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Auto Balance

A system for detecting errors in color balance in white and black areas of the picture and
automatically adjusting the white and black levels of both the red and blue signals as needed
for correction.

Auto Light Range


The range of light, e.g., sunlight to moonlight, over which a TV camera is capable of
automatically operating at specified output.

Automatic Brightness Control


In display devices, the self-acting mechanism which controls brightness of the device as a
function of ambient light.

Automatic Frequency
An arrangement whereby the frequency of an oscillator is automatically maintained within
specified limits.

Automatic Gain Control


See AGC

Automatic Iris Lens


A lens that automatically adjusts the amount of light reaching the imager.

Automatic Light Control


The process by which the illumination incident upon the face of a pickup device is
automatically adjusted as a function of scene brightness.
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References

B
Back Porch
That portion of the composite picture signal which lies between the trailing edge of the
horizontal sync pulse and the trailing edge of the corresponding blanking pulse.

Bandwidth
The range of signal frequencies that a piece of audio or video equipment can encode or
decode; the difference between the limiting frequencies of a continuous frequency band.
Video uses higher frequency than audio, thus requires a wider bandwidth.[2]

Bar Test Pattern (SMPTE)


Special test pattern for adjusting color TV receivers or color encoders. The upper portion
consists of vertical bars of saturated colors and white. The power horizontal bars have black
and white areas and I and Q signals.

Bit
Short for "Binary Digit". The smallest piece of binary digital data and is represented by either
0 or 1.

Bit Depth
The number of levels that a pixel might have, such as 256 with an 8-bit depth or 1024 with a
10-bit depth.[1]

Bit Rate
a) The rate at which the compressed bit stream is delivered from the storage medium to the
input of a decoder. The digital equivalent of analog bandwidth. b) The speed at which bits are

transmitted, usually expressed in bit/s (sometimes abbreviated "bps"). video information, in a


digitized image for example, is transferred, recorded, and reproduced through the production
process at some bit rate appropriate to the nature and capabilities of the origination, the
channel, and the receptor. c) The amount of data transported in a given amount of time,
usually defined in Mbit/s. Bit rate is one means used to define the amount of compression
used on a video signal. The uncompressed D1 format has a bit rate of 270 Mbit/s. MPEG-1
has a bit rate of 1.2 Mbit/s.[1]