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Final Document for KJZZ

Taylor Brightwell, Kasey McNerney


and Anna Werner
Fall 2016

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Table of Contents
UNITY PUBLIC RELATIONS TEAM 4

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 8

PART I: ANALYSIS 9

Client Description 10

Problem Statement 13

Situation Analysis 14

Stakeholder Analysis 16

SWOT Analysis 19

SPEC Analysis 21

Secondary Research 24

Primary Research 28

PART II: CAMPAIGN PROPOSAL 31

Goals and Objectives 32

Strategies and Tactics 33

Budget 34

Implementation Timeline 36

Evaluation 37

Future Recommendations 39

PART III: APPENDICES 40

Appendix A: Production Samples 41

Appendix B: Survey Questions 48

Appendix C: Content Sharing Platform Recommendation 50

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Appendix D: Communications Kit 54

WORKS CITED 63

Unity Public Relations Team

4
Taylor Brightwell
is currently a public relations
senior at the Walter Cronkite
School of Journalism and
Mass Communication at
Arizona State University (ASU).
Taylor is also in Barrett, The
Honors College, and pursuing
a certificate in Sales and
Marketing Essentials from the
W.P. Carey School of
Business.

As an ASU student, Taylor has


gained practical work
experience through internships and campus organizations. She worked as a
copywriter for Lucid Agency, a marketing agency in Tempe, Arizona. There, Taylor
gained experience writing content and developing social media calendars for a
variety of clients including fashion, real estate, nonprofits and small businesses. She
serves as the assistant vice president of public relations as well as Greek relations
chair for Kappa Delta Sorority, where she is also a member.

Originally from Redondo Beach, California, Taylor enjoys the beach lifestyle and
misses it terribly while she attends school in Arizona. In 2013, she enrolled in the
Cronkite School to develop and hone her skills in creative writing and storytelling. In
addition, Taylor is also the daughter of successful small business owners, and as a
result has developed a keen interest in strategic marketing.

Taylor is determined to launch a career that combines all of these influences and
wishes to pursue a profession in sports communications or agency public relations
after she graduates in May 2017.

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Kasey McNerney is
currently a senior studying public
relations at the Walter Cronkite
School of Journalism and Mass
Communication at Arizona State
University.

During her time at ASU, Kasey has


gained experience at multiple
internships and school
organizations. She has worked at
the State Press, ASUs student-run
newspaper, as an arts and
entertainment reporter. She also
served at the director of communications for DPC Aware, a student organization
dedicated to raising awareness about health and social issues.

Kasey worked as an intern at Arizona Sports, a local radio station and website,
creating written content for the site. Her first public relations internship was with the
Harlem Globetrotters, where she assisted with community and media relations,
among other tasks. She has also worked at Phoenix International Raceway since her
freshman year as a pit note reporter. In this position, she works in a team to cover
on-track events during NASCAR and IndyCar weekends, including writing race
stories for the tracks website.

Kasey wishes to use her experience and education to find a job in sports public
relations when she graduates in May 2017.

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Anna Werner is
studying public relations at
the Walter Cronkite School of
Journalism and Mass
Communication at Arizona
State University, and is also
pursuing a minor in wellness
foundations and a certificate
in sales and marketing. She
currently works as an intern
at B. Sterling Public
Relations, a boutique agency
in Phoenix, and is interested
in working in
communications for
corporate fitness companies.

Anna focuses on the power of precision and detail to communicate efficiently and
holds true to her belief that trust is the root of all thriving relationships. Throughout
her college career, she has developed an expertise in writing and her articles have
been published in AZ Big Media, LivAbility Magazine, Spokes N Sports and
Downtown Devil.

Prior to her current internship, Anna worked at the Logan County Chamber of
Commerce managing marketing and community outreach events. As an intern at
Ability360, Arizonas largest center for independent living, Anna helped create
LivAbility Magazine, Ability360s quarterly publication, and worked with a team of
marketing experts to rebrand the company. She gained experience working with
local and national clients and media members at her internship at The Knight
Agency in Scottsdale.

As a member of Barrett, the Honors College, Anna pushes herself to strive for the
best. She is actively involved in her sorority, Kappa Alpha Theta, and has served as
an academic mentor and the chapters information technology director.

Anna believes in setting goals, taking risks and challenging doubts. She strives to
create strong relationships with others and impactful connections with the world.

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Executive Summary
KJZZ is a radio station that broadcasts local and national news in addition to
entertainment programing and jazz music in the Phoenix area and other select areas
of Arizona. As a smaller news organization, KJZZ needs to innovate to find fresh
news content.

To gather newsworthy information quickly and effectively, KJZZ developed an


information exchange program with its reporters and public relations specialists in
the healthcare industry. Members of this program meet quarterly to discuss current
trends in their industry and share information about their organizations. At these
meetings notes are taken and shared through a Google Doc that reporters have
access to for story ideas.

Though the healthcare information exchange program helps reporters gather


information for news content, the program lacks formal structure. Clear program
guidelines and expectations have not been set, and there is inconsistent
communication between the KJZZ reporters and PR professionals.

To help KJZZ improve its current program and expand this concept to create an
overarching information exchange system with additional programs for business,
technology and education industries, Unity PR created the following strategic public
relations campaign.

Unity PR developed objectives, strategies and tactics based on findings from


secondary research and feedback from a survey the team sent to current exchange
program members.

Unity PR has provided KJZZ with the following tools for improving and developing
the exchange system: member outreach lists; a communications kit with invitation
templates and terms and conditions agreement; and a new content sharing
platform suggestion.

By implementing this campaign and utilizing its deliverables, KJZZ has been
successful in improving and expanding its information exchange system.

Part I: Analysis

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Client Description
About KJZZ:

KJZZ 91.5 FM is a radio station that features public radio news and entertainment
programming. KJZZ broadcasts local and national news, and features jazz music and
additional unique entertainment programming. Its two local news shows are Here
and Now, an open forum of news discussions and interviews hosted by Steve
Goldstein, and The Show, a curated program of local, national and international
news, features and stories.

KJZZ is a service of Rio Salado College and Maricopa County Community College
and is affiliated with National Public Radio (NPR), Public Radio International, the
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) and American Public Media. As a part of
Friends of Public Radio Arizona, KJZZ follows a collaborative model with KBAQ 89.5
FM, working with Rio Salado College, the Maricopa County Community College
District, public radio partners and local companies and organizations to generate
stories and news content (KJZZ, 2016).

Public Radio Collaborative Model:

(FPRAZ, 2016).

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Mission:

The mission of KJZZ 91.5FM and KBAQ 89.5FM is to provide objective, intelligent
news and information programing, along with engaging musical and cultural
entertainment free of commercial constraints, as a public service for our
community (KJZZ and KBAQ, 2016, p. 4).

Audience:

A highly-educated, influential, cultural and community-minded audience totaling


almost three-quarters of a million different people each month (KJZZ, 2016, p. 4).

Senior Management:

Dr. Jim Paluzzi


Vice President, Division of Public Service

Bill John Jon Ralph Lou Mark Linda Scott


Shedd Sage Hoban Hogan Stanley Moran Pastori Williams
Associate Associate Associate Associate Associate
Director, Director, Director,
General General General General General
Information Strategic Audience
Manager, Manager, Manager, Manager, Manager,
Operations Technology Programming Engineering Initiatives News Development Reach

(KJZZ, 2016)

Contact information:

2323 W. 14th Street


Tempe, Arizona 85281
480-834-5627
www.kjzz.org




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Competitors:

Local and national radio stations in the greater Phoenix area including KTAR 92.3
FM, KFNN 105.1 FM, KPHX 1480 AM, KOY 1230 AM, KKNT 960 AM and KFYI 550
AM.

History:

KJZZ was established with the call letters KMCR for Mesa College Radio in the early
1970s. The radio stations name was changed to KJZZ in 1985 when it began airing
jazz music in the evenings (Federal Communications Commission, 2016).

