric shape of the engine stator is mathematically defined but is
visually similar to the Wankel engine stator. The rotor is a rhombus which deforms as it rotates. The corners of the
rhombus remain in contact with the stator as the they rotate thus creating the four combustion chambers.
Modelling Required Predictions of the potential torque and power of the engine are required in order to decide on any
future development of the engine. The modelling task is to first mathematically represent the geometry of the
combustion chamber and to then simulate the thermodynamic behaviour of combustion as the chamber changes shape
throughout the power stroke. The modelling does not extend to predictions of volumetric efficiency, or losses from
friction or pumping effects.
Keywords: Ideal Modelling; Rotary Engine; Mathematical Simulation; Work; Power; Torque; Piston; Combustion.

Figure 73: Szorenyi Engine Concept.


http://sportingregister.org.au/)

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(courtesy: Gippsland Sporting and Classic Car Register,

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Page 83

Laser Processing Of New Biodegradable Zn-1X Binary Alloys


With Nutrient Alloying Elements Mg, Ca And Sr
Wan, Bowen
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: Manufacturing (MC224)
First Research Supervisor: Xu, Wei
Second Research Supervisor: Ding, Songlin

Abstract #A-2016-S1-74
Biodegradable metals have attracted a large amount of attentions from many universities and commercial
organizations in recent years. Compared with the early medical field metals such as Fe and Mg, Zn, an essential
element with osteogenic potential of human body, is studied and accepted widely as a new kind of potential
biodegradable metal currently. However, the experimental result displays highly purified Zinc metal is soft, brittle and
has low mechanical properties, which needs to be further improved for meeting the clinical requirements. In the quit
recently, the novel Zn based alloys with adding the nutrition elements Mg, Ca and Sr were designed and fabricated by
the traditional manufacture method such as cast, rolled and extruded. Their mechanical properties, microstructure,
degradation and in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility were studied by many researchers. However, till now, the study
of the microstructure, the mechanical properties and the corrosion behavior of pure zinc and Zn-based alloys
fabricated by the laser processing is lacking. There are several different presented in the laser processing compared
with the traditional thermal deformations. Firstly, the process parameter such as scanning speed, power and the size
of the spot can be changed easily. Secondly, the change of temperature difference in the laser processing is enormous
from more than 1000 C to room temperature in a quite short time, which result in that the surface of the workpiece
may transform to a martensite and the intermetallic phase structure could be changed due to the rapid cooling.
Therefore, in this project, the laser processing will be used to fabricate pure zinc and its alloys. Their mechanical
properties, microstructure and corrosion behavior will be analyzed.
Keywords: Biodegradable Metals, Zinc, Zn-Based Alloys, Laser Processing.

Figure 74: 2-Dimensional and 3-Dimensional Tomography Assessment of Absorbable Metal Scaffold
(Courtesy: https://auth.cardiosource.org/EasyConnect/Integration/Post.aspx/)

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Page 84

Identification Of The Release Of A Bowled Cricket Ball From


Aero-Torques Recorded With A Smart Cricket Ball
Vassiliadis, Dimitrios
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: International Sports Technology (MC190)
First Research Supervisor: Fuss, Franz
Second Research Supervisor: Doljin, Batdelger

Abstract #A-2016-S1-75
Since the advancing MEMS technology is not restriced by size and performance, there has been a variaty of
implementations in small sports equipment, which opens new pathways for understanding an athletes motion. The
smart cricket ball developed by the RMIT in 2011 is equipped with three high-speed MEMS gyroscopes which
measure the angular velocity about the three main axis and the time-dependend position of the spin axis.
Previous studies on the smart cricket ball show the existence of possible aero-torques in the data after the ball is
released from the hand of the bowler. In theory, those aero-torques are produced at release when the cricket ball leaves
the stable hand of the bowler and is hit by unstable windconditions. However, there is no scientific proof of when the
ball is released. Until now, it couldonly be estimated from data or obtained by motion tracking systems.
In order to identify the exact release point of the bowled cricket ball, a sprung flyweight governor is proposed: The
device will fit into a standard drilling machine that, when sped up and due to centrifugal force, releases the smart
cricket ball at a minimum of 15 revolutions per second into the wind tunnel. Other than the lay out design of
thegovernor, which includes the dimensioning of the masses and the spring connecting the two arms of the clamp, this
project will involve dry runs of the device (no aero-torquesshould be detected), testing in the wind tunnel, and a
post-analysis of the data by implementing an algorithm that detects the exact release of the cricket ball.
Keywords: Smart Cricket Ball, Motion Analysis, Release Point Identification, Wind Tunnel Testing.

Figure 75: Torque, angular velocity and the time-dependend position of the spin axis measured by
the RMIT smart cricket ball. (Courtesy: Lecture notes Franz Konstantin Fuss SmartEquipment03)

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Page 85

Using Thermocouples To Determine The Position Of Bat-Ball


Impact In Cricket
Kannangara, Lahiru Shanaka
Course: OENG1089 (24CP, Masters Research Project Part 1)
Program: International Sports Technology (MC190)
First Research Supervisor: Fuss, Franz
Second Research Supervisor: Weizman, Udi

Abstract #A-2016-S1-76
Cricket is a battle between the batsman and the bowler. The bowler bowls the ball at the batsman, trying to get them
out and to restrict them from scoring runs. The batsman is required to hit the ball with their bat as effectively as they
can, in order to score the most runs as they can without getting out. The batsman must learn how to control the ball
with their bat, to best manipulate the ball through the field. The path of the ball after it hits the bat is determined
by where on the bat it impacts, and thus there are better places for the ball to hit the bat than others. It is important
for the batsman to aim to hit the ball in a specific spot on the bat, commonly known as the sweet spot. The sweet
spot is ideal as it allows the batsman to transfer as much force from their swing of the bat into the ball, maximising
the force, and therefore the distance the ball travels, as well as allowing the batsman to control the direction of the
balls placement to best effect. Current technology does not allow the batsman to know where the ball has hit the bat,
outside of how the ball hits the bat and how that feels in their hands, and what they may see when they play their
shot. The intent of this project is to give the batsman a better understanding of where the ball has hit the bat in
order to improve their training and timing. The impact is not a perfect transfer of energy, with the energy being lost
through heat and sound. This project intends to measure this heat production, allowing us to detect where the ball
has hit the ball. Through the use of thermocouples acting on the face of the bat, it will separate the bat into horizontal
sections to relay the batsman the area on the bat the ball hit. A micro-controller will then be used to acquire the
data, and relay this data through a Bluetooth transceiver in order to store the data. It will also translate the different
signals from each section to a small speaker, to give the batsman direct audio feedback on the shot they have just
played. The stored data can be used to see the tendencies of the batsman and to further evaluate their batting form.
Keywords: Cricket, Bat, Thermocouple.

