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AUGUST-SEPTEMBER 2014

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WITH EVERY ISSUE

40 PAGES OF
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No 79

Helping you become a better player

PLUS AUDIO TRACKS

Daniil
TRIFONOV

A star is born
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FESTIVAL HALL RECITAL!

13LEARN
PIECES TO

ALL LEVELS AND ALL STYLES

BEHIND

BACHS

FAMOUS 48

With expert advice on


a prelude & fugue

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YOUR TECHNIQUE!

Improve your dynamics


Practise the right way
How not to speed up

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2 Pianist 77

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Pianist 79

CONTENTS

August - September 2014


The next issue of Pianist goes on sale 26 September 2014

72

82

74

12
4

Editors Note

Competition Win a pair of tickets to

Daniil Trifonovs Royal Festival Hall recital


on 30 September

Readers Letters

News The Russians are coming to


London, a swanky Steinway pen, good
news for British pianos, competition
winners announced, and more

10 Expert Talk Tim Stein on how to avoid


speeding up when you get nervous, Ji Liu
on a typical practice day and the PTA on
dealing with cracks in a pianos iron frame

12 Daniil Trifonov talks to Jessica Duchen

about his love for golden age pianists,


learning as much repertoire as possible and
the benefits of pratising underwater

16 How to Play Masterclass 1

Mark Tanner on the dynamics of dynamics


remember, a beautiful and shaded touch
stems from a mastery of dynamics

18 How to Play Masterclass 2

Graham Fitch on strategies for practising


correctly from the outset so you dont
embed mistakes into your playing
Dont miss Grahams online lessons!

20 How to Play 1 Melanie Spanswick

on the Allegro movement from Attwoods


Sonatina in G (Scores page 30)

22 How to Play 2 Janet Newman on

Mendelssohns Song without Words op 30


no 3 (Scores page 38)

24 How to Play 3 Lucy Parham on

Schumanns Romance in F sharp op 28


no 2 (Scores page 63)

27 The Scores A pullout section of 40


pages of sheet music for all levels
Read about our online lessons!

45 Beginner Keyboard Class

Hans-Gnter Heumanns Lesson No 7:


major scales

67 Bachs 48 The staple of most

pianists diet, amateur and professional


alike, the 48 pieces of The Well-Tempered
Clavier can bring lasting satisfaction, says
Bach expert Daniel-Ben Pienaar. Plus, read
his tips on the prelude and fugue thats
inside this issues scores

70 John McLeod at 80 Contributor

Mark Tanner salutes the Scottish composer


and writes a piece for him as a tribute

78
78 Piano Clubs A piano club provides

performing opportunities, moral support


and more. Inge Kjemtrup tells you what to
expect and how to form your own

81 Subscribe today for just 4.50 an issue

by Direct Debit and receive two free books


worth 16

82 Yamahas TransAcoustic Its a

traditional upright, a silent piano and a


high-tech miracle that uses the instrument
itself as a soundboard. Intrigued? Take a
close-up look at this multi-faceted new
instrument

86 CD Review Margaret Fingerhut,

Howard Shelley and Bertrand Chamayou


get five stars each this issue, but there are
other gems as well

88 Sheet Music Review This issues

round-up features a boogie and blues


tutorial, Schubert duets, Rachmaninov
preludes and much more

89 Classifieds

72 Argerich the film Erica Worth

speaks to Stphanie Argerich about her


intimate and funny new documentary
about her famous mother

74 Inside Fazioli Erica Worth takes a trip

to Sacile, Italy, the birthplace of the famed


Italian maker thats taking the world (and
some of its pianists) by storm

VISIT THE PIANIST WEBSITE


WWW.PIANISTMAGAZINE.COM
to sign up for our regular FREE e-newsletters
PLUS Watch our online piano tutorials

Cover photo: Dario Acosta Photography/DG. Images this page, clockwise from top left: New Wave Films (Argerich) Dario Acosta Photography (Trifonov)
Notice: Every effort has been made to secure permission for copyrighted material in this magazine, however, should copyrighted material inadvertently have been
used, copyright acknowledgement will be made in a later issue of the magazine.

p03_Contents79-FINAL.indd 3

10/07/2014 14:21

Editors note

ost of us seem to think that good practising means sitting


at the piano, looking at the score, practising the same
tricky passages day in day out, and with luck, playing
the music a little better each day. But lets try to think
outside of the box. Heres an idea: try practising away from the piano
for a change. Our cover star Daniil Trifonov does that on a regular
basis. He says it helps him to really absorb all the things about a piece,
so that they are absorbed into his mind as well as his fingers. Trifonov
likes to practise underwater too (this might be tricky if theres no pool
handy). Pool or no pool, do read Jessica Duchens inspiring interview
with the dynamic 23-year-old Russian star on page 12.
Another unconventional method of practising pops up in a reader
question (Letters, page 6) about playing blind. Dont worry this
doesnt involve having no eyesight, but it does involve not looking at
the keys. It sounds daunting, sure, but Graham Fitch suggests that its fantastic for practising leaps and
will really help you gain a feel of the geography of the keyboard. Graham offers some more off-the-beatentrack practising methods in his Masterclass (page 18), all designed to ensure that careless errors dont
creep into your playing. One technique that can benefit from practice (but rarely is) is playing pppp. Dip
into Mark Tanners Masterclass on page 16 where the subject is dynamics. It will help with the Schumann
Romance inside this issue lots of pp in that!
It wasnt by design, but several of this issues scores have workouts for the thumb. Theres the Gurlitt
exercise for the thumbs (its so lyrical and doesnt sound like an exercise) and the gorgeous Schumann
Romance, where both right and left thumbs carry the melody (read Lucy Parhams lesson on the piece
on page 22). Even Bachs C minor Fugue requires diligent thumb work some inner voices need major
thumb attention. Daniel-Ben Pienaar shares his words of wisdom on Bachs 48 on page 67.
There are some fabulous non-technical features as well. I travel to Italy to visit the Fazioli factory (page
74), Inge Kjemtrup looks at the joys of belonging to (and possibly forming) a piano club (page 78), theres
an interview with Martha Argerichs daughter Stphanie about her fly-on-the-wall film on her famous
mother (page 72) and we get inside Yamahas genre-breaking TransAcoustic piano (page 82).
So delve in. Your thumbs, pianissimos and leaps might very well be grateful you did.

ERICA WORTH, EDITOR

Make sure that you keep in touch with me what Ive been up to, which
pianists Ive spoken to, exclusive extra articles and interviews by registering for
our FREE e-newsletter. All you need to do is go to www.pianistmagazine.com

COMPETITION

ENTER ONLINE AT WWW.PIANISTMAGAZINE.COM

WIN A PAIR OF TICKETS TO DANIIL TRIFONOVS RECITAL AT THE

ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL, LONDON, ON 30 SEPTEMBER!

Answer the question below correctly and you could be the lucky winner who
receives a free pair of tickets to one of the hottest recitals in town

Dario Acosta Photography/DG

When Jessica Duchen interviewed Daniil Trifonov for this issue, he was about to
walk onto the stage to perform a Chopin piano concerto. How many concertos
did Chopin write?
A: 5 B: 3 C: 2

ENTER ONLINE AT WWW.PIANISTMAGAZINE.COM (CLOSING DATE 12 SEPTEMBER)

Postcard entries are also accepted. Please send to Erica Worth, Editor, COMP PIA0107, Pianist,
6 Warrington Crescent, London W9 1EL, UK. Competition closes 12 Sept 2014. Quote PIA0107 and
remember to put your name, address and telephone number on the postcard as well as your answer.
Answer to the page 4 competition in Pianist No 77: C: 24. Congratulations to the three lucky winners:
Mr Aaron Milne (Cheshire), Miss Jennifer Parmenter (Essex), Mrs Catherine Woods (North Yorkshire)
4 Pianist 64

p04-editorial79-FINAL.indd 4

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Readers
Letters
Get in touch

WRITE TO:The Editor, Pianist, 6 Warrington Crescent, London, W9 1EL, UK


OR EMAIL: editor@pianistmagazine.com
STAR LETTER wins a surprise CD. Letters may be edited.

E D U C AT I O N

Top
Marks

STAR LETTER
Piano exams Just go for it!

Can doing a graded music exam help


you become
a better player? Clare Stevens talks
to examiners,
teachers and adult students who have
taken the leap.
Plus, Ed Balls shares his exam-taking
experience

70 Pianist 78

exam room are also wonderful concert


pieces that you can play to friends,
family, and perhaps the public.
Essex-based Fiona Lau is currently
teaching seven adults, who are at
varying stages from beginners to restarters and teachers wanting to update
their keyboard skills. Together they
make up 50 per cent of my home
teaching, she says. I like working
with adults because they decided for
themselves that they wanted to come
for
lessons, rather than having someone
else
decide for them as is usually the case
with children they are well motivated.
One is preparing for her Grade 1 exam,
one for Grade 8 and one is preparing
to
take the ABRSMs diploma in teaching.
In general, Lau doesnt encourage
adults to take exams they get
extremely worried and there are better,
more enjoyable ways to motivate them
and help them achieve but she
admits that the discipline does focus
the
students practising and provides some
sort of measurable and recognisable
achievement. The impetus to do it
comes from the students themselves,
for a variety of reasons: Teachers might
need to have a diploma, for example,
to
get a job with a music service. Others
see it as a symbol of their achievement.
Frances Wilson, who blogs on music
and pianism as The Cross-Eyed Pianist,

(main image); ABRSM (page 71)

ts an experience that many of


Thats certainly how I felt, having left
us recall only in nightmares:
school at somewhere around ABRSM
the thumping heart; the
Grade 6 standard, and escaping an actual
sweaty palms; the apparent
assessment at that level by taking an
disappearance of everything
O-level practical test considered to be
we had painstakingly learned
more or less equivalent. But I do
about scales and their key
sometimes find myself digging out those
signatures from our mental filing
old exam anthologies and wondering
if
cabinets. Whether they made it as
I should go back and take a couple more
far as Grade 8 or diploma level or
grades. I know Im not alone in feeling
never got further than Grade 2 or 3,
that without some sort of challenge my
many adults look back on the ritual
playing will remain very rusty indeed.
of taking practical music exams as a
For many adults who return to the piano
kind of torture inflicted upon them by
or take it up from scratch as a spare
sadistic parents and teachers. Part of
time or retirement project, it can be
the pleasure of returning to playing or
inspiring and stimulating to have their
singing in later life is the knowledge
efforts acknowledged by the award of
that the dreaded exams do not have to
a certificate of achievement, even if it
is
be part of the process.
only Grade 1 or 2.
So what are the pros and cons of
taking exams?
Our graded exams provide
motivation and inspiration as you
work from a carefully structured
syllabus towards a definite goal, says
the ABRSMs Syllabus Director, Nigel
Scaife. Theyre a measure of personal
progress and attainment against
established, international benchmarks.
They provide a focus for your work
and an objective guide to improve
your musical skills. An exam is also a
valuable performance opportunity
not forgetting that pieces played in the

Courtesy of Nationwide Music Exams

I have just read with interest the two articles in Pianist No 78 on


adult learning and exam-taking and wanted to relate my own
experience not in order to boast, but hopefully to encourage and
motivate other adult learners.
I started the piano at the age of nine but gave up lessons at 15,
having reached only Grade 5. I continued to play on and off, taking
sporadic lessons for the next quarter of a century and then, at 40,
decided to complete my education by entering myself for Grade 8. Much to my surprise,
I was just one mark off a Distinction, which encouraged me to take the Advanced Certificate
(which I believe sadly no longer exists; what is there now for those who wish to progress beyond
Grade 8 without becoming teachers or professional pianists?). In this I achieved a Merit. I am
now 56 and still playing regularly, forcing myself to practise by entering festivals around
the southeast of England. I recently did Chelmsford and Hatfield and will soon be playing at
Colchester, then Woking.
I dont remember much about my Grade 8 exam, other than that it was on a rather shaky
upright in some kind of schoolroom: hardly guaranteed to put one at ones ease. As for the
Advanced Certificate, this was at one of the London colleges, where I had to contend with someone
practising Beethovens opus 110 in the next room throughout the exam!
So my advice to others is: go for it. The pride you will have in passing will greatly outweigh
any suffering you chalk up en route!
Joseph Laredo, Hemel Hempstead
p70_Exams-FINAL.indd 70

15/05/2014 09:50

For many amateur pianists, exam-taking and playing in music festivals provides the motivation they
need to progress their skills. Others find just the challenge of performing for an audience in any kind of
setting to be inspiring. The popularity of piano clubs is surely a sign of this (see the article on piano clubs
on page 78). Thanks for your letter. A surprise CD is on its way to you.

If Ed Balls can do it

I enjoyed reading the


articles on exams in the
latest Pianist, especially
Pass or
the interview between
no pass
Nigel Scaife and Ed
Balls. Even if I might
not always agree what
Ed Balls has to say on
the political front, I now
rather admire him for
his pursuit of his piano
dreams. If he can find the time to practise for his
exams, then it has given me hope for finding the
time to do mine. I took Grade 2 some years back
and I didnt enjoy it too much. I was petrified!
I decided that the whole piano exam thing
wasnt for me. Now, our very own UK Shadow
Chancellor has given me fresh inspiration, so I
am going to try Grade 3 very soon!
Malcolm Jefferies, Edinburgh
E D U C AT I O N

Just before UK Shadow Chancellor Ed Balls took his Grade 3 exam, he spoke with ABRSM
Chief Examiner Nigel Scaife (his teacher Lola Perrin was there for moral support)
your practice, the tension in the room
can slightly get to you.

Ed Balls: My Grade 1 exam was


supposed to be in Finchley Town Hall,
and Lola Perrin, my piano teacher, had
said to me, normally my students all go
as a group are you happy to do that?
and I said, of course, that will be fine.
She said, the only thing you need to
know is that the other five are all aged
eight and under!. We had to change it
at the last minute because something
came up in Parliament, so thats why
I ended up doing my first exam here
[at the ABRSM building in central
London].
For that exam, Lola came with me,
and we sat together in the waiting
room, and opposite us was an 11-yearold boy and his mum. I was feeling
quite embarrassed about the fact that
there was me in my mid-forties with my
piano teacher. Then the mum leaned
over and said, Can I ask, are you doing
your exam today?, and I said I was, and
she said, So am I my sons come for
moral support! The 11-year-old had
come to support her, and she was even
more nervous than me!
I did my second exam at Schotts
Music in London, which was tough
because it was quite noisy. I practised
really hard on my three pieces but the
one I thought was my best piece was the
one I had to restart a couple of times.
However much you think youve done

NS: Well, perhaps there are important


lessons in life there. How do you deal
with your nerves and prepare for taking
the exam?

EB: Well, first of all, I took up piano


because our children were all learning
and they had a really good teacher. Id
always wanted to play the piano and I
never had when I was young. I wanted
to do the exams because I knew that the
discipline and the deadline of the exam
was really good for learning. If it hadnt
been for the exams, I wouldnt have
made the progress Id made.
When youre ten, whether you do well
in the exam or not really matters. For
me, whether I do well in the exam or
not is less important than having done
the work to get here. Although the huge
frustration for me is that in the last
exam, I got a Pass, and my 14-year-old
and 12-year-old did theirs a month
later and one got a Distinction, the
other a Merit. So I spurred them on to
greater achievement! They very much
enjoyed pointing out to me that I only
got a Pass.
In the job I do, familiarity makes a
huge difference. The very first time you
go on the Andrew Marr sofa, its so new
and so different, whereas now Ive done
it many times and I know exactly what
its going to feel like. The same is true

Ed Balls playing at
Kings Place, London,
in December 2013 he was
one of 13 celebrity
amateur pianists playing

Schumanns Kinderszenen

with the exams: the first one you do, its


so unfamiliar, whereas, Im doing my
Grade 3 today; I know what its going
to feel like. In exactly the same way
you stand up in front of the dispatch
box in the House of Commons and if
youve done the work, you know your
audience, youve been there before, its
just much, much easier. You always have
to remember what it feels like, and what
it feels like to do it well in order to do
it well the next time. Having said that,
things often go wrong, and thats the
nature of life.
NS: What advice would you give to
another adult learner like yourself,
who is preparing for an exam?

EB: The most important advice is to


get the syllabus book and listen to the
CD with your family members. Because
however much they like the pieces, by
the time you get to the day of your exam
(and as an adult, youre always catching
your practice before the school run, in the
evening), they will have to live through
them, unless youve got a soundproofed
room. If from the outset they cant stand
the pieces, thats really bad! In my first set,
there was one really annoying piece. With
the three Im doing now, theres a huge
variation. Your teachers will always be
telling you which piece is easier or which
has technique that is more deal-able,
but if you dont enjoy playing it, and the
rest of the family doesnt enjoy listening

Amy Zielinski

Nigel Scaife: Tell us a bit about the


exams youve taken.

74 Pianist 78

p74_Ed Balls-FINAL.indd 74

Discovering Merikanto

surprise I found it difficult to stop playing it.


And I hadnt even heard of Merikanto!
I learned the piece quite quickly and Im now
alternating it with Neil Sedakas 1970s song
Brighton, which has some tricky chromatic
movements but a most distinctive melody.
Classic or pop, music reaches out to all corners!
Graham Andrews, Devon

15/05/2014 09:52

I agree with Erica Worth wholeheartedly in her


sentiments about the Oskar Merikanto piece
Valse lente [Editors Note, issue 78]. Its simply
lovely, with some gorgeous lilting phrases, so no

We are delighted that you enjoyed Merikantos Valse


lente. Erica does her best to find a good balance
between standard pieces with more off-the-beatentrack pieces. Have a look for Massenets Barcarolle
in this issues scores. Erica fell for that piece as well!
75 Pianist 77
78

Playing blindly

I have been playing over 20 years. Recently


I visited a piano store (and school), and as I
played on their piano, an instructor told me
something very strange. She told me I should
play blindly without looking at the keyboard.
In all my years of music school in Europe, I
had never heard of playing without looking at
the keyboard. Could you please give me some
insight? Is it simply personal preference or is
playing blindly the proper way to play piano?
Gintas Simkus, Chicago, USA

Teacher and regular Pianist contributor


Graham Fitch responds: The famous British
concert pianist Cyril Smith, one of Rachmaninovs
favourite pianists, regularly practised blind.
Playing blind means either to practise in the dark
or with your eyes closed its best not to crane
your neck to look elsewhere as this creates postural
problems. The obvious benefit is an immediate
sharpening of your senses of hearing and touch. If
you can manage jumps with your eyes closed, think
how much easier they will be when you open them
again. Consider also that there are some notable
pianists who have been blind since birth, and the
reason they dont miss notes is a heightened sense
of proprioception: their brains know exactly where
their hands are in space, because an imaginary
keyboard has been incorporated vividly into the
brains map of their body. Any pianist will derive
benefit from practising with eyes closed oncein a
while, and I highly recommend it.
71 Pianist 78

Slows the way to go

Graham Fitchs Masterclass article on slow


practising is an invaluable read [issue 78]. I
cannot begin to stress enough the importance
of slow practising. Yes, its hard to abide by this
discipline. Most of us have a tendency to speed
up when we think we know a piece, and we
usually dont know it well enough by then.
What Mr Fitch writes about errors creeping in
carelessly is 100 per cent spot on. If we practise
slowly, however, and listen out for every single
note, we will spot any wrong notes along the way
and eradicate them immediately. I am working on
the Dvok piece inside the same issue [In a
Ring!] and I have set the tempo to lento instead
of the specified vivace. My playing has become
much clearer and cleaner. And if it takes me some
weeks to get to vivace, so be it!
Colin Stevens, Bradford

Never give up

I have only recently seen Mr Kays letter [Music


for the left hand] in Pianist No 68). May I first
of all express my sympathy to Mr Kay on the
partial disability of his right arm.
Years ago, when I was teaching, when a pupil
reached a certain stage of studying composition,
I would play the left hand while they would
play the right. Next, I would play the right
hand while they would play the left. They
would operate the pedals both times. Pupils
enjoyed this immensely. It entails playing the
composition twice.
If Mr Kay has a music friend or teacher who
could perform with him, he might begin a new
life. I wish him a good recovery, and a very
happy and long life.
Seamus ODonohue, Dublin

6 Pianist 79

p06_letters79-FINAL.indd 6

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7 Pianist 79

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09/07/2014 13:08

All the latest news from the world of the piano

HOT TICKETS

The Russians are coming


to London and beyond!

Russia has provided the classical music world with some of its greatest
pianists and repertoire, and both are in the spotlight in London this season.
At the opening concerts of the London Symphony Orchestra, Valery Gergiev
conducts Denis Matsuev (pictured above) in Prokovievs Concerto No 3
(21 Sept) and Tchaikovskys Concerto No 2 (23 Sept). Matsuev, the winner
of the 1998 Tchaikovsky Competition and a frequent Gergiev partner,
re-joins the LSO on 11 & 13 November to play Rachmaninovs Concerto
No 2. All the concerts are part of the LSOs Revolutionary Russians series.
Top London orchestras evidently
think alike, because the London
Philharmonic Orchestra has a yearlong Rachmaninov strand, called
Inside Out. The great Russians
piano works get a thorough dustingoff (as if thats needed), starting
with Concerto No 1, performed in
the original version by Alexander
Ghindin with Vladimir Jurowski
conducting the LPO (3 Oct),
followed by the No 3 (29 Oct, with
Pavel Kolesnikov) and No 4 (7 Nov,
Nikolai Lugansky, left) and the
evergreen Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini (28 Nov, Behzod Abduraimov).
Stay tuned for more dollops of Russian repertoire in the spring.
There are more Russian pianists, though not necessarily playing their
compatriots music, in the Southbanks International Piano Series. Cover
artist Daniil Trifonov plays Bach, Beethoven and Liszt on 30 September,
while Arcadi Volodos serves up Schubert, Brahms and Schumann (28 Oct)
and Alexi Volodin plays Schubert, Chopin and Schumann (26 Nov).
If you need a break from all this Russian borscht, the musical comedy
duo of Igudesman and Joo can help. The sparks behind the Rachmaninov
has big hands sketch are on a UK tour starting with just the two of them at
the Snape Proms (24 Aug) and touring with the LPO (15 Sep, Royal
Festival Hall; 17 Sep, Birmingham; 18 Sep, Leeds; 19 Sep, Manchester).
See lso.co.uk, southbankcentre.co.uk, lpo.org.uk and aldeburgh.co.uk (Snape Proms)

Pianoteq 5 released

Expand your digital pianos colour palette

If youre the owner of a digital piano, you can now have access to the sounds of a
broad range of pianos, acoustic and otherwise, with the latest software release
from Pianoteq. The new Pianoteq 5 offers nine new piano models, and with the
addition of directional microphones, the user can even choose from a range of
different microphones to get higher levels of control.
The grand piano models include a Blthner Model 1 and a Kawai grand
piano K2 that combines the best elements of several pianos. Modartt, the
company behind Pianoteq 5, has even collaborated with the Kremsegg Schloss
Museum in Austria to be able to render some historical pianos, including a 1796
Broadwood, an 1849 Erard and and 1899 Bechstein.
By connecting your computer thats running Pianoteq 5 software to your
digital piano, you can bring this colourful soundworld into your own home.
To listen to samples and download a free trial version of the new Pianoteq 5, go
to www.pianoteq.com

THE PEN IS MIGHTIER...

than the keyboard?

Glance quickly at this pen, and you may think its just another pianorelated trinket, but look more closely and youll notice the incredible detail
that shows it comes from that master of the desirable writing implement,
Montblanc. The Patron of the Art Edition pen is a tribute to Steinways
founder, Heinrich E Steinweg. His portrait graces the gold nib, while
theres other imagery including a Steinway grand
on the barrel, strings on the barrel and the iconic
Steinway & Sons name on the gold-plated cone
ring. Its yours for a mere 6,600!

James McMillan (Lugansky); Dmitri Savitski (Silver); Maxim Reider (Rubinstein Competition winners)

News

Rent a new piano for 10 a week


with the option to buy

www.pinkhampianos.co.uk
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03/10/2013 17:19:59

Top young jazzers vie for the prize


Twelve young jazz pianists will
be vying for the top prize at
the Nottingham International
Jazz Piano, Friday through
Sunday, 3-5 October. You can
see these stars of the future for
yourself at the semifinals on
Friday and Saturday at the
Newton Building,
Nottingham Trent University.
You can also watch the grand
final on Sunday at the Nottingham Albert Hall, when each of the four finalists
will play for 25 minutes and then improvise on a musical motif. Theyll all play
on a Bsendorfer grand (Yamaha is a competition supporter).
The prizes on offer at the competition could certainly help put a fledgling
career on the fast track the winner receives club dates, a recording session in
studios in Nottingham and a track of their playing will be including on a
covermount CD in Pianist, the media sponsor.
Mick Wilson, one of the organisers and a director of the citys Clement Pianos
showroom, explains, Its all fairly fast paced with decisions and the pianists dont
find out whos in the grand final until Sunday morning.
To buy tickets to the competition and for details, go to www.nijpc.com. Read more
about the Nottingham International Jazz Piano Competition in Pianist No 74.

Horace Silver dies


James McMillan (Lugansky); Dmitri Savitski (Silver); Maxim Reider (Rubinstein Competition winners)

Legendary jazz pianist played with the greats


Horace Silver, who co-founded the
Jazz Messengers and played with
many of the greatest jazz musicians,
died 18 June, age 85. Born in
Norwalk, Connecticut, Silver played
both saxophone and piano in high
school, all the while listening
intently to the jazz stars of the day,
some of whom, including Stan Getz,
he would end up playing with.
In a career that spanned more than
60 years, Silver refined his hard bop
style while in ensembles with such players as Coleman Hawkins, Lester
Young and Hank Mobley. As co-founder with Art Blakely with the Jazz
Messengers, he was also keen to pass on his knowledge to a younger
generation of players, and he was also a first-class composer and arranger.
In his most popular album, Song for My Father, Silver references his
Cape Verdean roots in a number of tunes, including the eponymous title as
well as The Cape Verdean Blues. Both tunes made the Billboard charts in
the mid 1960s.

Pianist regular Graham Fitch


gives London recital
Graham Fitch, a regular contributor to Pianists
Masterclass section, will be giving a recital and a
talk at Londons Craxton Studios on 14 September
at 3pm. Graham will play Bachs Partita No 1 and
the French Suite No 5, along with Haydns Sonata
No 50 in C Hob XVI:50. To sweeten things even
more, an afternoon tea featuring scones and jam is
included in the ticket price.
The recital and masterclass are presented by the London Piano Meetup
Group, one of several piano clubs profiled in the article on page 78.
To book tickets for Graham Fitchs recital and talk, go to www.wegottickets.com/
event/256860

Competition
round-up
Three major piano competitions saw Russian and Chinese pianists dominate,
but with gold medals going to non-Russian players as well.
Twenty-five-year-old Antonil Baryshevski of Ukraine (pictured above,
centre) won the 14th Arthur Rubinstein Competition, held in Tel Aviv in
May. Second prize went to Steven Lin (USA, above right) and third to Seong
Jin Cho (South Korea, above left). Best performance of a classical concerto
and best performer of a Chopin work went to Leonardo Colafelice (Italy).
The audience favourite was Maria Mazo (Russia).
At the Gina Bachauer Competition, 25-year-old Russian Andrey
Gugnin was the gold medallist, having performed Rachmaninovs Piano
Concerto No 3 with the Utah Symphony in the final. He will play with the
orchestra again as part of his prize, and also receives a recital at Carnegie
Hall and a recording contract with Steinway. Second prize was won by Chi
Ho Han (South Korea), with third going to Artem Yasynskyy (Ukraine).
French pianist Jonathan Fournel was the first prize winner of the tenth
annual Scottish International competition, while second place went to
Ilya Maximov (Russia), third to Jianing Kong (China) and fourth David
Gray (UK). Fournel also received the special prize for the best
performance of the commissioned work. 30 pianists from 18 countries
competed in the first stage, playing 30-minute long recitals, and then ten
went to the semi-final before the final four players were chosen. At the
final, they played with the Royal Scottish National Orchestra of Scotland
conducted by Gergely Madaras. The winner received a 10,000 cash
prize along with the Sir Alexander Stone Memorial Trophy, the Frederick
Lamond Gold Medal and a Blthner grand piano generously donated by
the Alfred-Reinhold-Stiffung Foundation.

BEST OF BRITISH

Cavendish partners with Broadwood


In a rare spot of good news for fans of
the home-grown British piano,
Cavendish and Broadwood, the
nations last remaining piano
manufacturers, will team up in a joint
venture. Broadwood, considered to be
the worlds oldest piano manufacturer
and holder of the Royal Warrant as
piano makers to Queen Elizabeth, will
see its instruments made by the
Yorkshire-based Cavendish. Broadwoods Dr Alastair Laurence, a piano builder
and technician, will oversee production of all Broadwood pianos at the new
facility in Bolton Abbey, Yorkshire.
In October, instruments from both makers will be on display at the
increasingly important Shanghai Music Fair, where the British marques and
British pianos in general have a cache with a growing population of piano
lovers. In a reversal of the usual global trend, Cavendish recently announced
that it had received a five-year, 1.75m contract to supply pianos to a Chinese
wholesaler. The sun has not yet entirely set on the British piano.
For more information about Cavendish, go to www.cavendishpianos.com; for
Broadwood go to www.broadwoodpianos.com

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The pros share their views


Q&A

with Tim Stein


I nd that when I play
a piece in public, I
speed up because I am
nervous. How can I
control this?

This is a common problem.