Friends of Public Radio Arizona (FPRAZ) works to assure the success of KJZZ as a
public radio station. This non-profit organization was started in November 2001 and
was awarded designation as a 501(c)(3) charitable organization for a five-year period
in March 2002. Board members were elected to the organization in June 2002, and
bylaws were presented and approved in October 2013. A Memorandum of
Understanding was signed between the Maricopa County Community College
Districts Governing Board and FPRAZ outlining their collaborative relationship
(FPRAZ, 2016).

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Problem Statement
KJZZs main challenge is that its information exchange program is not fully
developed. The program began when KJZZ started hosting quarterly meetings
between its reporters and PR professionals in the healthcare industry. During these
meetings PR professionals share news about their company, and the reporters use
this information to generate new story ideas.

Though the program has been in place for about two years, it still lacks clear
organizational structure. There is not consistent, regular communication between
the station and exchange members about meetings and the information being used
in stories.

KJZZ uses Google Docs as a content sharing platform to share ideas and contact
information collected during exchange meetings; however, this method is not ideal,
as there was no way to track changes or recover deleted content within the
documents. In addition, some members are not able to access this platform due to
online security restrictions at their workplace.

Linda Pastori, KJZZs associate general manager of development, approached the


Cronkite Public Relations Lab for assistance in expanding the information exchange
program beyond the healthcare industry. The station wants to create three
additional exchange systems in the technology, business and education sectors by
January 2017.

Unity PR was tasked with finding potential members of the new exchanges and
creating communications tools to reach them. KJZZ wanted to target large
businesses and technology organizations based in the Phoenix area, as well as each
of the schools within the Maricopa Community College District. The client also
wanted a suggestion of an alternative content sharing platform to utilize other than
Google Docs.

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Situation Analysis
KJZZ is the NPR affiliate in the greater Phoenix area. It is owned and operated by
Rio Salado College in Tempe, which is part of the Maricopa County Community
College District. The station airs public radio content throughout the day. KJZZ
currently has two original daytime programs, Here and Now and The Show,
and plays classic jazz music most nights.

Approximately two years ago, the station began hosting quarterly information
exchange meetings between KJZZ science desk reporters and public relations
professionals in the healthcare industry. In these meetings, participants share trends
in the healthcare industry and updates about their organizations to help reporters
develop story content. Information and notes are shared with all members of the
exchange through a content sharing platform, Google Docs. Suzanne Pfister, a
board member of Friends of Public Radio and president of Vitalyst Health
Foundation in Phoenix, runs these healthcare information exchange meetings.

This concept of collaborative journalism between the media and public relations
practitioners reflects a trend of growing positivity between the two professions. In
the past, there was hostility in these relationships, where each side perceived the
worst in each other (Anderson, 2007, p. 387). But as both reporters and public
relations professionals find themselves competing for views and attention,
collaborative journalism has emerged as a way for the two sides to work together to
produce the best content possible.

KJZZ started this program because of understaffing issues. Like many news
organizations, KJZZ has a small staff. For example, there is currently only one
reporter at the stations business desk. This has created a greater need for
organized communication between reporters and sources in order to produce
content in an efficient way.

Because of the success of the healthcare meetings, KJZZ wants to also hold
quarterly meetings with representatives from technology companies, local
businesses and the Maricopa County Community College District. Some
organizations, such as the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, have
expressed interest in joining the technology exchanges.

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Unity PRs role was to three new information exchange programs. The agencys
work included identifying the marketing and public relations professionals that
would be the best fit for these programs and developing tools to reach and
regularly communicate with them.

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Stakeholder Analysis
Donors:

KJZZ relies on its sponsors and underwriters to help fund the station and
operations. Its sponsors include business members, members of its leadership
society and individual members. Business members, local businesses in the Phoenix
area, are strategic stakeholders because they have the potential to contribute more
money to the station than individual contributors. These members are individually
valued based on their level of contribution, starting with premier followed by
partner, executive, associate, member and lastly, contributor.

The Leadership Society is another form of sponsorship KJZZ offers. Leadership


Society members generally contribute more than regular members, but less than
the majority of business members. They are local community leaders concerned
with the ethics and value of public radio. Individual members are generally
members of the local community, middle-aged and have a steady income.
Members are educated and informed, and regular listeners of KJZZ radio (KJZZ,
2016).

KJZZ communicates with its members and business member sponsors by sending
e-newsletters on a regular basis, giving them exclusive access to networking
receptions, hosting members-only events and allowing them to have direct access
to station staff through a special phone line. Sponsors are given exposure to KJZZ
listeners so that they obtain a deeper engagement with their potential customers
(KJZZ, 2016). Leadership Society members gain access to exclusive members-only
events at the station, get behind-the-scenes access to the production studios and
have direct access to the member support team (KJZZ, 2016). KJZZ reaches out to
potential sponsors through information and ads on its website and through on-air
promotional information.

Information Exchange Members:

KJZZ hosts quarterly information exchange sessions with representatives from local
businesses and organizations, along with reporters and other staff members, to
bring insights from the community to the station. Everyone who participates in
these meetings is part of the key public. The client currently began hosting
quarterly information exchanges with public relations and communications

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specialists of organizations in the healthcare industry approximately two years ago.
Given the success of these exchanges, KJZZ wants to create additional exchanges
for the Maricopa Community College District and technology and business
industries. For these information exchanges, KJZZ wants to target larger companies
in the Phoenix area with in-house public relations and communications professionals
such as Insight, Intel, Google, Amazon, the Arizona Technology Council and more.
KJZZ hopes to reach these companies by directly sending invitations to them for
the information exchange meetings.

Community Colleges:

KJZZ is a service of Rio Salado College and Maricopa Community Colleges. Rio
Salado College is an online community college in Tempe and is an institute in the
Maricopa Community College District. The Maricopa Community College District is
made up of 10 colleges, two skill centers and several education centers, and is one
of the largest providers of higher education in the U.S. KJZZ hopes to form a closer
relationship with these organizations by inviting them to its information exchanges
to generate more stories about the colleges (Maricopa Community Colleges, 2016).

Listeners:

Listeners greatly influence what topics are covered by KJZZ. According to KJZZ, the
station and its sister station, KBAQ, have more than 737,600 unique listeners each
month. KJZZ states that its listener base is more educated and affluent than the
average resident of the Phoenix area (KJZZ, 2016, p. 2). As the local affiliate of
NPR, KJZZ has a similar listener base to the national radio station, one that is loyal
to the station and its sponsors. NPR conducted a State of Sponsorship survey in
2015 and 2016. This survey revealed 81 percent of NPR listeners consider local
radio stations personally important, and 70 percent view companies who sponsor
NPR in a positive light (NPR, 2016, Table 1).

Employees:

Along with information exchange members, the station employees were a key
audience of this campaign. KJZZ has a 40-person news staff and seven-person
music staff, with nine senior management positions. News reporters, hosts and
producers contribute to the success of the information exchanges. They are the
employees present at the meetings, and use the information shared to generate

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new story ideas. It is important to communicate clearly with the employees about
the meetings because they are affected more than most stakeholders.

Target Audience:

The target audience for this campaign is public relations professionals and
communications specialists of technology and business organizations and the
Maricopa County Community Colleges. The campaign specifically targets large
organizations with headquarters or main offices located in the Phoenix area, such as
Avnet and PetSmart. To find qualified members for the information exchange
programs, the Unity PR team identified public relations and communications
specialists working for such organizations.

The campaign also targets current members of the exchange program. These
individuals are public relations professionals and communications specialists of
large healthcare organizations based in Phoenix, such as HonorHealth and Phoenix
Childrens Hospital. Unity PR used feedback from these members to assess the
current exchange program and create a strategy to improve and expand it.

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SWOT Analysis

Strengths Weaknesses
Affiliation with NPR Web content lacking
High volume of unique monthly Limited categories of coverage (i.e.:
listeners no sports)
Maricopa Community College Limited number of staff
District resources Only a few local broadcasts (mostly
Arizona Science Desk NPR and BBC syndication)
Have both local and national news The information exchange system is
source connections not fully established
Established news source in the Lack of back-and-forth conversation
community between reporters and company
representatives
Opportunities Threats
Working more with Maricopa County Bypassing KJZZ for NPR coverage
Community Colleges online
Building bank of story ideas through Competition with other local news
information exchanges outlets
Room for growth within its Potential for biased news reporting
information exchanges and biased story pitching
Growth in multimedia production Finding diversity within technology,
Growth in technology and business business and education sectors
connections, and news coverage

Strengths:

KJZZs strengths include its affiliation with NPR. It also has a high volume of unique
monthly listeners and the ability to provide these listeners with a variety of local and
national news stories from established news sources.