Figure 76:
Differing position of the
http://www.khelmart.org/tag/sweet-spot)

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sweet

spot.

(Courtesy:

DRAFT: Masters Final Projects Conference, Semester-1 2016

Khelmart.org,

Page 86

Density Functional Theory Study Of Organic Sensitisers For


Dye Sensitised Solar Cells
Qin, Rong
Course: OENG1090 (24CP, Masters Research Project Part 2)
Program: Sustainable Energy (MC229)
First Research Supervisor: Tachibana, Yasuhiro
Second Research Supervisor: Shabani, Bahman

Abstract #A-2016-S1-77
We will compare 6 dyes to investigate their influence on the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells. DFT calculation
was conducted to estimate potential energy levels and electron densities of the highest occupied molecular orbital
(HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) states of the dye. Dye molecular structures were first
optimized, and then the energy levels were calculated using the Gaussian 09 program package.26 A Becks
three-parameter hybrid functional with the Lee-Yang-Parr gradient-corrected functional (B3LYP) was employed
together with 6-31G (d,p) basis set. The calculated molecular orbitals were visualized by the GaussView 5.
Keywords: Solar Energy.

Figure 77: This is fully optimized SFD-3 structure using DFT calculations at the B3LYP theory with
6-31G* basis sets.

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Page 87

Shock Suspension Design Built


Chen, Xilun
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: International Automotive Engineering (MC160, MC230)
First Research Supervisor: Wang, Xu
Second Research Supervisor: Wang, Xu

Abstract #A-2016-S1-78
Structural control is one of the key components in smart structure technology, which refers to the means of protecting
primary structure system against dramatic vibrations and possible damages induced by traffics, wind and earthquakes.
A common and successful way is to dissipate excessive kinetic energy of structure via damping devices (Shock
Absorbers). In most cases, the mechanical energy is converted to heat, and thus energy dissipation is often associated
with undesirable self-heating. Meanwhile, energy harvesting from ambient vibration sources has emerged as a
prominent research area. A variety of mechanisms or materials have been explored, including electromagnetic
induction, piezoelectricity and hydraulic machinery.
Keywords: Suspension, Matlab, Vehicle.

Figure 78:
Automobile shock absorber structure.
https://www.scottastrong.com/)

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(Courtesy:

HOWSTUFFWORKS,

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Page 88

Study Of Energy Storage Polices In Australia And


Internationally With Emphasis On Hydrogen And Battery
Technologies
Moore, Jason Michael Ian
Course: OENG1089 (24CP, Masters Research Project Part 1)
Program: Sustainable Energy (MC229)
First Research Supervisor: Shabani, Bahman
Second Research Supervisor: Andrews, John

Abstract #A-2016-S1-79
This project is focused on conducting a review of Australian and key international policies aimed at supporting energy
storage for stationary power applications with a particular focus on battery and hydrogen storage. The project will
help identify the current gaps in Australian policy and propose recommendations to address these in order to fully
harness the benefit of deploying renewable energy in Australia and improve their economic viability and practicality.
Keywords: Energy Policies; Energy Storage; Renewable Energy; Hydrogen Technology; Battery Technology.

Figure 79: Future Energy Grid with Hydrogen and Battery Storage (Courtesy: Clean Technica,
http://cleantechnica.com/)

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Page 89

Shock Suspension Design Built


Wang, Zijian
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: International Automotive Engineering (MC160, MC230)
First Research Supervisor: Wang, Xu
Second Research Supervisor: Wang, Xu

Abstract #A-2016-S1-80
Nowadays, automotive vehicle is a large group of fuel consumer, since the fuel consumption efficiency is not high
enough, thus, the regeneration of energy becomes an essential technology, which still need to be improved. In this
research, a novel mechanical structure harvester is introduced; this design aims to enhance the ability of energy
regeneration for the vehicle suspension, basically, the working principle of this design follows the structure of ball
bearing, ball screw, contact bearing and rotating joint. A small high efficiency of the generator is applied, which is
connected to the system for storing the electrical energy. And a simulation of the system is introduced; the simulation
model supports the system testing numerically. Overall, the amount of regenerated energy is stored, and the
simulation reduces the experimental costs.
Keywords: Shock Absober.

Figure 80:
Automobile shock absorber structure.
https://www.howstuffworks.com/car-suspension2.htm)

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(Courtesy:

HOWSTUFFWORKS,

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Page 90

Comparative Study Of Grid-Based Energy Storage Vs


Electrochemical Energy Storage Connected To A Small
Microgrid
Quizhpe Conde, Jose German
Course: OENG1089 (24CP, Masters Research Project Part 1)
Program: Sustainable Energy (MC229)
First Research Supervisor: Shabani, Bahman
Second Research Supervisor: Shabani, Bahman

Abstract #A-2016-S1-81
Comparative paper that will study a small micro grid of around 5 homes using solar pv, battery and hydrogen fuel
system to provide power to each individual home and to the microgrid. The aim is to compare a microgrid with homes
been connected to the network with the following sources of energy: Solar Solar & storage Solar, storage and electric
car And Solar Solar & Hydrogen fuel cells Solar hydrogen fuel cells and electric car To do this comparison the software
homer will be used as tool to obtain the data and results. Finally a cost, benefit analysis will be run to determine
which could the best solution that could help an Melbournian household.
Keywords: Microgrids.

Figure 81: Micrgrids. (Courtesy: www.reneweconomy.com.au)

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Page 91

Technical Review And Experimental Investigation Of Options


To Improve The Roundtrip Energy Efficiency Of Unitised
Regenerative Fuel Cells (URFCs)with A Focus On Using
Pulsed DC In Charge Mode
Luo, Jiean
Course: OENG1089 (24CP, Masters Research Project Part 1)
Program: Sustainable Energy (MC229)
First Research Supervisor: Andrews, John
Second Research Supervisor: Paul, Biddyut
Sponsor: Defence Science and Techonolgy Group

Abstract #A-2016-S1-82
This project is a component within the RMIT Capability Technology Demonstrator project, funded by Australian
Department of Defence, to develop and demonstrate a portable power supply chargeable with PV or wind power and
based on reversible hydrogen fuel cell technology. It will involve working with both RMIT SAMME and Defence
Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO) research personnel. Experimental work will include basic experiments
on a small URFC or electrolyser to compare its response in terms of Faraday and overall energy efficiency in
electrolyser mode with a pulsed DC supply to that with a constant DC supply, and rate of degradation over time of
this performance.
Keywords: Water Electrolysis, Pulsed DC Input, Mass Transfer, EDL, Electron Transfer.