You practise and practise at
home at the tempo you are going to perform,
but as soon as you come to play the piece in
concert or in the exam, you end up speeding
up. Unless you are a robot, it is impossible to
play your pieces at exactly the same time every
time, because nerves or adrenaline take over.
Nevertheless, there are still a few things you can
do to keep your tempo in check.
In my teaching studio, I often see students
playing their exam pieces at wildly differing
tempos. The easy bits that they know well are
always played faster than the trickier bits. I
sometimes pick out random bars in a piece and
to get the student to play each bar at the same
tempo. Then I get them to check the tempo
with the metronome, to make sure that they are
playing each bar at exactly the same speed.
Metronome practice is invaluable when it
comes to checking your speed overall. Start out
with a very slow metronome speed, then once
you are playing in slow, strict time you can start
varying it, speeding up intentionally bit by bit.
Counting out loud is also an invaluable tool
for maintaining a tempo. Start by subdividing
the beat or just count the main beats for each
bar. Once you can do this successfully, just
count out the first beats of each bar, which can
sometimes take a little more practice. Again, if
you find this difficult, go back to counting every
single beat in each bar, or subdivide the beats.
For accelerandos and rallentandos, first
practise playing everything in time and then
practise the changes of tempos, counting
out aloud as you do so. Also try practising
consciously at different speeds, especially at a
faster speed than your intended performance
tempo. This is to allow for when the adrenaline
kicks in, so even if you end up playing a little
faster you can control the speed.
Even more importantly, give yourself as many
opportunities to perform as possible. Hopefully,
this will help lessen the anxiety.
Go to www.pianistmagazine.com to watch Tims
online lessons for beginners, and visit Tims own
website at www.pianowithtim.com

WRITE TO: The Editor, Pianist, 6 Warrington Crescent, London, W9 1EL, UK


OR EMAIL: editor@pianistmagazine.com

PIANIST AT WORK

Ji Liu

The young Chinese pianist talks to


Erica Worth about Bachs Goldberg,
the joys of Gershwin and why his
debut CD topped the charts
You are playing Rhapsody in Blue in September.
Do you enjoy playing Gershwins music?
Oh yes! I am a big fan of jazz. Gershwins music
is perfect for me: since he is also a pianist, his
music is quite comfortable to play pianistically.
What will you be playing at your Wigmore
Hall recital on 7 October?
Bachs Goldberg Variations, which Ive played
since I was 16. I always look for suitable places
and occasions to play it. It may sound absurd,
but I do feel that for certain pieces such as the
Goldberg Variations, we cant really play them
everywhere. The atmosphere, stage setting,
venue, instrument, audience, coughs and other
sounds in the hall, probably even the scent of
the air and the temperature, basically, everything
matters when we make music and magic with
certain masterpieces. Wigmore is such a special,
intimate venue that I thought my audience and I
would have a sublime hour with Bach.
What composers do you most like to play?
So many! But I am quite natural with Scarlatti,
Bach, Beethoven, Schubert, Chopin, Liszt,
Rachmaninov, Prokofiev, Debussy, Ravel and
some jazz as well.
Your debut CD was Editors Choice last issue
and topped the classical charts. Any ideas why?
I think the repertoire matters a lot. Some people
say young musicians need to play new music and
unknown pieces, and who would want to listen to
Beethoven Moonlight again and again? But it is
such a masterpiece that I had fresh ideas about it
and couldnt wait to share it with a wider audience.
Do you play unknown repertoire as well?
Indeed, yes! This season, I am playing Rzewskis
Winnsboro Cotton Mills Blues, which involves
elbow playing on the keyboard, and Busonis
Sonatina No 6, which is based on the themes
from Carmen. Last season I played one of

Schuberts unfinished piano sonatas alongside


Ligeti etudes. I enjoy discovering new pieces while
playing the most hard-core classical music.
Whats your hardest technical challenge?
Well, as we know, we cant really treat technique
simply as a technical challenge because
technique in a wider sense is all about art. It is
hard to recall any particular technical challenge
not because I dont have any, but there are
so many! I used to struggle with the Chopins
thirds tude a lot, so I practised it like mad. By
the way, I think John Cages 4' 33" is one of the
most difficult pieces I play!
Whats your usual practice day like?
It really depends, because I am travelling a lot
right now. I try my best to practise eight hours a
day. Since I have repertoire for different concerts,
I need to spend many hours on the keyboard, and
away from the keyboard to digest and absorb. But
luckily, I am a quick learner. Even so, I need to
practise a lot, as practice does make perfect well,
at least it makes us closer to perfection!
Ji Liu performs Rhapsody in Blue with the Royal
Liverpool Philharmonic at the Royal Albert Hall on
23 Sept as part of the Classic FM Live concert, gives
a lunchtime recital at the Wigmore Hall, London
(7 Oct) and is in recital at Leeds College (12 Nov)
and the Nottingham Royal Concert Hall (16 Nov).
To find out more, visit jipianist.com

Kevin Mcdaid

EXPERT TALK

UNDER THE LID

Top tuners and technicians from the Pianoforte Tuners Association (PTA) tackle your instrument queries
My piano has a crack in the frame. Can it be repaired?
Cracks in a cast-iron frame are uncommon, but if they do occur, they
can be repaired depending on where they are. Cracks in certain areas of
the frame can cause tuning instability and can get worse over time, while
other cracks can be present for a long time and not cause any problems.
They can occur over time from imperfections during the casting process in

the factory, by being dropped during shipping, or by uneven stress being


exerted when being re-strung or poor scale design.
You should seek expert advice for inspection and any repairs. A repair will
involve removing the frame from the piano and the cost of a re-string, so it
might not be economically viable on most pianos.
John Thompson, MPTA

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in the world and his schedule is jampacked. We are talking backstage at the
Barbican, mid-afternoon; in the evening
he will be out there, playing Chopins
Piano Concerto No 2 with the LSO and
Gergiev. Instead of talking to me, he
probably should be having a snooze but
he shows no signs of tiredness.
For this concert, he is using his own
choice of instrument, a Fazioli grand that
he has also requested for his Royal Festival
Hall recital debut in the International
Piano Series a programme containing
Bach, Beethovens Sonata opus 111 and
the small matter of Liszts complete
Transcendental Etudes.
Whats so special about that piano?
The first time I played on a Fazioli in
2010, I was very impressed with its
evenness and the quality of touch, which
allowed stupendous control of the softest
dynamics, Trifonov says. Every Fazioli
I have played since then has had its own
character and soul. As for this particular
piano, What struck me the most is
its amount of volume combined with
richness and warmth of tone. It can sing
even in episodes with full orchestral tuttis,
without any over-forcing. I couldnt wish
for a better instrument in this repertoire.
Composer turns pianist
Daniil Trifonov was born in Nizhny
Novgorod into a family of musicians.
His father is a composer and his mother
teaches chamber music. Trifonov, as it
happens, is also a composer and it was
this, not the piano, that was his first
musical love: Composing was actually
what brought me to classical music at the
age of five, he says. The piano
was just the instrument we had
at home. My parents saw that I
was starting to compose and to
explore the instrument and that
was the reason to bring me to a
musical school.
The family moved to
Moscow so that Daniil could
attend the famous Gnessin
School of Music, where his
piano teacher was Tatiana
Zelikman. I studied there for
eight years, he says. There
was an accent on a complete
variety of repertoire, but the
main focus was probably
on Beethoven and Chopin.
Later I developed a passion
for Scriabins music.
Listen to Trifonov play
Scriabin the Sonata No 2
features on his debut

ianists with the


potential for real
greatness are like
London buses: you wait
a couple of decades,
then along come several
at once. Currently there
is a flurry of excitement around the
twentysomethings, with the emergence of
such artists as Benjamin Grosvenor, Igor
Levit and Federico Colli. But even in this
context, the zoom to stardom of the
Russian pianist Daniil Trifonov, 23, is
something quite extraordinary.
He hit the headlines in 2011, winning
the piano gold medal of the Tchaikovsky
Competition in Moscow. He was already
in the public eye that year, however,
having just scooped top prize in the
Arthur Rubinstein Competition in
Tel Aviv, as well as third prize in the
Chopin Competition in Warsaw, in the
composers bicentenary year. All this in
just seven months.
That was an intense schedule but
Trifonov is an intense musician. From
the moment he steps on stage, it is as if
something is aflame inside him, which
then flares into being at the piano. In
his hands, familiar works seem entirely
newly minted, yet make perfect sense.
Trifonov never plays a repeated phrase the
same way twice, and his flair for drama
and narrative reaches heady heights in
combination with his beauty of tone and
inextinguishable passion for the music.
How did he cope, though, with that
succession of competitions? A very
important strategy, suggested by my
teacher Sergei Babayan, is not to play the
same repertoire for every competition,
Trifonov says. A competition can be
a great lesson, but it has both positive
and negative effects. It depends how
you treat it to get the best out of it. One
good thing is to learn a vast repertoire
with lots of new pieces. Also the focus
and concentration you can obtain from
playing at such a high-stress event is very
important.
The highest stress, he adds, was the
proximity of the Rubinstein Competition
winners immediate two-week concert
tour with the start of the Tchaikovsky
Competition: On the day of the last
Rubinstein winners concert, in the
morning I played Brahmss Liebeslieder
Waltzes with a choir; the same evening I
flew to Moscow and had the selection for
the Tchaikovsky Competition! There was
no time for a vacation.
There rarely is. Trifonov is now one
of the most sought-after young pianists

This
way up
In the galaxy of talented
pianists under 30,
Daniil Trifonov shines
exceptionally brightly.
Jessica Duchen meets
the prize-winning,
intensely focused and
brainy young Russian

Hao LV, Limura Studio

INTERVIEW

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10/07/2014 09:33

Win tickets!
13 Pianist 79

p12_interview-FINAL.indd 13

We are delighted to be offering a free pair of


tickets to Daniil Trifonovs recital on
30 September at the Royal Festival Hall,
London. Turn to page 4 for full details!

10/07/2014 09:33

If you could play only one piece in the whole


repertoire from now on, what would it be?
A piano transcription of Scriabins Poem of
Ecstasy but there is only a transcription for
two pianos. So, an original one
If you could play only one composer from now
on, which would it be?
Whichever composer you are playing immediately
becomes your favourite, so this is impossible!
One pianist, dead or alive, youd travel long and
far to hear?
Anyone from the golden age of pianists maybe
Rachmaninov.
Any technical struggles?
If you have a 15-hour flight and all your muscles
are tight, it is much more difficult to play than it is
after a yoga session.
What would be your advice to amateur pianist
about how to improve?
Listen to recordings of great musicians of the
past: a wonderful lesson for anyone.
If you werent a pianist, what would you be?
Maybe an organist.
One person youd love to play for?
My parents. I dont see them often enough.
One composer youre not quite ready to tackle?
Well, one composer Im looking forward to
playing more of, but not in the current season, is
Brahms.
What other kind of music do you like to listen to?
Progressive rock of the 1970s-80s like King
Crimson or Pink Floyd. Also jazz Art Tatum is one
of my favourite pianists.

LISTEN LEARN PLAY

13LEARN
PIECES TO

ALL LEVELS AND ALL STYLES


STEP-BY-STEP LESSON
ON MENDELSSOHNS

SONG WITHOUT
WORDS
OP 30 NO 3

PLAY A SULTRY

3 BEGINNER PIECES
WITH BAR-BY-BAR
TECHNICAL HELP

CUBAN DANCE

BY CERVANTES!

BONUS TRACK
Daniil Trifonov plays CHOPIN
Daniel Ben Pienaar plays BACH

SCORES BY MOZART BRAHMS MASSENET MENDELSSOHN


ATTWOOD GURLITT ARNDT and more performed by Chenyin Li
pianist79_CDcover.indd 2

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17/06/2014 10:11

ON THIS ISSUES CD
Daniil Trifonov plays
Chopin Prlude No 17
in A flat major. The track
comes from his Trifonov:
The Carnegie Hall
Recital release (Deutsche
Grammophon 479 1728)

storytelling. Its an ever-evolving, unstoppable


process, and the Liszt is one of the best
examples of how the material transforms
into completely different shapes, but never
loses the line.
Obviously all forms of arts are
interconnected, he adds. You can find a lot
of inspiration in literature, cinematography
and the visual arts. For example when I was
in Paris I visited the Muse dOrsay, where
there is a series of sculptures by Rodin
including several of hands. The expression
being transmitted through these hands is
incredible. And also watching pianists, the
hands are speaking and thats what you
can also find in the video recordings of great
artists. While practising you have to rely 99
per cent on your ears, but there are certain
things which you might not notice. So if
you film yourself from the side you can see
the process of your response to the music;
by watching your hands you can detect any
unnaturalness that might lead you off track
in the first stage of learning a new piece.
When I first learn a new piece, I listen
to recordings before looking at the score.
Because the score is in certain ways a
translation of what the composer intended in
the soundworld. Its very difficult to explain
music fully on paper the score is as detailed
as possible, but its always an analogy. By
listening, your first impression can at times
can be more explanatory than the score can
show. Of course later you have to study the
score in detail, but I believe it should be
the second stop in the journey, because first
you come to the realization of the music,
and then to thinking about how to explain it
in the symbols.
Titanic premiere
The penny drops: perhaps part of the secret
of Trifonovs exceptional musicianship is that
he is a composer himself and therefore thinks
about other composers music very much
from that perspective. When we met he was
preparing for the world premiere with the
Cleveland Institutes student orchestra of his
own piano concerto, a substantial, half-hour,
virtuoso effort in the tradition of the great
Russian concertos such as Rachmaninov,
Prokofiev and Shostakovich. Soon afterwards,
one review described the audience staggered
by Trifonovs titanic premiere of his own
First Piano Concerto.
Babayan believes theres a major correlation
between his pupils musical creativity and the
kaleidoscopic world of his pianism. Being
a composer makes a huge difference, he says.
It teaches one to take every detail of a score
with utmost seriousness and attention, yet
to go far beyond these details, understanding
the intentions of the composer on a
completely different level. Perhaps Daniil
will bring back the great tradition of the
composer-pianists.
Trifonov agrees: I think Schnabel said
that when you go on stage to play Beethoven
you should not play it, you should re-compose
it. Certainly I have to be part of co-creation
in the performance. Every piece comes

All photos Dario Acosta/DG

Up
close
DANIIL TRIFONOV

recording on Deutsche Grammophon, a live


recital from Carnegie Hall and you can
quickly tell they are soulmates. His music
has an incredibly sharp subtlety of harmonic
vision, he says. The first piece I heard was
Poem of Ecstasy. After that I couldnt get
enough of his music. Scriabins very rapid
evolution was remarkable, from the early
period when he was under the influence of
Chopin, and later Liszt and later still
Wagner, eventually forming a completely
unique style. I love the maximalism of the
emotions, which range from the most
extreme tenderness to extraordinary daring.
There is always a sense of creation in his
music its like the cosmos being created.
Finishing at the Gnessin School, Trifonov
who was born a few months after the fall
of the Soviet Union dreamed of studying
in the US. Zelikman suggested he go to
the Cleveland Institute of Music to study
with the Russian pianist Sergei Babayan. It
proved an inspired move. Hes an amazing
musician and pianist himself, Trifonov
enthuses. During lessons he can show
effortlessly anything at the piano, and the
colourful creativity of the language he uses is
something that will inspire any student.
Babayan, for his part, sensed at once that
a phenomenon had walked into his studio
when Trifonov arrived, bringing the Chopin
B minor Sonata. From our first meeting
I knew that this is a musician and person of
extraordinary gifts. Something about him
told me that he has that special rare gift for
Chopin that very few pianists have. You
can deepen it and develop it, but I cannot
imagine being able to implant it. The sense
of dealing with a precious diamond has never
left me, all these years.
Mostly he inspires me to come up with
ideas that would be unimaginable for a
person of lesser gifts. For a teacher to work
with Daniil Trifonov would be the same
as for a conductor to have a chance to be able
to work with the Vienna Philharmonic: the
possibilities are infinite.
One abiding love of Trifonovs that dates
from his school days in Russia is his passion
for the recordings of golden age pianists.
Tatiana Zelikman had large collections
of LPs by pianists like Alfred Cortot,
Dinu Lipatti, Ignaz Friedman, Vladimir
Sofronitsky At almost every lesson she
would give me one of them to listen to.
Probably this formed in some ways my
musical preferences. I love their incredible
individualization of touch, the subtlety of
timing, the poetry of their colours and the
effortlessness of their storytelling.
Trifonovs own skill in musical storytelling
is wonderfully distinctive, especially in a
work like Liszts B minor Sonata. Of course
it doesnt necessarily mean narrative in the
sense of characters and descriptions, but
in composition it is inevitable that there is
cause and effect, he explains. No musical
thought comes from nothing. It is always
coming from the previous thought, it is
always leading somewhere and there is always
something behind it so in that manner its
14 Pianist 79

10/07/2014 09:33

through the prism of the performer and there can


never be two identical performances of the same
work, even by the same pianist. The atmosphere
is different, the acoustic is different, the
emotional world is different. Music is primarily
the art of time.
Trifonovs future currently looks more than
limitless. Babayan, seeing his students runaway
success, is inevitably concerned for his well-being,
but remains confident that he can withstand
whatever life throws at him. He will always be
developing because his self-ignition mechanism is
innate, he says. I am worried for him, of course
that much travelling cannot be very healthy for
anyone. Every artist needs time to listen to the
silence. I believe that he should play as much as
he wants to.
In the end, Babayan is sure that Trifonovs
self-knowledge and intuition will lead him along
the right path. Daniil has a very decisive, strong
personality, he says. He listens to his heart and
to his nature. I do not think someone can fail
when so attuned to his own very open heart.
His love for music is something unmatched. For
me, Daniil is music itself.
Daniil Trifonov makes his Royal Festival Hall
recital debut in the International Piano Series, on
30 September (southbankcentre.co.uk). Go to
www.daniiltrifonov.com to find out more. Jessica
Duchen would like to thank Zsolt Bognar for putting
her in touch with Trifonovs teacher Sergei Babayan.

DANIIL TRIFONOV ON
UNDERWATER PRACTISING

When you practise, the most important thing is to


involve your creativity, which sometimes can lead
you to interesting solutions. Time will tell you
which of these inventions can serve your process
of practising and which ones can be put away
and forgotten.
There is a very simple logic behind the idea of
practising in a swimming pool. Most pianists, if
there is no piano next to them, can warm up just in
the air before going on stage. Now, water has much
more resistance than air, so if you apply the same
technique under water, it opens up your shoulders
and upper back. These muscles are always a great
concern for pianists, especially if you travel a lot and
have to spend hours on end sitting in aeroplanes.
Besides, quality of tone can often depend on where
the starting point of unrestricted motion in the hand is
located, something you can hear amazingly mastered
by Richter or Gilels, for example. So maintaining that
degree of flexibility in muscles is essential.
I do yoga and swimming whenever possible. This
is particularly helpful during long recital tours with a lot of travelling. But apart from that,
I dont relax much while I am on tour. I think you need to keep this level of high focus and
concentration. In that sense its good to have a very intense schedule and then afterwards
maybe a vacation of a week or ten days. A couple of times a year I have longer breaks and
thats the main time when I learn new repertoire. Of course there can be a place for relaxation
I love cinema, art and literature and, most of all, hiking in the countryside.

April 2014, recording of the Beethoven Emperor Concerto, Sir Neville Marriner and the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields, Cyprien Katsaris with Steingraeber E-272

All photos Dario Acosta/DG

The magnificent Steingraeber E-272 has proven once more to be an


ideal companion The sound is always perfect and never gets hard.

Cyprien Katsaris

Such a pleasure to work with Steingraeber instruments.


Perfect for the soloist, the orchestra and the conductor!

www.steingraeber.de

Sir Neville Marriner

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HOW TO

The dynamics of
DYNAMICS

If you want to bring a beautiful and shaded touch to your playing, mastering dynamics will take you
another step closer, says pianist and teacher Mark Tanner, who shares his best tricks and tips

he importance of
dynamics for pianists
is hard to overstate.
For although we
pianists can vary
dynamic shades with
seemingly infinite
sophistication, we have no capacity
for altering tone in the way that, say,
a violinist or clarinettist can take for
granted. This is because the piano is a
percussion instrument, and the hammer
makes only the briefest of connections
with the string(s) before retreating. In
broad terms, we can control just two
elements: how long each note lasts
and how loud or quiet it is. In other
words, there is no possibility for us to
alter how key speed is generated, only
how much. Granted, tonal variation
is made possible when the various
pedals are employed, either singly or in
combination, but management of tone
is actually management of dynamics,
and a pianist possessing a lovely touch
is in reality an expert at graduating and
balancing dynamics. Moreover, it is
worth thinking about what we are doing
when we attempt to create a crescendo
or diminuendo, for we cannot grow
through a note as a singer would in a
genuine crescendo, we can only suggest
ebb and flow by connecting up each
note dynamically as persuasively as our
instrument and technique will allow.
Incidentally, most of us are far better
at building crescendos than shaping
diminuendos, which can result in what I
call dynamic inflation in performance.
The breakthrough of the 18th-century
Cristofori prototype fortepiano was its
capacity to control dynamics on a
note-by-note basis, unlike a harpsichord,
which explains the derivation of
fortepiano: loud-quiet. Ironically, the
clavichord an equally important
precursor to the piano enjoyed some
tonal flexibility because a player could
retain control of the metal tangent
following its initial impact with the
string, bringing about the so-called
bebung effect, and effecting a sideways
rocking motion to produce something
akin to a vibrato. Alas, no amount of
after-strike manipulation of a piano key
will have the slightest effect on what is
heard. We must work with what we have.

Loud vs soft
How loud is loud, and how quiet is
quiet? The short answer is that it is for
each of us to gauge, for dynamics are
ultimately subjective, and the context
in which we are playing is pivotal.
Good piano playing in a small room
will often appear loud, but projecting
a meaningful palette of dynamics in
a large hall is an entirely different
matter. Hence, we cannot simply apply
dynamics with a blanket approach
because the bigger the space, the more
compressed the effect is destined to be.
Inexperienced players often produce a
small range of dynamics when moving
from their upright to a bigger one in, say,
an examination room. For this reason
it is worth getting as much practice as
possible with playing in different-sized
rooms and on a variety of instruments.
There comes a point at which a piano
will begin to complain when you attempt
an overly loud dynamic: when you hear
too much hammer attack, resulting
in an unrewarding, strident thud (an
effect a teacher of mine described as all
percussion and no note; others call it
hitting through the tone). Equally, there
is a limit to how quietly the instrument
can realistically respond, for an overly

TOP
TIPS

FIVE TOP TIPS FOR DYNAMIC DYNAMICS

Dynamics are a non-negotiable component of effective piano


playing, generating shape, contrast and much-needed interest
invariably best used in combination with careful articulation.

While all musical styles benefit from dynamics, bear in mind


the varying capacities of period instruments, as well as the
idiosyncrasies of the most important composers.

Know your instruments workable dynamics and guard against


making a clamorous or weedy sound. Note the parameters
pertaining to each piece, be they p to f or pppp to ffff.

While we should guard against exaggerating dynamic effects


for their own sake, target areas deserving of especial attention
in your playing, holding something back for your grandest
moments. Even the humblest scale invites a little active shaping.

Aim always to control the dynamic balance between the hands,


also to promote melodies, dissonances, colour notes within
chords and strands of musical interest buried within the texture.

Priory Records has just


released two new CDs with
Mark Tanner at the piano:
flautist Gillian Poznanskys
disc of Bachs Flute Sonatas,
praised as a performance of
truly fine musical expression
by Gillian Poznansky and Mark
Tanner, and Marks own folk
song arrangements, including
Loch Lomand and Down by
the Salley Gardens, with
bass-baritone Michael George.
Meanwhile, Spartan Press has
just published Marks latest
piano book, Cityscapes, for
Grades 2-5. Find out more at
www.marktanner.info

timid blow will bring about an effect that


is unlikely to feature within a workable
dynamics palette, even in a small room.
To get an idea of what works best,
record your playing from different parts
of a room/hall. In terms of balancing,
youll need to bring appreciably more
dynamic to melodies and interesting
moving parts, even though this may
result in a slightly exaggerated effect
when assessed close-up.
Try the following experiment to
discover the softest and loudest sounds
your instrument can achieve: using
your second or third finger, play a
note somewhere in the middle of the
piano keep the sustain pedal depressed
as you do this, as it will help you to
compare each shade in light of its
neighbour. Now close your eyes and
count how many discernible dynamic
shades you can come up with between
these two limits, beginning with the
softest and becoming gradually louder.
The same experiment performed at
different registers of the instrument,
and with chords instead of single notes,
will bring about a different number of
possibilities, though you may be startled
at what you discover. On a newish
Steinway Model D, I counted about
30 dynamic shades on middle C, but
even on an upright with the lid closed
you ought to be able to manage at least
half this with little difficulty. Now,
playing a simple scale up and down, see
whether you can actually use this range

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MASTERCLASS
of dynamics so that you start and end
pppp, with the highest note receiving
your boldest dynamic of ffff.
We pianists do not spend enough
time thinking along these lines. Listen
to a flautist or trumpeter practising, and
youll notice that they can spend hours
playing single notes, subtly altering the
dynamics, tone, attack, decay, harmonics
and vibrato in pursuit of absolute
control, which they can then call upon
when playing. I am not advocating the
vulgar employment of extremes in your
playing rather, I am suggesting we
need to know what both we and our
instrument are capable of before getting
down to the task of creating meaningful,
shapely phrases and teasing out bigger
events in our piano playing.
Dynamic implications
An eternally thorny issue for pianists
is how to interpret dynamics in music
of contrasting styles. This really comes
down to a judgement call based on
experience of reading scores and an
awareness of the instruments of the
time. For example, an ff in Beethoven
should not be considered the same as
an ff in Bartk, while a p in Mozart
cannot directly equate to one in, say,
Debussy. How much salt is enough in
your lasagne? Taste plays a part here,
but be guided also by what you know of
a composers overall strategy.
Whereas Mozart was more generous
with dynamic markings in earlier
sonatas than in later ones, Haydn was
the other way around. While neither
ever used mp in keyboard music (and
only rarely mf), Clementi used both
markings a fair amount, and cresc. and
dim. became increasingly conspicuous
in the keyboard music of all three
composers. Mozart assumed, in
common with many other composers of
his day, that a movement should start
at a dynamic of f unless told otherwise.
There are countless idiosyncrasies to be
aware of elsewhere, such as Beethovens
fondness for the ubiquitous sf, or a
protracted crescendo followed by a subito
p (intriguingly, Beethovens employment
of direct loud dynamics, such as ff, was
actually less commonplace than his use
of quieter ones, falling to ppp).
Brahms used f ma dolce, which on
the face of it is a contradiction in terms,
while French composers revelled in the
direction lointain, distant, which holds
an implication of a quiet dynamic but
is not necessarily used in conjunction
with a p or pp, let alone an instruction to
incorporate the una corda pedal. Other
Romantic composers, such as Liszt, saw
fit to repeat a marking, such as f, perhaps
several times on the same page without
indicating anything else in between it
is for you to decide whether to make
a series of crescendos from something
quieter on each occasion, to make each

f louder than the previous one, or else


to simply regard these as cautionary
markings and maintain the same
dynamic throughout the passage.
Bach and Scarlatti are often
troublesome too their keyboard scores
are bereft of dynamic markings, so where
does this leave us on a modern piano?
Once again, the answer will vary
according to schools of thought, but Id
suggest that any notion of authenticity
will not be achieved merely by
sidestepping the issue of dynamics; after
all, we are playing an instrument as far
removed from the harpsichord or
clavichord as a squash racquet is from a
hockey stick, and perhaps the worst fate
of all for a modern performance of
Baroque keyboard music is one which
comes from sitting on the fence for fear
of offending. Needless to say, Handel
ought not to sound like Rachmaninov,
but we do Baroque composers no favours
by shrinking from our responsibility to
play with conviction and artistry, which
may well involve a degree of dynamic
change. So-called terraced dynamics
(dynamics in blocks, that is, with one
phrase played, say, f, followed by another
played p or indeed the other way around)
are perfectly viable tools on a modern
piano. Terraced dynamics emulate what
would have been achievable on a
two-manual harpsichord or organ, giving
a subtle contouring of contrapuntal lines,
which can be more than agreeable if kept
within sensible bounds. Echo effects and
rising sequences abound in piano music
of all types, not just 18th-century
repertoire, and these can really help the
listener to understand what is going on.
In a performance, a pianist may well
choose to play music of several styles
and hence contrastingly varied dynamic
possibilities all on one instrument! So
rise to the challenge or your playing will
end up inhabiting a middle ground that
serves none of the repertoire profitably.
Arguably, while too much dynamic
contrast will frequently result in a
chaotic, unstructured appearance, too
little will leave listeners cold, wondering
what they are supposed to be latching
onto. CPE Bach wrote of the need to
emphasise dissonance in other words,
rude notes are more important than
polite ones and this can be seen to
apply equally to music of later periods
also, including the multitude of styles
which emerged during the 20th century,
of which jazz is but one important
example. The innate symmetry of
phrases in a Mozart sonata can be
advantaged by a balanced employment
of dynamic effects in conjunction with
the equally if not even more important
function of articulation. Indeed, with
composers from the Classical era, the
elegant chemistry of dynamics, accents,
melodic peaks and cadences was always
judiciously weighed up.

SOUND ADVICE

Mark Tanners tips for effective use of


dynamics in 3 of this issues scores

Tanner Loch Jedmon [Scores page 34]: Loch Jedmon, written


as an 80th birthday present for the eminent Scottish composer
John McLeod, [see page 70 for more] contains Scotch snaps
idiomatic little syncopations at bars 5, 14, 28 and 32. The LHs
bare fifths, adorned with grace notes, underpin the music and
invite a sensitive handling throughout; even the f markings need to
come over more as short-lived goals than moments of high drama.
Encourage the symmetrical phrases to acquire a sense of rhythmic
life by coinciding the subtle dynamic markings; furthermore, ensure
your decrescendos come down sufficiently on each occasion so that
the performance doesnt become louder and louder as it unfolds.

Cervantes Cuban Dance No 6 [Scores page 36]: The six Cuban


Dances are terrific miniatures and No 6 is over before its begun.
You must take the listener on a brief yet colourful journey that
culminates at bar 26, the pieces main event, where the G minor
chord is marked sf within a prevailing f. Observe the p marked straight
after to lend welcome whimsy to your performance.

Arndt Nola [Scores page 49]: Nola wends its unpretentious


way through a succession of related, gently exuberant sections,
though the music never becomes unduly flustered. The modest
herringbones and generally soft dynamic markings belie the need for
shape and colour, so treat these with imagination. In particular, go
with the rise and fall of the triplet sequences and resist adding too
much pedal its got to spring to life crisply and daintily throughout.

When tackling a more extended


work, especially one from the Romantic
era where there may be narrative
undercurrent at play, do a little analysis
to gauge precisely where you feel the
music is headed. Dynamic peaks are
indispensable in helping to perceive such
events from within a grander scheme.
The most dynamically intense moments
will commonly be found to coincide
with other clues, but ultimately, if we
cant hear what you were hoping for, you
didnt achieve it! To emphasise everything
would result in an absurd performance.
It will all come together satisfyingly for
your listener when your dynamic choices
closely follow the peaks and troughs in
the score (what the scholar N Todd aptly
called the dynamics of dynamics).
If we compare Boulez and Scarlattis
strategies for dynamic markings side
by side, we cannot fail to see how far
the goalposts have shifted over a couple
of hundred years. Some contemporary
scores are so littered with directions for
dynamics and other markings that there
hardly seems room for manoeuvre for
the performer. Ultimately, regardless of
repertoire, we need to remember what
we are trying to achieve when we mull
over the dynamic possibilities, whether
it be directional impulse, character, style,
structural unity or contrast.
In the next issue, Mark Tanner will be
talking about strengthening the left hand.

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HOW TO

Starting the right way

LEARNING TECHNIQUES

Faulty or careless practising will eventually reveal itself in your performance, says teacher and performer
Graham Fitch, who shares some strategies for practising correctly from the outset of your study

he biggest single challenge with practising for most players


is to keep your mind fully focused on what you are doing:
intense concentration is definitely the key to success. While we
do need to be able to go into autopilot mode in performance,
we should guard against this in our practice. Students of the
piano often assume the problems they are experiencing have to do with
a specific technical issue, such as difficult passagework or tricky ornaments.
That might sometimes be the case, but difficulties can very often be traced
back to skimping on thorough when they first started learning the piece
in question. Instead of building their performance on solid bedrock, they
were so keen to experience the joys and the sheer exhilaration of playing
through the music that they glossed over certain bars here and there, and
did not fully digest the contents.
Better, then, to start thinking of practising as encoding information
and performing as decoding it. Faulty or careless practising is bound to
show up in your performance. The good news is that the more care and
attention you give when first learning a piece, the stronger and more secure
you will be later on with it.
In this article, I will share some proven methods of learning deeply that
I hope will help you practise more efficiently and with a greater sense of
satisfaction. You will notice that all the practice suggestions I have given
here involve playing rhythmically. Making sure your practice is rhythmical
is another important way to keep engaged.
Bar-by-bar
Bar-by-bar practice can be great, but the problem is all that stopping and
starting! I have developed a process for practising bar by bar that connects
the stops and repetitions to a constant rhythmic pulse. Most pieces of music
are divided up into bar units, even though we dont usually tend to hear it
in that way. For our practical purposes, lets take each bar as one link. If we
are concerned about our ability to string each of these bars together into
one long chain without breaking down, there is a great way we can practise
to test this, as well as to reinforce and strengthen the links.
Start by playing from the beginning of the bar, stopping just over the
next bar line, on the first note or beat. You can do this up to speed, slowly
or very slowly, hands separately and then together.
Next, leave a silence before starting from the note you stopped on, and
then play the next whole bar ending on the first note or beat of the
following bar. Count out the remainder of the bar you just arrived at, and
add a whole extra bars worth of silence, making sure to keep the rhythm
alive during the silences. You can of course use a metronome, or just feel the
beats. During the silence, evaluate what you have just played and focus your
mind on what you are about to play. Continue in this fashion until you
reach the end of the piece or the end of your designated section for

WATCH GRAHAM ONLINE


Dont miss Graham Fitchs video
lessons, which youll find on
the Pianist website at
www.pianistmagazine.com.
Graham demonstrates everything
that he discusses on these pages
and more. His current lessons are
filmed at Steinway Hall, London, on
a Model D concert grand. Theres
nothing like watching the expert!