The clients relationship with Rio Salado provides KJZZ with many education-based
resources and connections. Unity PR also found potential in KJZZs Arizona Science
desk, which connects the station to people and resources within the science
community.

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Weaknesses:

The clients two primary weaknesses include that its information exchange system is
not fully established and that it has a small, limited staff, which impacts a number of
other projects within KJZZ. The current information exchange system lacks clear
guidelines for participants as well as a clear organizational structure. Also within the
information exchange, there is a lack of back-and-forth conversation between
reporters and company representatives.

The limited amount of staff impacts a wide range of components within KJZZ,
including its ability to cover a variety of topics. With a limited amount of reporters,
the amount of online content also suffers.

Aside from these primary weaknesses, the client broadcasts mainly NPR and BBC
content with only a few local broadcasts; this limits local news content.

Opportunities:

The foundation of KJZZs opportunities comes from the improvement and


reorganization of the information exchange system. The growth of the information
exchange system would allow for the expansion of technology and business
connections and coverage, an increase in multimedia production and the building
of a large story idea bank.

The clients connection with Maricopa County Community Colleges also provides
potential for growth in the education sector, as well as new opportunities for joint
programs and sponsorships.

Threats:

In todays digital world, news has become accessible to anyone on any platform
from a multitude of sources and outlets. KJZZs reliance on content from outlets
such as NPR and BBC Radio is its greatest threat. The client competes with several
other local outlets for the same stories. There is also concern for potential bias in
reporting due KJZZs funding and possible influence from members of the
information exchange program.

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SPEC Analysis
Social:

According to the 2016 State of the Media: Audio Today report by The Nielsen
Company, radio is the leading reach platform. In fact, 93 percent of all adult
consumers listen to the radio on a weekly basis which is more than those who
watch TV and use smartphones. Of those who are regular radio consumers, 45
percent are female, and 55 percent are male. The average age of a radio consumer
is 45. Sixty-nine percent of radio consumers work full or part-time and their average
yearly household income is $74,200. Approximately 40 million, or 97 percent of
Hispanics in America and 31.1 million, or 92 percent of African Americans use radio
each week. Of all the media platforms, radio has the most consistent share of time
spent across all demographics (Nielsen, 2016).

KJZZs members engage with the station through social networking platforms
including Twitter and Facebook. KJZZ is most prevalent on Twitter, having four
accounts with over 10,000 combined followers as of Dec. 5, 2016. The stations
primary account, @kjzzphoenix, used for programming and news content, is the
most popular and frequently used handle, with over 8,000 followers. To spread
station and event information to the KJZZ community, KJZZ uses its @yourkjzz
Twitter handle.

KJZZ regularly posts news content, station information and events on its Facebook
page. As of Dec. 5, 2016 the page had over 9,000 likes, and over 500 users had
checked-in to KJZZ through Facebook, implying that they were at the studio.
KJZZ has 4.6 out of five stars in its Facebook review. Overall, users left mostly
positive reviews on KJZZs page, with several users applauding it as an unbiased
news source.

Political:

The Public Broadcasting Act of 1967 authorized the creation of the Corporation for
Public Broadcasting (CPB) and the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). These
organizations are not government owned, but the act lays out guidelines for their
structure and operations. According to the act, it is in the public interest to
encourage the growth and development of public radio and television
broadcasting, (p. 1) and these avenues should be used to entertain, inform and

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educate the public with diverse, quality content. Section 399 states that no
noncommercial broadcasting entity can support or oppose political candidates
(Corporation for Public Broadcasting, n.d.).

According to a 2012 Pew Research Center study, 43 percent of NPR listeners are
Democrat, 37 percent are Independent and only 17 percent are Republican (Pew
Research Center, 2012). This is in contrast with the state of Arizona, where 30
percent of voters are registered Democrats, 34.8 percent are Republican and 35.2
percent are Independent which includes the Green and Libertarian parties and
Other (Arizona Secretary of State, 2016). This may mean that KJZZ will be reaching
out to companies that want to reach a more liberal audience than the general
Arizona population.

Economic:

A majority of KJZZs funding comes from Friends of Public Radio Arizona (FPRAZ).
Other funding sources for the station include government sources such as Maricopa
County Community College District (MCCCD), the Corporation for Public
Broadcasting (CPB), and the State Department of Library, Archives and Public
Records. Private donors and corporate underwriters continue to provide a majority
of the funding for all services.

As a part of the Maricopa County Community College District, KJZZ is partially


funded by tax levies and aid from the state government. According to 2016 study,
Arizona is 49th in the country for per capita spending on higher education, at
$115.83 (Illinois State University, 2016).

KJZZ and KBAQ have continued with intensified on-air fundraising strategies.
Deploying new, focused management and on-air production strategies, the stations
are now experiencing improvements in membership revenue trends particularly
with regard to sustained giving (KJZZ, 2014).

During 2014, new member sustaining revenue has exceeded 30 percent and total
sustaining revenue for KJZZ reached 50 percent. The stations overall financial
position increased in 2014, with total net position increasing from $2,696,913 in
2013 to $3,122,035 in 2014 (KJZZ, 2014).

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Cultural:

According to KJZZs media kit, its audience is more likely than the average Greater
Phoenician to be educatedmaking them more influential, affluent, cultural and
community minded (KJZZ, 2016, p. 2). Nearly 66.5 million millennials (92 percent)
use radio each week, followed by 58 million (94 percent) baby boomers, and 57.4
million (95 percent) Gen Xers (Nielsen, 2016). Millennials who are starting a family
are more likely to listen to radio than those who are dependent adults or on
their own (Nielsen, 2015, p. 4). Radio usage peaks during the workday, as the
majority of radio usage comes from employed listeners outside of the home.
According to the State of the Media report, the heaviest radio consumers are not
likely to be heavy TV watchers, but they do have a lot in common with heavy
internet users, in particular their working characteristics and use of social media
(Nielsen, 2016, p. 12). The top five most popular formats in America in 2015 were
country, news/talk, pop contemporary hit radio, adult contemporary, and classic
rock (Nielsen, 2016).

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Secondary Research

Overview:

In order to help KJZZ develop a better information exchange system, Unity PR


researched systems of collaboration and information exchange and the relationship
between journalists and PR professionals. Advancements in technology are
changing the way news is collected, created and spread. The rise of the digital
world and easily accessible networks has contributed to the availability of more
information than ever before. Heinrich (2013) describes this phenomenon as a
state of chaotic information flow (p. 89) in which news organizations are facing
problems finding and verifying new and relative information. This process is
extensive and requires many staff members something many news organizations
do not have. In search of a solution, many news organizations are developing new
information exchange and gathering techniques.

Citizen Journalism:

The process of information exchange and content collaboration is not a new


phenomenon. According to Spangenberg and Heise (2014), citizen journalism,
otherwise known as grassroots journalism, has been around long before the internet
was invented as information was traded by word of mouth and other means. The
development of the internet and constant growth in technology has led to
significant growth in grassroots journalism, making it prevalent now more than ever.
People are curating and spreading information through smartphones, social
networking platforms and more. This digital landscape provides an arena for
unlimited amounts of information creating a threat to professional news outlets.
There is a greater need for news organizations to gather and disseminate
information a need that many news organizations do not have the resources
(funds, staff members, etc.) to fulfill (Spangenberg & Heise, 2014).

Collaboration and Exchange:

Due to this chaotic information flow, news outlets have adopted new
collaboration systems to compile and spread news. Spangenberg and Heise (2014)
define collaborative journalism as involvement of external parties in the production
of information, thereby making audience contributions part of the storytelling
process or the story itself (p. 766). Many professional news outlets utilize

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collaborative journalism through programs such as France 24s The Observer,
which allows specifically selected individuals to report on witnessed incidents, and
CNNs iReport which asks the public to contribute to material. These methods of
collaboration bring news directly to the reporters, rather than having the reporters
seek out the news.