Figure 82: Illustration of water electrolysis process. (Courtesy: Nature, www.nature.com)

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Page 92

Trajectory Optimisation For Space Launch Systems


Jeyagopal, Jeyaseenivas
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: Aerospace and Aviation (MC225)
First Research Supervisor: Ogawa, Hideaki
Second Research Supervisor: NOT SPECIFIED BY THE MASTER STUDENT

Abstract #A-2016-S1-83
This research aims to examine the optimum trajectories for access-to-space with various objectives and constraints
(e.g. payload, flight time, dynamic pressure) via various propulsion options (e.g. turbojets, scramjets, rockets). It will
identify control strategies and key design factors for various missions to enable economical and reusable space
transport systems such as RBCC spaceplanes of JAXA and launch vehicles with aerodynamic manoeuvre. The study
is to be primarily performed analytically with pseudo-spectral methods (in conjunction with evolutionary algorithms)
on MATLAB.
Keywords: Trajectory Optimisation, Control Problem, Pseudo-Spectral Method.

Figure 83: Trajectory optimization for reusable space launch system.

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Page 93

Economics Of Energy Storage - The Opportunity For Energy


Storage Investment
Peake, Domenic
Course: OENG1090 (24CP, Masters Research Project Part 2)
Program: Sustainable Energy (MC229)
First Research Supervisor: Shabani, Bahman
Second Research Supervisor: NOT SPECIFIED BY THE MASTER STUDENT
Sponsor: Aventron AG

Abstract #A-2016-S1-84
This paper investigates applications of energy storage to provide analysis into current and emerging business models
for energy storage asset investment. Using a discounted profit and loss cash flow model, specific real world applications
of energy storage technology will be economically reviewed. technologies were evaluated with selected energy storage
applications over a realistic project time frame. Applications including Primary Frequency Control, Tariff Arbitrage,
Black stat and Renewable Energy Curtailment were reviewed and potential business models identified
Keywords: Energy Storage, Asset Investment.

Figure 84: Fraunhofer ISE comparison of rated power, energy content and discharge time of different
EES technologies. (Courtesy: IEC, 2011).

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Page 94

Development Of Sustainable Water Desalination And


Thermoelectric Power Generation System
Samant, Tanmay Tushar
Course: OENG1090 (24CP, Masters Research Project Part 2)
Program: Sustainable Energy (MC229)
First Research Supervisor: Date, Abhijit
Second Research Supervisor: Tan, Lip Pong (Daniel)

Abstract #A-2016-S1-85
The solar thermal technology is most commonly used for water heating purposes on commercial as well as residential
basis. Due to the high efficiency and anti-freezing properties, evacuated tube solar collectors have been commonly
used for desalination purposes. This paper presents an experimental and analytical study on the electricity generation
as well as desalination process from non-tracking solar thermal collector. The main focus of the project will be
economical and efficient system for remote area. The system is designed with an evacuated solar tube coupled with
heat engine. Also the desalination panel has been designed which can be coupled with solar ponds in future. The
initial aim of the panel is to get pure form of water from solar pond. Although initially experiments have been
performed for calculation of stagnation temperature with evacuated tube assembly, these readings will be taken into
consideration while coupling to desalination panel assembly. The experimented data for the same have been also
presented in paper along with result analysis. Furthermore, the future project scope has been discussed along with
current and projected systems prototype.
Keywords: Thermal Energy, Evacuated Tube Collectors, Desalination.

Figure 85: (a) Schematic Diagram of Desalination Panel (b) Actual Designed Desalination Panel.

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Page 95

Design And Product Selection Of An Electrolyser,hydrogen


Storage And PEM Fuel Cell System For A Micro-Grid
Demonstration
Jibu George,
Course: OENG1090 (24CP, Masters Research Project Part 2)
Program: Sustainable Energy (MC229)
First Research Supervisor: Andrews, John
Second Research Supervisor: Davoodnezhad, Reza

Abstract #A-2016-S1-86
An increase in the demand for electricity has shifted our focus from conventional energy sources to renewable energy
sources. A typical solution to supply power to remote locations is to use renewable sources such as solar or wind
energy. The reliability of a grid increases with a renewable and cost effective standalone system with storage. Solar
and wind energy are intermittent energy sources which lead to the installation of generators or storage banks. Energy
storage plays an important role in the development and operation of a sustainable future, it provides a buffer between
the grid and the unstable power system and thereby providing an option for decentralizing the electricity grid.
Hydrogen systems are energy efficient and are zero emission technologies and can be coupled with other renewable
sources such as solar and the wind to produce hydrogen by electrolysis of water for remote grid distribution.
Production of hydrogen using solar can be achieved either by solar thermal electrical power generation or by
photovoltaic electrical power generation through water electrolysis. The focus of this paper is to overcome the
shortcomings of storage by considering an optimal sizing of renewable energy which includes solar hydrogen storage
which is site specific (RMIT city campus). Hydrogen stored can be used for a longer time during seasonal variations.
The use of numerical analysis with some in hand practical demonstration using HOMER (simulation software) will
also be addressed.
Keywords: Renewable, Hydrogen Energy, Storage, RMIT.

Figure 86:
Renewable- Hydrogen
http://www.reliableplant.com/)

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Smart

grid

System.

(Courtesy:

DRAFT: Masters Final Projects Conference, Semester-1 2016

Reliable

Plant,

Page 96

OPTIMIZATION OF THE CHASSIS/STRUCTURE OF AN


URBAN ELECTRIC BUS
Nandakumar, Harish
Course: OENG1089 (24CP, Masters Research Project Part 1)
Program: International Automotive Engineering (MC160, MC230)
First Research Supervisor: Taylor, David
Second Research Supervisor: NOT SPECIFIED BY THE MASTER STUDENT
Sponsor: BUSTECH Pty., Ltd.

Abstract #A-2016-S1-87
In this project, I have considered the design of an electric bus chassis/structure and optimizing it to improve the
overall performance of the vehicle. Since the electric buses are slightly heavier than the traditional buses because of
the battery in an electric bus are heavy depending on the power, as it affects the overall performance of the bus. To
this reason, it is important to reduce the overall weight of the bus to improve the performance, and through studies, it
is understood that the chassis/structure of the bus is the best place to work on. Since the chassis/structure of the bus
has large amount of materials that withstands all the loads and stresses, it could be optimized by using the FEA
method. It is also important that the stresses are evenly distributed throughout the materials so as to maintain the
safety standards and to avoid any fatigue or wear and tear of the materials. This could also be achieved by using the
composite materials to replace the stainless steel materials used, but it could be more expensive and the process takes
long time to bring the efficiency. The main objectives are: * Optimize the design of the chassis/structure to ensure the
materials are efficiently utilized to their potential. * To ensure the stresses are evenly distributed to reduce the fatigue
of the materials. * Reduce the total mass of the vehicle without compromising the performance and safety standards.
* Increase the overall performance of the vehicle.
Keywords: REGISTRATION OF THE PROJECT.

Figure 87: Chassis structure of the urban electric bus.