Graham Fitch is a pianist, teacher, writer and adjudicator. He gives


masterclasses and workshops on piano playing internationally, and is in high
demand as a private teacher in London. A regular tutor at the Summer School
for Pianists in Walsall, Graham is also a tutor for the Piano Teachers Course
EPTA (UK). He writes a popular piano blog, www.practisingthepiano.com.

that days practice. If you stumble over any bar, it is vital that you are able
to play it flawlessly and fluently before you move on. If you want to be
really secure, you could consider repeating each bar three times anyway.
In that case, make a rule to play each bar three times correctly in a row.
Heres how it looks with a very simple piece (the Minuet in G BWV
Anh114, from the Anna Magdalene Notebook) but it will work with any
piece, including the most advanced:

#3
& 4f f f f f f

F
? # 43 FF

f f f

#f

f f f f f f

?# f

&

Be sure to start with the precise fingering at each new starting point the
same fingering you will be using in the finished version (you might prefer
to write in extra fingering for this). Be flexible about how you apply this
in pieces with short bars, or few notes in each bar, consider working in
units of two or four bars, and as you become more familiar with the
material, it is a good plan to extend the sections anyway. If there is a tied
note over the bar line, either depress that note silently before playing the
next bar or just leave it out.
Zigzagging
Zigzagging back and forth from one hand to the other is another useful
practice strategy. Lets take the C minor prelude of Bach, from Book I of
the 48 as our example. [The full score is featured on page 57 of this issue.]

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MASTERCLASS

PIANO AUCTION

As a supplement to practising hands separately, you can play a designated


section in one hand and pass it over to the other hand, back and forth. Do
this rhythmically, fluently and seamlessly without skipping a beat, aiming to
make the left hand (LH) sound as good as the right (RH):

b
& b bc f f f f f f f
f

? bb c
b

SATURDAY 20TH SEPTEMBER

f f nf f f f f
f
f f f f
f f f f

ffffffff

Now go back over the section doing it the other way round, beginning with
the LH. You can work in half-bar sections, and then in whole-bar sections
(it is good to vary the section lengths anyway). This is an extremely useful
way to test the memory, if you do it from memory! It also strengthens
motor control enormously as well as keeping you fully engaged mentally as
you practise. Try it its not easy at first! Instead of stopping on the very last
note of the section in one hand, you can add one more note so that both
hands play together on the downbeat. The last note in one hand and the
first note in the other are synchronised, thus linking the two hands.
Skeleton Practice
In my last article, on slow playing, I suggested making a sketch of the
opening of Beethovens Pathtique Sonata by leaving out the some of the
surface detail for practice purposes so you can better feel the main structural
events. Lets look at two more examples of how we might use skeletons in
our practice. Chopins Nocturne in E flat opus 9 no 2 is a popular piece, and
yet many players lose the overall shape of the line and how it wants to move
by getting bogged down in the LH chords. Obviously, you need to practise
the LH alone meticulously so you can organise the distances and learn the
hand shapes so that they are second nature. In parallel with this, you might
also play a skeleton version by omitting the chords, and playing only the low
bass notes together with the RH. As you do this, listen most carefully to the
balance between the hands and feel the ebb and flow of the cantilena (if you
want to reinforce your memory, play the skeleton from memory):

b 12 f
& b b 8 fJ

f f f f

Tb f f f
f f f fn
J
J
J

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f f
J

p espressivo dolce

j
? bb 12
f.
b 8 fj J fj j j f. fj fj
f.
.
.
f.
.
.

Auction opens Saturday


28th at 12:00 noon

The opening of the Rondo from Mendelssohns Andante and Rondo


Capriccioso opus 14 trips up many players. If you practise a skeleton
version whereby you feel the semiquaver upbeats and project these strongly,
it all feels so much easier when you revert to the original:

f # f f.
#6
J
& 8

14:00 - 20:00
10:00 - 20:00
09:00 -11:45

Presto

? # 68

.
f#f fJ

j
j
j
f#f f. f#ff. f#f f.

j
.
f & f#f fJ
j
f#ff.
f

Having played the skeleton a few times concentrating on rhythmical


projection, it will be excellent practice to mime the missing notes (touch
the surface of the keys without sounding the notes) while playing only the
notes of the skeleton.
Gradually building up a piece by adding and subtracting elements from it
is an excellent way to learn it. When you practise like this, it is as though you
get inside the mind of the composer as you discover how the piece is built up.
Rather than relying on muscular memory, you will know the music on
a much deeper level from having deconstructed it in your practice. n

www.britanniapianoauctions.com
info@britanniapianoauctions.com

In the next issue, Graham talks about how to work on producing a good tone.
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Ingasas

T MISS
DON NIE
MELA KS
SWIC
SPAN
PIECE
ON THIS 20

HOW TO

Thomas ATTWOOD (1765-1838)

N
LESSO

TRACK 3

BEGINNER

Allegro from Sonatina in G

PAG

Throughout his life, English composer Thomas Attwood benefited from the
patronage of the royal family, who even sent him to Vienna to study with Mozart.
The royal investment was not wasted: Mozart was impressed by him. This Allegro is
the first of a three-movement sonatina; the second movement appeared in issue 73.
Playing tips: Even if there are no phrase markings in the score, you need to know
where the melody is heading: The first two bars are a kind of question, with the next

two bars an answer. The whole first phase, however, is eight bars long. Keep the Alberti
bass of the LH nice and even. Make sure to adhere to all the dynamic markings,
crescendos and decrescendos, the rests and so on. This is a great exercise for finger
dexterity and evenness.
Take a look at the technical tips within the score. And read Melanie Spanswicks
step-by-step lesson on page 20.

Make the RH melody really sing. It has to sound


sweet and lyrical.Think in long 2- or 4-bar phrases.

FULL SCORE ON PAGE 30

Allegro q = 160
Allegro
q5 = 160
3

The key is G
major (notice
the F sharp).

# 4Allegro q = 160
f
f
f f
&# 44 ff ff ffq = 160
F
f ff f
f f
& #44Allegro
F
f f
& # 4 pff ff ff ff f ff
F
f f f f f f F f f f f ff ff
& 4p
f f
f
f
? #4
f ff ff ff ff ff ff ff f ff ff ff f ff ff ff
? # 444 pp
f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f
? #4
f
? # 44 Keep the LHfAlberti bass
fand even. No f
line nice
bumps. Slight emphasis on the first and fifth quaver.

{{

2
2

5
5

1
1

1
1

3
3

5
5

1
1

2
2

2
2

f
f
f
f

f f
f f ff
f f f
f ff ff ff
f f ff f f f f f
f f f f f f ff f
f f f f f f
f f f f
4
4

4
4

#j
f
f
f
f
&# fj f f f f f f f f
F
f f f f
f
f
f
& #ffjf f f ff f ff ff f ff
F
f f ff f
f
f
f
& # fj f f f f f f f f mff
F
f f f f
f
f mf f ff f f f f f F f
f
& f f f
f
fmf f f f f f f f f f f ff f
?#

fmf
? # FF
f f f f f f f f f f f ff

f
f
?#
f

f f f f ff f f f ff f f f f
? # FF Make sure to lift the hand for the rest.

4
4
4
4

{{

3 2
3 2

Allegro from Sonatina in G

4
4

5
5

4
4

4 are four bars of flowing quavers in the RH.


Now there
You will need to shape the line so thereis a good flow.

Practise slowly and think of each note as being important.


Small decrescendo here.
#
But always remember where the notes lead.
&# f f f f f
f
f
f f f
f f
& # f ff ff f f ff ff ff f ff f ff f f f ff f f ff ff ff ff ff
& # f f f f f f f f f f f f f pf f f f f f f f f f
f ff f f f ff f ff f ff pf f f f f f ff f f f
& f
?#
ff
f
fff
fff
fff pp
f

? # ffff
f

ff

ff
ff
ff
?# f
f
f

ff
ff
ff
? # fff
f

7
7
7
7

THOMAS ATTWOOD

Take note of all the dynamic markings the crescendos and decrescendos.

3 2
3 2

{{

1
1

2
4
2
4
2
4
2
4

2
2

1
1

2
2

3
3

4
4

1
5
1
5
1
5
1
5

1
2
1
2
1
2
1
2

1
1

5
5

1
1

#
f
&# f
f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f
f ff
& # f ff ff ff f f ff f ff ff ff f ff f ff f f f f ff f
f f
mf
&# f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f
f
f
f mff f
& f
f f
f
f Ff f f
f
F
? # f f f f ff
f

f f fmf ff

f
? # ff
f
F

f ff fmf

f
f
?#
f
f f
F
f

f
f
?# f
f
f f f f

10
10
10
10

{{

4
4

1
1

2
2

2
2

4
4

4
4

4
4

5
5

4
4

1
1

5
5

5
5

Lift your had off for the crotchet rests.


30 Pianist 79

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10/07/2014 16:30

Teacher and author Melanie Spanswick shows you how to bring clean, rhythmical delivery and
a pragmatic approach to tonal colour and dynamics to this justifiably popular Classical gem
Ability rating Beginner/Elementary
Info
Key: G major
Tempo: Allegro
Style: Classical

3 Articulation
3 Balance between the hands
3 Tonal shading

This beautiful little Sonatina is a fine


example of the Classical style and can
serve as a perfect first recital piece.
Melodic, cheerful and comfortable to
play, its a favourite with many pianists
around the world, as the plethora of
performances on YouTube suggest!
Thomas Attwood (1765-1838), born
in London, enjoyed royal patronage
from an early age. He was organist
at St Pauls Cathedral, composer and
organist at the Chapel Royal, and
music teacher to both the Duchess of
York and the Princess of Wales. One
of the first professors at the newly
formed Royal Academy of Music, and
a founder member and director of the
Philharmonic Society, he was apparently
one of Mozarts favourite pupils.
The Austrian masters influence is
clear from the outset. It has a diatonic,
simple melody combined with an
essentially Alberti bass (or broken-chord
accompaniment). This Sonatina may
look relatively straightforward but in
order to give a convincing performance,
several technical and musical challenges
must be met.
Before you start, listen to the
recording on this issues covermount
CD for an overall perspective. Doing
so can help you with general tempo,
aural perception and dynamics. The
suggested metronome marking of
crotchet equals 160 feels appropriate for
the style and character, however, when
you start to practise, a significantly
slower speed would be better, allowing
for complete assimilation of fingering
and note geography.

Fabrice Rizaato

Melanies Top Tips

Melanie Spanswick is a classical pianist, teacher, adjudicator, author


and presenter. She regularly conducts workshops and masterclasses
in Germany as well as for EPTA (European Piano Teachers
Association). She adjudicates for the British and International
Federation of Festivals and curates theClassical Conversations
Series, where she interviews eminent classical pianists on camera.
These interviews are published on YouTube. Her book, So You Want To
Play The Piano? has been critically acclaimed and recently featured in
the Pianist newsletter. Find out more at www.melaniespanswick.com
andwww.soyouwanttoplaythepiano.com

Will improve your

Be sure to find the top of the musical line within each phrase, and
colour appropriately.
Use a free, loose wrist when negotiating the quaver passagework
in the RH.
Ensure the LH thumb is light and smoothly voiced throughout,
especially during the Alberti bass figurations.
Observe all the rests in the LH.

The Classical style requires a clean,


rhythmical delivery. Separate hand
practice is beneficial. Work the left
hand (LH) broken chordal passagework
by blocking out, i.e. playing all the
notes of the first two crotchet beats in
the bar, together. The first four notes
in bar 1 (G, D, B, D) can be played in
unison (as the tonic chord), followed
by the second quaver group or last two
crotchet beats in bar 1 (F D, C, D)
which is the dominant seventh chord;
two chords will thus be sounded instead
of eight separate quavers. Apply this
method to the whole piece (where
broken-chord passagework occurs)
and you will rapidly learn the notes,
fingerings and hand positions of the
bass line. The LH crotchet chords and
single notes (bars 7-11, 13-15 and 26-7)
profit from a non-legato execution.
Articulation, that is, crisp fingerwork,
is key to a successful performance.
Rhythmic grasp and poise is required
throughout. Set a slow tempo, and for
really accurate articulation, sub-divide the
beat. Count aloud in semiquavers, playing
along precisely with your voice as you
count. You could also experiment with a
very slow quaver metronome pulse, being
sure to sit on the beat. Avoid pulling or
pushing the pulse, as each quaver beat
must be perfectly placed.
A particularly striking feature of
this Allegro is the constantly flowing
melody. It weaves its way around
Gmajor via a stream of mostly quaver
movement in the treble clef. The A-B-A
form ensures repetition of the tune
and the cheery, fundamentally four-bar
phrases provide measured punctuation.
A pragmatic approach to tonal colour
and dynamic gradation is paramount.
The balance of sound between each
hand is important too. Work at creating
a very fluid, silky musical line. Try to

master a perfectly smooth LH which


should be softer and lighter than the
RH. As you practise, evaluate carefully
each sound produced, ensuring a
consistent, equal match. Try practising
with a full tone, after which a much
lighter approach should reveal even
articulation and sonority.
The RH requires a firmer touch, even
in piano passages. This is because the
melody must sing out expressively.
Sufficient arm weight and a free wrist can
help. Use the fleshy part of your fingertip
and sink right into the key bed to allow
each note to ring, producing a warm
timbre. Youll need control to change the
sound from piano to forte, and to achieve
a completely legato melodic line.
Adhering to dynamic markings will
make for an interesting rendition.
Especially significant is the change from
forte in bar 16 to piano in bar 20 (for
the recapitulation), where the texture is
very sparse (just the RH alone). Practise
many different touches to find the
appropriate decrescendo.
Ornaments must be precisely
incorporated in any piece. Here they
can easily knock the rhythmic pulse,
thus changing the whole dynamic.
Practise the Sonatina without the
acciaccaturas (or grace notes, which
appear at bars 4 and 23) to begin with,
adding only when the rhythm is firmly
established. The acciaccaturas should
be light, elegant and played on the beat
(i.e. for the first acciaccatura, at bar 4,
play the clipped B of the RH at the
same time as the D in the LH).
A little rubato at bar 19 into bar 20
and also in the last bar (27) could be
stylistically attractive. Choice pedalling
at cadential points (possibly bars 8, 26
and 27) keeps the Classical character
alive, thus producing a full resonant
sound and creating colour and depth in
this sprightly miniature masterpiece.

20 Pianist 79

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10/07/2014 16:31

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play

Ingasas

WATCH CHENYIN LI PLAY THIS PIECE ONLINE AT WWW.PIANISTMAGAZINE.COM

Felix MENDELSSOHN (1809-1847)

TRACK 7

INTERMEDIATE

Song without Words op 30 no 3

HOW TO

DONT MISS
JANET NEWMANS

LESSON
ON THIS PIECE

PAGE
22

FULL SCORE ON PAGE 38

Adagio non troppo q = 60

##4
& # #4

? #### 44

5
1

1 2

ff

ff

ff
1

sf

F
? #### FF
1

3
1

sf

f
J j j
f
fff
ff

1
2

f f f
ff
mf

ff

F
j
f fj F

j
ff f ff ff f F
f F

1
2

. . . . .
fj f f f f f j
#f
f f n fff ff # fff fff
p
Ff f
ff
ff ff f F
f F
4

ff

5 2

FF

# # f
& # # F

Song without Words op 30 no 3

ff

ff

ff

? #### FFF

ff

ff

chords so that the top note sounds out the most. You will notice many
dynamic markings try to observe them. There is in fact a lot of
information on the score to digest, even if this piece is very slow. Another
challenging technique is being able to master chords when playing piano
so dig into the keys, even if gently. Remember to feel the pulse (as if
its inside your body), or things will begin to sound too static. It all ends
as beautifully as it began.
Read Janet Newmans step-by-step lesson on this piece on page 22.

.j . . . .
## j
& # # Ff f f f f f f f fj n ff f # ff ff
f
f f f f
#F

MENDELSSOHN

A fluent pianist himself, Mendelssohn wrote many pieces for solo piano,
not least the eight volumes of Songs without Words. Each volume contains
six short lyrical pieces. This tender Adagio comes from the second
volume, which dates from 1833-4.
Playing and pedal tips: This short piece is all about touch, control, and
aiming to bring out a beautiful tone from the piano. The melody notes
should be speaking to us. The opening should just float upwards. Then
the poignant main melody enters in the middle of bar 3. Voice the RH

j
f f #f f f f
F
f
2

FF

j
f f #f f f f
F
f

f f f
ff
mf

FF
2
4

ff # fff # ff
cresc.

F
F

f
3

f f
f f

5

38 Pianist 79

P38 Scores MENDELSSOHN-FINAL.indd 38

09/07/2014 12:25

With judicious use of pedalling, fingering and legato, you can make this delightful miniature sing and
memorising it would be even better, says teacher and performer Janet Newman
Ability rating Intermediate
Info
Key: E major
Tempo: Adagio non troppo
Style: Romantic
Mendelssohn composed Songs
without Words throughout his short
life. Although they were published
separately, they were collected into
eight volumes, several with dedications,
including among others, one for Clara
Schumann. The Songs without Words
have remained popular with pianists
of all abilities, and are still a staple of
the Romantic repertoire today, as they
offer plenty of scope for developing
technique, cantabile touch and line.
Many, including this delightful little
Romantic miniature that is in the
second volume, are just a joy to play
and have that timeless quality which is
associated with all great music.
This piece has a very clear structure,
which helps immensely inpractising.
This will also makes memorising a
real possibility. If you havent tried
memorising before, I would really urge
you to try it with this piece. Playing
from memory, in my opinion, adds
enormously to any performance because
you have a much greater relationship to
the sound you make and you have an
ability to react creatively. In terms of the
audience, memorising also adds a great
deal to communication and directness.
The opening is formed from an
Emajor arpeggio and needs to flow
seamlessly. Use the pedal throughout
this, taking it off on the top note.
It would feel natural to do a small
ritardando here more of a give
in the pace and place the final
two chords very gently to end the
introduction. Moving into the main
theme, Mendelssohn has written the
melody within the chords with the
top part needing to be voiced above
the harmonies below. So, using the
technique Ive written about in my
previous How to Plays, break down the
chords by practising the top part only,
always making sure that you use the
correct fingering consistently. As ever,
I cant stress enough the importance of
being precise about fingering. A lack of
awareness about fingering is at the root

Will improve your

3 Sense of phrasing
3 Legato touch
3 Preciseness of fingering

of many of the problems I encounter


with less-experienced pianists. It does
take time to gain control over this.
Once you have thoroughly absorbed
the melody line, add the middle line
and listen for your balance within
the parts. Is your top part slightly
to the fore? Does it sing above the
accompaniment? Its also worth just
playing the accompaniment left hand
(LH) plus the middle line of the right
hand (RH) in order to just know
exactly what it is you are trying to keep
quieter and balanced.
In bar 4, the articulation over
the quavers is meant to be semidetached. This will give a very

As a rule, use your pedal as an


addition to legato and texture,
not as a replacement this is
not always easy, I know!
expressive, almost hesitant quality to the
shape. Make sure that you sustain the
harmony lines in your fingers and just
lightly release the top part think of a
damp sound, not a spiky one. Follow
the phrase shaping as printed in bar 5
and grow through the phrase to the
Fminor chord. Although the marking
indicated is sf, dont see this as a harsh
accent, more of a natural outcome to
the musical sentence. The next phrase is
almost a mirror to the previous one, but
you need to take a little more time in
moving to the C minor chord (bar 8)
as the octave E has a greater impact
emotionally. Rhythmically, these bars
(7-11) are exactly the same as bars 3-7,
but the key change moves the music
into different territory and I think a
darker quality is hinted at until the
return of the theme in the phrase
ending at bars 10-11.
Janet Newman is Head
of Keyboard at the Royal
Grammar School in
Guildford. In addition to
her teaching, she is in
demand as a freelance
pianist and is an examiner
for the ABRSM.

Once the octaves in the LH begin at


bar 11, ensure that you play them as
legato as you can. Use the fingering as
suggested on the copy (i.e. not just all
5s on the fifth finger) and imagine your
pedal stops working so that you have
no choice but to join the bass line. As
a rule, use your pedal as an addition to

legato and texture, not as a replacement


this is not always easy, I know! In this
small section (bars 11-17), work again
on breaking down the RH chords in
order to get as good a tone as possible in
your melody line. This passage contains
the some of the biggest tone in the piece

Learning Tip

If in doubt about phrase shaping,


sing the melody and see where you
naturally breathe. This will help you
to play in a more song-like way.

and you need to have enough power


in your weaker fingers to project the
line convincingly. This taking apart of
chords and harmony really does help to
improve this aspect of playing, which is
why I suggest it so much!
The musical material repeats halfway
through bar 17 and there needs to be
a feeling of resolution and return in
your playing at that point. Check that
your wrists are relaxed I tend to think
that the wrists should be at the level of
the keys. If you feel tension here, stop
and try to think about relaxing down
into the keys, with no sense of forcing
coming into play. As there are so many
uses of the same musical material within
this small piece, think about varying
the dynamics sensitively and also the
use of rubato (the give and take within
the pulse) at the phrase endings. Its
hard to be precise about this, as it is
something that is intimate and personal
to each musician, but I would take my
time over the endings at bar 20 and bar
24. Whatever you may feel about this,
it is vital for the line and shape of the
melody to have plenty of time to speak.
I would encourage experimenting with
the differing ways of phrase shaping to
find what you like the best. By putting
expressiveness at the forefront of your
performance, you can make sure that
the flow and direction doesnt feel
halting or broken at all.
End the piece as you began it with
a wonderfully mellifluous, glowing
arpeggio followed by two perfectly
placed chords. If you can add a little
extra colour to the D and E here, that
will give a real feeling of conclusion to
the music.

22 Pianist 79

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09/07/2014 12:46

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23 Pianist 79

10/07/2014 10:27

play

HOW TO

SCHUMANN

Romance in F sharp op 28 no 2

Dont be fooled by the apparent simplicity of this tender Romance you must master a melody in
both hands and tricky part playing. Concert pianist and teacher Lucy Parham takes you through it
Ability rating
Info
Key: F sharp major
Tempo: A slow Andante
Style: Romantic

Advanced

Will improve your

3 Part playing
3 Balance between hands
3C
 ontrol of piano and pianissimo

This Romance is one of most loved


and best known of Robert Schumanns
short piano pieces. It is the second in
the set of Three Romances opus 28 and
is very much the most frequently
played. Do not be deceived by its
apparent simplicity, though! There are
a lot of things going on in this piece
that will demand close attention it
is a study in balance and part playing,
and is essentially a duet between the
right and left hands. You must also
pay attention to the pedalling, which
would require a whole essay in itself.
For reasons of space then, I will assume
that if you are playing this advanced
piece, that you already have a good
instinct for pedalling.
Clara Schumann particularly loved
the Romance in F sharp; sadly, it
turned out to be the last piece she
ever heard. It was played to her by
her grandson when she was on her
deathbed. This makes it especially
poignant, and when I perform this
piece, this fact is always in my mind.

Sven Arnstein

Start your study of this piece by


observing Schumanns very specific
marking of Einfach. This means
simply and is very significant because
this piece should never sound overindulged or over-romanticised. It should
always have a simplicity at its heart.
Schumann hated virtuosity for its own
sake even in his most bravura works
there is always an intention behind
his tempos. Showing off was not
something he cared for in any respect,
and Clara was always keen to reiterate
this in her own playing and writing.

Lucy Parham performs


Nocturne at St Georges,
Bradford with Patricia
Hodge and Robert
Glenister (10 Sep) and
in Mallorca with Harriet
Walter and Guy Paul
(28 Sep to 5 Oct).
She performs Rverie
at the Quartz Festival
with Henry Goodman
(9 Oct) and at her
Sheaffer Sunday Matinee
Series with Simon
Russell Beale at St Johns
Smith Square (19 Oct).
Lucys recording of
Strauss Enoch Arden
(with Henry Goodman)
will be released later this
year on Deux-Elles.
For other dates and
details, please visit
www.lucyparham.com.

You can do this for the first eight bars


before you need to change your method
and use your outer fingers (the top part
of the RH and the lower part of the
LH). Dont forget that this is a duet and
both hands are equally important while
they are sharing the melody.
Strive for a warm melodic tone at the
start. To achieve this, it is crucial to use
the side pad of your thumb and not
the tip of your thumb, that is, where
it meets the first knuckle. Really try to
sink into the key, drawing the sound
out of the piano rather than pushing
the sound inwards. Think of a viola.
A warm and mellow sound quality is
what is required right from the outset,
in order to draw the listener into this
private soundworld.
Always listen really carefully and ask
yourself if each note is beautifully
matched to the preceding note.
In general, the quaver upbeats in
the melody should be given special
attention. as this will avoid too much
emphasis on the crotchet downbeat.
A lot of the phrasing in this piece is
carefully constructed in two-bar phrases,
so try and breathe with the music.
Once you have started to feel
comfortable with the melody, add
in the accompanying semiquavers.
Make sure that they never overshadow
the melody, which means that your
touch on semiquavers needs to be
lighter. Its all about balance. You
want to try to use the fingertip here
rather than the pad of the finger to help

you in these accompanying notes. As


the melody moves through from bars 4
to 5, you can increase the dynamic

Learning Tip

Start your learning of this piece by


playing the melody alone, which is
in both hands

intensity a little bit and then take it


back from bar 7 to 8 into a beautifully
graded decrescendo that melts into the
double bar. It is important to observe
the repeat here, as it is an integral part
of the piece. It also allows you to make
a very different dynamic statement
from the first time you play it. Think
carefully about what you would like
to do in the repeat; maybe less than
before, maybe even project a little more
than the first time. It is a very individual
decision. Personally, I like to be more
reflective on the repeat but I know
thats not for everyone. Whatever you
choose to do, make sure it is convincing
and not just an exact repeat of those
same eight bars!
The falling five-note motif at bar 9
(the five descending RH notes that
resolve on to the D) is Claras theme.
This is the private and very personal
theme that Robert and Clara exchanged
during the time when, as young
lovers, they had been separated by
Clarasfather. When Schumann wrote
this theme into his music, Clara knew
that he was thinking about her. (The
theme originally comes from one of
Claras own pieces, the Nocturne opus
6, which I wrote about in my How to
Play in issue 75.)
Because of this motif, the melody
in bars 9 and 10 is particularly
significant. Try to give it a yearning
quality and change the colour in bars 11
and 12 as it goes in to the darker key of
F sharp minor. Make sure that the end
of bar 12 has a real decrescendo, so that
the C (first note) at the beginning of
bar 13 starts from nothing.

When you start to learn this piece,


play the melody alone in both
hands that is, the thumbs alone.
For the opening and much of the
middle section, it is thumbs that play
all the melody. Start by ignoring the
semiquavers and just play the left
hand (LH) and right hand (RH)
thumbs, so that you get the initial
shape and sense of line of this piece.

I always feel that there is a long,


sweeping line from the beginning of
bar 13 to the beginning of bar 18.
The part-playing is very important. The
RH begins, and then halfway through
24 Pianist 79

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10/07/2014 14:15

Ingasas

T MISS
DON PARHAMS
LUCY
PIECE
ON THIS E

Robert SCHUMANN (1810-1856)

N
LESSO

TRACK 13

ADVANCED

No 2 from Three Romances op 28

PAG
24

Robert Schumann composed the Three Romances opus 28 in 1839, the year before
he finally married Clara Wieck after their long and difficult courtship.
Playing and pedal tips: When you listen to the track on the CD, it sounds like an
easy piece. But sounds can be deceptive! Look at the score and you will find three

staves. That alone might worry some! However, the middle stave basically points
out the RH melody, which is mainly played by the thumb. You will need to use
ample legato pedalling, but try not to blur the melody notes. Use your ears.
Read Lucy Parhams step-by-step lesson on this piece on page 24.

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63 Pianist 79

P63 Scores SCHUMANN-FINAL.indd 63

bar13, the LH answers. Think of


this in terms of a conversation being
passed from one hand to the other.
This is a constant feature in this piece
as both hands are equally important
and there is always a dialogue going
on. You should never feel that it is
led by the RH alone.
Sink gently into the accents on the
half bar in bars 13, 14 and 15. They
are not to be strident or attacked in
any way, more pointed out. Note
the gradual crescendo from bar 14,
15 and into 16 and try to grade it
accordingly. Always remember that
you want to keep a sense of peace
and not urgency, and you must
achieve it without moving the tempo
on too much.
There is a real feeling of darkness
in bar 17, which is the only bar
where the LH is alone. It should
melt into the re-statement of the
opening theme at bar 18. Again, this
is a place where you have to think
about the different colour: Do you
want to make a change from the
opening? If you do not, beware,
because the statement is repeated
three times!
The end of bar 21 sees a change
into the beginning of bar 22 and
there is a feeling of moving on
as the piece climbs melodically.
Once you have reached the climax
at the middle of bar 24 (the dotted
crotchet), let the sound die away
gradually. Out of the embers of this
sound, the RH can start its new
melody, answered perfectly by the
LH. There should be perfect part

09/07/2014 12:30

playing here. All the parts have their


own specific voice in each register,
so try and give each one of them a
different colour.
At bar 27 you have reached the
lowest and deepest point of the
piece. You have to counteract this
with the ascending answer to the
previous two-bar phrase, as the music
climbs higher again. Do not forget
the conversational aspect discussed
earlier and use the crescendo to
bring you to the climax of this
phrase (really the climax of the
piece), which happens at bar 29.
Really project and play out, as it is a
moment of pure joy. The LH melody
at the beginning of bar 30 is the last
time we hear this phrase before the
piece melts back, this time into a
final coda. This should really sound
as if you are bidding farewell. A
reminiscing quality is needed here.
Now let the music grow quieter and
quieter its a great study in
control! In the last few notes you
need to get those repeated C sharps
as quiet as you can. You can achieve
this by keeping your finger on the
key and never letting any air come
between the finger and the key. Use
the weight of your shoulder to help
you too. This ending should have
a prayer-like quality and should hold
listeners spellbound, so spend a lot
of time in trying to get the last two
bars really beautiful. We need to feel
we have travelled full circle from
the start to the finish of the piece.
Lift the pedal slowly and keep your
hands above the key to create the
perfect melting ending.