Network journalism is another form of collaborative journalism in which reporters


use social media to gather information (Spangenberg & Heise, 2014). Neal Mann is
a reporter that utilizes this technique. By making lists of influential and trustworthy
individuals, especially local journalists and bloggers (p. 767) on his Twitter account,
Mann was able to gather useful information and contact sources. Heinrich (2013)
defines network journalism as a sphere of global news exchange that allows
connection opportunities to journalistic organizations (p. 95). Though information
collaboration with the public can be effective, the information shared is not always
reliable, since everyday people do not uphold themselves to journalistic ethics of
trustworthiness, accuracy and objectivity (Spangenberg & Heise, 2014). Journalists
must decide where to draw the line when it comes to implementing these
techniques.

Zerfass, Vercic and Wiesenberg (2016) conducted research on another collaborative


news technique of content strategy defined as a systematic plan that describes
how content will be created, managed and delivered (section 2.2). They further
investigated this technique through a study of public relations practitioners in
Europe. They developed a survey to gage their views on media trends and new
newsgathering practices. The majority (93 percent) said that a plan for creating,
managing and delivering content is important for strategic communication in the
future; however, over half (58 percent) admitted that their organization did not
utilize such a plan.

According to research by Furlan (2012), the public relations industry has been an
essential component of providing news organizations with information. While news
industries are struggling with the fragmentation of the news industry in a
demanding 24-hour news cycle, public relations professionals are developing new
tactics and techniques of delivering pre-packaged information (Furlan, 2012;
Zerfass, Vercic & Wiesenberg, 2016). This creates a greater need for collaboration
between journalists and PR professionals.

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Relationship Insights:

Some view collaboration between PR and news outlets as an opportunity, while


others view it as a threat. In a research review, Furlan (2012) describes the two as
having a love-hate relationship but recognizes that journalists have relied on
public relations sources for content for years. Primary research conducted in this
study found this definition to be accurate. Reporters interviewed in the study
criticized PR practitioners as being uninformed, self-centered and manipulative of
news outlets in an effort to get free advertising. Only 16 percent of the reporters in
the study strongly agreed or agreed that public relations practitioners are ethical
and trustworthy. Research by Zerfass, Vercic and Wiesenberg (2016) also provides
evidence of this love-hate relationship. Some public relations scholars find the
partnership between PR professionals and journalists to be manipulative, giving
more power to the organization being represented; however, some view these
relationships as opportunities. Some journalists in Furlans study (2012) recognized
the importance of relationships with PR professionals. The relationship was defined
as a two-way street in which both parties benefit from collaboration. One reporter
stated that PR practitioners help to get raw information to journalists who in turn
make this information understandable for the public (Furlan, 2012, p. 110).
Content development often requires both professionals expertise.

Relationships and Trust:

Journalists and PR professionals have worked together since the early 1900s, but
their relationships have not always had a positive outcome. PR professionals are
often known to spin information with a bias towards the organization they
represent. In a study of the relationship between PR professionals and medical
reporters, journalists were interviewed on their view of the reliability of PR
practitioners. The results show that most reporters do not fully trust PR
professionals; however, trust can be established with time (Furlan, 2012). In order
for information exchanges to be successful, journalists and PR professionals must
set boundaries and standards for accuracy and reliability to establish trustworthy
relationships.

Theoretical Underpinnings:

KJZZ is in the midst of the state of chaotic information flow, in which it faces
constraints due to having a small staff and other limited resources. In order to
gather information more efficiently, the station created an information exchange

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system. This system utilizes a collaborative journalism method, bringing together
public relations specialists and KJZZ reporters. This type of content strategy is more
similar to network journalism than grassroots journalism, as it is used to gather
information from specific professionals, rather than the larger population of
everyday citizens.

To expand on and improve this system, it is essential that KJZZ develops and
maintains strong relationships with the PR specialists involved. Since trust is the
fundamental aspect of relationships between reporters and PR specialists, KJZZ
must work to build trust by being transparent and communicating efficiently with
members of the exchange. Having members agree to set terms and conditions can
help set boundaries and expectations for the information exchange. Staying in
contact with members by regularly sending them information, updates and
reminders about upcoming meetings can also help further develop these
relationships.

27
Primary Research
Survey:

To assess KJZZs current healthcare information exchange program, Unity PR


administered an online survey to PR and communications professionals involved in
the program (see Appendix B). The survey link was sent to 65 individuals via email
and remained open for 17 days. Unity PR received six submissions, a response rate
of approximately 9 percent. The survey consisted of 11 questions relating to the
participants involvement in the program and their feedback on the program. Seven
of the questions were open response and an additional field for comments and
suggestions was included.

Results:

All of the respondents were members of the information exchange program, and
five of the six respondents (83.33 percent) had attended at least two information
exchange meetings. The majority of the respondents (50 percent) learned about the
information exchange program from fellow colleagues; while two were invited to
join the program by Vitalyst Health Foundation, and one by KJZZ.

When asked how satisfied they were with the current communication within the
program, half of respondents were either satisfied or very satisfied, 33 percent of
respondents were neutral and the remaining 16 percent were unsatisfied.

Most of the respondents (83.33 percent) said that the opportunity to engage with
others in their industry initially made them want to participate in this type of
program. The opportunity to raise awareness about their organization was another
appealing aspect of the program.

The respondents wrote mixed reviews of their initial impressions of the program.
Half had a positive impression and said that the program was helpful, the group
was friendly and that it was a welcoming opportunity.

Three respondents had a negative first impression of the program in regards to the
attitudes of KJZZ staff members and communication. Two stated that they felt
reporters and KJZZ staff members were not engaged or interested during the
meetings. One respondents first impression was that the newsroom staff did not

28
seem fully on board with the concept of listening to PR people. Another
respondent felt that the KJZZ team did not understand the PR professionals
interests. In addition, one respondent expressed that he/she did not receive
sufficient information about the program and that the process and purpose of the
meetings was not communicated to him/her.

When asked what two features they liked most about the program, 80 percent of
the responses related to the opportunity to interact and engage with fellow industry
professionals as well as with KJZZ reporters. The respondents also stated the
features they would like to see expanded on or refined. Most responses expressed
the need for more interactive discussion with the reporters. In addition, one
respondent said an editorial calendar with information on longer lead stories the
editors are pursuing would be helpful.

To assess the programs current content sharing platform, respondents were asked
about their satisfaction with Google Docs. Two were very unsatisfied, two neutral
and two satisfied. One respondent stated that he/she could not access Google
Docs at work due to his/her organizations computer security system.

When asked if they liked the programs method of exchange more or less that the
traditional way of working with reporters, the majority of respondents (two of three)
had positive feedback saying it provided great access to decision makers and was
more collaborative. One respondent, however, was unsatisfied with the method
of exchange, saying he/she did not find it valuable because the story ideas got
watered down.

Respondents said that the program has helped their organization through
communication with KJZZ reporters. One said that his/her organization has had
several individual and collaborative stories run on KJZZ as a result of the program.
Personally, respondents said that the program has helped them meet peers in their
industry.

Analysis:

After analyzing the survey results, Unity PR summarized a few key takeaways from
the responses.

29
The majority of the responses about the program were positive. Most respondents
said the program was a good opportunity to network with other professionals in
their industry as well as to network with reporters and editors at KJZZ.
Unity PR also found a few key areas of improvement including a need to make the
programs meetings more focused and engaging, a need for a better
understanding of the programs purpose and a need for better communication
tools, including a new content sharing platform as a majority of the respondents
were unsatisfied with Google Docs.

30

Part II: Campaign Proposal


31
Goals and Objectives

In order to improve KJZZs public radio collaborative model and align with its
mission to provide objective, intelligent news and information programming, Unity
PR established an overall goal to help KJZZ grow.

The overall goal of the campaign was to improve and expand KJZZs current
information exchange program.