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Page 97

Solar Light - Actuated Electrothermal Microfluidic Motion


Melagiriyappanavar, Pavan Krishna Reddy
Course: OENG1090 (24CP, Masters Research Project Part 2)
Program: Sustainable Energy (MC229)
First Research Supervisor: Rosengarten, Gary
Second Research Supervisor: Herringer, James

Abstract #A-2016-S1-88
Novel equipment is proposed that can be used for study of microfluidic motion. The system is built on the basis of
electrokinetic theory, which uses AC electric field and a focused solar light to generate electro-thermal flow and
achieve particle/fluid manipulation at the micro scale. Over the years experiments are developed using the LASER to
induce thermal gradient in the chip consisting of two electrodes and fluid with micro particles suspended in it.
However, this experiment aims to make the fluid manipulation technique economical by substituting LASER with
focused solar beam. An experimental prototype is designed and has to be tested. The theoretical analysis and the
governing equations implicate the possibility to use focused solar light. The flow is observed by particle image
velocimetry technique. Further, extensive work on the results and data acquired by the prototype has to be studied.
Keywords: Electrothermal, PIV, Microfluidic Motion, Fluid Manipulation.

Figure 88: Schematic diagram of experimental setup.

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Page 98

A Proposed Photovoltaic Retrofit Of The External Glass


Facade Of The RMIT Design Hub
Rubin, Cristian Nicholas2
Course: OENG1090 (24CP, Masters Research Project Part 2)
Program: Sustainable Energy (MC229)
First Research Supervisor: Andrews, John
Second Research Supervisor: Shabani, Bahman

Abstract #A-2016-S1-89
The objective of this proposal is to determine the economic viability of retrofitting the RMIT design hub with
integrated photovoltaics. This will be through considering replacing the current glass cells with a similarly shaped
photovoltaic, with a comparison to an alternative solution such as using a less customised photovoltaic to reduce costs
but maintaining similar output. The definition of building-integrated-photovoltaics (BIPV) retrofits is defined by the
function to generating power from solar conversion while simultaneously replacing the use of a conventional material
in achieving a primary structural property, such as shading, insulation, and/or structural integrity. Photovoltaic
systems that are mounted on the roof do provide some shading benefits but their evaluation does not consider
structural properties as a requirement and should not be considered part of an evaluation. A photovoltaic retrofit of
an existing facade however can be defined as BIPV as the facades primary purpose is to shade the windows of the
structure to reduce excessive external light and heat exposure. The building envelope is partially shaded with the
faade in place constructed of 16,000 circular cells sandblasted to provide diffused sunlight on the building, although
total shading is not achieved by the nature of the facades design. The cost of a suitable photovoltaic technology and
system for this proposal, that can achieve a reasonable output of energy for building use, will be considered for a
10-storey building facade. This will then be combined with a suitable building profile based on the expected energy
consumption from current data and the expected solar exposure on the building, over the course of an annum, to
calculate whether the return on investment is within a reasonable range to define the proposal as economically viable.
Keywords: Photovoltaic, Solar, Retrofit, Glass Facade.

Figure 89: Caption has not been provided by the Master student.

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Page 99

Scale Aerodynamic Testing Of 3D Printed Bicycles


Rose, Mitchell Luke
Course: OENG1089 (24CP, Masters Research Project Part 1)
Program: International Sports Technology (MC190)
First Research Supervisor: Marino Matthew
Second Research Supervisor: Fox, Kate
Sponsor: Cell Bikes

Abstract #A-2016-S1-90
Full scale aerodynamic tests of bicycles can often be expensive due to the cost of wind tunnel hire and specialised
rigging requirements to measure aerodynamic forces at relevant velocities. A more cost effective solution could be
testing the bicyclesat smaller scales using state-of-the-art 3D printing technology. This approach will allow the use of
smaller and more cost effective wind tunnels, as well as reducing the expense of the rigging to perform the testing. It
will also allow a bicycle company to be able to get accurate aerodynamic data of a bicycle before it has left the design
stage. Traditionally this data is only attained after the company has built a full size working prototype of their design.
As aerodynamics is becoming increasingly more important for performance and marketing for bicycle companies, this
would allow designers freedom and knowledge that was previously unachievable due to the cost associated with
building a prototype and the wind tunnel testing.
The aim of this research to develop somewhat of a methodology of wind tunnel testing prototype designs with the use
of 3D printing. It is aimed at making it cheaper and easier for a manufacturer to get accurate data on their new
designs before having to make a full size prototype and hence making the development more focused and informed but
also making the whole process of designing a bicycle more efficient.
Keywords: 3D Printing, Aerodynamics, Wind Tunnel, Bicycle, Half-Scale.

Figure 90: Wind tunnel testing of Specialized Tarmac.


http://www.bicycling.com/)

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(Courtesy:

Bicycle Magazine,

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Page 100

Efficient Configurations Of Sustainable Hybrid Energy


Systems Including Bio-Diesel Generators, Photovoltaics,
Inverters And Ultra-Batteries
Stephens, Matthew James
Course: OENG1089 (24CP, Masters Research Project Part 1)
Program: Sustainable Energy (MC229)
First Research Supervisor: Shabani, Bahman
Second Research Supervisor: Andrews, John
Sponsor: Green Power Solutions

Abstract #A-2016-S1-91
Green power solutions (GPS) have built a hybrid bio-diesel/PV power generation system that can produce around
1MWh of energy per day. The primary generator is a 37kW ISUZU 4JGIT with a 4 cylinder 3.059L turbo charged,
fuel injected engine capable of producing 265 N.m torque, it has an RSV mechanical governor and a 12-35 V-A
alternator. There is a 1200 liter fuel tank with a fuel monitoring system. The hybrid system uses ABB inverters and
programmable Selectronic SP PRO inverters on each of the three phases and there are two Ecoult 48V 20kWh
ultra-batteries. Diagnostic information may be obtained using software that queries the control system from a remote
computer and transmits the data via the mobile phone network. By using simulation software to model the energy
network and by collecting empirical data; the aim of this project is to assist GPS to determine the efficiency of their
hybrid energy generation system, focusing on finding configurations which have minimal fuel consumption rates. As
well as verifying the performance of the existing system we may also consider hybrid systems that utilise a variety of
combinations of combustion engine driven generators, photovoltaics and energy storage technologies; in order to gain
insight into optional hybrid arrangements that can reliably generate the required amount of electrical energy for a site
that may have significantly variable stochastic demand load.
Keywords: Hybrid Energy Systems, Photovoltaics, Bio-Diesel Generator, Efficient Configurations, Energy Flow
Simulation.

Figure 91: Efficient configurations of sustainable hybrid energy systems.