Lucy Parham on Florestan and Eusabius

Schumann had two alter egos called Florestan and Eusabius. Florestan was the
wild impetuous character and Eusabius the fragile tender side. He felt these two
characters represented the two sides of his personality. But they were also, in
his mind, real people. Schumann was diagnosed as a manic depressive (bipolar).
Having two personalities is linked to this condition though not always.
Much of his music focuses on one of these characters and some of his music,
such as Kreisleriana, embodies them both. He even signs the letter F or E at
the end of each piece, like a signature. In Carnaval, Florestan and Eusabius also
each have their own individual pieces
This Romance is the voice of Eusabius. And if you want to find other pieces
with the Eusabius character, try Trumerei (from Kinderszenen), Des Abends
(the first piece of Fantasistcke op 12) and Warum? (No 3 from Fantasistcke).
Florestan is a kind of nervy, manic character (not bombastic or march-like)
the last movement of the G minor Sonata is a perfect example. A full-throttled
Florestan comes in to play in the first movement of Kreisleriana and the E flat
minor Intermezzo from Faschingsschwank aus Wien is very Florestan-like.

P24 HTP Lucy 79-FINALish.indd 25

10/07/2014 14:15

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26 Pianist 79

Pianist
mag July26
2014 (230x300).indd 1
p26 Ads.indd

10/07/2014
15:02:31
10/07/2014
15:20

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24
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Track

oN tHis

PiECE

Scores

LEARN { MORE WITH OUR


{
VIDEO
LESSONS
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p45-48_K

eyboard-F

54

54

LUCY PARHAM

65

INAL.indd

Contents

46 Pianist
65

46

p49-65 Scores2-F

INAL.indd

63

63

LOESCHHORN
Study in C op 65 no 3

29

MOZART
Minuet in F K2

30

ATTWOOD
Allegro from Sonatina in G

32

GURLITT
Study for the thumb

34

TANNER
Loch Jedmon

36

CERVANTES
No 6 from Six Cuban Dances

38

MENDELSSOHN
Song without Words op 30 no 3

40

BRAHMS
Waltz op 39 no 11

42

MASSENET
Barcarolle op 10 no 3

45

KEYBOARD CLASS
Major scales

49

FELIX ARNDT
Nola

57

JS BACH
Prelude in C minor BWV 847
Well-Tempered Clavier Book 1

60

JS BACH
Fugue in C minor BWV 847
Well-Tempered Clavier Book 1

63

SCHUMANN
Romance op 28 no 2

65

5/3/12 16:08:20

5/3/12 16:12:00

28

6/3/12 09:17:03

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Quick guide to
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p27_Scores_Intro-FINAL.indd 23

w = semibreve/whole note
h = minim/half note
q = crotchet/quarter note
e = quaver/eighth note
x = semiquaver/16th note
y = demisemiquaver/32nd note
14/07/2014 16:07

Albert LOESCHHORN (1819-1905)

TRACK 1

German pianist, pedagogue and composer Albert Loeschhorn wrote concert pieces
for the piano as well as studies. This piece comes from a volume of 48 short studies.
Playing tips: Try to keep the pulse moving, but never rush. Start off by playing it
slowly, possibly with the help of a metronome, and then increase the speed with time.

Count in silently, a bar or


two, before you begin.

Allegretto

f
4

3F
&4
1

The key is the


easy C major.
No sharps or
flats.

BEGINNER

Study in C op 65 no 3

3
&4

q = c.144

If you find the grace note tricky below, start off by


practising without it.Then add it only when notes
are secure.The grace note should be very light and
quickly move to the B, which is played on the beat.

f
5

F
2

The fingers need a light touch and even touch. This is definitely a good exercise for
even RH articulation. The LH is the accompaniment, so make sure that it supports
the RH, with the first beat being the strongest.
Take a look at the technical tips within the score.

4
fj

f f f

Lightness of touch is needed in the RH.


Try to round off the four-quaver/crotchet
pattern in each bar.

f f f f f

f f f f f

This needs to be

mf

f
f f

f
f f
5

mp quieter.

f
f f

f
f f

Aim for a legato even touch in the LH. No


bumps allowed.The fingering will help.

Play the grace note


lightly again.

.
f f f f f f f f F
f

&
Dont forget the staccato last note!

& F

#f

The double barlines with the dots


mean that you need to go back
and repeat the first 8 bars.

fj

f f f

f f f f f f F

f f f

mf

f
f f

&

&

19

&

fj

f f f

f f f f f f F

f f f f f

f f f f f

mp

f
f f

f f f

f f f f f
2

f f f

The four-quaver/crotchet pattern now plays over 4 bars.


Try to phrase each bar, but make the four bars a whole unit.

& F

Crescendo gradually up to the beginning of bar 11, then decrescendo down again.

Bars 13-16 should be an echo of the previous four bars.

13

.
f
f
f

f f f f f
2

FF

1
3

f
F
F
1
5

f f.

Lift the hands off from the


keys at the same time.

Lift the LH for the crotchet rests.

mf

f
f f

f
f f

F
F

Make a small decrescendo.

28 Pianist 79

p28 Scores Loeschhorn-FINAL.indd 28

10/07/2014 16:16

Wolfgang Amadeus MOZART (1756-1791)

TRACK 2

BEGINNER

Minuet in F K2

The young Wolfgang Amadeus wrote this minuet in Salzburg in January 1762, no
doubt under the watchful eye of his father, Leopold. 1762 also marked the first
performance by Wolfgang and his sister Nannerl for royalty the duo performed on
the harpsichord for Maximilian III Joseph, Elector of Bavaria.
Playing tips: This piece should sound like a stately minuet, something suitable for
The tempo should be
a stately andante.

f f f
3
& b4
5

The key is
F major (notice
the B flat).

a courtly visit. As with the Loeschhorn on the previous page, the RH has the melody,
with the LH the calm accompaniment. Notice how there is just one place in the whole
piece where there is a triplet (bar 7, RH). We suggest that you practise the RH alone
in order to get that rhythm precisely right.
Take a look at the technical tips within the score.
Round off the
Good finger articulation is needed throughout.The notes need to sound clear.
phrase nicely here.
1

f f f

f f f

Feel the 3/4 pulse.


Emphasis on beat 1.

mp

? b 43 F
5

The LH plays the accompanying role.

&b

f
f f

f
f f

bf
f
& b f
4

? b #F

&b f f f

?b F
1

19

&b f f f f
3

?b F
1

Allow yourself a little slowing down


here (rit), before the pause sign.

U
f
4

U
F

f f #f
3

#F

f
f

f f f f
5

f f f
1

Make a nice ritardando


at the end.

rit.

mp

f f f

f f f f

f f f f

f f f

Now make these last four bars


dainty and sweet sounding.
3

Back to the opening statement


now. Notice that its now louder.
3

mf

Go back to the beginning


and repeat.

f f f

Round off the first 4-bar


phrase nicely below.

Now round off the second


4-bar phrase neatly.

14

f f
f f3

f f f

There now follows a short development section, comprising two 4-bar


phrases, where you will find a few new accidentals creep in.
2

Be ready for the triplet below.


Dont let it catch you out!

Crescendo a little
through bars 5-7.

?b F

f f

29 Pianist 79

p29 Scores Mozart-FINAL.indd 29

10/07/2014 16:29

ISS
T M
DONELANIE
M
KS
SWIC
SPAN
IECE
HIS P
ON T GE 20

Thomas ATTWOOD (1765-1838)

ON
LESS

TRACK 3

BEGINNER

Allegro from Sonatina in G

PA

Throughout his life, English composer Thomas Attwood benefited from the
patronage of the royal family, who even sent him to Vienna to study with Mozart.
The royal investment was not wasted: Mozart was impressed by him. This Allegro is
the first of a three-movement sonatina; the second movement appeared in issue 73.
Playing tips: Even if there are no phrase markings in the score, you need to know
where the melody is heading: The first two bars are a kind of question, with the next

two bars an answer. The whole first phase, however, is eight bars long. Keep the Alberti
bass of the LH nice and even. Make sure to adhere to all the dynamic markings,
crescendos and decrescendos, the rests and so on. This is a great exercise for finger
dexterity and evenness.
Take a look at the technical tips within the score. And read Melanie Spanswicks
step-by-step lesson on page 20.

Make the RH melody really sing. It has to sound


sweet and lyrical.Think in long 2- or 4-bar phrases.

The key is G
major (notice
the F sharp).

Allegro q = 160
Allegro
q5 = 160
3
# 4Allegro
f
3f f
5 q = 160
f
&# 44Allegro
f
f3 f 5q = 160
f

f ff
f ff
F
f
& #44 f f f f f
F
f f
& # 4 pf f f f f ff
F
f f f f F f f f f ff ff
f
f
& 4p
f
ff f f f ff f ff f
? #4
f f ff f ff f ff f f f ff f f f ff f
? # 444 pp
f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f
? # 44
f
? # 4 Keep the LHfAlberti bass
fand even. No f
line nice
bumps. Slight emphasis on the first and fifth quaver.

{{

# j
#
& ffj ff
& # fj
& # fj f
& f
?# F
?# F
?# F
?# F

4
4
4
4

{{

3 2
3 2

5
5

3
3

5
5

f
f
f
f

1
1

f
f
f
f

2
4
2
4
2
4
2
4

4
4

4
4

f
f
f
f

2
2

2
2

f
f
f
f

f
f
f
f

1
1

f
f
f
ff
ff
ff
f
f
1
1

2
2

f
f
f
f
2

1
5
1
5
1
5
1
5

f
f
f
f

4
4

4
4

Take note of all the dynamic markings the crescendos and decrescendos.

f
f
f
f

f
f
f
f

f
f ff ff ff
f f f f
f f ff f f f f f
f f f f ff f ff f
f f f f f f f
f f f f f f f f
f
f

2
2

2
2

f
f
f
mf
f
mf f
f f
fmf
mf f
f f
f
4
4

1
1

f
f
f
ff
f
f
f
1
1

4
4

4
4

f
f
f
f

1
1

2
2

3
Small
decrescendo here.

f
f
f
fff
ff
ff
ff

f
f
f
f

f
f
f
f

f ff
f f
f f
f
f
f
f
f

f
f
f
f

f
f
f
f
f
f
f
f

f
f
f
f
f
f
f
f

f
f
f
f

F
F
F
f F
f f
f f
f f
f
4
4

f
f
f
f

1
2
1
2
1
2
1
2

4
4

5
5

5
5

f
f
f
f

f
f
f
fff
ff
ff
ff

f
f
f
f

f
f
f
f

f
f
f
f

4
4

f f f
f f f
f pf f
fff pfp f
ff p
ff
ff

f
f
f
f
f
f
f
f
4
4

4
4

f
f
f
f

f
f
f
f

f
f
f
f

f
f
f
f

f
f
f
ff
f
f
f

#
&# f
& #f
&# f
& f
? # ff
?# f
?# f
?#

{{

f ff ff f
f
f
f f ff f
f f
f

hand for the rest.


Make sure to lift the

3 2

#
&# ff
&#
&# f
& f
? # ff
? # ff
? # ff
? # ff

10
10
10
10

1
1

1
1

5
5

f
f
f
f

3 2

7
7
7
7

{{

2
2

f
f
f
f

f
f
f
f

f
f
f
f
f
f
f
f

f
f
f
f

f
f
f
f

f
f
f
f

4 are four bars of flowing quavers in the RH.


Now there
You will need to shape the line so thereis a good flow.
Practise slowly and think of each
1 note as being important.
But always remember where the
1 notes lead.

f
f
f
f
f
f
f
f

f
f
f
f

5
5

5
5

f f f
f f f
f f f
f Ff f
F
F
F
1
1

1
1

f
f
f
f

f
f
f
f

f
f
f
f

f
f
f
f

f
f
fff
f
f
f
1

f
f
f
f

1
1

1
1

f
f
f
f
f
f
f
f
5
5

f
f
f
f

4
4

f
f
f
mf
mff
fmf
fmf
f
f
4

f
f
f
f

f
f
f
f

f
f
f
ff
f
f
f

5
5

Lift your had off for the crotchet rests.


30 Pianist 79

p30 Scores Attwood-FINAL.indd 30

10/07/2014 16:30

Thomas ATTWOOD (1765-1838)

TRACK 3

13

& f f f f f f f f

?# f

BEGINNER

Allegro from Sonatina in G

f f f f f f f f

f f f f f f f f

The LH crotchets in the above bars should be very slightly detached.

16

&

Keep the notes even here. Shape the line and create a gradual crescendo...

#F

f f f #f
1

f #f f f f f f f

?# f f f f f

Make a very subtle ritardando here (slowing down).

# f #f f f f nf
f f
&

19

Now back to the opening theme (and tempo).

f
5

f f f f f f f f

#f
&

22

j
f

f f f
f f f
f
?# f

f f f f f f f f

f f

f f f f f

mf

Make the ending resolute. From bar 25 you need to build up to the forte (loud) dynamic.

& F

f f f f

?# f f f f f

ff

f
f

f f f
f f f f

The ending should be triumphant!

f f f f f f f f
1

f f

?#

25

...followed by a diminuendo.

f f f #f f f f f
4

f f f f f
f

ff

ff

ff

31 Pianist 79

p30 Scores Attwood-FINAL.indd 31

10/07/2014 16:30

Cornelius GURLITT (1820-1901)

TRACK 4

Study for the thumb

The pianist, composer and teacher Cornelius Gurlitt was born in Altona, near
Hamburg, but his career took him from there to Copenhagen, Rome and Leipzig,
where he was part of Schumann and Brahms circle. His gift for teaching is evidenced
by his many volumes of studies, including this unusual study for the thumb.
Playing tips: As the title makes clear, the most important thing in this study is to
work on the RH thumb and bring out its melody. It has to sound nice and smooth.

Allegro q = 132
Allegro
q =3 1321
1
3
5
Allegro
q = 132
# 3Allegro
1
f3 f5 q =f3 1321

& # 43 fR
f ff f
& # 43 pfR leggiero
& # 43 fR ff f ff
&
? # 443 pp>fF
R> leggiero
? # 43 p>Fleggiero
Fleggiero
? # 43
>
? # 43 F

3
# f ff f ff
3
&
# f f ff f f ff f
3
3& # R
f f R f Rf
& # fRF ff f ff fRf ff f ff fR
&
fR
fR
? # fRFR
R
R
?# F

? # Fsim.
?#
sim.
sim.
sim.
6
#
6
f ff f f ff f
f
&
#
6
R f R f R
6& # f f f f f f f f f
& # fRfR ff f ff fRfR ff f ff RfR
&
fR
? # RF
R
?# F
?# F
?# F

{{
{

{{
{
{{
{
{{
{

1
1
1

3
4
3
4
3
4
3
4

4
5
4
5
4
5
4
5

3
4
3
4
3
4
3
4

#
9
&
# fR f
9
9& # f f
& # mffRFR ff
&
fFR
? # mf
mf
? # mfF
?# F
?#
9

BEGINNER/
INTERMEDIATE

1
1
1
1

ff
ff
ff
ff
5
5
5

f
Rf
fR
fR
R

f
f
f
f

ff
ff
ff
ff

fR
fR
fR
fR

f f
Rf f
fR ff
fR
R

f ff
f ff
f ff f
f f
3

f
f
f
f

f
f
f
f

fR
fR
fR
fR

f
f
f
f

fR
fR
fR
fFR
F
F
F

ff
ff
ff
ff

f
f
f
f

We suggest that you practise just the RH thumb on its own first, so that you can get
used to hearing the melody. Then add the LH bass notes. Finally, start to add the filler
notes (which have to sound really soft and even). Remember to keep the thumb as
loose as possible, always relaxing it between striking the notes. The LH is the calm
accompaniment. This is a gorgeous little piece to play though, and when youve
masterd it, it will surely sound like more than just an exercise.

f
f
f
f

f
f
f
f

f
Rf
fR
fRF
RF
F
F

f
f
f
f

fR
fR
fR
fR

f
f
f
f

1
1
1

3
3
3

f
f
f
f
5
5
5

f
f
f
f

f
f
f
f

fR
fR
fR
fR

f
f
f
f

ff
ff
ff
ff

fR
fR
fR
f
R

f
f
f
f

ff
ff
ff
ff

nf
f
nf f nf f f f f f f
nRf ff nf ff Rf ff f ff Rf
nfR nf Rf f fR
#nfRF f f fR f f fR
R
R
#RF
#F
#F

f
f
f
f

ff
ff
ff
ff

3
3
3

2
2
2

f
f
f
f

ff
ff
ff
ff

ff
ff
ff
ff

fR
fR
fR
fRF
F
F
F
1

1
1

f
f
f
f

f
Rf
fR
fR
R
1
1
1

f ff
f ff f
f ff
f f
2

f
f
f
f

f
f
f
f

f
f
f
f

fR
fR
fR
fR

f
f
f
f

fR
fR
fR
fR
1
1
1

f
Rf
fR
fR
R

f
f
f
f

ff
ff
ff
ff

fR
fR
fR
fR

f
f
f
f

ff
ff
ff
ff

3
3
3
3

f
f
f
f

ff
ff
ff
ff

f
f ff f ff f
Rf f f f Rf
Rf f f f fR
fRF
fR
R
R
F
F
F

f
f
f
f

ff
ff
ff
ff

#f
f f #f f f f ff f f
Rf f #f f Rf f f f Rf
fRF ff #f ff fR ff f ff fR
fR
fR
fR
RF
R
R
F
F
1

f
f
f
f

ff
ff
ff
ff

f
Rf
Rf
fR
R

f
f
f
f

f
f
f
f

ff
ff
ff
ff

ff
ff
ff
ff

fR
fR
fR
fFR
F
F
F

f
f
f
f

ff
ff
ff
ff

32 Pianist 79

P32 Scores GURLITT-FINAL.indd 32

09/07/2014 12:22

Cornelius GURLITT (1820-1901)

TRACK 4

12

BEGINNER/
INTERMEDIATE

Study for the thumb

& f f #f f f f #f f f f f f #f f nf f f f nf f f f f f #f f f f f f f f f f f f
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
?# F
#F
nF

15

f
f
f
& f f f f f f f f f f f f #f f f f f f f f f f f f fR f f f f f fR f f
R
R
R
R
R
R
R

?# F

18

bF

f
f
f
f
f
f
f
f
f
& fR f f fR f f fR f f f f f f f f f f f fR f f fR f f fR f f
R
R
R
F
F
F
?#

21

f f
f f
f f f f f f
f f
f f f
f f
& fR f
fR f
f
f f
R
R
R
R

?# F

23

& f
R

?# F

f
R

f
R

3
1

FF

33 Pianist 79

P32 Scores GURLITT-FINAL.indd 33

09/07/2014 12:22

TRACK 5

Mark TANNER
Loch Jedmon

Composer Mark Tanner writes: Loch Jedmon is my 80th birthday present for the
eminent Scottish composer, John McLeod the title is an anagram of his name.
Composers playing tips: The main thing to keep in mind is the musics solid
rhythmic underpinning let it move along in a stately, nonchalant fashion and the

INTERMEDIATE

need to dispatch the grace notes without undue fuss.Take care over the important
idiomatic details, such as the syncopated Scotch Snaps.
Composers pedal tips: Ensure pedalling doesnt intrude upon the texture.
Turn to page 70 to read Mark Tanners article on the composer John McLeod.

34 Pianist 79

P34 Scores TANNER-FINAL.indd 34

09/07/2014 12:22

TRACK 5

Mark TANNER
Loch Jedmon

INTERMEDIATE

35 Pianist 79

P34 Scores TANNER-FINAL.indd 35

09/07/2014 12:22

Ignacio CERVANTES (1847-1905)

TRACK 6

INTERMEDIATE

No 6 from Six Cuban Dances

Born in Havana, Cervantes was a child prodigy whose teachers included Gottschalk
and Alkan. A fervent Cuban nationalist, he used the folk music of his native land in
his music, as in the Six Cuban Dances. No 2 was presented in issue 63.
Playing tips: You need to feel that Latin dance flavour in this piece. Be quite
flamboyant and use some rubato when appropriate. Youll notice a lot of syncopation
and if you manage that well, it will add to the dramatic dance feel. Theres quite a

bit of jumping around in both hands so try to move the hand as quickly as possible
so that it is ready above the next note/chord before you play. Keep hands close to the
keyboard. Make sure to just peter away at the end, as if its all just a floating
afterthought.
Pedal tips: See the markings on the score. Pedalling is needed, but it should never
sound drowned out.

Moderato melanconico
Moderato melanconico
5
Moderato
1
4 . melanconico
3
2
1
j melanconico
Moderato
b2

b
&b b 4 j
b 2f
& bbbbbbbbb 422 p jj
&
b 4f
&
? bbbb 442 pfffjj
b p
? bb b 42 pfjj
?
ffj
? bbbbbbbb 4422
b

{{
{
4

b
& b bb
b
& bbbbbbbbb
&
b
&
? bbbb
b
? bb b
?
? bbbbbbbb
b

{{
{
{{
{
{{
{
4
4
4

7
7
7
7

b
& b bb
b
& bbbbbbbbb
&
b
&
? bbbb
b
? bb b
?
? bbbbbbbb
b

4
2

ff
ff
ff
f
f
ff

f
f
ff
f
f
ff
4
2
4
2
4
2

4
4
4
4

b b nf
11& b b f
11
11 bb b nf
& bbbbbbb nnfff
&
b f
&
? bbbb f
b
? bb b ff
?
? bbbbbbbb
b
11

1
1

1
1
1
1

nff
nfff
nnff
ff
ff
ff

f
f
ff
f
f
ff
3
1
3
1
3
1

3
3
3
3

1
1
1
1

ff
ff
ff
f
f
ff

5
2

f

f f f
f nf f f f f
J
f f f
f
fJ ff
f n f f f ff ff
f
ff n f f ff f
f ffJ f
Jf
f nnff ff
f
ff
f nf f ff fff ff
fJf
ff nf f f
JJ
nf f

.
.
f ff nff bbff nff. bbff. nff. nnff. bbff.
f
f f
ff.. nff.. bbff.. f. bf. nf. . .
f
ff. nf. bbf. nff.. bbff.. nff.. nnnfff. bbbfff.
f
f ff ff ff rubato
f nff bbff bnnfff bbbfff nff nnnff. bbbff.
ff f
f
rubato
ff

b fff fff
Jf
rubato
ff

b
f
rubato
bb ff ff
ff
f

fJf sim.

bf
JJ

bb ff
sim.
sim.
sim.
f.
.j
n
f
f
f
.
f
ff ff nff nf f. j ff.
f
j
f
f
f
f
n
ff fff nnfff nff nnfff.. j ff..jj f n f f
ff f nf nff ff fjj ff f n f f f
f ff f nf f. ffj ff ff n f ff ff
nnff f
f
f f
f f f f ff.. j
ff ff f f f fjj f ff nf f ff
ff ff f nnff ff f
f f ff
ff.
f.j
ff.jj
ff
ff
f
fJ
f
ffJ
fJJ

5
4
5
4
5
4

3
1

>
n>ff
>
n>>ffff
nnff
>f
>>ff
ff

4
1

2
2
2

4
1
4
1
4
1

3
3

2
2

1
1

3
3

2
2

4
4

1
1
5
1

3
3

1
1

4
2

5
1

4
2

5
1
5
1
5
1

4
2
4
2
4
2

5
1
5
1
5
1

4
2
4
2
4
2

4
4

1
1

2
2

4
4

2
2

2
3

1
4

2
3
2
3
2
3

1
4
1
4
1
4

3
1

5
1

4
2

3
1
3
1
3
1

5
1
5
1
5
1

4
2
4
2
4
2

1
3

1
2

1
3
1
3
1
3

1
2
1
2
1
2

2
1

2
1
2
1
2
1

1
1

3
3

2
2

1
1

f
ff

1
1
1

ff
ff
ff
f
f
f
ff
3
1
3
1
3
1

f
f
ff
f
f
ff
3

3
3

2
2

1
1

3
3

2
2

4
4

1
1

3
3

ff
ff
n fff
nf
nn ff

ff f
ff f
ff ff
ff

ff
ff
ff
f
f
ff

ff
ff
ff
f
f
ff

nff
nfff
nnff
ff
ff
ff

f
f
ff
f
Jf
ff
fJf
JJ

f
f
ff

f
f
ff

5
5

ff. nff.
ff.. nff..
ff. nf.
f nff
rubato

brubato
f
rubato
b f
bb ff
rubato

nff ff
nff fff
nnff f
f f
f ff
ff f


nf f
nf ff
nnff f
f
ff
5
1

4
2
4
2
4
2

5
1
5
1
5
1

ff
ff
ff
f
f
ff

1
1

2
2

1
1

f
f
ff
f
f
ff
.
bbff
.
bbbfff..
bbbff

4
2
4
2
4
2

3
3

1
1

nf
nf
nn ff

4
2

f
f
ff
f
f
ff

4
4

ff
ff
ff
f
f
ff

3
1

f
f
ff

f
f
ff

4
2

1
1

>
n>f
f
>>f
n>ff
nnff
f
>ff
>>ff
ff

f
f
ff

.
nff
.
nfff..
nf
bnff
b fff
bb ff

5
5
5

2
1

3
1
3
1
3
1

2
1
2
1
2
1

ff ff f ff
ff ff f ff
n fff ffff ff fff
nf f
nn ff f
f



nf f f
nf ff fff
nnff ff f
nf
f
nf ff ff
nnff f
5

5
5

.
bbff
.
bbbfff..
bbbff
f
ff
ff
f

f
f
ff

fJ
fJ
ffJ
Jf
ff
fJf
JJ

f
f
ff

f
ff

nff.
nff..
nnff.
f

.
nnff
.
nnnfff..
nnnff
ff
ff
f

.
bbff
.
bbbfff..
bbbff

1
4

2
3

2
3
2
3
2
3

3
1

1
4
1
4
1
4

36 Pianist 79

P36 Scores CERVANTES-FINAL.indd 36

09/07/2014 12:24

Ignacio CERVANTES (1847-1905)

TRACK 6

bb
& bbbb
bbbb
&
&b b

14
14
14
14

{{

? bb
? bbbbbbbb
bb

nf
nnff
nf
nf

ff
ff
f
f
ff

b
& bbbbb f ff
b b ff f
&
& b bb fff f ff

18
18
18
18

{{

4
2
4
ff4242 f
2

? bb b
b
?
? bbbbbb
b

ff
ff
f

f
f
f

f
ff
f
ff

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P36 Scores CERVANTES-FINAL.indd 37

nff
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37 Pianist 79

f
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INTERMEDIATE

No 6 from Six Cuban Dances

p
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09/07/2014 12:24

WATCH CHENYIN LI PLAY THIS PIECE ONLINE AT WWW.PIANISTMAGAZINE.COM

Felix MENDELSSOHN (1809-1847)

TRACK 7

INTERMEDIATE

Song without Words op 30 no 3

DONT MISS
JANET NEWMANS

LESSON
ON THIS PIECE

PAGE
22

A fluent pianist himself, Mendelssohn wrote many pieces for solo piano,
not least the eight volumes of Songs without Words. Each volume contains
six short lyrical pieces. This tender Adagio comes from the second
volume, which dates from 1833-4.
Playing and pedal tips: This short piece is all about touch, control, and
aiming to bring out a beautiful tone from the piano. The melody notes
should be speaking to us. The opening should just float upwards. Then
the poignant main melody enters in the middle of bar 3. Voice the RH

chords so that the top note sounds out the most. You will notice many
dynamic markings try to observe them. There is in fact a lot of
information on the score to digest, even if this piece is very slow. Another
challenging technique is being able to master chords when playing piano
so dig into the keys, even if gently. Remember to feel the pulse (as if
its inside your body), or things will begin to sound too static. It all ends
as beautifully as it began.
Read Janet Newmans step-by-step lesson on this piece on page 22.

Adagio non troppo q = 60

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38 Pianist 79

P38 Scores MENDELSSOHN-FINAL.indd 38

09/07/2014 12:25

WATCH CHENIN LI PLAY THIS PIECE ONLINE AT WWW.PIANISTMAGAZINE.COM

Felix MENDELSSOHN (1809-1847)

TRACK 7

INTERMEDIATE

Song without Words op 30 no 3

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P38 Scores MENDELSSOHN-FINAL.indd 39

ff # ff
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39 Pianist 79

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09/07/2014 12:25

Johannes BRAHMS (1833-1897)

TRACK 8

When Brahms composed the 16 piano duets of his opus 39 in 1865, he quickly knew
he had a success. He arranged these attractive short waltzes for piano solo and this
waltz, along with four others, was also arranged for four hands, two pianos.
Playing tips: This short piece might look deceptively simple, but our house pianist
Chenyin Li felt it could even be classified as Intermediate/Advanced. This waltz has
to sound graceful and full of charm subtlety is the key word. The writing is quite

q = 130
q = 130

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INTERMEDIATE

Waltz op 39 no 11

5
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thick throughout, so from the outset you have to think about voicing both the LH
and the RH chords well. The LH is an exercise in itself, and needs practice on its own.
Get the chords really secure under the hands. Then start with the RH. The RH has
to dance playfully. Notice all the slurs and phase markings. There are some tricky
triplets too that youll need to master.
Pedal tips: Pedalling advice is marked in the score at the start.

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40 Pianist 79

P40 Scores BRAHMS-FINAL.indd 40

09/07/2014 12:26

Johannes BRAHMS (1833-1897)

TRACK 8

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& # f ff

17

4
1

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27

INTERMEDIATE

Waltz op 39 no 11

ff
f

41 Pianist 79

P40 Scores BRAHMS-FINAL.indd 41

09/07/2014 12:26

Jules MASSENET (1842-1912)

TRACK 9

You may know Massenet because of his operas, such as Thas, but he also wrote a
small but piquant collection of piano works. This should not be surprising, as
Massenets mother was a piano teacher and he himself a serious student of the
instrument. His piano works are being rediscoverd by modern performers such as
Jean-Efflam Bavouzet. This barcarolle comes from Ten pices de genre (1866).
Playing tips: This piece definitely sounds like a barcarolle one can picture a small
boat rocking gently on the calm water. Regarding the LH accompaniment rhythm,
if youre getting stuck, we suggest you listen to the CD. Its obvious that the RH has

Andantino
Andantino
## 6Andantino
6
&
& 88Andantino

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5
5
5

2
2

1
1

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4

poco rit.
poco rit.

ff
f
f
ff
f
f

poco rit.
poco rit.

5
5

55
5
35
3
5
3
5
3

5
5
3
3
5
3
5
3

5
5
3
3

ff
f
ff
ff
5
3
5
3

ff
f
f

ff
f
f

2
2
1
1

ff
f
ff
ff

1
1

ff
f
f

2
2

#f
#f.
#p>>f.
#p>f. f
nnff p>. f ff
p f
n..f f ff
n.f
.
a tempo
a tempo
a tempo
FF tempo
a
F
F
ff f
f
ff f f
f f
f
f
2

ff
f
f
j
ffj
j
fj
f
ff
f
f
5
3
5
3

ff
f
f

ff
f
f

ff
f
ff
ff
ff
f
f

q. = 63
q. = 63

2
2

5
5
3
3

2
1
2
1

ff
f
f

the melody. Look at all the phrase markings first, before you start your practising, so
that you know where the melody is going. Always voice the RH chords so that the
top note sounds out most. There are some gorgeous harmonic moments, such as in
bar 26. Make sure that we hear the semiquaver rests. The opening returns at bar 31,
now with filigree additions in the RH they need to be very light and floaty. Die
away at the end.
Pedal tips: Pedalling has been marked into the score. Note that where there are
semiquaver rests, the pedal needs to be lifted (but gently does it).

q. = 63
q. = 63

andante
andante
andante
andante

ff
f
f

j
ffj
j
fj
f

7
7
## f
ff.
7&
f. nnff.
.
7& # .
.
f
.
& # ff. nf.
& . nf. f f.
f ff
?
? ## ff
f f
f f
? # ..f
? # f
.
.
10
10
## f
ff
f
10& f
f
f
n
f
10& # f nf
ff f fff
& #pp
& ppf nnfff f
pp
ff f
?
#
? #ppf
f

f
f
?#
f ff
? # f
f

{{

quasi
quasi
quasi

quasi

#6

& # 68 pp sostenuto
sostenuto

& 8
?
? ## 6688 ppf sostenuto
sostenuto

ff
? # 68 f
? # 68
f
f

f
f

ff f
ff

f
f
f
f f
f
.
f f .ff f

.
.