KJZZs information exchange system generates story ideas about the healthcare
industry. In order to provide its audience with a wider variety of news and
information, KJZZ wants to expand this program to technology and business
industries and Maricopa Community Colleges to generate more stories in an
organized, efficient way.

In order to accomplish this goal, Unity PR pursued four objectives:

- Create an exchange system with representatives from 5-10 technology


companies in the Phoenix area by Dec. 1, 2016.
- Create an exchange system with representatives from 10-15 leading
businesses in the Phoenix area by Dec. 1, 2016.
- Create an exchange system with representatives from the 5-8 schools within
the Maricopa County College District by Dec. 1, 2016 in order to strengthen
their established relationship with KJZZ.
- Implement a better online content sharing platform for members of the
exchanges by Dec. 1, 2016.

32
Strategies and Tactics
Strategy 1:

- Identify and reach potential information exchange members.


- Tactic: Create new member outreach list of public relations professionals
from the local technology community, businesses based in Arizona and the
Maricopa Community College District. Accomplish this by researching
Arizona organizations and their PR representative, looking up contact
information for those people and compiling lists of 15 technology
organizations, 21 businesses and 10 Maricopa Community Colleges.

Strategy 2:

- Research an improved content sharing platform for the exchange program.


- Tactic: Identify and suggest a new content sharing platform to KJZZ
for reporters and public relations professionals to share contact
information and story ideas.

Strategy 3:

- Develop a communications kit for the information exchange program.


- Tactic: Create a standardized meeting invitation template that will be
sent out by KJZZ to potential information exchange members in all
systems.
- Tactic: Provide a terms and conditions agreement for public relations
professionals to clarify that participation in the information exchange
does not guarantee coverage for their company.

33
Budget

Below are estimates for Unity PRs initial campaign activities for KJZZ (Sept. 7 Dec.
8, 2016). This estimate includes the campaign proposal, internal process and all
other deliverables, including the information exchange member survey, new
member outreach lists and the communications kit.

ACTIVITY HOURS FEE

Campaign Development 75 hours $7,500.00

(Document which includes initial


research, planning, SWOT, SPEC,
future recommendations and
other strategical research)

Account Management 45 hours $4,500.00

(includes meetings and meeting


prep for all three team members)

Communications Kit 15 hours $1,500.00

Information Exchange Member 14 hours $1,400.00


Survey

Media Contacts 10 hours $1,000.00

(Includes contacts in education,


business and technology sectors)

TOTAL 159 hours $15,900.00

34
Unity PR provided KJZZ with 159 hours, totaling $15,900. All hours were billed at
$100 per hour and account management fees were multiplied by three for each
Unity PR member. The team provided a final document that details the campaign as
a whole and includes primary and secondary research, SWOT and SPEC analysis,
future recommendations and other strategical research.

The team conducted a survey among the current healthcare information exchange
members which provided insight as to how members think the exchange program
can be refined.

Unity PR compiled a list of public relations and marketing professionals from a


variety of companies based in Arizona for future information exchange systems in
the business, technology and education sectors. This includes 22 business contacts,
15 technology contacts and 12 contacts within the Maricopa Community College
District.

Additional investment recommendations include regularly surveying reporters and


information exchange members. Unity PR recommends using a platform such as
SurveyMonkey, which costs $300 annually for the Gold account and $1,020 annually
for a Platinum account.

If KJZZ plans to hold quarterly exchange meetings with each of the programs
sectors, they should expect to spend between $400-$800 per year on refreshments
for the meetings.

35

Implementation Timeline

The following implementation timeline outlines the dates of each step in the
process of improving the KJZZ information exchange program. It should be noted
that each date is subject to change depending on the clients schedule and
cooperation.

Task Date Completed

Compile technology member outreach list (See Appendix A) Oct. 12, 2016

Compile business member outreach list (See Appendix A) Oct. 12, 2016

Compile education member outreach list (See Appendix A) Oct. 12, 2016

Conduct information exchange survey (See Appendix B) Oct. 26, 2016

Finalize new content sharing platform (See Appendix C) Nov. 15, 2016

Finalize invitation template (See Appendix D) Dec. 1, 2016

Finalize terms and conditions agreement (See Appendix D) Dec. 1, 2016

Finalize client Prezi presentation Dec. 1, 2016

36
Evaluation
In order to measure the success of the campaign, the client should look at the
implementation of the information exchange systems and on receiving the
communications kit.

Objective 1: Creation of an exchange system with representatives from 5-10


technology companies in the Phoenix area by Dec. 1, 2016.

How to measure: The team met this objective if it got at least a 50 percent
response rate to the emails sent to technology representatives about an
information exchange system beginning next year.

Results: The team created a list of 15 Phoenix-based technology companies
and their communications representatives. Unity PR sent the list, along with
an invitation template and terms and conditions agreement, to KJZZ, which
plans to begin the program at the beginning of 2017. Thus, this objective is
ongoing.

Objective 2: Creation of an exchange system with representatives from 10-15


leading businesses in the Phoenix area by Dec. 1, 2016.

How to measure: The team met this objective if it got at least a 50 percent
response rate to the emails sent to business representatives about an
information exchange system beginning next year.

Results: The team created a list of 25 Phoenix-based businesses and their
communications representatives. Unity PR sent the list, along with an
invitation template and terms and conditions agreement, to KJZZ, which
plans to begin the program at the beginning of 2017. Thus, this objective is
ongoing.

Objective 3: Creation of an exchange system with representatives from 5-8 schools


within the Maricopa County College District by Dec. 1, 2016 in order to strengthen
their established relationship with KJZZ.

How to measure: The team met this objective if it got at least a 50 percent
response rate to the emails sent to Maricopa Community College District
representatives about an information exchange system beginning next year.

37

Results: The team created a list of the 10 Maricopa County Community
Colleges and their communications representatives. Unity PR sent the list,
along with an invitation template and terms and conditions agreement, to
KJZZ, which plans to begin the program at the beginning of 2017. Thus, this
objective is ongoing.

Objective 4: Implementation of a better online content sharing platform for


members of the exchanges by Dec. 1, 2016

How to measure: The team met this objective if it found an appropriate


content platform, shared it with KJZZ and got the station to implement this
platform in their information exchange program by the date given.

Results: The team was successful in identifying a new content sharing
platform: Dropbox Paper. Unity believes this will allow KJZZ to communicate
more effectively with members of the exchanges and in a more secure
environment. The team developed sample documents and files to
demonstrate the program and wrote an overview about how to use Dropbox
Paper (See Appendix C).

38
Future Recommendations

Survey KJZZ reporters in information exchange program

Unity PR suggests that KJZZ conduct a survey with the KJZZ reporters who have
participated in the information exchange program. This survey would be similar in
nature to the survey that was distributed to the PR professionals who are in the
program. It would be beneficial to see how the reporters feel about the program
and how KJZZ can adjust it to make the experience better for them. If the reporters
are more engaged, it would follow that the PR professionals would value the
program more as well.

Keep in regular contact with reporters and public relations professionals

The team recommends that KJZZ communicates with the information exchange
members as often as possible. Sending out bi-monthly reminders to the public
relations practitioners about upcoming meetings will help make sure attendance is
constant. The station should also send regular updates to all members about the
program.

Create sub-groups within the business information exchange system

Because of the large number of businesses included in the new member outreach
list, the team recommends that KJZZ considers creating sub-groups within the
business sector. This will depend on the number of participants in the business
information exchanges. If there is a large number of PR professionals attending the
meetings, smaller groups divided by area of business would be easier to manage,
and will ensure that everyone has a chance to speak up at the meetings.

Survey all participants in the information exchange program bi-annually

To make sure the information exchange program is always functioning as smoothly


as possible, the station should send out a twice yearly survey to all participants. This
survey can be similar to the one Unity PR developed, as the goal is to find out what
is working in the program, and what can be improved. This can change over time,
so it is important to ask at regular intervals to ensure the program is always at its
best. If KJZZs team sees that a system isnt functioning as it should, a survey should
be sent out more often to figure out how to improve.