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Page 101

Finite Element Analysis Of Drilling Of Carbon Fiber


Reinforced Polymer
Li, Xiao
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: Manufacturing (MC224)
First Research Supervisor: Ding, Songlin
Second Research Supervisor: Mo, John

Abstract #A-2016-S1-92
Composite materials have developed rapidly in recent decades. One of the most uses in composite material is carbon
fiber reinforced polymer. Drilling is the most machining processes which are used on carbon fiber reinforced polymer
in order to achieve assembly requirements. However, defects such as delamination, uncut fibers and internal laminar
cracking are always found after drilling carbon fiber reinforced polymer. Minimizing defects are dependent on many
factors of drilling process, such as spindle speed, feed rate, and geometry of drill bit. In this study, Finite element
models are implemented during the research to investigate effects on drilling carbon fiber reinforced polymer using
different drilling properties. Different feed rate and spindle speed are used in order to determine the difference of
thrust force, torque and delamination factor. Finite element models are developed in Abaqus software to simulate the
drilling of carbon fiber reinforced polymer process.
Keywords: Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer, Drilling, Finite Element Analysis, Abaqus.

Figure 92: Finite element model CFRP Laminate & twist drill.
http://www.akademiabaru.com/)

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(Courtesy:

DRAFT: Masters Final Projects Conference, Semester-1 2016

S. Al-Wandi,

Page 102

Assessment And Coaching Of Spin Bowling Performance,


And Classification Of Spin Bowling Deliveries With A Smart
Cricket Ball
Dehler, Janos
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: International Sports Technology (MC190)
First Research Supervisor: Fuss, Franz
Second Research Supervisor: Weizman, Udi

Abstract #A-2016-S1-93
Spin bowling is neglected in comparison to fast bowling, and it is almost a forgotten art. Within the spin bowling
there are various numbers of spin bowling delivery types based on different bowling techniques. Whilst systems such
as the Hawk-Eye system, stump camera, hot spot or snickometer are now commonly used in the game of cricket to
obtain information about the ball, the assessment of important performance parameters such as the spin rate or the
position of the spin axis with respect to the plane of the seam is limited to labour intensive lab tests and the use of
stationary 3D motion capture systems.
A smart cricket ball, with three high-speed MEMS gyroscopes implemented, was developed at the RMIT in 2011 in
order to investigate different delivery types and thus make coaches and athletes help to assess and improve spin
bowling performance. The existing smart cricket ball is capable of measuring performance parameters like spin rate,
spin vector diagram, torque, precession, centre of pressure and efficiency but not the orientation of the ball with
respect to the environment (global coordinate system) at any stage of the delivery. Without any further motion
tracking systems it is not yet possible to make statements about the spin direction.
Therefore a method needed to be developed for determining the angle between spin axis at release and flight path of
the ball. This angle replaces the lab-based motion analysis system, and makes the ball suitable for outdoor use by
giving immediate feedback of the spin direction (hypertop, top, topside, side, backside, back, hyperback, swerve) and
therefore classifies the delivery in addition to the existing performance parameters.
As a first step it is to be investigated whether the orientation of the ball can be calculated with the data from the
gyro-sensors, which are already incorporated in the smart cricket ball, or by implementing further inertial sensors,
thus as accelerometers. Once the hardware solution is settled an algorithm has to be developed and implemented into
the existing data analysis software in order to calculate the actual orientation of the ball. Validation of the
performance of the system and the methods used will require repeated testing and comparison with a gold standard
optical tracking system.
Keywords: Cricket, Smart Cricket Ball, Spin Bowling, Type Of Delivery, Gyros, Angle Between Flight Path And
Spin Axis.

c
Figure 93: Classification of spin bowling deliveries with a smart cricket ball . ( Fuss
F.K., 1993).

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Page 103

Design, Development And Experimental Testing Of A Metal


Hydride Hydrogen Storage System For A 1.2 KW Power
Supply Based On A Unitised Regenerative Fuel Cell
Sutera, Andrea
Course: OENG1089 (24CP, Masters Research Project Part 1)
Program: Sustainable Energy (MC229)
First Research Supervisor: Andrews, John
Second Research Supervisor: Lin, Albert
Sponsor: Australian Defence Science and Technology Group

Abstract #A-2016-S1-94
This final thesis is a small component of the RMIT Capability Technology Demonstrator (CTD) project, funded by
the Australian Department of Defence to develop a renewable mobile power supply (MPS) to recharge electronic
devices in military applications. This system will use regenerative fuel cell technology, able to produce electricity from
hydrogen and store that into metal hydride canisters. The focus of this project will entirely be on the MH storage
system, given determined input from the other elements such as the specific volume flow rate necessary for the fuel
cells and the thermal management of heat. Specifically, this final project will study, analyse and test two different MH
canisters: a commercialized one by JSW and a new alloy developed by CSIRO and UNSW.
Keywords: Metal Hydride, Hydrogen, Hydrogen Storage System.

Figure 94: Commercial JSW metal hydride (MH) canister tested under charging conditions.

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Page 104

Additive Manufacturing Business Case


Desai, Pranav Pradeep
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: Manufacturing (MC224)
First Research Supervisor: Taylor, David
Second Research Supervisor: Easton, Mark

Abstract #A-2016-S1-95
In todays scenario, cost is considered as one the major aspects in decision making. Cost associated in manufacturing
a part should not only include the direct costs, such as raw material, labour and overheads, but also should include
the indirect costs, such as administration, infrastructure and logistics. Cost model is a systematic approach in
tabulating all these direct and indirect costs which help in estimating the cost of manufacturing a part. This is
extremely important from the business point-of-view. But when it comes manufacturing parts in the university
campus, the cost model aspect is always missing. The report will be based on the model developed for calculating cost
of parts manufactured from various Additive Manufacturing (AM) mahines considering high impact of investment and
overhead cost, which will aid in cost reduction activities of the AM machine in futurre and will benefit in justyfing the
use of AM manufactured parts. The methodology implemented during the development of the cost model will follow
standard steps. Firstly, the machine will selected and studied which will be followed by the system diagram. The
system diagram will help in understanding the input, outout and wastes of a particular manchine or process. After
differentiating the inputs, outputs and wastes, it will be tabulated and cost will be associated to it. All the parameters
will be weighed in terms of cost. Finally, the developed cost model will help in understanding the cost associated in
manufacturing a component using the particular machine or process. The AM macinhes considered in this report are
present in the RMIT Additive Manufacturing Precinct (AMP) facility. The cost models are only developed for these
machines and proposed to the university.
Keywords: Cost Model, Additive Manufacturing, Cost Estimation, Data Analysis.

Figure 95: Basic cost model for a Fused Deposition Modelling machine, machine 1 is Fortus 900mc
and machine 2 is MakerBot Replicator 2.