4
4

{{

INTERMEDIATE

Barcarolle op 10 no 3

1
1

ff
f
f
ff
..f
.f
.

ff
f
f

ff
f
f

ff
f
f

j
ff. j
.j
f. j
ff.
f
f
f

ff
fR
fRf
ffR
R
3
1
3
1

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4
4
2
2

ff
f
ff
ff

ff
f
ff
ff

4
2
4
2

ff
ff
f f
f

ff
f
f

2
2

1
1

ff ff
f ff
f
ff
..f
.f sim.
sim.
. sim.
sim.

ff
f
f

ff
f
f
ff
f
f
2

5
5

ff
f
f

ff
f
f
3
3
1
1

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f
f

..
f ##ff f
f
ff f f
JJ.
ff #ff f
f.
ff #ff f
fJ
J
ff
ff
f f
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1
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5
5
5

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f
4
4
2
2

ff
f
ff
ff
4
2
4
2

ff
f
f

ff
f
f

ff
f
f

ff
f
f
bbff
b..f
b.f
.
3
3
3
3

1
1

ff
f
f
1
1

4
4

ff
f
f

nnff
nf
nf
ff f
f
f f
f f
5
5
5
5

4
4

3
3
1
1

ff
f
f

ff
f
f

ff
f
f

ff
f
f

ff
f
f

j
ffj
j
fj
f
ff
f
f
4
4
2
2

3
3
1
1

ff
f
ff
ff

ff
f
ff
ff
4
2
4
2

3
1
3
1

ff
f
f

ff
f
f

ff
f
f
3
3
1
1

ff
f
ff
ff
3
1
3
1

ff
f
f

4
4
2
2

ff
fJ
Jff
ffJ
J
ff
f
f
4
2
4
2

ff
f
f

4
4

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f
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5
5

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4

ff
f
f

ff
f
f

42 Pianist 79

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09/07/2014 12:26

Jules MASSENET (1842-1912)

TRACK 9

# ffr f f
& fR f
>

13

4
2

?#

16

&

2
1

f f
bf
.

&

j
f

?#

ff ff
J

# f
& fJ

ff
J
4
2

#f
& f ff
5
3

? # f

f. f
.

5
4

ff ff f
f
5

f f
f

#f
>.

f
.
5
3

ff
J

f f

ff ff #ff
J

ff

ff

f f

f f f

f f

f f
f
.
sim.

f f
f

j
f.

nf
.

j
f

f. f

ff

ff
J

3
1

f f f # f f

? # #f

f f
f

f f

ff
J

f f f

ff
J
f f

5
3

5
3

2
1

22

25

f f

f f

f
f

ff
J

f f

3
1

f
f f
j f f
f
.

nf

f f f

f f

j
ff

ff
f f
f f
f

? # f
.

19

INTERMEDIATE

Barcarolle op 10 no 3

ff
f f

f f
f

5
4

2
1

ff f
nf

ff nf
f

ff
J
f f

5
3

ff ff f
f

2
1

ff
5

f f
f

f f

5
3

ff ff f
f

ff

4
2

ff ff
R
3
1

ff

ff #ff

ff.
J

pp

f f

f f

f f
f f

f
1

43 Pianist 79

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09/07/2014 12:26

Jules MASSENET (1842-1912)

TRACK 9

# ff ff
&

28

?#

31

34

f f

& f

f f
f f

j
f

f f

nf

f f

j
f.

a tempo

j
ff

ff ff
R
>

f
.

f f

f f f
f f
bf
.

f
.

f f

f
.
5

f f
.

f f
f
f

ff

ff

# f f f
f f f f f f f f f f
&
4

f f f .
f
f
f

ff

&

poco a poco dim.

ff

f
5

?#

f f f f f F
f

pi p

40

f f

f f f f f f f f f f f >F
f
f
f
f
f f
f
1

37

?#

j
f

rit.

f. f

f. nf
.

una corda

f f
f f
f
.

?#

? # nf
.

ff

ffj

ff

ff ff ff
f f
f

& #f.
>

INTERMEDIATE

Barcarolle op 10 no 3

ff

ff

ff

ff

ten.

f.
-

pp

ff
f

ff
f

pi pp

ppp

f-.

ff

ff

ff
f

44 Pianist 79

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09/07/2014 12:27

A Z E R T Y

H A NS - G NTER HEUMA NN

B E Gzerty
INNERS
XXXX (XXXXX)

PLAGE

KEYBOARD CLASS
LESSON 7: MAJOR SCALES

Over the course of a year and a half, Pianist will cover some of the basic stages of learning the piano through a series of lessons by
Hans-Gnter Heumann. This seventh lesson discusses the major scale, first explaining the notes in C major, then incorporating the scale
into exercises and pieces.

C major scale
The scale consists of eight notes. In music theory, these scale degrees are indicated by Roman numerals.
The scale begins and ends with the same note, the key note. The scale is named after its key note.
In a major scale, there are five wholetone steps (whole steps) and two halftone steps (half steps) between the notes.
The C major scale has no key signature. The major tonality is characterised by a major third, which is four halftone steps above the
keynote. The major tonality is bright, clear and lively.
The halftone steps occur between III and IV and VII and VIII (see diagram below). The seventh note leads back to the key note and is
therefore called the leading note.

The construction of major scales

W = wholetone step (whole step)


H = halftone step (half step)

C major triad/chord
The major triad or major chord consists of the 1st (key note),
3rd (third) and 5th (fifth) notes of the major scale.

45 Pianist 79

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HANS-GNTER HEUMANN KEYBOARD CLASS

PLAGE

Playing a C major scale

A Z E R T Y
XXXX (XXXXX)

zerty

RH
Ascending: 3 (thumb under) + 5
The fingering of the C major scale is quite straightforward.
Descending: 5 (3rd finger over) + 3
Thedueight
are terra
played
withcivilia
consecutive
fingers
5+
3 or
3 + 5.saepe gessi, victorque omnibus veniam petentibus civibus peperci. Externas gentes, quibus
faux notes
texte Bella
et mari
externaque
toto in
orbe
terrarum
tuto ignosci potuit, conservare quam excidere malui. Millia civium Romanorum sub sacramento meo fuerunt
LH circiter quingenta. Ex quibus deduxi in colonias aut
Seeremisi
moreintips
in box sua
at right.
municipia
stipendis emeritis millia aliquanto plura quam trecenta, et iis omnibus agros adsignavi
aut pecuniam
pro praemiis
dedi. Naves cepi
Ascending:
5 (3rd finger
over) +militiae
5
sescentas praeter eas, si quae minores quam triremes fuerunt.Bella terra et mari civilia externaque toto in orbe terrarum
saepe3gessi,
victorque
omnibus
Descending:
(thumb
under)
+ 5 veniam petentibus
civibus peperci. Externas gentes, quibus tuto ignosci potuit, conservare quam excidere malui. Millia civium Romanorum sub sacramento meo fuerunt circiter quingenta.
Ex quibus deduxi in colonias aut remisi in municipia sua stipendis emeritis millia aliquanto plura quam trecenta, et iis omnibus agros adsignavi aut pecuniam pro praemiis
militiae dedi. Naves cepi sescentas praeter eas, si quae minores quam triremes fuerunt.Bella terra et mari civilia externaque tot.

Finger Fitness 3

46 Pianist 79

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HANS-GNTER HEUMANN KEYBOARD CLASS

Cancan

A Z E R T Y
XXXX (XXXXX)

Jacques Offenbach (1819-1880) arr. Hans-Gnter Heumann


From the operetta Orpheus in the Underworld

zerty

PLAGE

The rapid, galloping cancan is a French dance in a quick 2/4 time, derived from a quadrille in Paris around 1830. It is a rather frivolous
show dance and an attraction in variety performances, cabaret and revue theatre, as well as appearing in Offenbachs operettas.
Typical features of the cancan are high kicks, while the dancers lift their skirts. They also make wild leaps, sometimes landing in the splits.

Hans-Gnter Heumann continues his beginner series in the next issue.


To find out more about Heumann, go to www.schott-music.com

47 Pianist 79

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HANS-GNTER HEUMANN KEYBOARD CLASS

PLAGE

Z E R T
Further accompanimentApatterns
XXXX (XXXXX)
zerty
for Offenbachs Cancan

du faux texte Bella terra et mari civilia externaque toto in orbe terrarum saepe gessi, victorque omnibus veniam petentibus civibus peperci. Externas gentes, quibus
tuto ignosci potuit, conservare quam excidere malui. Millia civium Romanorum sub sacramento meo fuerunt circiter quingenta. Ex quibus deduxi in colonias aut
remisi in municipia sua stipendis emeritis millia aliquanto plura quam trecenta, et iis omnibus agros adsignavi aut pecuniam pro praemiis militiae dedi. Naves cepi
sescentas praeter eas, si quae minores quam triremes fuerunt.Bella terra et mari civilia externaque toto in orbe terrarum saepe gessi, victorque omnibus veniam petentibus
civibus peperci. Externas gentes, quibus tuto ignosci potuit, conservare quam excidere malui. Millia civium Romanorum sub sacramento meo fuerunt circiter quingenta.
the cancan,
the five
alternativepro praemiis
Ex quibus deduxi in colonias aut remisi in municipia sua stipendis emeritis millia aliquanto plura quam trecenta, etPlay
iis omnibus
agrosusing
adsignavi
aut pecuniam
accompaniment
patterns, in both your right
militiae dedi. Naves cepi sescentas praeter eas, si quae minores quam triremes fuerunt.Bella terra et mari civilia externaque
tot.
and left hands.

Playing Tips:

First practise each accompaniment pattern


separately, and then play the variations one after
another without a break.
Feel free to try other combinations!

Alberti bass
The use of similar repeated broken
chord patterns in the left hand, highlighted
here in the third variation, is called
the Alberti bass. Its named after the
composer and harpsichordist Domenico
Alberti (c.1710-1740), who used such
figures extensively.

48 Pianist 79

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Felix ARNDT (1889-1918)

TRACK 10

Nola

Felix Arndt was an American composer of light-hearted music, of which Nola (written
in 1915) is a splendid example. He wrote the piece for his fiancee and later wife, Nola
Locke. Though cruelly cut off in his prime aged 29 by the Spanish flu, which was
epidemic in 1918, Arndt was enchanted by what has become known as the novelty
ragtime genre, exerting influence upon Gershwin.
Playing tips: The LH here plays in a stride style, even though it was written decades
before that style was popularised. Because the hand needs to move quickly, ready for

Lightly h = 72

##C
&

? ##C

##
&

? ##

f
f
f
f
f
f
f
f
#
f
f
f
f
f
f
f
f
f

fff f
f
f f #f f f f f f f f
f f ff
f f ff
3

ff

ff

3 5 3

ff

2 1 2

ff

#ff

ff

#ff f

sim.

j j ffffff f ff
fff
f #f f
fff
f
f
f
f
f
J
f
f
f
f
f
J
f
f
f
f
f
f
ff
ff
f f
f f f f
J
3
3
2 4

nf

f
f

fj
ff

2 1
3

5
1 2

L.H.

#
f
f
& # f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f #f f f f f f #f f f f f f f f f f
f

? ##

ff

ff
f

ff

ff

#ff

ff

## f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f
f
f
f
f
fff
& f

13

ff
f

f
ff
f

ff
f f

? ##

5 4 3 2 1

#ff

j
f
fff
f

ffj
ff

R.H.
f
3
3
f
3
f
j
j
ff J f f f f
f f fJ ff j b
J
f
fJ
f
4

1 2 3

3 2 1

the next chord, it should remain close to the keyboard, or youll lose valuable time.
With the RH melody, take liberty, with the odd rubato here and there. It should
sound flashy! The RH has to be articulate, though. Its a great workout for the fingers.
You will notice on the score that there are some twig-like diagonal lines (the first one
appears in bar 7). They are what we like to call courtesy lines they are there to help
the eye realise that one hand needs to take over the other hands part.
Pedal tips: See suggestions in the score.

INTERMEDIATE/
ADVANCED

49 Pianist 79

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Felix ARNDT (1889-1918)

TRACK 10

Nola

f f

17

&b f

f
f
? f f
b

20

&b

?b

mf

f f

#f f f

ff

nf
f

nf #f f

23

5
2

#
&#

f
ff f

#f f f
nf
f

#ff

#>f

f f
ff

f bff nf f nff
f # f f n#ff
# ff
n>f

rit.

26

nf f
bf
nf f f f
f #f f f f nf f f f f f
ff
ff
f
ff
f
f
f
1

f f

f
ff

& b f bf f f f nff f ff
f
nf
>f
>f
#>f
?b
f
1

ff

bf
f

bf #f f
f
f
f
f
J
#f
f nf f
L.H.
f

f #f f

INTERMEDIATE/
ADVANCED

f f

nf #f f #f nf f f nff f
ff

bf
f

U
##

ff

ff

a tempo

f f f f
f f f
f
f
p

##
u f

ff

ff
f

f
f
f
f
f
#
f
f
f f f f f f f f f f f
f f
f f #f f f f f f f f f
ff
ff
ff
#ff
#ff
f
? ##
f
f
f
f
f
f
3

50 Pianist 79

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Felix ARNDT (1889-1918)

TRACK 10

##
&

Nola

j j
f
f
f
f f f f f #fJ f
ff
J

29

fff

f
nf

f
f
f
f f
f f f f f f f f f f f
f

? ##

INTERMEDIATE/
ADVANCED

L.H.

fj
ff

## f f f f f f f f f f
f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f
&
J
f
ff
ff
ff
ff
? ##
f
f
f
f

32

f
f

f
f
f
f
f
f
f
f
f f #f
f f f
f f #f f f f f f f f f
ff
ff
f
f
f
f
f
#f
f
#f
? ## f
f
f
f
f
f
#
&#

35

#
f
f
& # f f f f f f f f f

38

fff
ff
1

j
ffff
f

ffj
ff

f
ff fJ f f fj f f f fj
j
f
J
ff
J
fJ
f
R.H.

? ##

ff
f

#
#

51 Pianist 79

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Felix ARNDT (1889-1918)

TRACK 10

&

Nola

f f f
f
f f
mf

?# j f

ff
f

>
#f f nff
J nf

ff

47

?# f
f
#

50

&

rit.

j
f

f f f
ff
f

?# f
f
2
5

fff

ff

fff

>
f #f f
J nf

L.H.

f nf #f f #f
fff

#ff

ff

n ff
#f

nf

2
5

a tempo

f f nf 3 3
f
f nf f f

j
f

f
<#>ff

f
f

#ff

j #f f f

f
f
#
f
<#>
f
f
3

f f #f f
J f

f
j

fff

f
f

ff

f f nf nf nf f f
#f
f f bf
5

n ff
ff

ff
f
f f #f f J ff

f f nf 3 3
f
f fff

ff

f
f

& f #f f #f #fJ
ff
#
f
?#
f
f
1

f
f

# f f f
& nff f f f f #f f nf f
4

44

f f
J
#ff

f
n
f
#
f
f

j f f #f f fJ fff
#f
nf
1

>
f #f f
J nf

ff

f f #f
J
1

L.H.

ff f f f f f f nf
nf
f
#f
f
4

41

INTERMEDIATE/
ADVANCED

f
f

ff

f
f

ff

>
ff f n ffj
53
ff
b
>f f f
f
f

f
# f
f
f

nff #f
f
&
J
nf nf f f f f f f f f f f ff bff
f
J
>
f
bf
ff # >f
f
ff
f
F
J
?#
nf
f
2

52 Pianist 79

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Felix ARNDT (1889-1918)

TRACK 10

INTERMEDIATE/
ADVANCED

Nola

ff
# ff f f nf f
ff
f
f
&

F
?# F

f #f f
5

56

f
f
f

f
# ff

mf

f nf f

f f f

f
ff
#f

f f f
f
f
f
f
# ff

f
ff

#f

nf
f #f f
f nf f f
# f f f f f #f f f f f f #f f f f f
J
#f
nf
f
&
J
J
fJ f f #f f f
J
J
L.H.
f
ff
ff
#
f
f
f
?# f
J
f
f
1

62

&

# f f

?#

65

&

f f f f f f f f f f f f #f f f
f f #f f f
#f
#
f
f
J
J
J
#fJ f f # f f f
J
J
L.H.
f
f
# ff
ff
J
#f

f #f f #f f #f f #f f
#
f
f
#
f
#f f
# f f #f f
3
2

f
n fff

59

5
3

? # #f f #f f #f f
2

<>
# f f f #f f f
#f f f
# J
f
f
#
f
#f f f #f f f
J
J
&
J
J
J
# fJ f f
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

67

?#

#f f f
J

53 Pianist 79

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Felix ARNDT (1889-1918)

TRACK 10

f nf
f

& f

nf #f

?# f
f

fff

73

&

f
f J

77

&

f
#ff

f
nff

f f
f

#ff

f
f

ff

>
#f f
J nf

fff

f
f

nff

& f #f f #f #fJ
#fff
?#
f
f

ff
f

f
f

f f f #f f nf f
2

f #fj #f

ff

f
f

nf

2
5

f f

nf
#ff

rit.

f 3 f
J J
ff
f

f
5

n ff
ff

f nf nf nf
#f f f f f bf
3

f ff
f

J
f
#
f
f
ff

3
f f nf 3
f
f nf f f

?# j f

>
#f f
J nf

f f #f f
J f
1

L.H.

fff

2
5

a tempo

ff

f
f

f #f

ff
nff

f
5

f f #f
J

f
f J

f #f

3
f f nf 3
f f f
f
f

?# j f

75

>
#f f
J nf

j
#f

mf

?# j f

71

&

Nola

69

INTERMEDIATE/
ADVANCED

ff

j
f nf #f f #f

f
f

fff

f
<#>ff
#ff

54 Pianist 79

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Felix ARNDT (1889-1918)

TRACK 10

INTERMEDIATE/
ADVANCED

Nola

>f f
f f
# ff f f f f f f

f
f
f

f
f
& nf f
#f nf f
f
f f ff bff
nf nf f
f
f
ff
f
bf
f # >f
ff
ff
f
F
f
?# f
f
f
f
nf
f

80

>
ff f ffj
83
# nff b#ff n ff fff
& fJ
J
f
>
f
?# J

ff f
f
f f nf f f fff

##
&

86

F
F

f
ff

##
##

f
f
f
f
f
f f f
f
p

ff

ff
f

f
f
f
f
f
f
#
f
f
#
f
f
f
f
f
f

f
f
f
f
f
f
f
f f f f f f f
f
ff
ff
ff
ff
#ff
#ff
f
? ##
f
f
f
f
f
f
3

#
&#

89

? ##

f f f

f
nf

f f

f f

f f f f

f f f f f f f
f
f

j
##
f f f f f f f f
j
f
f #f f
f f f
& f f f f f f
J
J
fJ f f
3
3
3
2

91

? ## fj
ff

L.H.

55 Pianist 79

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09/07/2014 12:28

Felix ARNDT (1889-1918)

TRACK 10

INTERMEDIATE/
ADVANCED

Nola

##
&

93

f
f

f
f
f
f
#
f
f
f
f
f
f
f
f
f

f f f f
f
f
f f
ff
f f
f f
p
f
f
ff
ff
ff
ff
#f
f
? ##
f
f
f
f
f
f

f
f
f
##

f
f
f
f
f
f
f
f f f f f f f f f f f
& f #f f f f f f f f f
ff
ff
ff
f
f
f
f
f
#f
f
? ## f
f
f
f
f

96

# ff
fff
&#

99

j
ffff
f

ffj
ff

f
f f f3 j
f
f fj
? ## f J
fff

J
f
j
ff
J
fJ
f
R.H.

f f f f f f
f
f
f

f
#ff f f nf
2

mp

Whimsical

3
## f #f f f f f
f
f

f
f
f
f
& # f nf f nf f f f f f
f f f f
fff
J

fff
f
#f
nf f
f
#f
nf f
fff
? ##
f
f

102

##
&

105

rit.

f
f #f f#f f #f f #f f J
#
f
f
#
f
f
# f f #f f #f
L.H.

a tempo

? ## #f f #f f #f f
5

fff
f
J
f
f
J

ff
ff
J
p

f
ff
j
J
f
fJ

56 Pianist 79

P49 Scores ARNDT-FINAL.indd 56

09/07/2014 12:28

Johann Sebastian BACH (1685-1750)

TRACK 11

Prelude in C minor BWV 847 from The Well-Tempered Clavier Book I

READ
ARTICLE ON

BACHS
48
PAGE
67

Each of the two volumes of The Well-Tempered Clavier contains 24 pieces


(hence the 48 nickname for these set). This prelude comes from the
first volume, which Bach composed in Kthen in 1722.
Playing and pedal tips: All the notes here should sound even and well
articulated. We need to hear each and every note! Really enjoy digging

INTERMEDIATE

into the notes. Its almost the feeling one has when using a typewriter!
The last page proves more challenging. We suggest that you concentrate
on that first. Start very slowly and build up the speed over time. Dont
let any wrong notes creep in! No pedal required.
Daniel-Ben Pienaar gives his own tips on this prelude on page 67.

b
& b bc f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f nf f f f f f f f f f f f f f nf f bf f f f f f f f f f f f f f
2

? bb c f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f
b

f
f
b
& b b f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f #f nf f f f f f f f f f f f f f
1

? bb f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f nf f f #f f f f f f f f f f f f
b

b f
f
& b b f #f f f f f f f f f f f f f f nf f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f nf f f f f f f f f f f f f f
3

? bb f nf f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f nf f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f
f
f
f
bf
f
f

b
& b b f f bf f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f

10

? bb f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f
bf
f
f
f
3

57 Pianist 79

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Johann Sebastian BACH (1685-1750)

TRACK 11

b
& bbbbbb
&
&b b

13
13
13
13

{{

bb
?
b
?
? bbbb
bb
b
& bbbbbb
&
&b b

16
16
16
16

?b
?
? bbbbbbb
b
bbbb
&
bbb
&
&b b

19
19
19
19

? bb
?
? bbbbbb
b

2
2
2
2

f
f
ff ff f ff f ff f ff ff ff f ff f ff f ff
f ff f ff f ff f f ff f ff f ff f
f
f
ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff
ff f f f f fff f f f f f

ff f f f f fff f f f f f
ff f f f n f f f f ff f f f f f f f
f f f nn ff f f f f f f ff f f f
f ff ff ff bbbfff ff ff ff f ff ff ff fff ff ff ff
ff f f f f f f ff f f f f f f
4
4
4
4

2
2
2
2

f
f
ff f f f ff f f f ff f f f ff f f f
ff f ff f ff f ff ff f ff f ff f ff
f
f
f
f
f
f
f
f
f
f
f
f
f
f f ff f f f ff f f f ff f f f ff ff
ff f f f f f f f ff f f f f f f f
2
2
2
2

3
3
3
3

1
1
1
1

4
4
4
4

ff f f f f fff f f f f f
ff f f f n f f f f ff f f f f f f f
f f f nn ff f f f f f f ff f f f
f
f
f ff nnff ff ff ff ff ff f ff ff ff ff ff ff ff
ff f nf f f f f ff f f f f f f

4
4
4
4

ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff f n f f ff f f f f f f ff f f f
f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f # f ff n f ff f ff f ff f ff f ff f ff f ff
ff
ff
## ff n f
f ff f
f
f ff nnff ff ff ff ff ff f ff ff ff ff ff ff ff nf fff ff fff ff fff ff fff f fff ff fff ff fff ff fff
ff f nf f f f f f ff f f f f f f f nnff f f f ff f f f
2
2
2
2

1
1
1
1

b
& bbbbbb #f f
&
& b b ##ff ff nn ff fff nn ff fff
nf nf
? bb
f f f f f
?
b
f
b
? bbbb f ff ff ff ff ff
b f

f
ff
f
ff

ff
f
f
ff

f f f
ff f ff f ff
f ff f ff f
f f f
f ff fff ff ff ff
ff
f

f
ff
f
ff

ff
f
f
ff

b
& bbbbbb ff f f f f
&
& b b f ff nn ff ff ff ff
nf
b f f f ff f
?
b
?
? bbbbbb ff ff ff ff f ff
bf

f
ff
f
ff

f
ff
f
ff

ff f f f f
f f ff f ff f
f f f f
f f f f f
f ff ff ff ff ff
ff

f
ff
f
ff

f
ff
f nf f
ff f nf f
ff nf f

22
22
22
22

{{

INTERMEDIATE

Prelude in C minor BWV 847 from The Well-Tempered Clavier Book I

3
3
3
3

1
1
1
1

24
24
24
24

{{

2
2
2
2

ff f f f n f f f f ff f f f f f f f
f ff f ff n f ff f ff f ff f ff f ff f ff
f nf f
f f f
n
f
f
f
f
f
f nf ff f ff f ff f f f ff ff ff ff ff ff
ff nf f f f f f f ff f f f f f f f
4
4
4
4

f
ff

f n f f f f f f ff f f f f f f f
ff n f ff f ff f ff f ff f ff f ff f ff
nf f f
f f f
f bbff ff ff ff ff ff ffbf ff ff ff ff ff ff ff
ff bf f f f f f fbf f f f f f f f
bf
1
1
1
1

ff f n f f f f f ff f f f f f f
f ff nn ff ff ff ff ff ff f ff ff ff ff ff ff ff
f
f
f
ff ff ff f ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff
ff f f f f f f f ff f f f f f f f
f
f
2
2
2
2

f f
ff f n f f ff ff
f nn ff ff f f
f f f f
f ff fff ff ff ff
ff
2
2
2
2

f
ff
f
ff

ff
f
f
ff

f f
ff f f f ff ff
f ff ff f f
f f f f
f ff fff ff ff ff
ff

r
nf f f
ffrr ff ff nnff ff nnff ff ff ff ff ff
f f
f f f nf f f
1
1
1
1

2
2
2
2

1
1
1
1

4
4
4
4

4
4
4
4

2
2
2
2

f
ff
f
ff

ff
f
f
ff

2
2
2
2

3
3
3
3

f ff
ff f

58 Pianist 79

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11/07/2014 09:07

Johann Sebastian BACH (1685-1750)

TRACK 11

26 bbb
&b
&b b
26

{{

?b
? bbb
bb

INTERMEDIATE

Prelude in C minor BWV 847 from The Well-Tempered Clavier Book I


4

f f ff
f f ff
4
4

rf
f
bf r f f #f f
f
f bf f f #f f
ff
3

3
3

1
1

1
1
1

2
2

2
2

b
& bbb f nf nf f f f f f #f f f f f f f f
& b b f nf nf f f f f f #f f f f f f f f
f f f f f nf f nf f f f f f f f
? bb
f ff
f
? bbb f f f nf f nf f f f f f f
b f

29
29

{{

3
3

2
2

f f f f f nf f nf f f f f f f f

n
f
rf
fr f n f f #f f nf f f f f f f f f f f nf f nf f f f f f f f
f f f n f f #f f f f f f f

2
2

2
2

Presto

4
4

1
1

f fff
f f f f f nf ##ff
f nf

Presto

4
4

4
4

w
w

f nf f f f f f f f f f f f f f
f f nf f f f f f f f f f f f f f
f
f nf nf f f bf f f f nf f f nf f f f
f nf nf f f bf f f f nf f f nf f f f

f ff f ff ff f f f nf f f f ff f f f
f ff ff ff ff ff ff ff nff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff
f fff ffff fff
f
f

4
4

1 2

1 3

1
1 2
2

3
1
1 3

2
2

2
2

32

{{

? bb
? bbb
b

ff
ff

f nf
ff nff
f f

Adagio

34

Adagio

{{

ff
ff

f
f
f
2

f
f
f

f
f
f

ff
ff

2
2

34

b
& bbb
&b b
? bb
? bbb
b

f
ff
f

f f
f nf
f nf
2

2
2

f
n ff f f f f f f f ff f ff f f f f f
n ff f f f f f f f f f f f f
bff

f
bff

1
1

4
4

b
& bbb
&b b

32

f
f
f

f f f
ff f f f
ff
nf nf nf
nf nf nf

f
f
f
f

f nf
f nf
f f
f f

3
3

1
1

2
2

f f
f
f f f f f f f f
f f f f
f f f f f nff
f f f f f f f nf
f
f

M
Mf f f f nf f f f f fbf f f f f
f f
f f
f
f
f
ff f f nf f fbf f f f f f f

bff
f

bff
f

Allegro

1
1

3
3

Allegro

nf
nf

1 5
1
1 5
5

f
nf f ff
fJ nf f ff
fJ f
1
1

36

{{

4
4

3
3

4
4

59 Pianist 79

P57 Scores BACH PREL-FINAL.indd 59

3
3

fff f f f fffff
f f f fF f f f f f f f
FF
F
4

4
4

1
1

4
4

5 4

5
4
5 4

U
M
U
f f nf f f f f nMf
f
f
f
f
f nf f f f
f
f
f
f nf
f f
1

36

f f f f f
f f f f f
f f nf f
f f f nf f
f

2
2

b
& bbb
&b b
bf
? bb nf b f bf f ff f f f f f f f f f nf f nf f f f f f nf f
? bb nf bf f f f f f f f f f f nf f nf f f f f f nf f F
bb
F

1
1

r f bf f
nf
f f ffr nff f bf f
ff f
1

1
1

1
1
1

f
w
f
w
w
w

11/07/2014 09:07

Johann Sebastian BACH (1685-1750)

TRACK 12

INTERMEDIATE/
ADVANCED

Fugue in C minor BWV 847 from The Well-Tempered Clavier Book I


The 24 major and minor keys are covered in each of the two volumes of
Bachs Well-Tempered Clavier, with every key being explored in the form
of a prelude followed by a fugue.
Playing and pedal tips: As with most of the Bach preludes and fugues,
the fugue is always more challenging. Firstly, work out where all the
voices are, where they enter, where they finish and so on. Then, the next
most important thing is working on the fingering, making sure you stick

READ
ARTICLE ON

BACHS
48
PAGE
67

to it. If you keep changing the fingering, your fingers will end up getting
tangled up. See our fingering suggestions in the score. You will find that
there are many moments with the inner voice in the RH where you are
required to use the thumb a great deal (e.g. bar 8).
When it comes to the pedalling, dab the pedal here and there, but
overall very little is needed.
Daniel-Ben Pienaar gives his own tips on this fugue on page 67.

f #f f
ff f ff n f

bb 4 f nf f f f f f
f

f
f
f
f
f
f
b
n
f
n
f
& 4
ff
f
f f f f f f n f f nf f f f
4

? bb 44
b

M
n
f
f
f
f ff
#
f
nf f f
bb bff nf f f f f f f f f f f f f
f f f f nf
f
f
f
f
n
f
b
b
b
f
f
f
n
f
n
f
f
&
#f f f f f ff f n f f
f ff ffff
f ff f
2