39




Part III: Appendices

40
Appendix A: Production Samples

Business Member Outreach List

Company PR Contact Location
American LaKesha Brown Phoenix Sky Harbor
Airlines Corporate Communications Manager International Airport
817-967-1577 3400 E. Sky Harbor Blvd.,
lakesha.brown@aa.com Phoenix, AZ 85034
APS John Hatfield 400 N. 5th St.,
Vice President Communication Phoenix, AZ 85004
602-270-1000
john.hatfield@aps.com
Bell Steel Inc. Billy Bell 1100 N. Hamilton St.,
Owner and President Chandler, AZ 85225
admin@bell-steel.com
480-833-5538
Chase Maura Cordova 201 N. Central Ave.,
Regional Media Relations and Phoenix, AZ 85004
Communications Manager
maura.cordova@chase.com
Cold Stone Jessica (Jewell) Benedick 9311 E. Via de Ventura
Creamery Director of Public Relations Scottsdale, AZ 85258-3423
Kahala Brands
Cold Stone Creamery
480-362-4837
jbenedick@kahalamgmt.com
Discount Tire Greg Miller Discount Tire
214-891-7668 5310 E. Shea Blvd.
Greg_miller@richards.com Scottsdale, AZ 85254-4700
Fennemore Stephen A. Good 2394 E Camelback Rd
Craig Phoenix Director Suite 600
602-916-5395 Phoenix, AZ 85016
sgood@fclaw.com
Fox Restaurants Anita Walker 4455 E. Camelback Rd.,
Vice President Marketing Suite B100
480-751-2169 Phoenix, AZ 85018
prinquiry@foxrc.net

41
Freeport- Eric Kinneberg 333 N. Central Ave.
McMoRan Director-External Communications Phoenix, AZ 85004
602-366-7994
mr@fmi.com
Greater Phoenix Michelle Kauk 2 N. Central Ave.,
Economic Senior VP, Communications & Public Suite 2500,
Council Affairs Phoenix, AZ 85004
602-262-8602
mkauk@gpec.org
Hensley Doug Yonko 4201 N. 45th Ave.
Beverage Co. Hensley Beverage Company Phoenix, AZ 85031
Vice President Communications
602-679-7053
DYonko@Hensley.com
Local First Erica Fetherston 407 E. Roosevelt St., Phoenix,
Communications Director AZ 85004
602-956-0909 x7
erica@localfirstaz.com
PetSmart Erin Gray 19601 N. 27th Ave.,
Senior Corporate Communications Phoenix, AZ 85027
Manager at PetSmart
623-516-3908
egray@petsmart.com
Shamrock Brandye Billeter 3900 E. Camelback Rd., Suite
Foods For Arizona Media 300
602-821-2881 Phoenix, AZ 85018
brandye@beheardpr.com
Smith & Wesson Elizabeth Sharp 7377 E. Doubletree Ranch
Holding Corp. Vice President, Investor Relations Rd.,
Scottsdale, AZ 85258
480-949-9700 x115

lsharp@smith-wesson.com

Sprouts Farmers Shawn Gensch 5455 E. High St.,
Market Chief Marketing Officer Suite 111
602-682-3173 Phoenix, AZ 85054
media@sprouts.com
State Farm Naomi Johnson 2700 S. Sunland Dr.,
Media Specialist (AZ, NM, NV) Tempe, AZ 85282
480-293-6090
Naomi.johnson.jjee@statefarm.com
Swift Cozette Phifer 2200 S. 75th Ave.,
Transportation Vice President, Brand Marketing & Phoenix, AZ 85043

42
Corporate Communications
602-477-3438
communications@swifttrans.com
TASER Steve Tuttle 17800 N. 85th St.,
International VP of Strategic Communications Scottsdale, AZ 85255
480-444-4000

Sydney Siegmeth
PR Director, Axon
480-463-2152
press@taser.com
Triple A Michelle Donati-Grayman 2375 E. Camelback Rd., Suite
Communications Manager 500
mdonati@arizona.aaa.com Phoenix, AZ 85016
Phone: 602-650-2726
Cell: 602-571-4832

Uhaul Jeff Lockridge U-Haul International


Manager of Media and Public 2727 N. Central Ave.,
Relations Phoenix, AZ 85004
602-263-6194
mediarelations@uhaul.com
Waste Janette Micelli 222 S. Mill Ave.,
Management Manager, External Communications, Suite 333
Waste Management Corporate Tempe, AZ 85281
Communications
Phone: 480-457-4702
Cell: 602-579-6152
jmicelli@wm.com

43
Technology Member Outreach List

Company PR Contact Location

Arizona Technology Linda Capcara 2800 N. Central Ave.,


Council 602-343-8324 Suite 1920
lcapcara@gmail.com Phoenix, AZ 85004

Avnet Maureen OLeary 2211 S. 47th St.,


Director, Media Relations Phoenix, AZ 85034
Corporate Communications
Maureen.oleary@avnet.com

Boeing Chaz Bickers Mesa Plant:


Corporate Communications Director 5000 E. McDowell
312-544-2002 Rd.,
charles.n.bickers@boeing.com Mesa, AZ 85215

First Solar Steve Krum 350 W. Washington


Director, Global Communications St.,
602-427-3359 Suite 600
stephen.krum@firstsolar.com Tempe, AZ 85281

GoDaddy Elizabeth L. Driscoll 14455 N. Hayden Rd.,


Vice President, Public Relations Suite 219
elizabeth@godaddy.com Scottsdale, AZ 85260
480-505-8878

Honeywell Steve Brecken 1944 E. Sky Harbor


(Aerospace) Aerospace Division Media Relations Circle,
602-365-2347 Phoenix, AZ 85034
steven.brecken@honeywell.com

IEEE (Institute of Wei Xu N/A


Electrical and Publicity Chair
Electronics Engineers), 480-296-1116
Phoenix Chapter Wei.dr.xu@ieee.org

InfusionSoft Cory Fetter 1260 S. Spectrum


Head of Public Relations Blvd.,
480-499-6672 Chandler, AZ 85286
Cory.fetter@infusionsoft.com

Insight Chuck King 6820 S. Harl Ave.,

44
Media Relations Tempe, AZ 85283
480-409-6390
chuck.king@insight.com

Intel Jason D. Farrell 5000 W. Chandler


Media Relations Manager Blvd.,
602-799-5759 Chandler, AZ 85226
Jason.D.Farrell@intel.com

IrisPR Rebecca Sprynczynatyk 4105 N. 20th St.,


VP of Product Marketing Suite 260
888-869-6645 Phoenix, AZ 85016
iris@myirispr.com

LifeLock Jeff Davis 60 E. Rio Salado Pky.,


Senior Director, Corporate Suite 400
Communications Tempe, AZ 85281
480-457-2138
media@lifelock.com

Microchip Tech. Brian Thorsen 2355 W. Chandler


Public Relations Manager Blvd.,
480-792-7200 Chandler, AZ 85224
brian.thorsen@microchip.com

ON Semiconductor Kris Pugsley 5005 E. McDowell


Global Communications Manager Rd.,
Kris.pugsley@onsemi.com Phoenix, AZ 85008
312-909-0661

Orbital ATK (Flight Jennifer Bowman Group Headquarters


Systems) Director of Communications 3377 S. Price Rd.,
435-863-4809 Chandler, AZ 85248
jennifer.bowman@orbitalatk.com

45
Education Member Outreach List

College PR Contact Location
District Office Heidi Capriotti 2411 W. 14th St.,
480-731-8503 Tempe, AZ 85281
Heidi.capriotti@domail.maricopa.edu
Maricopa Corporate Patricia OBrien 1050 W. Washington
College 480-377-2720 St.,
Patricia.obrien@maricopacorporate.com Suite 133
Tempe, AZ 85281
Gregory Bullock (CEI)
602-286-8958 275 N. Gateway Dr.,
Gregory.bullock@ceigateway.com Phoenix, AZ 85034
Chandler-Gilbert Cindy Barnes 2626 E. Pecos Rd.,
480-732-7093 Chandler, AZ 85225-
Cindy.barnes@cgc.edu 2499
Estrella Mountain Karen Harbin 3000 N. Dysart Rd.,
623-935-8054 Avondale, AZ 85392
Karen.harbin@estrellamountain.edu
GateWay Christine Lambrakis 108 N. 40th St.,
602-286-8227 Phoenix, AZ 85034
lambrakis@gatewaycc.edu