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Page 105

Hole Transport Layer Materials And Replacement Of P-Type


Semiconductors In Perovskite Solar Cells
Jimenez Franco, Bernardo Antonio
Course: OENG1089 (24CP, Masters Research Project Part 1)
Program: Sustainable Energy (MC229)
First Research Supervisor: Tachibana, Yasuhiro
Second Research Supervisor: Shabani, Bahman

Abstract #A-2016-S1-96
In the last 7 years, PSC or Perovskite Solar Cells have been developed by various research groups around the globe,
and they have become very well-known lately. These technology is considered very promising not only because of the
accelerated development during these few years but also because of the reduced production costs that can be achieved
if compared to other similar technologies such as silicon solar cells. While some other research groups have been
focused on achieving better efficiency each time, this study deals with the fabrication of perovskite solar cells or PSC
in air, and the different challenges that arise from the fabrication of these crystalline structure material in air
conditions, focusing on the different inorganic materials that can be used into making better and cheaper materials for
the Hole Transport Layer. For this study, a literature review has been necessary in order to understand
inorganic-organic solar cells and its various architectures such as inverted planar, normal planar and mesoporous
structures. The outcome of the literature review is the design, and execution of several experiments on the effect that
air and fabrication parameters have on this devices. Lastly, the results of these experiments will become the base for
comparison between methods, parameters and materials that will hopefully help us find patterns that allows for solid
conclusions on materials effectiveness in these devices.
Keywords: Perovskite Solar Cells, Renewable Energy, Emerging Solar Cells, Nickel Oxide, Hole Transport Layer,
Air Processed Perovskite Solar Cell.

Figure 96: Perovskite Solar Cells, a bright future for Humanity.

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Page 106

Engine Alternator Noise Components


Li, Xin
Course: OENG1089 (24CP, Masters Research Project Part 1)
Program: International Automotive Engineering (MC160, MC230)
First Research Supervisor: Fard, Mohammad
Second Research Supervisor: NOT SPECIFIED BY THE MASTER STUDENT
Sponsor: VKA of RWTH Aachen University Institute for Combustion Engine

Abstract #A-2016-S1-97
The perceived noise quality of combustion engines is predominantly influenced by the occurrence and the
characteristics of individual disturbing noise components. The Institute for Combustion Engines of the RWTH Aachen
University has developed a methodology within the framework of a FVV project, which allows the extraction of
audible noise components so that they can be listened to separately, and the annoyance level of these components can
be quantified automatically. Furthermore, the methodology allows the synthesis of a newly weighted total engine noise
from the separated noise components for target value definition.
Keywords: NVH, Engine Noise, Alternator.

Figure 97:
Engine alternator
https://www.autoworksmn.com/)

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RMIT University, SENG 2016

noise

components.

(Courtesy:

Autoworks,

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Page 107

Design And Optimization Of Flywheels


Ni, Sheng
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: International Automotive Engineering (MC160, MC230)
First Research Supervisor: Trivailo, Pavel
Second Research Supervisor: Trivailo, Pavel

Abstract #A-2016-S1-98
In this project, the main task is to find out an optimal solution for minimizing delamination between composite disks
in flywheels. Besides this, a great deal of research and reviews need to be done due to the high quality of the final
design. Using mechanical drawing software, including solid works, and simulating through 3D drawing software will
accelerate the pace of progress and enhance the accuracy of 3D modelling. Furthermore, the dynamic modelling
method and assembly motion mode, which will be used in this project, will improve the analysis efficiency for design
modelling. Finally, a better designed flywheel disk will be obtained, which will meet the demands for reducing the gap
between the composite disks and improving the rotating efficiency for flywheels.
Keywords: Flywheel, 3D Modelling, Simulation.

Figure 98:
Four bar linkage
https://www.bobcat.com/)

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RMIT University, SENG 2016

applied

for

skid

steer

loader.

(Courtesy:

DRAFT: Masters Final Projects Conference, Semester-1 2016

Bobcat,

Page 108

DESIGN & ANALYSIS OF A STRONG BACK FIXTURE


FOR MACHINING OF FLAT TRACK BEAM USED IN
AIRCRAFTS
Sathya Prakash, Nikhil
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: Manufacturing (MC224)
First Research Supervisor: Ding, Songlin
Second Research Supervisor: Ding, Songlin

Abstract #A-2016-S1-99
To be able to compete against other aircraft manufacturers, Industry must be able to decrease the manufacturing and
assembly costs. Jig and Fixture are the most common word used in assembly and manufacturing. The manufacturing
of a high prcised Flap Track Beam (FTB) fixture plays a vital role as it is required to support and hold a workpiece in
a precise location and orientation while its subjected to the cutting forces. The cutting forces cause the workpiece to
deform elastically which can change the machining dimensional accuracy when the fixture is not strong. A properly
designed fixture must be able to reduce the deflections, enhanced dimensional control within the workpiece, and to
provide the constrained workpiece with a quasi-equilibrium environment throughout an entire machining operation
which includes setup and material removal. The aim of this project is to study the complete construction of the FTB
to know the critical parameters for clamping of the beam and to design a strong back fixture followed by an FEA
Analysis to find out any deflections during its different operating conditions.
Keywords: Design, Analysis, Flat Track Beam And Fixtures.

Figure 99: Flat Track Beam.

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Page 109

Optimization Of An Angular Semiautomatic Rope Break A


Mathematical Approach To Enhance The Design And The
Safety Factor
Anedda, Bastian Reinhold
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: International Sports Technology (MC190)
First Research Supervisor: Fuss, Franz
Second Research Supervisor: Weizman, Udi

Abstract #A-2016-S1-100
Rope climbing is an inherently dangerous activity. In order to ensure the safety of the climber the process of belaying
and the devices used for it are very important. A variety of devices using different mechanisms is available to ensure
the climbers safety. This study focusses on the subgroup of angular semiautomatic rope breaks. The goal of this study
is to provide an insight into the mechanisms and functionality of these angular semiautomatic devices investigating the
friction forces as well as the forces and moments acting upon and inside the system. The mechanism is then related to
the safety of the climber measured by the safety factor. Furthermore the study takes the gained insights to construct a
system of equations that relates the safety factor as well as the dimensions of the device in order to get on optimal
solution. Several restrictions form a mathematical optimization problem, which is solved afterwards in order to fulfil
safety and size requirements. The outputs of the optimization problem are parameters that define the length of the
lever arms and the angle of deflection for the belt friction, which can then be used to generate an enhanced and
optimized design for a new device.
Keywords: Rope Brake, Climbing, Optimization, Design.

Figure 100: Caption has not been provided by the Master student.