? bb
b

1 2

ff
ff ff
b ff f f f bf
b
& b
bf f f
f f f f f
f
? bb f nf f
b
1

{
9

b
& b b ff

f #f f

nff
J

nfj
f
4

f f nf
f f f

f f
ff
f f f

f f
f

f
f f nf f
f f f

f f f

ff

nf
f

f nf f

nff
J

f f

ff

f f f

fj
f
4

bf bf f f f
? bb f f nf nf f f f f f f f f f
f f f f f f f f f
bf bf f f
b
f
5

60 Pianist 79

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09/07/2014 12:29

Johann Sebastian BACH (1685-1750)

TRACK 12

bbbb bbff
&
11
11& b b f
bbb bbff
b
b
&
& b ff
? bb
? bbb f
?
? bbbbbb f
b ff

Fugue in C minor
BWV4 847 from The Well-Tempered
Clavier Book I
4
2

11
11

{{

f
f
ff

bbbb
&
13
13& b b
bbb
b
b
&
& b
? bb
? bbb
?
? bbbbbb
b

2
2

f
f
ff

f
f
ff

f
f
ff

f
f
ff

1
1

2
2

1
1

{{

f
f
ff

bbbb
&
15
15& b b
bbb
b
b
&
& b
? bb
? bbb
?
? bbbbbb
b

f
f
ff

nf nf
nf nf
nn ff nn ff
f #f
f #f
ff ## ff

15
15

{{

bbbb
&
17
17& b b
bb
b
b
&
& bb
? bb
? bbb
?
? bbbbbb
b
17
17

{{

bbbb
&
19
19& b b
bbb
b
b
&
& b
? bb
? bbb
?
? bbbbb
bb
19
19

{{

ffjj
fJfj
Jfffj
JJ
f
fJ
ffJf
ffJ
J
f
f
ff

f
f
fff
ff
f
fff
1
1

f
f
ff
fff
f
f f ff
f f f
ff ff
bfff
bf
bbfff

ff
Jff
Jff
fJJ
f
f
ff
2
2
2

1
1

4
4

f
f
ff

1
3
1
3
1
1
3
3

f f
f f
ff ff

f nf
f nf
ff nnff
5
5

1
1

f
f
ff
ff
ff
fff

f
f
ff

f
f
ff

4
4
4

f
f
ff
ff
ff
fff

f
f
ff
ff
ff
fff

f
f
ff

2
2

f
f
ff

f
f
ff

nf
nf
nnff
2
2

f
f
ff
ff
ff
fff

f
f
ff

f
f
ff
f
f
ff

nf
nf
nnff

f
f
ff

f
f
ff
ff
ff
fff
1
1

1
1

4
4

f
f
ff
f
f
ff
4
4

j
fj
fjj f nf ##ff
ff f nf
ff nnff ##ff
f
f f
ff f
ff

f
f
ff
ff
ff
ff
2
2

2
2

4
4

f
f
ff

ff
ff
fff

f
f
ff
ff
ff
fff

f
f
ff

f
f
ff

f nn ff nn ff
f
ff nn ff nn ff

ff
ff
fff

nfff
nf
nnfff

1
1

1
1

f
f
ff
ff
ff
fff

f
f
ff

f
f
ff

f
f
ff

f
f
ff
ff
ff
fff

f
f
ff

5
5

f
f #f
fff #f
ff ##ff
f
f
ff
5
5

2
2

nf
f nnff nff
f nnff
ff nnff f
f
f f
f ff
ff
1
1
1
1

1
1

1
1

ff
ff
fff

1
3
1
3
1
1
3
3

f
f
ff
f
ff
f

f
f
ff

f
f
ff
f
f
ff

f nn ff
f
ff nn ff
ff
ff
fff

5
5

ff
ff
ff
f
f
f
ff
5
5

f
f
ff

nf
nf
nnff
f
f
ff

3
3

f
f
fff
ff

nff #f
nff #f
nnffff #f
#f
f
f
ff

nf
nf
nnff
f
f
ff

#f
f #ff nnff
f #f nf
ff #ff nf
f f
f f
ff ff

1
1
1
1

f
f
ff
ff
ff
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f
f
ff
1
1

1
1

1
3
1
3
1
1
3
3

1
2
1
2
1
1
2
2

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nf
nnfff

ffjj
ffjj f nnff
ff f
f nf
f f nf
f nf
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f
f
ff ff ff
ff b fff
ff b fff
ff bb ff
fff f

ff
ff
fff
f
f
ff

3
3

1
1
1
1

2
2

f nnff
f
ff nnff
ff
ff
fff

nfff
nf
nnfff
f
f
ff

f bf
f bf
ff bbff
ff
ff
fff

3
3

#ff
#f
##ff
f
f
f
ff

2
2

3
3

f
f
ff
1
1
1
1

1
1

f
f
ff
ff
ff
fff
2
3
2
3
2
2
3
3

ff
ff
fff
f
f
ff

ff
ff
f
f
ff

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nnfff
f ff
f
ff ff
2
2
2
2

ff
ff
fff

f
f
ff

f
f
ff
f
f
ff
1
1
1
1

nff
nff
nnfff
f nnff
f
ff nnff
2
2
2
2

ff
ff
fff

j
ffj
ffjj n f
fff n f
f nf nn fff
f nf f
ff nf f
nf f
2
2

5
5

1
1
1
1

2
2

f
f
ff

61 Pianist 79

P60 Scores BACH FUG-FINAL.indd 61

1
1
1
1

1
1

f
f
ff
f
f
ff

f
f
ff

4
4

ff
ff
fff
f
f
ff
4
4

f
f
ff
2
2

2
2

1
1

5
5

f
f
ff
f
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JJ

1
1

1
4
1
4
1
1
4
4

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ff
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2
2

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2
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5
5

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5
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1
1

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f
f
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4
4

2
2

5
5

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ff
ff
ff
f
f
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f
f
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f
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f
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1
1

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f
ff
f
f
ff
fff

2
2

f
f
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f bf
f bf
ff bbff

1
1

2
2

13
13

INTERMEDIATE/
ADVANCED

f
f
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f nf
f nf
ff nnff
f f
f f
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2
2
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2

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f
f
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4
4

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ff
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f
f
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3
3
3
3

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fff f
f
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ff nf nf
f nf nf
f nf nf
f
f
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ff
ff
ff
bf
bf
bb ff

f
f
fff
ff
2
2
2
2

f
f
ff
09/07/2014 12:29

Johann Sebastian BACH (1685-1750)

TRACK 12

b
& bbb
& bbbbb
&
?b
? bbb
? bbb
bb

21
21
21
21

{{

b
& bbb
& bbbbb
&
? bb
? bbb
? bbb
b

23
23
23
23

{{

b
& bbb
& bbbbb
&
? bb
? bbb
? bbb
b

25
25
25
25

{{

b
& bbb
& bbbbb
&
? bb
? bbb
? bbb
b

27
27
27
27

{{

Fugue in C minor BWV 847 from The Well-Tempered Clavier Book I

{{

f nf
f nf
ff nf
f
f
f
f

ff
ff
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2
2
2
2
2

f
ff
f
f
f
f
f

f
f
f

f nf
f nf
f nf
f
f
f

f
f
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f
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f
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f
f
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b
& bbb nff
& bbbbb nnfff
& f
? bb f
bf
?
b
b
? bbb f
b

29
29
29
29

INTERMEDIATE/
ADVANCED

f
f
f

f
f
f

f
ff
f
f

1
1

1
1

1
1
1

1
1
1

f
f
f

f
f
f

f
f
f

P60 Scores BACH FUG-FINAL.indd 62

1
1
1
1
1

f
f
f

f
ff
f
f
f
f
f

f
f
f

f
n ff
nf
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3
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3
3
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4
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4
4
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3
3
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5
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5
5

f
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f
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f
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5
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5
5

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f
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2
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1
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f
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f
f
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ff
ff
ff
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f
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3
3

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f f
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2
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f
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f
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1
1
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3
3

5
5 2
2
5 2

3
3
3

f
f
f
4
4

4
4
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f
f
f
1
1

f
f
f

f
f
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f
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1
1
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4
4

5
5

4
4
4

5
5
5

f
f
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3
3

f
ff
n ff
ff
nf
ff
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f f f
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f

f
f
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f
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1
1

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f bnfJff bff
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f
ff
f
f

ff
ff
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3
3
3

ff
ff
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f nf
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3
3
3

w
w
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2
2

4
4
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2
2
2

62 Pianist 79

1
1
1
1
1

f
ff
f
f

f
f
f
f
f
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f
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f
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ff
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f
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f
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f
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f f f
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f f
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1
1

1
1
1

f
ff f
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fJf
J
f nf
f nf
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ff
ff
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f
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3
3

4
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1
1

1
1
1

3
3
3

2
2
2

3
3

1
1

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1
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f
f
f
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2
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f f fF
f f fF
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2
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2
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3
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2
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3
3

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3
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f
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f
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1
1

1
1

1
1

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nf
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f
ff f
ff
ff
f
f
f

3
3

f
f ff ff
f Jfff fff
Jf f
J
f f f f f
f f f f
f f f f ff

2
2
2
2
2

f
ff
f
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f
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f
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f
f
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f
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f f
f f
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4
4

ff
ff
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1
1
1
1
1

4
4

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fJf
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f
f
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4
4
4

f
f
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4
4
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f
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3
3
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3
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2
2
2
2
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5
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f n FF
f n FFF
f n FF
F
5
5
5

09/07/2014 12:29

ISS
S
T M
HAM
R
DON
A
P
Y
C
U
L
IECE
HIS P
ON TPAGE

Robert SCHUMANN (1810-1856)

ON

LESS

TRACK 13

ADVANCED

No 2 from Three Romances op 28

24

Robert Schumann composed the Three Romances opus 28 in 1839, the year before
he finally married Clara Wieck after their long and difficult courtship.
Playing and pedal tips: When you listen to the track on the CD, it sounds like an
easy piece. But sounds can be deceptive! Look at the score and you will find three

staves. That alone might worry some! However, the middle stave basically points
out the RH melody, which is mainly played by the thumb. You will need to use
ample legato pedalling, but try not to blur the melody notes. Use your ears.
Read Lucy Parhams step-by-step lesson on this piece on page 24.

Einfach e = 100

#### # 6
& #8

f f f
p

f
J

f ff

f f f

f f
J

? #### # 68 f
#

f ff

1 2

f f
J

ff f

f
fff f f f f
f
J

j
j
? #### # 68 f f f fj f f f f fj f ff f f f f f ff f f f f f f f f f f f f f
#
f
f
f
f
f
f
p

con pedale 1

#### #
& #

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f
f f f

f
f f

f f

f f

f
f f

f f f f

f f f f f
f f f f
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f
f
f
f
f f f
f
f

4
1

63 Pianist 79

P63 Scores SCHUMANN-FINAL.indd 63

09/07/2014 12:30

Robert SCHUMANN (1810-1856)

TRACK 13

9
9
9
9

j
#### # nf
f
#
#
& ## # # f f f fj #f
& ###### nnfff f n f f ffj #f
& ###### npff f n f f ffj #f
& # f f n f f ff #f
? #### # pp n f j
fj
? ###### pf
#
? ## ### f
fj
ffj
? ###### ff
f
# f
f
f

{{

5
4
5
4
5
4
5
4

5
4
5
4
5
4
5
4

4
4
4

#### #
j
& ###### n ff
f
#
& ## ### n ff f n f f # ffjj
& ###### n ff f n f f # ffj
& # n ff f n f f # ff
? #### # f n f f # fj
? ###### f
fj
? ###### f
fj
? ###### ff
ffj
# f
f
f
f

{{

#### #
& ######
& ######
& ######
& #
? #### #
? ######
? ######
? ######
#

15
15
15
15

{{

j
f
fnfnf f j
fnfnf f ffj
fnfnf f fj
fnfnf f
f f nf
f f nnff
ff ff n f
f f nf
f f nf
3
3
3
3

4
4
4
4

j
ff
f
ff f f f fffjj
ff f f f ffj
ff f f f ff
f f
f f fjj
f
fj
ff
ffj
f
f
f
f

4
2
4
2
4
2

3
5
3
5
3

f f
ffff ff fff f fff f
ff f ff f fff f
fff f ff f ff f
f f f
f f f
f f f
ff ff ff
f f f
f f f
4
4

12
12
12
12

ADVANCED

4
No35 2 from
op 28
2
5Three Romances
5

j
fj f
f fj f f f f
f ffj f f f f
ff fff f
ff f f f
f nf f
f nf f
ff nn ff ff
f nf f
f nf f
4
4
4

3
5
3
5
3
5
3

3
5
3
5
3
5
3

5
5
5

j
f
f fjj f ff f f
f ffj f f f f
ff fff f
ff f f f
f f f
f f f
ff ff ff
f f f
f f f
4
4
4
4

4
4
4

j
n
f
ff f j
f f n f f nnffj
f f n f f nfj
f f nf f
nf

ff
f
f

j
nff
f
ff f f f
f
nff # f n f f ffjj f # fff f nnfff f ff f
nff # f n f f ffj ff # ff f nff f fff f
nff # f n f f ff # fff f nff f f f
#f nf f j f # f
fff
fj f n f f
f
fj f n f f
f
ffj ff nn ff ff
ff
f f nf f
f
f f nf f
f
4
4
4

f n ff f f f # fff f
f n >ff f f f # f f
f n ff f f f # ff f
f n >f f f f # f f
j
>
nfj
>f
nfj
f
nnffj
ff
nf
f
nf
f
1 2
1 2
1 2
1 2

fnffnf #f f#fff f ffnf fnf f f


fn>ffnf #f f#f f fnf ffnf f f fn f f
fnffnf #f f#ff f fnf fnf f f fn f f
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>
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f
f
n
f
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f
f
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f
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5
5

1
1
1

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5 4

5 4

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f
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#f nf n f f ffj
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f f f
f f f
ff ff ff
f f f
f f f

5
5

4
4

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f n >ff #f f f nf f
f n ff #f f f nf f
f n >f #f f f f f
j
>
n
f
j
n>f
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n
f
nf
n
f
n fj
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nf
nf
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3

1
1
1
1

ritard.
ritard.
ritard.
ritard.

4
2
4
2

5 4

ff nnffnff
ff nfnf
ff nfnf
ff fnf

14

2
2

1
1



R.H.

pp
R.H.

pp
R.H.
pp
ff
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f
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# fJ#fffff f# f f # f f##ff#f f f
# fJ#ffff f# f f # f f#f#f f f
# fJ f f# f f # f f

5
5
5

#### # a tempo f
& ###### faftempo
f f fff f
& ###### p faftempo
#
#
f
& ## # # f ff ff ff ff ff ff
&
? ###### ppf f f f#f f ff f f fJ f
f
? ###### pff #Jf f
Jf
? ###### pf #Jf f
Jf
? ###### p #Jfj
J
? ###### pf f f Jfj f f f f fjj f
? ###### pf f f f fj f f f f f fj f
? ###### f f f fj f f f f fj f
? ###### f f f f f f f f f f f f
f
f
#
f
f
a tempo

18
18
18
18

{{

P63 Scores SCHUMANN-FINAL.indd 64

1
1
1
1

1 2

1 2

1 2

1 2

f
f ff f f f ff f
f f f f f ff f
f f f f ff
f f f ff ff f f ff f
f
f f ff
f
f f f

f
ff
ff f ff ff ff f f f
ff f f ff ff ffff f ff f
ff f f ff ff ff f ff f
ff f f ff ff f ff f
f
f
2

2 64 Pianist 79

f
ffff f fff f
fff f fff f
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f ffffj ff ffffj f
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f ffff ff ffff f
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f
f fff f f ff f
f ff f f ff f
f f f f f f
f f fff ff f f ff f
f
f f ff
f
f f f

f
ff
ff f ff ff ff f f f
ff f fff ff ffff f ff f
ff f fff ff ff f ff f
ff f fff ff f ff f
f
f
3

09/07/2014 12:30

Robert SCHUMANN (1810-1856)

TRACK 13

## ### ##
#
22& #
& #######
&# #

No 2 from Three Romances op 28

22
22
22

f
ff ff ff ff
f f f
ff ff f ff
f
f f ff

f
ff f ff
f
f f

ff
JJ
>>fJ
>>j
fj f
?
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65 Pianist 79

09/07/2014 12:30

Try the New Unique Audiovisual Study Tool:

www.pianostreet.com/AST

66 Pianist 79

p66 Ads.indd 66

10/07/2014 10:29

E D U C AT I O N

A Well-Tempered Challenge
Daunted by Bachs Well-Tempered Clavier? Dont be, says Daniel-Ben Pienaar, a concert pianist and
teacher who shares his inspiring insights on getting into the great 48 with Jessica Duchen

p67_BACH 48-FINALish.indd 67

to programme the entirety of either or


both of the two books of 24 pieces in
recitals. Its the same with recordings:
while many pianists seem happy to
tackle Beethovens 32 sonatas on CD,
most seem to find Bachs 48 to be
more daunting.
One of the most fascinating artists
to take up the 48 gauntlet in recent
years is Daniel-Ben Pienaar, the South

African-born pianist and teacher, who is


now a professor at the Royal Academy
of Music (RAM) in London. His
recording (on Avie) is a fresh, daring,
creative and extraordinarily vivid take
on the work, making the most of the
sheer variety inherent in Bachs traversals
of all the major and minor keys, and the
kaleidoscopic range of colours and states
of mind that the journey entails.

he complete
Preludes and
Fugues of Bachs
Well-Tempered
Clavier present
a pianistic
mountain range
that not every
musician dares to climb. Relatively
few professional performers venture

67 Pianist 79

10/07/2014 10:23

E D U C AT I O N
INTERMEDIATE

1750)
I
an BACH (1685pered Clavier Book
Johann Sebasti
847 from The Well-Tem

Prelude in C minor

TRACK 11

BWV

a typewriter!
has when using
the feeling one
concentrate
the notes. Its almost challenging. We suggest that you
24 pieces into
more
over time. Dont
Clavier contains
The last page proves slowly and build up the speed
very
comes from the
volumes of The Well-Tempered
required.
on that first. Start
set). This prelude
Each of the two
on page 67.
creep in! No pedal
nickname for these in Kthen in 1722.
on this prelude
let any wrong notes
(hence the 48
gives his own tips
even and well
Bach composed
Daniel-Ben Pienaar
first volume, which tips: All the notes here should soundenjoy digging
Really
Playing and pedal
and every note!
need to hear each
articulated. We

READ
ARTICLE ON

BACHS
48
PAGE
67

nf f bf ffffff ffffff f

ff
fff ff ff f fff
f
b f
fff nf f f
& b bc ffff fff ffff
ffffff f
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f fff fff fffff
fff fffff fff f
? bb bc fffff
3

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f
7
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ff
b f
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f ff
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f nf f f f ff f ff f
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f
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f fff fffff fff ffff


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f f f fff
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ffff

f f f f f f f ff f f

f f
ffff ffffffff f f

f
ff f ff
f fff ffff fff fff
3

79
57 Pianist
09/07/2014

P57 Scores BACH

PREL-FINAL.indd

57

12:29

PLAY IT!

Bachs Prelude in
C minor BWV 847 from
Well-Tempered Clavier Book I
SCORES PAGE 57

Daniel-Ben Pienaar offers up some learning


tips for the Bach Prelude in C minor, which
appears inside this issue on page 57. His
learning tips for the C minor Fugue can be
seen on the opposite page
Prelude
There is a tradition for playing this piece rather fast, like a kind of
toccata and it can be done very excitingly in this way. Listen to
Richter, who sounds impressively regimented, or Feinberg, whose
windswept version is breathtaking, or Edwin Fischer, who manages
a tantalising detached touch. However, the opening section does not
necessarily have to be up tempo. If you compare the earlier version
of this piece (in the notebook for WF Bach) with the version in the
Well-Tempered Clavier you see how Bach transformed a simple
exercise piece into something with a dramatic shape (most of the
second half belongs only to the later version). The Presto section can
be very effective if taken at twice the speed of the opening page, so
the opening should therefore be taken rather slowly. Make it a study
in touch and control rather than in dexterity. In this way the tension
builds (especially over the extended pedal point in bars 21-27), until it
is released in the fast section, which sets the stage for the rhetorical
flourishes at the end. Glenn Gould explores all sorts of tricks of
articulation and over-holding of certain notes on the first page.
Another source of reference for me is the opening moments of
the St John Passion with its brooding, ruminating semiquavers. The
wonder of this piece is that it yields to so many different approaches
as long as your aim remains a poetic one!

Sometimes you feel that people end up


playing the importance of this music,
instead of the music itself
Perhaps it is no wonder that his
recording is unconventional, since his
path into these pieces was anything
but usual. Most people who play the
piano seem to have been force-fed some
preludes and fugues in childhood, often
before being old enough to understand
them musically. Pienaar, though, grew
up on a military base at Kimberley in
the Northern Cape, South Africa, where
his father was a chaplain, with none of
the access to record shops, concerts and
other musical experiences that others
might take for granted. It was only
when he was 18 and won a scholarship
to the RAM that he began to build up
his knowledge of the repertoire in which
he has become most celebrated Bach,
Mozart, Schubert and Beethoven.
Until then, I had a certain natural
facility, he recalls, but no real structure
to the technique. Mostly Id just get
hold of music and try to play it. I
didnt learn many of the Bach Preludes
and Fugues until I was 18. During
my student years I used to earn some
money by playing background music
in Browns Hotel, so I took along the
books of Mozart Sonatas, Bach Partitas
and Chopin Waltzes things that are
not too loud! and played through
them until I felt I knew them all.
After that I decided to try the WellTempered Clavier and read through

the whole book, very badly. Then I


started again from the beginning.
Gradually it began to be absorbed.
Not that his way is one he would
recommend to anyone else approaching
the 48 for the first time. My advice
would always be to start with what
intrigues you, what excites you and
what you love, he suggests. But one
perfectly good way in is to start with
the first prelude of the first book and
let it unfold from there, which it does
quite quickly.
Eleven of the first 12 preludes exist
in earlier versions, written originally for
Bachs son Wilhelm Friedemann to study.
Pienaar suggests that comparing the
early versions with what Bach ends up
including in the Well-Tempered Clavier
offers an interesting way to explore the
initial pieces more deeply. Invariably the
first version looks more like an exercise,
while the later one becomes a piece
with a rhetorical structure and a more
ambitious poetic ambience. Thats a good
place to start if you want to know what
the 48 is really about.
From low to high
The preludes contain a world of
different influences and inspirations,
from the highest form of ecclesiastical
music to the most raucous popular
dances, Pienaar says. As for the
fugues, when youre learning them,
look for the big cadences. I think
people often see the fugues as these
oozing miasmas of contrapuntal lines
that have to be a bit of a struggle, so
the important thing with the fugues is
not to think of it like that.
The music does have a kind of
continuity built into it, so it is helpful
to try to cut it up into paragraphs
via those big cadences or breathing
points. Then look at the parts that are
very strictly contrapuntal and the
episodes that are more relaxed, so that
you differentiate between them. You
dont want to be hammering out note
after note, beat after beat, as so often
can happen.
The canonic status of the WellTempered Clavier inevitably adds to
the challenges inherent in approaching
it. First of all, says Pienaar, dont be
intimidated. Sometimes you feel that
people end up playing the importance
of this music, instead of the music
itself, he warns.
People sometimes comment on a
performance they think is wonderful

Hannah Zushi

Ingasas

68 Pianist 79

p67_BACH 48-FINALish.indd 68

10/07/2014 10:23

Ingasas

INTERMEDIATE/
ADVANCED

1750)
I
an BACH (1685Johann Sebasti from The Well-Tempered Clavier Book
BWV 847

Fugue in C minor

TRACK 12

up getting
fingers will end
the fingering, your
You will find that
it. If you keep changing suggestions in the score.
you are
volumes of to
fingering
in the RH where
in each of the two the form tangled up. See our
the inner voice
in
moments with
minor keys are covered
bar 8).
there are many
The 24 major and Clavier, with every key being explored
a great deal (e.g.
and there, but
to use the thumb
dab the pedal here
Bachs Well-Tempered by a fugue.
and fugues, required it comes to the pedalling,
When
of a prelude followedtips: As with most of the Bach preludeswhere all the
page 67.
is needed.
on this fugue on
Firstly, work out
overall very little
Playing and pedal
gives his own tips
more challenging.
on. Then, the next
Daniel-Ben Pienaar
the fugue is always enter, where they finish and so
stick
they
making sure you
voices are, where
on the fingering,
thing is working
most important

READ
ARTICLE ON

BACHS
48
PAGE
67

nf
f
f ff f ff f
f nff n#ff f nf ff f

f
f f f nf f f f f f f f f
b 4 f nf f f f f f f
&b b4

? bb b44
4

f
f ff
f f f f nf
nf f f
M
f nf f f fnff f bf f f f f
fff
bf f f f fnff f f
fnf
f f
b f f #f f f #ff f f f f f ff f ff f n f
& b b bf nf

? bb b

PLAY IT!

Bachs Fugue in C minor BWV 847


from Well-Tempered Clavier Book I
SCORES PAGE 60

1 2

ff ff
ff
b ff f f f bf bf f f

&b b
f f
f f f
f nf f
f
? bb b
1

f f
ff
f f f

f f nff
f f

f ff

f f f f f
f f nf
1

f f
2

3
5

nfj
f f f f
4

b f
&b b f

f #f f

nff
J

ff

f nf f

nf
f

f nf nf f f f f f f f f f bf bf f f
? bb b f
1

nff
J

ff

f f f

j
f
f

bf bf f f f f f f f f f f f f f
1

79
60 Pianist
09/07/2014

P60 Scores BACH

FUG-FINAL.indd

12:29

60

Fugue
This piece should have a good, buoyant rhythm and texture. In Bachs livelier
music, think of heavy and light notes rather than legato or staccato. A
binary attitude to articulation can be so depressing in the fugues. Equally
unbearable is an accent on every beat, so a good starting guide for how many
heavier notes there should be is to listen to the harmonic rhythm. Feel a lilt
of two or even one in a bar and use these notes as a kind of outline for shaping
the phrases in the case of the subject, the descending A flat, G, F and E flat.
Another idea is to feel the difference between the more strict counterpoint (like
in bars 7-8, 11-12 etc) and the more free-wheeling, sequential episodic material
(bars 9-10, 13-14 etc). Sometimes this episodic material can be playful (e.g.
bars 7-8) or sometimes it can drive the music to a goal (e.g. bars 17-19).
Explore differences in touch (for example a spruce detach for the unaccented
quavers or a more singing touch for the semiquaver scales maybe particularly
when they are ascending). There are so many interesting possibilities the last
thing this should feel like is some kind of contrapuntal duty!

by saying he lets the music speak for


itself , but of course music doesnt speak
for itself! It needs us to make it our
own. And that owning of it means you
mustnt think of it as the Holy Grail,
but as something real and alive to you.
That is a challenge for professionals
as well as learners, Pienaar feels:
Because then, do you have the
technical and intellectual capacity to
make it compelling without relying on
existing traditions?
Those traditions can be misleading.
We have to look at how through the
ages these pieces have been misread.
We may very well play a piece in the
wrong way, but bring something
powerfully poetic to it in which
case youre actually adding to what
the Well-Tempered Clavier is. Were
not just playing the Well-Tempered
Clavier any more: were playing all
the subsequent history and reception
of this music. That happens with big
canonical collections. They acquire all
the emotions, thoughts and aspirations
of the people whove performed them,
thought about them and studied them.
He advises against simply accepting
received opinion on how to play the
pieces: Theres one way of thinking in
which the fugue subject is hammered
out every time it appears and is always
articulated in the same way, he says.
This is ridiculous! Knowing where
the theme is, is often not the most
interesting part of whats happening.
And sometimes the subject evolves
emotionally through the fugue: for
instance it might return strongly at a
climax point, having been a throwaway
line at the start.

Attitudes towards historical


performance practice have relaxed
a little, he adds. The danger is that
because we have a few treatises,
people get very obsessed with the
historical stuff and start to think
about it dogmatically, rather than
seeing that the historical element
actually gives us expressive tools
to use. You may find somethings a
gigue, but you decide not to play it
like a gigue. But look at what people
do with Shakespeare! For some
reason theatre people dont have any
problem with that.
Of course nobody is obliged to
play the complete 48 but doing
so can bring exceptional rewards.
When your starting point is opening
up to all the expressive possibilities
and means, then youre opening
the door to 19th-century ways of
playing; to period instruments, to
modern ways of playing with digital
technology. Its like a big Pandoras
box and it can feel chaotic. But you
dont have to have a philosophy of
interpretation; you can take the
cycle and let it teach you the ways
in which similar pieces are different.
On its own terms it starts to impose
limits on what is reasonable,
acceptable or expressively tasteful.
We need the tension of limits.
Daniel-Ben Pienaar plays two
Preludes and Fugues on this issues
covermount CD. For full track details,
look at the complete listing back of
the covermount. His complete Bach
Preludes and Fugues album is available
on Avie Records (AV2299, 4 CDs)
69 Pianist 79

p67_BACH 48-FINALish.indd 69

LOUIS LORTIE
presents Volume 3 in his survey of works
for solo piano by Chopin

CHAN 10813

Lortie is a model Chopinist


eloquent but never sentimental
this is Chopin playing of an
exceptionally high order

*****

Instrumental Choice
BBC Music Magazine

S TAY I N T H E KNOW

New releases Reviews Special offers Artist features

www.chandos.net
www.theclassicalshop.net
(24-bit studio masters, lossless, MP3)

10/07/2014 10:23

INSIGHT

JOHN
McLEOD
and the

piano
Pianist Mark Tanner salutes Scottish
composer John McLeods 80th birthday
with the tribute here and a new piece,
written in McLeods honour, in the Scores

PAGE 34

espite the fact that


2014 marks his 80th
year, the composer
John McLeods
unswerving creative
impulse continues to
spur him forward with
bewildering energy
and conviction. Described by The Scotsman as
a major force in contemporary Scottish music,
McLeod, born in 1934, is one of Scotlands most
prolific composers. His music, including several
major works for piano, has been commissioned,
performed and recorded by leading orchestras,
ensembles and soloists around the world.
As a student at the Royal Academy of Music,
McLeod studied clarinet with Jack Brymer,
Reginald Kell and Gervase de Peyer. However,
after winning several important prizes for
composition, he changed direction and became a
pupil of Lennox Berkeley and Witold Lutoslawski
and later studied conducting with Adrian Boult.
I first met John McLeod and his wife, Margaret
Murray McLeod, while undertaking an examining
tour to Hong Kong for ABRSM. We became
friends and colleagues, so it was an enormous
pleasure for me to perform, broadcast and record
Haflidis Pictures: 12 Aphorisms for Piano from
Drawings by Haflidi Hallgrimsson.
From modest beginnings I remember we
initially discussed the possibility of four or five
bagatelles for piano emerged an epic, virtuosic
30-minute work. Following the premiere at
Londons Wigmore Hall in 2008, I recorded
Haflidis Pictures at St Georges Bristol along
with hitherto unrecorded works by composers
such as Graham Fitkin and Philip Martin. I
also gave the Scottish and Welsh premieres of
Haflidis Pictures, before performing extracts live
on BBC Radio 3. In all of these performances

I was joined by John, who took on the role of


speaker to read the pithy, highly entertaining
epigrams. We had quite a hoot doing all of
those performances, though on one occasion
my unavoidably late arrival at a venue left John
in the lurch. I arrived in a ball of sweat, to find
John in full flight, midway through an off-thecuff lecture on the contemporary music scene.
A few years later, flautist Gillian Poznansky
and I gave another Wigmore Hall McLeod
premiere: Quicksilver. All of Johns pieces have
a gritty rhythmic drive, but also an undeniable
lyricism and poetical charm.
Piano love affair
The piano continues to be a prime protagonist
in Johns output. As well as Haflidis Pictures,
his piano music catalogue includes the Piano
Concerto; Symphonies of Stone and Water for
solo piano, solo percussion, three saxophones,
three trumpets and three trombones; five piano
sonatas; Hebridean Dances; Twelve Preludes;
Four Impromptus; Three Protest Pieces and Three
Interludes from the film Another Time, Another
Place. The recently commissioned Piano Sonata
No5 is about to receive two dozen performances
all over Europe and Australia by Murray
McLachlan, a terrific pianist and champion of
Johns piano music. Johns piano works have also
been performed regularly by distinguished pianists
including Peter Donohoe, Sam Haywood, Peter
Evans and his wife, Margaret Murray McLeod.
Margaret is a well-known pianist, writer and
educator; her penchant for detail, I am sure John
would agree, has been of considerable help to him
over the years, encouraging him to write music for
an impressive array of forces.
I spoke to John recently about his lifelong
relationship with the piano: My love affair with
the piano goes right back to when I was nine

years of age and was taken to a recital given


by the great and glamorous Eileen Joyce, with
whom I immediately fell in love, he said. I got
her address, wrote to her and she sent back a
lovely signed photograph. One of the pieces she
played in that recital was Mozarts Sonata in C
(K545), which I bought the very next day from
our local music shop in Aberdeen and practised
it diligently! I managed with difficulty to pass all
the Associated Board Exams but by the time I
got to Grade 8, something told me I wasnt going
to be a concert pianist. I tried very hard through
a series of well-meaning (but not very good) local
teachers, but found it almost impossible to break
through the technical barrier. After several years
of attempting to play the Schumann Concerto, I
switched to the clarinet and became a professional
player for several years. But that wasnt enough for
me, and from here my creative urges set me onto
my real vocation that of a composer.
However, Ive never lost touch with the piano,
and in fact use it daily for improvisation and
composition; to me it has the feeling of an entire
orchestra. Although we have a Steinway in the
house, I use an old upright Challen, slightly
out of tune, and I relish hearing all the amazing
harmonics which occur when I play and which
lead me into all sorts of areas of sound!
On page 34 of this issue, you will find a short
piece that I wrote a few weeks ago as a birthday
present to John. It is entitled Loch Jedmon an
anagram of John McLeod and it contains a
number of idiomatic Scottish features that I hope
you (and he) will enjoy.
The BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra under
Donald Runnicles gives the London premiere of
John McLeods orchestral work, Sun Dances, at
the BBC Proms, Royal Albert Hall, on 3 August.
Further information at www.johnmcleod.uk.com

Wojtek Kutyla

PLAY!