Carlos Samano
602-286-8231
samano@gatewaycc.edu
Glendale Tressa Jumps 6000 W. Olive Ave.,
623-845-3805 Glendale, AZ 85302
Tressa.jumps@gccaz.edu
Mesa Dawn Zimmer 1833 W. Southern Ave.,
480-377-2720 Mesa, AZ 85202
Dawn.zimmer@mesacc.edu
Paradise Valley Candace Oehler 18401 N. 32nd St.,
602-787-6606 Phoenix, AZ 85032
Candace.oehler@paradisevalley.edu
Phoenix Michelle Klinger 1202 W. Thomas Rd.,
602-285-7842 Phoenix, AZ 85013
Michelle.klinger@phoenixcollege.edu

Megan Martin
602-285-7849
Megan.martin@phoenixcollege.edu

46
Rio Salado Annette Flores 323 W. 14th St.,
480-517-8467 Tempe, AZ 85281
Annette.flores@riosalado.edu

Mira Radovich
480-517-8471
Mira.radovich@riosalado.edu
Scottsdale Jonathan Higuera 9000 E. Chaparral Rd.,
480-425-6637 Scottsdale, AZ 85256
Jonathan.higuera@scottsdalecc.edu

Nancy Neff
480-423-6567
Nancy.neff@scottsdalecc.edu
South Mountain Jennifer Grentz 7050 S. 24th St.,
602-243-8030 Phoenix, AZ 85042
Jennifer.grentz@southmountaincc.edu

Tanya Craven
602-243-8169
Tanya.craven@southmountaincc.edu

47
Appendix B: Survey Questions
Thank you for participating in this survey. Your responses will be kept confidential
and anonymous, and will be used by KJZZ and Unity PR to improve and expand the
KJZZ information exchange program. If you have any questions or comments about
the survey, please contact tbrightw@asu.edu.

KJZZ Information Exchange Survey


Please circle an option or write-in your view on these topics.

1. How many information exchange meetings have you attended?


a. I have not attended a meeting.
b. One
c. Two-Three
d. Four-Five
e. Six or More

2. How were you first introduced to the information exchange program?


a. KJZZ invited me
b. Vitalyst Health Foundation invited me
c. One of my colleagues
d. Other ________________

3. What initially made you want to participate in this type of program?

4. Think back to when you first became involved with the program. What
were your first impressions?

5. List the top two features/components you like most about the
information exchanges.
1.
2.

48
6. List the top two features/components you would like to see expanded on
or refined.
1.
2.

7. Are you satisfied with the current communication system within these
information exchanges? (invitations to the meeting, meeting follow-up,
and story curation)
a. Very satisfied
b. Satisfied
c. Neither satisfied or unsatisfied
d. Unsatisfied
e. Very unsatisfied

8. How satisfied are you with using Google Docs as an information sharing
platform?
a. Very satisfied
b. Satisfied
c. Neither satisfied or unsatisfied
d. Unsatisfied
e. Very unsatisfied

9. Do you like this new way of collaborative information exchange more or


less than the traditional way of working with reporters? Why or why not?

10.How have these exchanges helped your organization or company?

11.Have these exchanges helped you personally (improved networking,


broadened education on industries, etc.)?

12.If you have any other comments, suggestions or changes you would like
in the information exchange, please elaborate below.

49
Appendix C: Content Sharing Platform
Recommendation

Dropbox Paper

About:
Dropbox Paper was created to help teams work together on documents and share
important information. Users can access Dropbox Paper through their Dropbox
accounts. Folders and documents can be shared with team members to view and/or
edit. Here are some of the ways teams can collaborate with Paper:

Brainstorming Use the same document to share ideas and industry updates
and trends
Meeting notes Link Paper to your Google Calendar to create a meeting
agenda and notes. The document will automatically be sent to all members
invited to the meeting.
To-do lists Make checklists and assign tasks to others by using @ + their
username.

For more information, visit paper.dropbox.com.

Getting Started:
1) Sign up for your free Dropbox account (if you do not already have one) at
www.dropbox.com.
2) Once you have verified your account, go to paper.dropbox.com.
3) Create a folder for each information exchange program, and share it with
members of the exchange.
4) An email will be sent to the members once folder has been shared. They can
access it through a link in the email or via the Shared with me link in Paper.
If members do not already have Dropbox accounts, they will have to sign up
for one.

Recommendations:
Create and share a collaborative folder for each information exchange
program
Upload important documents (Terms and Conditions Agreement, Program
Introduction, etc.) and share as view only docs

50
Use the meeting notes feature to schedule upcoming meetings, record
agendas and take notes during the meetings
Use brainstorming feature to create a collaborative document for story
ideas and updates
Create a collaborative document for sources contacts for story ideas
Create conversations by commenting on documents and @ mention other
members

Example:
We have implemented the recommendations by creating sample documents in a
shared a file that can be accessed through this link:

https://paper.dropbox.com/doc/2016-Healthcare-Information-Exchange-Meeting-
Notes-W4ioHk9QaUNcdZcFfCTby

We have also included the following screenshots of these examples:

51










52





53
Appendix D: Communications Kit

Business Information Exchange Program Invitation

Dear [name]:

On behalf of KJZZ 91.5 FM, we would like to extend an invitation to you and fellow
communication specialists at [organization name] to become a member of our KJZZ
Business Information Exchange Program. The KJZZ Business Information Exchange
Program is a collaborative journalism initiative, developed to strategically generate
news content and form stronger relationships with business leaders in the Phoenix
area.

As a member of the program, you will be invited to quarterly information exchange


meetings to share updates on your organization with KJZZ reporters, which they
may use to generate story ideas. KJZZ staff members will also share updates about
the station during these meetings. In addition, you will receive access to a content
sharing platform to directly and regularly communicate with KJZZ reporters. There
is no fee associated with becoming a member of the program and meeting
attendance is voluntary, though highly encouraged. Meetings will last
approximately 90 minutes.

It would be a pleasure to have you attend our next information exchange meeting
on [day of the week, month day] from [time to time] at [location, address]. Please
RSVP to the next information exchange meeting by emailing [contact name at email
address] by [date].

If you cannot attend the next meeting, but would still like to be a member of the
program and receive regular updates and meeting invitations, please email [contact
name at email address].

We look forward to working with you and your organization!

Sincerely,
[signature]


54
About the KJZZ Business Information Exchange Program:
The KJZZ Business Information Exchange Program is a collaborative journalism
effort between KJZZ reporters and communications specialists of business leaders
in the Phoenix area. Through the information exchange program, communication
specialists can strategically share organizational updates and industry news with
KJZZ reporters to help them develop news content for the radio station. Members
of the program meet quarterly and utilize a content sharing platform for news
curation.

About KJZZ:
As one of the leading news and talk show radio stations in the Phoenix area, KJZZ
broadcasts local and national news, entertainment programing and jazz music.
Along with its sister station, KBAQ, KJZZ is a service of Rio Salado College and The
Maricopa County Community College District, and follows a collaborative public
radio model public radio partners such as National Public Radio (NPR) and The
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). KJZZ has over 737,600 unique monthly
listeners and receives funding from its sponsors through Friends of Public Radio
Arizona (FPRAZ). For more information, visit www.kjzz.org.

55
Education Information Exchange Program Invitation

Dear [name]:

On behalf of KJZZ 91.5 FM, we would like to extend an invitation to you and fellow
communication specialists at [organization name] to become a member of our KJZZ
Education Information Exchange Program. The KJZZ Education Information
Exchange Program is a collaborative journalism initiative, developed to strategically
generate news content and form stronger relationships with education leaders in
the Phoenix area.