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Page 110

Optimise Stainless Steel Spaceframe Chassis Of A Bus


Gupta, Nitesh
Course: OENG1088 (48CP, Masters Research Project)
Program: International Automotive Engineering (MC160, MC230)
First Research Supervisor: Taylor, David
Second Research Supervisor: NOT SPECIFIED BY THE MASTER STUDENT
Sponsor: Bustech

Abstract #A-2016-S1-101
The main aim of doing this project is to analyse spaceframe of a bus to reduce its material and also reduce the
number of welds in the whole chassis. This would be done to make the structure more stable and more durable. The
whole project would be proceeded in various stages starting from the FEA of the various types of joints and then
further designing whole spaceframe of the bus. The members of the model is rectangular tube beams. The major
outcoke of this will help in selecting the best suited method for the whole model which will further help in designing
and analysing the whole structure of the bus.
Keywords: Bustech, FEA.

Figure 101: The CAD model of space-frame chassis of a bus by Bustech.

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Page 112

Index-1: Master Students


A
Acosta Manosalvas, Jorge Javier . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Ahmed, Nuzuhath . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Alharbi, Mohammed Abdullah H . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Alramadan, Hussein Taher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Alsheheri, Mohammad Awad Khalufa . . . . . . . . 17
Anedda, Bastian Reinhold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Arumugam, Dushyanthan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45

B
Bafkar, Omid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Banerjee, Shashank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43
Berry, Daniel Simon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Bhavsar, Vedang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Borse, Rohit Nimbadas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Brown, Ashley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Burston, Martin Thorne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67

Li, Xiao . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102


Li, Xin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Lou, Jingjie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Luo, Jiean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Lyu, Chenchao . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52

M
Mangubat, Robie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Marshall, Jordan Elliot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Melagiriyappanavar, Pavan Krishna Reddy . . . 98
Meng, Chanvibol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Menzel, Tobias . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Minto, Cameron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Modh, Shreyas Ramakantbhai . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Moore, Jason Michael Ian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Moyo, Sibonginkosi Abigail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51

N
C
Chege, Timothy Kuria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Chen, Long . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Chen, Xilun . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Cron, Samuel Frederick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58

D
Daniel Alex, George . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Dehler, Janos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Desai, Pranav Pradeep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Dueking, Peter Anatoli . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

E
Eapen, Ajay Thomas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Espinosa Delgado, Luis Felipe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83

G
Gale, Jordan Charles Francis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Gauta Burgos, John Edicson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Grbac, Nikola . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Grisanti Bravo, Maria Elena . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Gupta, Nitesh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111

Nandakumar, Harish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Nanur Rameshwar, Arun Kumar . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Nasir, Murtaza . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Ngamphaiboon, Hattaphol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Ni, Sheng . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
Nobile Padron, Athos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63

P
Pachernegg, Stefan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Panchal, Nikunj Dilipkumar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Pandit, Nikhil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Park, Alexander James . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Pattla, Nia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Paturi, Ravi Teja . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Peake, Domenic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Periakali, Vaishnav . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Poornachandra, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

Q
Qin, Rong . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Qu, Shuai . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Quizhpe Conde, Jose German . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91

H
Haulder, Neelesh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Huang, Xin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

J
Jayasundara Pathirennehalage, Pubudu Rukshan
Jayasu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Jeyagopal, Jeyaseenivas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Jibu George, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Jimenez Franco, Bernardo Antonio . . . . . . . . . 106

K
Kally, Ridgleigh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Kannangara, Lahiru Shanaka . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Kloster, Jerrit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Koerfer, Felix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59

Ram, Raghavender . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Rampinelli Rota, Bruno Carlo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Rose, Mitchell Luke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Rubin, Cristian Nicholas2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99

S
Sadoghirad, Mohammad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Saldanha, Keppler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Samant, Tanmay Tushar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Sanchez Ochoa, Cesar Manuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Saraf, Siddhesh Shripad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Sathya Prakash, Nikhil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Sharma, Nikhil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Sowmya Holaly Nagaraj, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Stegmann, Andreas Siegfried . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Stephens, Matthew James . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Sutera, Andrea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104

L
Lee, Tyrone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Li, Rixin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

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V
Vassiliadis, Dimitrios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85

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W
Wan, Bowen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Wang, Yuechen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Wang, Zijian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Waterson, Dale Brendan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Whipp, Sean Christopher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Wilson Prabaharan, Elisha Dhanapaul . . . . . . . 68
Woo, Terence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Y
Yedhukulesh, Vineesh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Yu, Jiaqi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82

Z
Zhang, Weinan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Zhao, Nan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Ziyaeiasl, Siyamak . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

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Index-2: Research Supervisors


A

Alam, Firoz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Andrews, John . . 32, 36, 74, 89, 92, 96, 99, 101,
104

Mafinejad, Yasser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Marino Matthew . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Marzbani, Hormoz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65, 69
Mazur, Maciej . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38, 80
Mo, John . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102

B
Bateman, Stuart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Baxter, Glenn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Bil, Cees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29, 35, 52
Blacklock, Matthew . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Bulla, Marian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59

N
NOT SPECIFIED BY THE MASTER STUDENT
51, 60, 93, 94, 97, 107, 111

C
Castelletto, Stefania . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Cheung, Chi Pok . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15, 16
Chowdhury, Harun . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Ogawa, Hideaki . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Othman, Maazuza . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

P
Pang, Toh Yen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56, 77
Paul, Biddyut . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49, 92

D
Dabnichki, Peter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Daliri, Ali . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Date, Abhijit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Davoodnezhad, Reza . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Dilag, Jessirie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Ding, Songlin . . . . . . 18, 48, 78, 82, 84, 102, 109
Doljin, Batdelger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Dorrington, Graham . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83

E
Easton, Mark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34, 47, 66, 105
Edsell, Jon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25, 46
Elbanhawi, Mohamad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43, 45, 55

F
Fard, Mohammad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63, 107
Ferrari, David . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18, 27
Fox, Kate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Fuss, Franz . . 19, 21, 28, 30, 33, 40, 50, 54, 56,
58, 85, 86, 103, 110

G
Gardi, Alessandro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67

H
Herringer, James . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98

I
Imtiaz, Ahmed Khan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

J
John, Sabu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29, 35, 39, 52

K
Kandare, Everson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26, 42
Khatibi, Akbar Afaghi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42, 73
Kootsookos, Alex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Kumar, Arun . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41, 61, 72

Q
Qiu, Dong . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66

R
Rosengarten, Gary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11, 14, 37, 98

S
Sabatini, Roberto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Shabani, Bahman 13, 20, 24, 32, 36, 44, 79, 87,
89, 91, 94, 99, 101, 106
Shiwakoti, Nirajan . . . . 12, 23, 41, 53, 61, 68, 72
Silva, Jose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73, 81
Simic, Milan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17, 43, 45, 55
Stanley, Cameron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11, 13, 37
Stasinopoulos, Peter . . . . . . . . . 23, 51, 53, 64, 68