MARK TANNERS
LOCH JEDMON

70 Pianist 79

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09/07/2014 12:34

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I N S I D E S TO R Y

ARGERICH
on stage, off stage
Martha Argerichs daughter Stphanie has made a touching, intimate and funny new documentary
about her famous mother. In the run-up to the lms UK release, she speaks with Erica Worth

Why did you decide to make this film?


It was a very natural thing. I didnt know I was going
to make a film when I started out. I was 11 when I
filmed some of the footage. My mother had received
this camera from Japan and I enjoyed using it. Then
I studied photography. I always had a camera with
me. So it came about as a very unconscious thing.
The turning point was just after I became a mother.
Thats when you see your family in a slightly different
way. I could see my mother in a different way; I could
be less critical maybe, and understand her differently.
You also feel an urgency that life is moving by quickly birth and death
and so on. Thats how it started.
Did your parents watch the film before release?
Of course I had to show it to them and my sisters. I wanted to gain their
approval at the final editing stage. Everyone was rather nervous and scared
beforehand, and they all watched it together! But they didnt ask me to
change anything. I think as interpreters themselves, they understand

about my wanting to be as honest as possible. I didnt want to make some


Walt Disney version of my family. I wanted light things as well because I
didnt want to fall into something too intimate, or too sentimental, or too
voyeuristic. I tried to find the balance. Some people might think its too
intimate, some might be disturbed. Ive been happy to see peoples reactions
to date. Nobody has destroyed the film. And of course, it is a specialist
film. The average person on the street will not see it.
Did your parents like it?
You have to ask them! My father is quite proud I think.
He hasnt seen anything that Ive done before. For
my mother, the film is still disturbing. She cant be
that relaxed about it. Shes looking at herself and shes
embarrassed by herself a lot.
We all know how hard it is to pin Martha down for
an interview. Is it hard for you to find time with your
mother?
Yes, and no. We havent shared the usual things that
many families share, such as going on holidays, sharing
activities and so on. Everything is centred either around
the home or the concerts. Thats how we had to adapt
ourselves. The time spent is still as meaningful though.
Do you remember your mother and father talking
about piano together?
Yes, sometimes. My father is not so much into this. He
practises, but at the end of the day he doesnt want to talk about it. My
mother likes to talk about it more. When they see each other, they dont
talk about the music so much. A little bit but in a light way. They are not
going to spend hours! Theres a moment in the film where shes showing
him fingering on the piano, but hes less interested in talking about it. Even
now, she tells me I have to meet this pianist because I want him to help
me with the Mozart and so on. She asks for advice from other pianists. She
likes that. Theres a French word for it: confrre. My father is more private.

Images courtesy of New Wave Films

he daughter of Martha Argerich and Stephen


Kovacevich, and the middle child of Argerichs three
daughters, Stphanie Argerich is a filmmaker whose
new documentary to be released this autumn in the
UK is an intimate, funny and sometimes voyeuristic
portrait of her mother. Seen through Stphanies eyes,
this personal film explores her mothers love, life and
extraordinary talent, and
exposes the challenges of combining motherhood
with a glittering concert career where everyone
wants a slice of Martha. Footage includes family
tapes, TV archive, and of course Stphanies own
filming, spanning the early years of Argerichs
triumph at the Chopin Piano Competition in
Warsaw in 1965 to present day.

72 Pianist 79

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10/07/2014 09:54

SS 2015 134x89:Layout 1 07/07/2014 11:14 Page 1

Chethams International
Summer School &
Festival for Pianists
Artistic Director: Murray McLachlan

Part One: 1420 August 2015


Part Two: 2026 August 2015
Was there ever rivalry between them?
Not now! But probably some time in the past, when they were a couple.
They are very different pianists. They dont compete in the same things.
Your mother is such an icon. This film shows her as more of a human being.
I think you see both in the film. Shes a mythological goddess, beyond
normal talent and abilities. My mother is a star, and this had to be visible
in the film. But shes also a human being, with all of the fragilities and the
weaknesses. Its fascinating to see different aspects of her. As a mother and as
a pianist, she can be so different.
How did she take to being a grandmother?
I was not the first of her daughters to have a baby. She was already a grandma.
She loves to see my two boys. She interacts in a special way with children. She
can enter their world and makes great conversation with them.
What pieces do you most love to hear your mother play?
I grew up with all the things she plays. They are almost like lullabies. I have
loved her Schumann. Some passages make me want to cry. And also Ravel.
I find great spirit in her Prokofiev. I recognise the person. Its fun!
Can you recognise your parents playing?
Its easier for me to recognise my mothers playing because I heard her
play more often as I grew up more with her. My fathers playing is more
mysterious to me. Even then, they dont recognise themselves. They
sometimes listen to the radio and say, thats really good or thats not very
good and its one of them! She was listening to Chopin once, and she said:
If its not me, then its someone else very inspired by me!
You have met so many great musicians who surround your mother.
I have known Mischa Maisky since I was a little girl. One of my favourite
pieces was the Arpeggione that he and my mother played together. I used
to fall asleep listening to it. They still play together (my mother is very
faithful!). She has a special connection with Evgeny Kissin too. At her
Lugano festival she usually invites the same people the Russian mafia!
Its a very friends festival. She is very good friends with Nelson Freire too.
Theyve known each other since their teens.

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You look a lot like your mother.


Thank you. Shes beautiful!

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Do you play the piano too?


I learned a bit, and I did some saxophone. But when I was a teenager, I
stopped. There were too many pianists around! My profession is film director.
My parents didnt want me to be a pianist, especially my father. My mother
was more open to it, but she never pushed, as shed been pushed so much
herself. I am happy that I just listened to it so much and I enjoy it so much. I
never wanted to be a musician. It was also obvious I couldnt compete! n
Argerich, A film by Stphanie Argerich, will be released in selected cinemas in
the UK this autumn. For the exact release date and further information, go to
www.newwavefilms.co.uk

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73 Pianist 79

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10/07/2014 16:36

MAKERS

A PIANO WORTH
WAITING FOR

h, how I love
Italy that
land of pasta,
red wine,
opera, designer
fashion and
holiday
destinations.
The country has produced some
legendary pianists of course think
Michelangeli and Pollini and, I hasten
to add, our issue 77 cover star Federico
Colli, from the new generation. But
when it comes to piano makers, Italy
has been rather low-key. Until now.
Over the past 30 plus years, Fazioli
has been making its way into the
piano scene and has become the piano
of choice for such pianists as Angela
Hewitt, Louis Lortie and our cover
artist Daniil Trifonov. Ive tried only a
couple of Faziolis over the years, so the

chance to visit the factory in the town


of Sacile, some 45 minutes outside of
Venice, is intriguing. Give me Versace
and Chianti, any day. But an Italian
piano? Lets see.
On a hot spring day, along with
a group of piano technicians, piano
teachers, performers and journalists,
I am standing outside the impressive
factory, noticing how the Fazioli logo
glimmers brightly in the sun (more
about that logo later), when we are
joined by Paolo Fazioli. Even though
Paolo (as I will call him, so as not to
confuse with his eponymous piano
make) will be entertaining us for
the next couple of hours showing us
round the factory, his eager eyes will be
watching every workman like a hawk
a friendly hawk, though. He has a
relaxed charm about him, the Italian
equivalent of je ne sais quoi. He looks

like a combination of crazy scientist and


arty designer with his floppy hair and
casual attire.
Paolos story began next door, inside
what was the furniture factory once
owned by his father. My family gave
me one little space where I could start
this adventure, he says with affection.
My parents were sceptical. It was not
easy to think of a project like this at the
time. The history of piano makers, as
we know, is very old and theres lots of
tradition. We had none of this.
But Paolo was driven he thought
the sector was sleeping, as he puts it.
Everyone was saying that the piano
has reached this level, and nothing
should be changed. This is stupid.
I demonstrated from the beginning
that its possible to do much more.
Weve made a big contribution to the
development of piano industry. They

All photos Erica Worth, except page 75 sanding the lid Fazioli

A Fazioli takes two to three years from start to nish to produce so is it worth the wait?
Erica Worth takes a trip to the Fazioli factory in Italy to see for herself

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10/07/2014 16:13

wrapped around the gig and press. Then


its a process of waiting two years before
using a rim. Theres a lot of waiting so it
seems, but Paolo says that if you want
quality you must wait. Theres an array of
different-sized rims. Since the prototype
days, there are now six grand models: 156
(the Picolo), 183, 212 (which Paolo says
is the most popular, at 7ft), 228, 278 (the
concert grand) and the enormous 308 (at
over 10ft). Why such a beast? The length
of string influences the sound of tone.
When longer, the sound is more pure. I
wanted more clarity in the sound.
Lasting logo
I cant help but ask about the striking
Fazioli logo we first saw at the factory
entrance and which appears on every
instrument. The logo was made at
the beginning and it was the biggest
investment I made, Paolo explains.
Giulio Confalonieri designed it, and it
cost a fortune! He was top level like
Philippe Starck. I thought, I will spend
this money today and I am spending it for
life. Back then, it was judged a little odd.
But now, after all these years, its fantastic.
Everyone likes it and remembers it.
Confalonieri said he was inspired by the
name Fazioli, and by studying the Golden
Section system for the letters. Its very
harmonious, nothing is wrong.
Just like that logo, theres something
about Fazioli that is so balanced. Paolo
explains the elements of the Fazioli
philosophy: to produce grands only;
not to imitate any other existing pianos;
to individually handcraft each piano

Photos, this page,


clockwise from left:
Pianist Editor Erica
Worth and Paolo
Fazioli in front of the
rims; Paolo explains
the gig and press
process; sanding the
lids using a special
machine

combining traditional methods and


technology; and to constantly improve
the quality by using the results coming
from scientific research. For this last
point, he says, I felt that there wasnt
enough research. I felt makers were
just looking at business and profit etc.
I thought I can come into this market
with new things.
We go into the polyester room,
where six layers of polyester and resin
are coated on to the surface of the
pianos rim. More material is used than
necessary, and then its a matter of
sanding it down, though its a wait of 15
days before it can be sanded to polish.
The sanding starts with a course grade,
and then moves to an ever-finer one each
time. The final sanding process reminds
me a bit of a carwash machine: A big
polisher goes all the way around the rim,
with small hand polishers for the edge
bits. Our company designed this, Paolo
says proudly. Everything is done by hand
unless the machine does it better, thats
the ethos of Fazioli.
Paolo stops by a tray of hinges and
takes one out, telling us that theyre not
made of the usual brass, but are 18ctgold plated. They are gleaming brightly.
We walk into another room where a
happy-looking man called Michele is
doing the veneering. Anything with a
particular wood veneer is made to order
(inside every standard Fazioli its the
wood of the burr of poplar). I mention
how driven the workmen seem. There
are some people who have been working
here for 30 years, Paolo replies. We

discovered they were sleeping, and they


reacted!, he chuckles mischievously.
For the vitality of the sector, our
presence was important. We gave some
benefit to everyone. We made everyone
improve. I think history will say that
about us. And the fact that the piano
was played by Brahms and so on is not
important to me. Its the instrument
itself. I am sure today, for example, if
Liszt were here, hed love my pianos!
The Fazioli piano company was
officially launched in 1981 and its first
prototype, the Model 183, was shown
in Milan that same year. Although
the 183 was sold, I bought it back; I
wanted it! Paolo says.
Fazioli was a small team back then,
consisting of Professor Pietro Righini,
an expert in musical acoustics, and
Lino Tiveron, an expert in piano
construction. Today, the bespoke
6,000-square metre factory houses 45
staff a lot of space per workman. The
factory has produced 2,300 pianos to
date. We make 130 pianos each year,
Paolo says, But wed like to make 150.
We need bigger space, though.
To me, the factory looks vast, and as I
walk into the entrance, I am overwhelmed
by the natural light and beautiful
proportions. Very tasteful. Oh, and its
designed in the shape of a piano! Trust
an Italian to be so design conscious.
We start off where the inner and
outer rims are made. They comprise
layers of Canadian maple wood, with
mahogany for the outer rim. Im
told the rim remains for four days

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MAKERS

prefer to start with young people who


dont have experience. We teach them.
They are very proud and loyal. They
come to the concerts. Some who didnt
know music, now know a lot. They
became much more connected. There
are three departments they can work in:
soundboard, polyester and action. They
stay within their department, but they
are able to move around within it.
I peer at the wooden framework of
the underneath of the piano and observe
that there are no screws in the joints.
Everything is natural wood, with dovetail
joints made with laser precision. This
allows for no gaps and for the piano to
breathe naturally, says Paolo, who adds
that once the wooden frame is ready, it
has to wait between four to five months
to be used. More waiting.
Now to the soundboard, the very core
of the piano. We enter a room that has
precisely 26 per cent humidity the
Soundboard Curing Room in which
a soundboard is preserved for three years
before use (goodness, now thats really
a long wait). After curing, a craftsman
cuts the bridge. Its a dangerous job and
our particular craftsman got so nervous
with us watching him that he had to
stop and wait until wed gone! The
soundboard spruce comes from the Val
di Fiemmes forest in the eastern Italian
alps, the same forest from which the
violin makers of the Cremona school
(including Stradivari) sourced their

spruce. Paolo holds the wood up close


for us to see. Theres such an even grain
you can make out all the layers in it
just like a fine layer cake.
Then we are shown how the wrest
plank, or pin-block, is fitted perfectly
to the iron frame. Paolo tells us how
important it is to get it fitted correctly,
and that each wrest plank belongs
specifically to an iron frame. We move
into the iron frame room, where
an employee named Danny shows
us a board on the wall with a list of
specifications that need to be ticked off
in order for the frame to pass through
to the next stage. Last month we threw
away 35 frames, he says, and sold them
for scrap iron. It was too expensive to
return them.
Coming together
From seeing the pianos body come
together, we move into the stringing
area. It takes a day and a half to string
a Fazioli, using Rslau wires. A piano
string is made with a steel core wrapped
with wire. The lower down the piano,
the thicker the wire (copper wire is used
for the bass string). We watch a bass
string being made. Its just fantastic to
witness the wire whizzing its way around
the core, rapidly from one end to the
other. Fazioli makes the copper wires
used for the bass strings themselves. By
doing this, they can decide the exact
length and thickness and, of equal

Photos, this page, from


left: Delicate work is
required on the bridge;
soundboard wood showing
the fine layers; steel frames

importance, they are completely sure


about the quality of steel, copper and
the whole procedure. Im given that
particular bass string to take home with
me (an honour indeed I am now the
proud owner of a Fazioli bass string!).
Now into the spacious action
department, where we watch a
craftsman meticulously check the
Renner hammers (Paolo checks them
again too). What they are doing here
is testing the hammer flanges to make
sure the resistance is just right. If
anything isnt just perfect, its put aside.
At the next piano, Paolo demonstrates
the weighting of the keys, which is done
with lead weights, and again we see
how complex and precise this process
has to be. The whole regulation process
is a few days work duplex scaling is
one days work; tuning and voicing two
and a half.
Along one side of the room is a row
of three rooms with closed doors. The
first is for the initial voicing. The middle
room is the playing in room, where a
machine literally bashes all the keys of
the piano, going up and down thick
chords, very loud! This room is where
everything gets shaken into place (it
certainly shook me up!). The third room
is the final voicing room.
The piano is ready to go now, but
not before Paolo tries it. He tells us that
he tries out every single piano before it
leaves the factory. He is a perfectionist,

76 Pianist 79

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10/07/2014 16:13

as underscored by yet another set


of Fazioli precepts that are aimed at
attaining as good a sound as possible
on the pianos: clarity of sound (so
that you cant hear noises within it);
evenness (the timbre has to be the same,
no matter what register one is playing
in); duration of the sound (the sound
to remain as long as possible); more
dynamic spectrum (from big fortissimos
to tiny ppps) and sound selectivity
(being able to hear different voices in
polyphonic compositions). This is
what we are trying all the time to
perfect, Paolo explains.
At the end of our tour, we are treated
to a recital by Australian pianist John
Granger Fisher in the Fazioli Concert
Hall. The 198-seat hall, which was
built to ensure the finest acoustics, was
opened in April 2005.
At the end of the day, a piano is only
worth its weight in gold if theres a

pianist to play on it, and Paolo has been


fortunate in those who play his pianos.
Nikita Magaloff was one of the first.
He performed on a Fazioli in Saciles
own Teatro Zancanaro in 1981. Paolo
recounts, I convinced him to come
to Sacile. Just days before the concert,
when he discovered it was a tiny city, he
refused to come the mayor was upset!
Then he accepted, and he played the
concert in December 1981.
Others followed: with Aldo Ciccolini
in 1984 at Teatro Alla Scala, Milan;
then Argerich, Brendel and Ashkenazy
in 1988. And then we come to the
most recent, Angela Hewitt, Paolo says
proudly. She is our greatest fan today.
This is the right way, that the younger
generation are coming to us. The old
generation spends their whole life with
one piano. Pollini, Schiff, Sokolov, Lupu
they are not interested in changing. It
doesnt make sense for them.

Photos, this page,


counter-clockwise from
top left: Making the
strings; working on the
veneer; Paolo checks the
hammer flanges; Paolo
demonstrates weighting
of the keys; Fazioli
Concert Hall

Today, in the UK, youll sometimes


find a Fazioli gracing the stage at such
venues as the Wigmore Hall and the
Southbank. There are four concert
grand 278s on tap in the UK, housed
at Jaques Samuel Pianos in London,
Faziolis exclusive UK dealer. They were
handpicked by Louis Lortie, Trifonov,
Boris Giltburg and Hewitt. Recent
pianists who have opted to play on a
Fazioli include Federico Colli, Francesco
Piemontesi and John Lill.
This issues cover artist, Daniil
Trifonov, will be playing his favourite
Fazioli at his Royal Festival Hall recital
on 30 September. For him, no doubt, it
was worth the wait. n
Jaques Samuel Pianos (www.jspianos.com)
is the exclusive Fazioli dealer in the UK.
To find a Fazioli dealer around the world
and for further information about the
make, go to www.fazioli.com

77 Pianist 79

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HANDS ON

Kindred spirits
A piano club can provide performing opportunities, self-improvement, fellowship and more.
Heres what to expect if you join one and tips on starting your own. By Inge Kjemtrup

o any of the following


scenarios sound
familiar? Scenario 1:
Youve been practising
up a storm and have
taken a few lessons,
but youve gone as
far with your latest
piece as you can. Youd like to enter a festival,
but first you would like feedback from sources
other than your teacher, your family or the dog
(anyway, he seems to like everything you play).
Scenario 2: Youre a beginner/intermediate
player, and the thought of playing in front of
others completely terrifies you yet you know
that the only way to improve your playing is to
take that leap into the unknown. Scenario3:
Youve recently returned to the piano after
The 2013 Member Showcase of the New York
several years away, and you need some kind
Piano Group at Steinway Hall
of challenge to get serious about playing again.
Scenario 4: Youve just moved to a new town and youd like to meet others
by listening to other players. Plus, playing at a piano club can be invaluable
who love the piano as much as you do.
before facing an exam or a music festival. As one amateur player told me,
If you recognise any of these scenarios, a piano club might be what
There are always adult pianists trying to get performances without the
youre after. There are piano clubs dotted throughout the UK, the US and
horrors of being outclassed by a 17-year-old dynamo.
Canada, and no doubt around the world. Piano clubs range in size from
Besides performing opportunities, clubs generally have a social aspect
local clubs with eight or nine members to the 300-member New York Piano that will help you meet others who share your passion for the piano. This
Group. But no matter what their size, the best piano clubs will give you a
is not something that should be dismissed as secondary. Its important
regular opportunity to perform in front of knowledgeable, supportive peers
to have the right sort of atmosphere, friendly and welcoming, and you
and give you the chance to improve your playing through masterclasses and should feel that it doesnt matter if you make mistakes, says John Elkington
of the Piano Club (surely an excellent name for Internet searches). The
Worcestershire-based club meets once a month on Sunday afternoons, when
members play what they are working on, to share the pleasure of playing,
TOP
TIPS 5 TOP TIPS FOR STARTING A PIANO CLUB
and we listen to it attentively, and then have a cup of tea.
Most of this clubs meetings take place in private homes, rotating among
members. This lets members try different pianos, a valuable part of the
Want to start your own piano club? Heres what youll need
piano club experience. Within Elkingtons club, as well as his own Steinway
to consider, based on advice from those whove been there
grand, other piano makes include Boston, Yamaha and Kawai.
Meanwhile, the Piano Club (apparently a popular name, and for good
Have a clear goal in mind, says Hannah Kim of the New York Piano
reason) of West Yorkshire holds a monthly meeting at the Square Chapel
Group. There are many reasons to start a club fellowship, selfCentre for the Arts in Halifax. The 240-seat Square Chapel Centre has the
improvement, new repertoire, playing in different settings. Knowing
obvious attraction of two excellent pianos: a Steinway concert grand and a
whats most important will help you decide everything else.
Yamaha C3, which allows the club to include duets and a piano concerto
plus accompaniment on programmes.
Find the right venue for your members. The relaxed setting of
Playing in a thriving, popular venue has been beneficial, according
members homes can be terribly important, says London Piano
to club founder Dave Nelson. People come in partly because of venue,
Circles Parry, but other pianists are keen to strut their stuff in a real
though when they come to our concert, we bribe them with cake and tea
venue playing on a concert grand.
as part of ticket price, says Nelson. He founded the club 20 years ago with
another pianist-teacher who had recently relocated from London. We met
Set an initial meeting date. Give yourself an event to work towards and
up here and realised that one thing we missed was those fantastic classes [at
if you can, find a fellow pianist to help you organise things.
Londons Morley College], so we formed a group with everyone we could
think of my students, her students, other teachers.
Advertise for members. Use social media like Facebook, Meetup
Nelson likens his club to a mutual support group. Everyone plays for
and Twitter, websites and emailing, but dont forget standbys like
each other and only constructive criticism is allowed. The idea of receiving
newspapers, magazines like Pianist and local music shops.
feedback about their performance appeals to some pianists but is not
for everyone. The comments are sometimes very specific, but are always
Factor in the social side. Coffee and tea, a glass of wine, a trip to the
made in a nice way, and were all friends. The anxiety runs both ways, it
pub? Whichever you choose, dont overlook the need for your members
transpires. When it comes to comments from listeners, some people dont
to relax and socialise after they play.
feel qualified to say too much.

4
5

Dr Martin Wolstencroft (p75, right)

78 Pianist 79

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11/07/2014 09:40

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11:53

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Music Teacher:
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Ottawa Piano Group members (left); Liz Watford (right), Durham Piano Club

Liz Watford is sympathetic to the first-time performer anxiety. When


she returned to the piano after a break of five years, she found it extremely
stressful to play in front of others: The first time, it was one of the most
nerve-wracking things Ive ever done! Watford was living in Cardiff then,
and received great encouragement from the local piano groups. Since
then, she has started up not one, but two piano clubs, mostly recently in
Durham, where she recently moved after four years in Ottawa, Canada.
Watfords groups both hold monthly meetings, usually in a members
home. You play a piece of whatever variety you choose in a no-pressure
environment, she says. We offer constructive comments afterwards. It
depends if a person is looking for guidance. People working towards a
diploma will say its a diploma piece and invite comments.

Content includes

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When Watford moved to Ottawa, she took the piano club idea with her,
and she founded the Ottawa Piano Group with a like-minded local pianist.
Watfords experience underscores the truth that there are multiple ways to
find potential members. In Ottawa, she found a good source of members
in a chapter of the national amateur musician group. That, and emailing
everyone I could think of, including teachers.
The ease with which members can be found through the Internet is a
contrast to 20 years ago, recalls Nelson of the West Yorkshire Piano Club,
when the main option was to write letters to everyone I could think of,
saying come along or send your students. There were other strategies back
then, some of which might still come in handy today. The founder of the
Worcestershire Piano Club found his first members simply by putting an
advertisement in the Malvern Gazette that said Calling all pianists, says
Elkington. Of course these days, the club, like many others, has a website.
The social media site Meetup.com has proved to be a boon for many
clubs, not least the London Piano Meetup Group (LPMG). Our main
way of communicating is Meetup, enthuses co-founder Lorraine Liyanage

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Meetup is brilliant. We get people joining through it; I have no idea of how
they find us otherwise.
LPMG, which was founded in May 2013, is a joint venture of two piano
teachers, Liyanage and Frances Wilson. The group focuses on beginner
pianists who want to conquer their fears and play for others. Liyanages
inspiration came from her experiences as a teacher, where she noticed that
her adult students were adamant about not wanting to play in recitals with
kids, because kids were more advanced. LPMG aims to fill this gap. Were
really about encouraging beginners, people who have just started, so they
can play, says Liyanage. The majority are all learning and having lessons.
To help with their members performance nerves, we do say something
at beginning of a concert. We ask them to not pre-empt their performance
by saying how bad its going to be. We say if you can, keep a poker face and
dont let the audience down in advance. We can dissect later at the pub if
need be. Everyone gets a big round of applause!

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how to simplify
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79 Pianist 79
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07/11/2013 09:30

11/07/2014 09:40

HANDS ON
Of LPMGs two to three monthly events, one
is always a performance opportunity we call it
anything goes, says Liyanage and the rest mainly
recitals and masterclasses from professionals, including
regular Pianist contributor Graham Fitch. A big part
of it is social, we either go to pub or have a meal after,
explains Liyanage.
Like the LPMG, the New York Piano Group
(NYPG) uses Meetup to find, register and keep in
touch with its members. The NYPG was founded
by Hannah Kim four years ago, with the goal
of gathering like-minded piano enthusiasts for
concert outings, performance meetups, professional
development, etc. There are meetups every few
months, and an annual Member Showcase, held most
recently at Steinway Hall in Manhattan.
A London Piano Meetup Group masterclass
As the NYPG has so many members, how does the
programming get done? The organiser of each event is
responsible for the programming, explains Kim. Active members perform
hire a hall. Except for masterclasses, where a teacher must be paid,
four to five times a year.
Elkingtons club also doesnt charge.
With 60-70 members, the London Piano Circle finds it wise to keep lists
Members of the West Yorkshire Piano Club pay 10 three times a year.
of who has played most recently. The Circles activities include monthly
The London Piano Circle charges 25 per year flat fee, while the NYPG has
meetups in members homes, as well as five other events per year, two
a $1 annual fee and an event fee that depends on the venue and the number
concerts and three masterclasses, in which five to six people play for teachers of participants. LPMGs 70 members pay an annual membership fee of 5,
such as James Lisney (he has a masterclass in the autumn on Chopin). Even as well as a fee for each event.
though many members are eager to take part in a masterclass, says Maureen
In any case, a modest financial outlay seems entirely worthwhile considering
Parry, Treasurer of the London Piano Circle, were forever trying to get less
the many benefits of belonging to a piano club, and those I spoke with are
advanced people to come forward.
happy to highlight these benefits. Its great for people who indulge in this
In Worcestershire, theres a masterclass every nine months with a professional solitary pursuit to come together to talk repertoire and technique, says West
pianist who spends 20 minutes with each person who has volunteered to be put Yorkshires Nelson. We exist in order to get better. Having been in a group
under the knife, says Elkington. Recently, the role of visiting pianist-musical
for as long as I have, I also know how valuable it is to play on a decent piano
surgeon has been filled by teacher Graham Lloyd. Hes absolutely incredible; a
in a decent auditorium for people who are knowledgeable. Not to mention
good teacher who pays attention to detail of performances.
that being in a club gives you an opportunity to play and therefore, a
Unlike most other clubs, the West Yorkshire club chooses themes or
motivation to practise, says NYPGs Kim.
projects. When I spoke with Elkington in June, Liszt was the focus. Past
For Elkington, one important feature is that we have a couple of really
projects have been Latin American music, Scandinavian music, playing
elderly members who said if it werent for the piano club they wouldnt play
rubato or pedalling. We dont know entirely what theyll play, though usually at all. The club provides a real incentive to play. Theres no doubt being in
everyone tries to play something by composer or genre. One time we did
a piano club makes people want to try things. Its amazing, the range of
Schumanns Kinderszenen and everyone learned one piece. Theres the shared
repertoire you can hear in one afternoon!
experience of talking and playing the composer. Weve gone from a very
After founding two groups and playing many times in public, Watford
narrow view to something broader. Its a great way of learning repertoire.
feels that shes become more confident in general in meeting people. She
Mendelssohns Songs without Words is on the menu for September.
observes that its nice to have other people to talk to who are interested in
the same aspect of music.
Pay to play
The importance of piano fellowship is echoed by Liyanage. Friends dont
Piano club fees vary widely, and these fees are strongly correlated with
understand why we like the piano, why we are such piano nerds. Weve met
the goals of the club and its operating costs. Those clubs that hold events
some really great people.
in members homes charge little to nothing, unless you factor in that as
I must say, its very friendly, comments Parry of her London Piano
a host you may be expected to bake a cake, brew a pot of tea or open a
Circle. There are some real high flyers, but everyone is interested in others.
bottle of wine. For some clubs, asking members to pay a fee goes against
To get out there and practise to perform and share, its amazing. I have so
the community-spirit ethos of their group. Neither of Liz Watfords clubs
many piano friends. We love studying something, but the events are also
charges a fee, unless it was a special event, like when there was a fee to
sociable, meeting kindred spirits.
Ready to join a piano club? The best suggestion is to locate a club in your
area and come along for a event, without feeling you have to play, to see if
the standard, the atmosphere and the style suit you. And if it doesnt live up
to your dreams, you can always start a club of your own!