As a member of the program, you will be invited to quarterly information exchange


meetings to share updates on your organization with KJZZ reporters, which they
may use to generate story ideas. KJZZ staff members will also share updates about
the station during these meetings. In addition, you will receive access to a content
sharing platform to directly and regularly communicate with KJZZ reporters. There
is no fee associated with becoming a member of the program and meeting
attendance is voluntary, though highly encouraged. Meetings will last
approximately 90 minutes.

It would be a pleasure to have you attend our next information exchange meeting
on [day of the week, month day] from [time to time] at [location, address]. Please
RSVP to the next information exchange meeting by emailing [contact name at email
address] by [date].

If you cannot attend the next meeting, but would still like to be a member of the
program and receive regular updates and meeting invitations, please email [contact
name at email address].

We look forward to working with you and your organization!

Sincerely,
[signature]

About the KJZZ Education Information Exchange Program:


The KJZZ Education Information Exchange Program is a collaborative journalism
effort between KJZZ reporters and communications specialists of education leaders
in the Phoenix area. Through the information exchange program, communication
specialists can strategically share organizational updates and industry news with

56
KJZZ reporters to help them develop news content for the radio station. Members
of the program meet quarterly and utilize a content sharing platform for news
curation.

About KJZZ:
As one of the leading news and talk show radio stations in the Phoenix area, KJZZ
broadcasts local and national news, entertainment programing and jazz music.
Along with its sister station, KBAQ, KJZZ is a service of Rio Salado College and The
Maricopa County Community College District, and follows a collaborative public
radio model public radio partners such as National Public Radio (NPR) and The
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). KJZZ has over 737,600 unique monthly
listeners and receives funding from its sponsors through Friends of Public Radio
Arizona (FPRAZ). For more information, visit www.kjzz.org.

57
Healthcare Information Exchange Program Invitation

Dear [name]:

On behalf of KJZZ 91.5 FM, we would like to extend an invitation to you and fellow
communication specialists at [organization name] to become a member of our KJZZ
Healthcare Information Exchange Program. The KJZZ Healthcare Information
Exchange Program is a collaborative journalism initiative, developed to strategically
generate news content and form stronger relationships with healthcare leaders in
the Phoenix area.

As a member of the program, you will be invited to quarterly information exchange


meetings to share updates on your organization with KJZZ reporters, which they
may use to generate story ideas. KJZZ staff members will also share updates about
the station during these meetings. In addition, you will receive access to a content
sharing platform to directly and regularly communicate with KJZZ reporters. There
is no fee associated with becoming a member of the program and meeting
attendance is voluntary, though highly encouraged. Meetings will last
approximately 90 minutes.

It would be a pleasure to have you attend our next information exchange meeting
on [day of the week, month day] from [time to time] at [location, address]. Please
RSVP to the next information exchange meeting by emailing [contact name at email
address] by [date].

If you cannot attend the next meeting, but would still like to be a member of the
program and receive regular updates and meeting invitations, please email [contact
name at email address].

We look forward to working with you and your organization!

Sincerely,
[signature]

About the KJZZ Healthcare Information Exchange Program:


The KJZZ Healthcare Information Exchange Program is a collaborative journalism
effort between KJZZ reporters and communications specialists of healthcare leaders
in the Phoenix area. Through the information exchange program, communication
specialists can strategically share organizational updates and industry news with

58
KJZZ reporters to help them develop news content for the radio station. Members
of the program meet quarterly and utilize a content sharing platform for news
curation.

About KJZZ:
As one of the leading news and talk show radio stations in the Phoenix area, KJZZ
broadcasts local and national news, entertainment programing and jazz music.
Along with its sister station, KBAQ, KJZZ is a service of Rio Salado College and The
Maricopa County Community College District, and follows a collaborative public
radio model public radio partners such as National Public Radio (NPR) and The
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). KJZZ has over 737,600 unique monthly
listeners and receives funding from its sponsors through Friends of Public Radio
Arizona (FPRAZ). For more information, visit www.kjzz.org.

59
Technology Information Exchange Program Invitation

Dear [name]:

On behalf of KJZZ 91.5 FM, we would like to extend an invitation to you and fellow
communication specialists at [organization name] to become a member of our KJZZ
Technology Information Exchange Program. The KJZZ Technology Information
Exchange Program is a collaborative journalism initiative, developed to strategically
generate news content and form stronger relationships with technology leaders in
the Phoenix area.

As a member of the program, you will be invited to quarterly information exchange


meetings to share updates on your organization with KJZZ reporters, which they
may use to generate story ideas. KJZZ staff members will also share updates about
the station during these meetings. In addition, you will receive access to a content
sharing platform to directly and regularly communicate with KJZZ reporters. There
is no fee associated with becoming a member of the program and meeting
attendance is voluntary, though highly encouraged. Meetings will last
approximately 90 minutes.

It would be a pleasure to have you attend our next information exchange meeting
on [day of the week, month day] from [time to time] at [location, address]. Please
RSVP to the next information exchange meeting by emailing [contact name at email
address] by [date].

If you cannot attend the next meeting, but would still like to be a member of the
program and receive regular updates and meeting invitations, please email [contact
name at email address].

We look forward to working with you and your organization!

Sincerely,
[signature]

About the KJZZ Technology Information Exchange Program:


The KJZZ Technology Information Exchange Program is a collaborative journalism
effort between KJZZ reporters and communications specialists of technology
leaders in the Phoenix area. Through the information exchange program,
communication specialists can strategically share organizational updates and

60
industry news with KJZZ reporters to help them develop news content for the radio
station. Members of the program meet quarterly and utilize a content sharing
platform for news curation.

About KJZZ:
As one of the leading news and talk show radio stations in the Phoenix area, KJZZ
broadcasts local and national news, entertainment programing and jazz music.
Along with its sister station, KBAQ, KJZZ is a service of Rio Salado College and The
Maricopa County Community College District, and follows a collaborative public
radio model public radio partners such as National Public Radio (NPR) and The
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). KJZZ has over 737,600 unique monthly
listeners and receives funding from its sponsors through Friends of Public Radio
Arizona (FPRAZ). For more information, visit www.kjzz.org.

61
Terms and Conditions Agreement

Thank you for joining the KJZZ Information Exchange Program. It is our hope that
within this program you will get to know our reporters as well as network with other
professionals in your industry. The Information Exchange Program is designed as a
collaborative initiative to improve the relationship between communication
specialists and KJZZ reporters. It provides participants with an opportunity to
discuss organizational updates and industry trends.

By becoming a member of the KJZZ Information Exchange Program, you are


agreeing to the following conditions:

- Your participation does not guarantee news coverage for your organization.

- All participants have an equal opportunity to speak during the exchange meetings.
No one person or organization should dominate the conversation.

- Information spread via the content staring platform (story ideas, contact information,
etc.) should not be deleted or shared with individuals outside of the program.

- The content sharing platform and Information Exchange meetings are meant to be
collaborative and, while we encourage members to share organizational and
industry news, we discourage traditional news pitching.

- Participation is free of charge.

- You are able to opt out of the program at any time by emailing XXX.

If you have any questions, comments or concerns, please contact XXX at XXX.

Full Name:

Organization:

Signature: Date:

62
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Journalism/Public Relations Dynamic? An Application of Theory From the Sociology
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Arizona Secretary of State. (2016). Voter Registration & Historical Election Data. Retrieved
from azsos.gov: http://www.azsos.gov/elections/voter-registration-historical-
election-data
Corporation for Public Broadcasting. (n.d.). Public Broadcasting Act of 1967. Retrieved from
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Federal Communications Commission. (2016, November 14). Call Sign History. Washington,
DC, USA. Retrieved from wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KJZZ_(FM)
FPRAZ. (2016). About. Retrieved from Friends of Public Radio Arizona:
http://fpraz.org/about.php
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5dbb0fab86d32/1468417751579/KJZZ_K-BACH+Media+Kit.pdf
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https://www.maricopa.edu/about-us
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reports/q4-2015-total-audience-report.pdf
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reports/state-of-the-media-audio-today-radio-2016.pdf
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Media.

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Pew Research Center. (2012). Section 4: Demographics and Political Views of News
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Zerfass, A., Vercic, D., & Wiesenberg, M. (2016). The dawn of a new golden age for media
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