T
Tachibana, Yasuhiro . . . . . 20, 24, 44, 79, 87, 106
Takla, Monir . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Tan, Lip Pong (Daniel) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Tariq, Madiha . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31, 62, 71
Taube, Richard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Taylor, David 12, 15, 34, 47, 48, 70, 80, 97, 105,
111
Trivailo, Pavel . . . . . . . . . . . 2, 31, 62, 70, 71, 108
Troynikov, Olga . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

W
Wang, Xu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88, 90
Watkins, Simon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Weizman, Udi . . 19, 21, 30, 33, 40, 58, 86, 103,
110
Wild, Graham . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60, 64, 75

X
Xu, Wei . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82, 84

L
Lappas, Petros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14, 25, 46, 83
Leary, Martin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38, 65, 69, 76
Lin, Albert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104

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Page 115

Index-3: Key Words


D

Symbols
3D
3D
3D
3D

Modelling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31, 71, 108


modelling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
printing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
printing blades . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

A
Accelerometers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Additive Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Additive manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57, 66
Additve manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Advanced propulsion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Aero-load . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Aerodynamic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Aerodynamics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15, 22, 100
Aeroengines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
AFL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30, 50
Air transport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Algae . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Aluminium extrusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Ammonia added in CIEs & SIEs . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Ammonia-Hydrocarbon fuel blends . . . . . . . . . . 25
Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Application of CCTV system for large enterprise
monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Australian football . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Australian Football League . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Autonomous Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43, 45, 55

B
Badminton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Bat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Battery Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Bicycle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Bio-diesel generator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Biodegradable Metals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Biomass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Biomechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Body . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Bus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
Bustech . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111

C
Ca . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .82
Carbon fiber reinforced polymer . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
CATIA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Center of Pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
CFD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Characterization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
CHP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36
Climbing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Composites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Control problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Cost Estimation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Cost Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Cost modeling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Cost modelling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Cricket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86, 103
Crowd monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Customisation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

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RMIT University, SENG 2016

Data Analytics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65, 69, 109
Design Optimisation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Diagonal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Distortion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Distributed propulsion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Domestic Airlines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Domestic wind turbine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Drilling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
Drop punt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

E
EDL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Efficient configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Electricity Demand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Electrothermal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Emerging solar cells . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Emulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31, 71
Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Energy Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Engine noise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Enterprise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Epoxy Adhesive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Evacuated Tube Collectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Experimental study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

F
Fabrics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28
Fairings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
FEA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Feather . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Female . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Fence Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43, 45
Fibres . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Finite element . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Finite element analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
Finite Element Analysis (FEA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Fire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Flywheel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
Football . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Forecasting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Fracture Toughness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Future of inflight entertainment . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60

G
Gait Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Garments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Golf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Gyros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103

H
Head Injury Criterion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Heat transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
High-Speed Spindle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Hole transport Layer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Humanitarian Logistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Humanoid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31, 71
Hybrid energy systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Hydrogen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32, 104
Hydrogen Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96

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I
ICAO Annex 17 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Industrial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Industrial Sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Inertial Measurement Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Inflight entertainment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Information technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Infrastructure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Instrumented boxing glove . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

K
Key words: biodegradable materials (BMs) . . 82
Keywords-Hydrogen fuelled ICEs . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Kistler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
KUKA KR 120 R2700 extra HA robotic arm . 48

PIV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Poly ball valve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Power Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Pressure sensor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58
Process parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Profit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Prosthesis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38
Prosthetic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Prosthetic Ankle-Foot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Pulsed DC input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Pure Zn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82

Q
Quantum Dots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20, 44
Quantum dots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79

L
Laser processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
LCA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Lead Sulphide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Life cycle assessments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Life of spark plug . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Linkage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65, 69
Logistic technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Logistics automation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Logistics engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

R
Reduction of raw materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Refugees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Release point identification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Remote Sensing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43, 45
Renewable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Renewable energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Retrofit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Road Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Rope Brake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110

M
Magnetic Bearing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29, 52
Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Mass transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Matlab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Maximum distance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Medical implant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Metal Hydride . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Microcontroller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Microfluidic motion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Modelling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Morphology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Motion analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77, 85
Motion Capture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Movement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40

N
Nano-cellulose Fibers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Nano-Crystalline Cellulose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Nanoparticles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
NCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26
Nickel Oxide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Noise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
NVH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107

O
Objective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Optimisation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50, 80
Optimization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110

P
Passenger Demand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Perovskite solar cells . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Phase Change Material . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Photovoltaic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Photovoltaics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Piezoelectric . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58

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S
Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Selective Laser Melting (SLM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Sensors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Shuttlecock design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Silver Sulphide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Skicross . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28
SLM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Small-scale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Smart cricket ball . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85, 103
Solar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Solar Cells . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Solar compound parabolic collector (CPC) . . . 18
Solar energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11, 18
Solar Hydrogen systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Solar PV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13, 14
Solar thermal systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Spin bowling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Sr) alloys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Static . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63
Statistical Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Stiffness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63, 78
Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Strategic Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29, 52
Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Super-capacitors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Supply chain management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Suspension . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Synthetic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Synthetic rubbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
System Dynamics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64

T
Thermal Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Tracking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Trajectory optimisation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93

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Type of delivery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103

U
Unmanned
Unmanned
Unmanned
Unmanned
Unmanned
Unmanned

Aerial Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Aerial Vehicle (UAV) . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Aerial Vehicles (UAV) . . . . . . . . 43, 45
Floating Vehicle (UFV) . . . . . . . . . . 55
Ground Vehicle (UGV) . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Underwater Vehicle (UUV) . . . . . . 55

V
Vehicle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Visco-elastic Cork Particle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81

W
Water . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Water electrolysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Water polo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Wearable technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Weight transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Wind Tunnel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Wind turbine blades . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Womans Football . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50

Z
Zinc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Zn-1X( Mg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Zn-based alloys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82, 84

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Index-4: Sponsors
A
AJKP PTY LTD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Altair Engineering GmbH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
ARC, RMIT, Japan Science and Technology
Agency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Australian Defence Science and Technology
Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Auto CRC and Car Servicing and You . . . . . . . 25
Aventron AG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94

B
Bustech . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15, 111
BUSTECH Pty., Ltd. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97

C
CAPRAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Cell Bikes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100

D
Defence Science and Techonolgy Group . . . . . 92
DSTO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74

E
Engineers Without Borders Australia . . . . . . . . 51
Engineers Without Borders Australia (EWB)
RMIT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

F
FCST Pty Ltd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Ford Motor Company Australia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63

G
Green Power Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101

J
Jayco . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65, 69

M
Melbourne Water . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

P
Philmac , South Australia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80

R
RMIT UNIVERSITY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
RMIT, Japan Science and Technology Agency 24

S
Simplex - CNC company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Sustainability Victoria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27, 37

V
VKA of RWTH Aachen University Institute for
Combustion Engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107

W
Wood&Frieve Engineers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

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