Contacts
Durham
www.durhamamateurpianists.
blogspot.co.uk

Ottawa
www.ottawapianogroup.blogspot.
co.uk

London Piano Circle


www.londonpianocircle.com

The Piano Club (West Yorkshire)


www.thepianoclub.co.uk

London Piano Meetup Group


meetup.com/LondonPMG

The Piano Club (Worcestershire)


the-piano-club.org.uk

New York Piano Group


meetup.com/newyorkpianogroup

Classical Piano Meetup List


classical-piano.meetup.com/all

Members of the Piano Club (Worcestershire) at a home event


80 Pianist 79

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92 Pianist 79

p92 Ads.indd 92

09/07/2014 14:34

MAKERS

INSIDE OUT
OUTSIDE IN
Yamahas new TransAcoustic is a traditional upright, a silent piano
and a high-tech miracle that uses the instrument itself as the
speaker system. Gez Kahan admires this multi-faceted miracle

s anything ever the finished


article? In the case of classical
instruments, it seems we
often think there is. There
are plenty of violinists who
believe Antonio Stradivari
has had the last word on
violin making, while, in
the piano world, theres a pervasive
feeling that the ideal piano has already
been built. There may be refinements,
but most high-grade pianos are little
different from instruments designed a
hundred or more years ago.
That may be the case if we confine
our parameters to the concert platform
and the repertoire that goes with it. But
most of Pianists readers (and indeed
most people who play the piano), Id
contend, are not concert pianists. So
why arent there more companies asking
what a piano should really be for the
amateurs who make up the bulk of the
piano market?

One company that does ask that


question is Yamaha. Along with making
traditional pianos from concert grands
to entry level uprights, their R&D
teams work on new technologies, such
as digital pianos, hybrids and silent
systems. Thats because we dont live in

enjoyment, in a smallish dwellingplace with real-world problems such


as neighbours. Some of us (dont tell
teacher) even enjoy playing music
beyond the standard classical repertoire,
and wont necessarily always want the
instrument to sound exactly like a

If you want an instrument you can play silently at


night, quietly in the day and at full whack in the
evening, the TransAcoustic is well worth a look
an ideal world in which everyone can
afford a concert grand and a room to
house it, let alone do it justice through
possessing the skills of a Hewitt, a
Schiff, a Lupu or a Trifonov. Many of
us play the piano for our own private

concert grand. That doesnt, though,


mean settling for second best, and its
the quest for a better experience for the
amateur that has led to the development
of the TransAcoustic. This, youll have
guessed, isnt a traditional concert

82 Pianist 79

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10/07/2014 16:16

The TransAcoustic instead uses the


instrument itself as the speaker system.
To do that, Yamaha had to find
a way to harness the pianos inbuilt
loudspeaker properties for use not only
for the piano strings but for the tone
generator too. That means attaching
a transducer (defined as a device that
converts one form of energy into
another) to the soundboard to convert
electrical impulses into acoustic energy.
This has been tried before, by several
manufacturers, who found that the
transducer itself was interfering with
the soundboards operation in
traditional piano only mode. Yamaha
believes it has solved that problem with
the TransAcoustic by using
ultra-delicate transducers which
barely touch the soundboard, with the
associated electronics contained in a
box tucked away out of sight behind the
front panel.

Playing is believing
It works. I went to hear it at Yamahas
Piano Selection Centre in Milton
Keynes, where Yamahas chief
demonstrator, Bert Smorenburg,
suggested I try it for myself, contenting
himself with pointing out the various
features and there are a lot of them.
First, and most important, is the
wonderful sense of immersion in
the sound that comes from playing,
say, a church organ or a harpsichord
voice using the piano itself as the
amplification system.
Thats added to by the resonance that
comes from the strings, which vibrate
in sympathy with tone-generated
sounds just as they do in standard piano
mode. Its a revelation: while digital
pianos have become much cleverer at
mimicking the way that open strings
interact with each other and excite
related frequencies, they cant quite

The richness of an
acoustic piano
In TransAcoustic mode, this piano sounds
so good thats because it follows the
same principles of a traditional acoustic
piano. Gez Kahan explains
One reason that an acoustic instrument is so satisfying to
play is that it is totally self-contained. The instrument not
only makes the sound but is its own amplification system.
The sound is immersive, and even the vibrations that cause
the sound are felt by the player.
The only significant difference between an acoustic
instrument and the loudspeakers in your hi-fi system is the
sound source, which will be supplied by electrical impulses.
These activate an electro-magnetic coil that causes
vibrations in a diaphragm (the speaker cone), which are
amplified by the speaker cabinet. Headphones use exactly
the same principle on a miniature scale, with the cabinet
being the cavity between the headphone and your ear. The
cavity amplifies the sound, but because its enclosed by the
headphones, the wearer is the only person to hear it, which
makes them perfect for those late night practice sessions.
But the whole process is so much more organic with
an acoustic instrument. Take an acoustic guitar or a violin.
The strings vibrate when plucked, bowed or strummed.
The vibrations travel through a bridge to the body of the
instrument which vibrates in turn. Because the body is
hollow and reflective, those vibrations are amplified (just as
your voice sounds louder inside an empty room). The same
principle vibrating air inside a cavity applies equally to
wind and percussion instruments.
When it comes to the piano, where theres a complicated
action, plus a pedal mechanism, to fit inside the body,
theres a soundboard that picks up and transmits the
vibrations from the bridge, though the empty space inside
the case still acts as an amplifier. The vibration may not be
noticeable in the way it is for, say, a double bass player,
but its there nonetheless and is part of the experience. The
sound itself is not source dependant, as it tends to be with a
small speaker. The soundboard is wide and the piano case is
a huge leaky box, so it literally envelops you in the music.

grand. So lets ask what it is and


there are several answers. First off, it is
a traditional upright. Take a seat, run
your fingers across the keys, and its a
standard Yamaha U1. It feels right and
it sounds right. Thats unsurprising
look inside, and there are hammers and
strings and dampers and a soundboard.
But theres more.
Its also a silent piano, almost exactly
like the Yamaha silent instruments we
looked at in Pianist No 71. Theres a
stop rail, activated via the middle pedal,
to prevent the hammers touching the
strings without affecting the feel of the
keyboard. In silent mode, optical
sensors beneath the keys and on the
pedals translate your playing into digital
signals to operate the little black box
tucked unobtrusively under the
keyboard. Plug in headphones and off
you go, playing to your hearts content
in the middle of the night while your
grumpy neighbour snores away,
blissfully unaware that youre massacring
Rachmaninov (or rather his music).
Like any of Yamahas silent systems,
this instrument uses a tone generator,
meaning that you have a choice of
sounds electric pianos as well as
traditional, along with harpsichord,
organ, strings and so on. Plus playback
options, so that you can play along with
pre-recorded tracks. So far, so familiar.
This may not be traditional technology,
but its well established.
Now for some innovation.
The silent system is ideal for personal
practice when you dont want to disturb
others. But in general use you might
want to hear the additional sounds from
the tone generator without having to
wear headphones. You could put the
sound through a separate loudspeaker
system your hi-fi for instance but
that loses the intimacy you experience
playing an acoustic instrument.

83 Pianist 79

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10/07/2014 16:16

Its a revelation: while digital pianos


have become much cleverer at
mimicking the way that open strings
interact with each other and excite
related frequencies, they cant quite
match the traditional instrument.
The Yamaha TransAcoustic does

TransAcoustic Express!

Chris Taylor Photography

Yamahas new piano struts its stuff at


Abbey Road Studios in London
Abbey Road Studios is a legendary recording space. Its
where Vladimir Horowitz recorded Liszt, where the London
Symphony Orchestra laid down the soundtracks for the
Star Wars and Harry Potter films and where the Beatles
recorded almost 200 of their songs. As I arrive for the
Yamaha TransAcoustic launch in June, diehard Beatles
fans are holding up traffic by re-creating the famous fours
street crossing on their Abbey Road album.
The Abbey Road glamour infuses the TransAcoustic
launch in Studio 3, the smallest of the three studios.
We mingle and admire the old recording gear, but
then Yamahas Bert Smorenburg (above) grabs our full
attention with his lively demo of the TransAcoustic.
The front of the U2 upright is off, so we can see all of
the workings (you can see this in the images on page
82 and 83), including the transducer that allows digital
sounds to resonate through the pianos soundboard. I
am struck by the fluency with which Bert controls the
piano, working deftly with the small control unit thats
underneath the left-hand side of the keyboard.
The versatility of the TransAcoustic is whats most
compelling, especially when Bert plays the piano along
with digital sounds, all of it pouring out from the U2 and,
later, from speakers. He brings the house down when he
cues up a video recording of his jazz band and plays along
a piano for a one-man band! -Inge Kjemtrup

match the traditional instrument.


This because it is built on a
traditional instrument does, and
imparts an organic richness to the
tone generators sounds. And since
the sound source is digital, you can
also add effects, such as cathedral
reverb so you can play Bachs Toccata
and Fugue in D minor (sans pedals,
naturally) as if you were in St Pauls.
But thats getting ahead of
ourselves. Lets stick with the piano
for a moment. When you activate
silent mode without headphones,
the first voice you hear is the tone
generators piano sound. Its perfectly
acceptable, though not precisely
the same as the U1 TransAcoustics
natural piano sound. (This may
change. The model I tried was
a prototype, and it may be that
production models will offer a choice
of tone-generated piano voices, some
mellow, some bright, and including
grands as well as uprights).
Much more important is that the
TransAcoustic has a volume control.
That means that, even without
headphones, you can practise really
loud passages, but quietly and without
compromising your technique.
From there, the world is your
oyster. You can record yourself in
high-quality audio and play it back.
Or get yourself some audio tracks to
play along with Yamahas NoteStar
app, for example, allows you to
mute the piano part so you can play
live with a recorded band. Or you
can play music from your iPod
or similar via the tone generators
inputs and listen to it playing via

your pianos soundboard. You can


even combine real piano with the tone
generator voices.
There are more adjustable parameters
(tuning modes, transposition etc) than
theres space to deal with here. And,
remarkably, at a standard UK retail
price of 10,623, its less than 1,000
more than the U1 Silent.
No, of course the TransAcoustic isnt
going to replace the concert grand
(although there is a TransAcoustic
grand planned for release in
November 2014), at least not for
standard repertoire. Sacrilege though
it may be to a traditional piano purist,
the concert grand may not be the
perfect instrument for everyone. But
if you want an instrument you can
play silently at night, quietly in the
day and at full whack in the evening;
if you want to play along with
accompaniment that feels as if youre
really part of the orchestra or band;
if you want alternative sounds such
as organ, harpsichord and electric
pianos to give you the same immersive
experience you get from a traditional
piano for any of the above, the
TransAcoustic is well worth a look.
And one final thing. It took 170
years for anyone to be able to claim
theyd developed the last word in
traditional acoustic pianos. Who
can guess where this new technology
might lead us in a much shorter
length of time?
The TransAcoustic is now available at
selected dealers. For further information,
go to uk.yamaha.com. For the USA, go
to usa.yamaha.com

The all-important transducer inside the Yamaha TransAcoustic


84 Pianist 79

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2014_07_Pianist_International Piano

03/07/2014

14:51

Page 1

NEW PIANO RELEASES


THE CLASSICAL PIANO CONCERTO 1

TRANSACOUSTIC

Dussek
Following on from Hyperions popular
Romantic Piano Concerto series, The Classical
Piano Concerto focuses on the lesser-known
concertos from between about 1770 and 1820,
when Clementi, Cramer, Dussek, Steibelt, Woelfl
and others made their names as composers and
performers of piano concertos. This series aims
to be the first in-depth recorded survey of this
forgotten repertoire. This first volume features
three of Bohemian virtuoso Jan Ladislav Dusseks
eighteen piano concertos.

The new Yamaha U1 Transacoustic In stock now!

Please call us for a VIP appointment to listen and to


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CDA68027

HOWARD SHELLEY piano


ULSTER ORCHESTRA

NIKOLAI MEDTNER
SERGEI RACHMANINOV

Piano Sonatas
Steven Osborne has become increasingly
admired for his performances and recordings
of Russian Romantic piano music. Here he
presents an impressive selection from two
masters who lived and worked
contemporaneously. Medtners Sonata
Romantica is in its title and scope a manifesto
for his art; Rachmaninovs Sonata in B flat minor
needs no introduction.

CDA67936
Available September 2014

STEVEN OSBORNE piano

JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH

The Art of Fugue


Angelas much-awaited recording of Bachs
ultimate masterpiece, The Art of Fugue, is
destined to be the crowning achievement of her
Bach cycle for Hyperion. With decades of
experience behind her, she breathes fresh air
into the most complex keyboard writing of Bach,
bringing it to life with amazing clarity and
emotion. A tour de force from both Bach and one
of the worlds foremost pianists.

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ANGELA HEWITT piano


CDA67980
(2 compact discs for the price of 1)
Available October 2014

THE ROMANTIC PIANO CONCERTO 63

Godard
Howard Shelley directs the Tasmanian
Symphony Orchestra from the piano in this
latest volume of The Romantic Piano Concerto
series. As ever, they perform unknown music
with consummate style and deep
understanding. We have reached Volume 63 and
the works of French composer Benjamin Godard,
a composer who combines the sentimental
melodic appeal of Massenet with the fecundity
and technical facility of Saint-Sans.
HOWARD SHELLEY piano
TASMANIAN SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

CDA68043

Free Hyperion Monthly Samplers

Monthly taster albums are available exclusively for download from our website, and are completely free.

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Pianist 79

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CDs, MP3 and lossless downloads of all


our recordings are available from

www.hyperion-records.co.uk

10/07/2014 14:51

REVIEW CD

Marius Dawn nds endless joy in Margaret Fingerhuts latest CD, though
Chamayous Schubert and Shelleys Dussek have their charms too
Pianist star ratings: Essential go get it! Really great A ne release Average For specialists only
Buy these CDs from the Pianist website.Visit http://pianistm.ag/cdreviews

Edit o rs

BERTRAND CHAMAYOU

C HOI C E

MARGARET FINGERHUT

Endless Song Encores for piano. Solo works by


Schubert/Liszt, Chopin, Poulenc, Gershwin,
Rachmaninov, Guastavino, Albniz, Mendelssohn,
Metcalf, etc

Chandos CHAN 10826


Margaret Fingerhut dedicates her new CD to DT, who loves a good tune
and theres nothing wrong in having a tune you can whistle on your way
home from work. Her splendid selection kicks off with John Metcalf s
Endless Song, after which the rest of the CD is an endless joy.
The care with which Fingerhut shapes the phrases and her calm,
unrushed tempos are soothing in the best possible sense of the word like
someone telling a story on the piano. The Spanish pieces are especially
successful, and Fingerhut knows how to keep a floating melodic line
above the elaborate Liszt arrangements. She offers up bonbons such as the
Mendelssohn and Poulenc miniatures, and when she want to make you
dance, she trots Gershwin out onto the dance floor. She never falls into
the trap of over-sentimentalising, even in the Rachmaninov Vocalise.
Fingerhut is a pianist of the old school she knows she doesnt need to
tinker idiosyncratically with the printed score. A perfect example is the
two Guastavino dances, in which her tongue-in-cheek underplaying of
the rhythm is exactly what makes this music so fresh and invigorating.
She is helped by an informative booklet and a piano sound to die for. Her
welcoming face on the front just adds to a gem of a piano recital.

IVANA GAVRIC

DENIS MATSUEV

Grieg Piano Works.


Ballade, Sonata, Lyric
Pieces, Sltter, etc;
Cheryl FrancesHoad: Contemplation
Champs Hill
Records
CHRCD067

LISE DE LA SALLE
Schumann:
Kinderszenen,
Abegg Variations,
Fantasy in C
Nave V5364

Schubert:
Wanderer Fantasy,
3 Klavierstcke
D946, 12 Lndler
D790, Der Mller
und der Bach, etc
Erato 08256
463707 8 8

Those accustomed to the leisurely


Schubert of pianists such as Wilhelm
Kempff might find Chamayou to be
a sleek modern racehorse. However,
when one hears playing of such
intellectual conviction paired with a
singing tone of heart-breaking beauty,
one has to accept that theres no single
way into Schubert. The Liszt
transcriptions are the best example
of the modern style of piano playing;
Chamayou keeps the intensity of a
moment sustained over a long period
and doesnt fuss around with dynamic
markings. He does not over-project
the fragile Schubert Lndler and if
you think he lacks humour, fast
forward to the Kupelwieser-Waltzer
and youll feel that youre waltzing
down the street in a ball gown.

I was nearly put off listening to the


rest of this Schumann disc by one of
the most bombastic Kinderszenen I
have ever heard. Why on earth No6,
An important event, needs to be like
Stravinsky is beyond me. The second
movement of the Fantasy is also
hammered away in an unforgiving
way, however the lyrical moments
and the tenderness with which de
la Salle brings to the last movement
plus her well-calculated first
movement reveals great musicality.
If the Abegg Variations are slightly
bland, Schumann is partly to blame,
however again, when she has the
chance to make the pianissimos shine
we hear a golden tone that I wish she
could also produce in her relentlessly
sharp fortissimos!

HOWARD SHELLEY

YUNDI
Beethoven: Piano
Concerto No 5
Schumann: Fantasy
in C
Berlin Philharmonic/
Daniel Harding
DG
DG 481 0710

The Classical Piano


Concerto 1. Dussek:
Piano Concertos op
1 no 3, op 29, op 70
Ulster Orchestra/
Howard Shelley
Hyperion
CDA68027

Tchaikovsky Piano
Concertos Nos 1
&2
Mariinsky
Orchestra/Valery
Gergiev
Mariinsky SACD
MARO548

I am convinced this is the slowest


version ever of Griegs Ballade.
It nearly grinds to a halt halfway
through, and I was beginning to fear
Gavric would never make it to the
end. But the rest of her CD is full
of Nordic magic, trolls and rustlings
in the forest. The Lyric Pieces
selection is full of charm; although
pianistically simple, they can be
tricky to pull off. Sltter (Norwegian
Peasant Dances) is Grieg at his most
nationalistic, and Gavric seems to
enjoy a good frolic in the grass and
mud. Griegs only piano sonata is his
least successful composition, but a
spot-on homage to Grieg by Cheryl
Frances-Hoad is a fine encore to this
musical trip to the Norwegian fjords.

Some like their Tchaikovsky with


the setting fully on loud and fast
and you get this in abundance
from Matsuev. And with a partner
like Gergiev, its a full throttle
version of these warhorses. The
partnership of pianist and conductor
works especially well in the slow
movements, where both bring out
lyrical moments (beautiful violin and
cello solos too, in the No 2, making
for some fine chamber playing with
soloist and orchestra). No 2 is not
overly represented in the catalogue,
so any new release is always
welcome. Superlative recording and
lively orchestral support make this
a choice for those wanting their
Tchaikovsky larger than life.

The indefatigable Howard Shelley


and Hyperion Records have
embarked on a new series, the
Classical Piano Concerto. As he
does in Hyperions Romantic Piano
Concertos, Shelley conducts the
orchestra as well. The result is
splendid and sparkling. The only
problem is that Dusseks music
does not pass the test of time,
even with Shelleys fleet fingers.
But for those curious to know
what was happening in the music
scene around the time of Mozart,
Beethoven and Schubert should
give Dussek (1760-1812) a chance.
Start from the last track and you
will quickly get a sense of what the
Classical piano concerto is all about.

This new CD gets five stars for a


Beethoven Concerto No 5 with a
glorious orchestral accompaniment,
but three stars for an uncontrolled
and patchy Schumann Fantasy.
Yundi is a skilled pianist who wants
to go his own way, and while I dont
agree with much of what he does,
I cannot deny that the world also
has room for his kind of playing.
Whats most impressive here are his
colossal chordal progressions in the
Beethoven and his willingness to let
the orchestra share the limelight.
However, when it comes to the
many-faceted sides of the Schumann
Fantasy, other pianists have more to
say. Yundi plays with conviction, but
its just not my cup of tea.

86 Pianist 79

p86_CD Review-FINAL.indd 86

10/07/2014 09:54

SACD MAR0548

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87 Pianist 79

10/07/2014 15:09

10/07/2014 15:11

REVIEW SHEET MUSIC


Michael McMillans round-up features a new boogie and blues tutorial, Schubert
duets, Rachmaninov preludes and a collection of easy pieces inspired by toys
OLA GJEILO
Stone Rose; Chorale
Edition Peters
ISMN: 979-0-57700373-3 (Stone Rose);
-814-1 (Chorale)

TOYS

PIANOWORKS
A Night at the Theatre;
Popular Styles
Janet and Alan Bullard
OUP
ISBN: 978-0-19336589-6 (A Night);
-339816-0 (Popular
Styles)

Edited by Monika
Twelsiek
Schott
ISBN: 978-3-79574772-5

BELWIN CONTEST
WINNERS

Books 1-4
Alfred
Publishing
ISBN: 978-0-73909278-1 (Bk 1);
-9279-8 (Bk 2);
-9280-4 (Bk 3);
-7390-9281-1 (Bk 4)

Ola Gjeilo (pronounced Yay-lo)


is a Norwegian composer who is
composer-in-residence with the
Manhattan Chorale. Stone Rose
contains five of the 15 pieces found
in Gjeilos CD of the same name:
January, Sidewalks, Snow in New
York, The Hudson and April (the cello
parts in The Hudson and Sidewalks
are absorbed into the solo piano
writing). Snow in New York is a
joyful, upbeat piece, while all the
others are relaxing and atmospheric
works that would not be out of
place in a heart-warming film score.
Difficulty ranges from Grade 5 to
Grade 7, and the 2:3 and 3:4 crossrhythms may require some practice!
The reflective three-page Chorale is
an almost exact transcription of the
composers performance in his Piano
Improvisations album, and features
stretches up to a tenth.

Pianoworks is an attractive series of


books written by Janet and Alan
Bullard for older beginners. It
includes a tutorial (Pianoworks Book
1 and 2) and seven supplementary
volumes of repertoire. A Night at the
Theatre was published a few years
ago and has 28 solo arrangements
(Grades 1-3) of music from operas,
ballets and musicals, while Popular
Styles was added to the catalogue
earlier this year and contains 18
original pieces (Grade 2 to 4) written
in a range of styles popularised
in the last century. The music in
both volumes is sympathetically
written for learners at this level, and
the theatrical arrangements retain
enough of their original musical
interest and flavour to motivate your
efforts. The pieces in Popular Styles
are not particularly memorable but
lie well under the hands.

This book contains 44 solo pieces


from the 19th century onwards that
were inspired by toys and other
childhood experiences. Ten of them
are commonly found in other easy
collections, but Monika Twelsieks
remaining selection is typically
enterprising, with lesser-known but
no less rewarding repertoire from
composers such as Petr Eben
(1929-2007), Friedrich Radermacher
(b.1924) and Daniel Kemminer
(b.1978). Difficulty increases through
the book, which begins with short,
two or three-line pre-Grade 1 pieces,
and ends with pieces such as
Debussys Little Negro, around Grade
4 and up to three pages long. A book
devoted to childlike music will have
limited appeal for those seeking
repertoire books with a range of
styles and character, but theres much
to enjoy here within this niche.

In the previous issue, I looked at


five books of Belwin Contest Winners
for piano duets. Here are the four
corresponding solo books in the
series, ranging from Grade 1 to 4.
Each book is around 30 pages long,
with seven to 15 pieces that are two
to five pages long. The music has
been drawn from the catalogues
of Belwin-Mills and SummyBirchard, which include the works
of popular American educational
composers such as David Carr
Glover, Lynn Freeman Olson and
Louise Garrow. The pieces are well
written, pianistically effective and
easy to listen to. Although few of
the pieces are notably original or
make a lasting impression, these
books contain a good representative
sample of contemporary American
educational piano music at a
reasonable price.

DISCOVERING BOOGIE &


BLUES PIANO

SERGEI RACHMANINOV

COMPOSER PORTRAITS

SCHUBERT DUETS

Wolfgang Wierzyk
Schott
ISMN: 978-1-84761153-6

This boogie and blues tutorial is the


latest in a series of instructional
volumes from Schott that has already
covered blues, Latin, rock and jazz
styles. The author is Wolfgang
Wierzyk, a teacher in Germany, and
the tutorial is an updated version of
his Blues & Blues Method. The
author assumes some basic
knowledge before you begin (Grade
1 or 2). Over the course of about 100
pages, you will learn plenty of music
theory, how to play licks and boogie
patterns, intros and endings, and
will be given many opportunities to
improvise. As one would expect
from a method that has been
road-tested by the authors students,
the material is presented clearly and
systematically, and the accompanying
CD illustrates all the music in the
book. All in all, a fantastic tutorial.

24 Preludes; Prelude
op 3 no 2
Henle Verlag
ISMN: 979-0-20181200-7 (24); -1211-3
(op 3 no 2)

Richard Rodney Bennett;


Lennox Berkeley
Wise Publications
(Music Sales)
ISBN: 978-1-78305-382-7
(Bennett); -540-1
(Berkeley)

Rachmaninovs music has recently


come out of copyright, and Henles
new edition of his 24 preludes is
primarily based upon editions
originally published by Gutheil in
1893 (opus 3), 1903-4 (opus 23),
and 1910-11 (opus 32). Guthiels
editions were the only ones
authorised by the composer.
Rachmaninov left few fingering
suggestions (printed in italics); these
are supplemented by Marc-Andr
Hamelin, the Canadian virtuoso
pianist, in non-italicised numerals.
As with the Boosey & Hawkes
authentic edition from 1992, there
are up to six staves per page, but
Henles print is slightly clearer and
has bar numbers, while the Boosey
edition has no editorial fingering.
The famous C sharp minor Prelude
is also available separately.

The new Composer Portraits series


from Wise Publications aims to
provide an overview of the life and
piano music of seven 20th-century
composers; all seven volumes are
edited by Samuel Lung. Lennox
Berkeley and Richard Rodney
Bennett are two of the three English
composers represented in the series
(Rodney Bennett was in fact taught
composition by Lennox Berkeley at
the Royal Academy of Music); each
volume contains nine piano works
that demonstrate the diversity
of their compositional abilities.
Much of the music is accessible to
the listener, although the technical
difficulty for the performer
sometimes stretches to well beyond
Grade 8. A page of introductory
text for each piece provides
interesting insight into its genesis.

Brenreiter ISMN:
979-0-006-53987-1
(Works for Piano Duet
Vol 3); Alfred ISBN:
978-0-7390-9325-2
(Allegro in A min);
-9327-6 (Fantasy in F
min); -9328-3 (Rondo)

Brenreiters New Edition of the


Complete Works of Schubert includes
five volumes devoted to piano
duets. This, the third volume, has
his most important large-scale
works for the genre and is the only
volume to be issued in a relatively
affordable, soft-cover package. It is
beautifully presented and contains
the Variations D908 and the Fugue
in E D952, in addition to the three
works also published individually
by Alfred. The biggest difference
between Brenreiter and Alfreds
editions is that Brenreiter has
helpfully printed the primo part
above the secondo for easy reference,
whereas Alfred have printed the parts
on separate pages. Alfreds edition
offers editorial fingering, a Naxos
CD recording of each work, and a
cheaper price point.

88
79
Pianist #13
88 Pianist

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10/07/2014 09:55

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EST 2002

Britannia Classified.indd The


1 Shigeru Kawai SX-EX

thepianoman.ltd.uk

FULL CONCERT GRAND


Formerly, Kawai UK's concert instrument, only 5 years old.

49,500 inc 10 year warranty


FREE NATIONWIDE DELIVERY
168-170 Easterly Road (A58) Leeds LS8 3AD
www.thepianoman.ltd.uk

08/07/2014 14:58

is simply the finest


concert grand piano
I have ever played.
Julian Saphir.

Meticulously handcrafted
in strictly limited numbers,
the Shigeru Kawai brings to fruition
over 80 years of piano advancement,
knowledge and craftsmanship.

0113 240 8030

11/07/2014 10:49

CL ASSIFIEDS
Improve
playing
Bringingyour
together
somewith
of the best

Tel: 0771-855-2390 | Email: studio@swantondesign.co.uk

Swanton Design & Marketing

PIANO
TECHNIQUES

articles from Pianist magazine with


expert advice on chords, fingering,
memorising, sight-reading, and more!

INCLUDES 18 PIECES TO LEARN in over 50 PAGES


of sheet music, with audio tracks and video tutorials

Piano specialists for over four generations

We have over
70 pianos on offer from
Bosendorfer | Bluthner
Bechstein | Kemble
Yamaha | Kawai
With many other new and
quality pre loved pianos.
With delivery arranged countrywide

Download the app today!

www.handelpianos.co.uk
Tel: 01344 873645 Email: sales@handelpianos.co.uk

Verve House | London Road | Sunningdale | Berkshire


SL5 0DJ
Pianist
14 |
65

14 Pianist 76

BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE CREATORS OF PIANIST MAGAZINE

PIANO WORKSHOP

Piano Techniques advert.indd 14

09/01/2014 16:30

Est. 1982

Bringing together some of the best


articles from Pianist magazine with
expert advice on chords, fingering,
memorising,
sight-reading, and more!
Yamaha U1

KAWAI FOR SALE

Exceptional 510 Grand. Studio /


professional quality instrument.
Sumptuous tonal beauty.
Powerful dynamics /expressive
control. Expertly maintained.
Duet bench. 7000.

Turner,
01723 368886,
07780 567257

with silent system

INCLUDES
18 PIECES TO LEARN in over 50 PAGES
Restoration specialists - pianos purchased. Over 90 pianos on display.
of www.pianoworkshop.co.uk
sheet music, with audio tracksTel:
and01737
video242174
tutorials

Turner.indd 1

08/07/2014 14:25

46b Albert Road North, Reigate, Surrey RH2 9EL

Download the app today!


14 Pianist 76

14 Pianist 65

BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE CREATORS OF PIANIST MAGAZINE

Are you looking for pre-owned ?

Piano Techniques advert.indd 14

09/01/2014 16:30

We have 2 pre-owned Schimmel grand pianos


in our showrooms - K169 and K230
Unusual opportunity to buy a nearly new Schimmel
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Please contact us for further details.

www.valepianos.co.uk 01386 860419

WORCESTERSHIRE

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Call Lottie Day on

0845 226 0477


p89 class Ads.indd 90

10/07/2014 16:40

91 Pianist 79

p91 Ads.indd 91

09/07/2014 14:32