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CHANDAMAMA

JUNE 1972

.

92 PAISE

GROWING UP

IS FUNWITH

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Each deposit is one more step

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for your child.

LET US HELP YOUR CHILD LEARN THE SAVINGS HABIT— THE CHARTERED WAY

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SO ENJOY A SWEET TREAT— POP OUT POPPINS

evBiesl/1H0/Pp

1971 JULY

the Silver Jubilee Year of

Cbamiatnama brings Mew Twins to Chandarnama family !

CHANOAHASA

JAHNAMAMU

Bengali

Oriya

language editions to serve the Children of Bengal and Orissa

inaugural issues will be available at at! Book Stalls during the 3rd Week of June.

now in

'fuotenerf

TEN National Languages

CHANDAMAMA continues to

educate and entertain the Children

of India

through

its

lively tale and

lovely format !

0.90 Paise a copy

Rs. lO SO Ps. annual

fOR PARTICULARS:

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'CHANDAMAMA BUILOINCS'

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KUIEM

5»AN (IMI4) PVT. ITD.

CHANDAMAMA

Vol; 2 No. II

June 1972

Itljl IJCMUIN a acCKtl

8

1 IN nla UcrcINCb

.

10

THE MINSTREL

12

THE KIND LITTLE SISTER

.

16

MISTLETOE AND THE SUN-OOD

.

20

PHOTO CAPTION CONTEST

.

26

MAHABHARATA

.

27

THE DECEIVERS

.

33

CARD INDEX OF KNOWLEDGE

.

39

HOW THE REDSKINS WERE MADE

.

.

41

.

44

ROBIN HOOD

.

50

A STINGING REMEDY THE FAIRY BRIDE

.

52

LEGEND OF ST. GEORGE

.

57

IN WOLF'S CLOTHING

.

60

CHANDAMAMA SHORT STORY CONTEST

Rs. 3501- IN PRIZES—TURN TO PAGE 32

Prinled by B. V. Reddi al The Prasad Process Privale Lid., and Published

by B, Viswanalha Reddi for Chandamama Publications, 2& 3, Arcoi Road, Madras-26. Conirolling Editor; 'Chakrapani"

The Demon's Secret

Grandfather sat back in his

banks of a big river, lived the

chair, eager

to

enjoy ail

the

Demon Chandavarman, who

political

gossip

 

and

local

was known throughout the land

scandal

in

the

pages

of

his

as the Wicked Demon.

newspaper.

But

the incessant

The Wicked Demon used to

chatter of his grand-children,

jump onto the backs of unwary

made concentration

a

little

travellers and make them carry

difficult.

 

him down to the river.

When

"Dear

me,"

said

grand-

they reached the river, he made

father, looking over his glasses

his poor victim sit on the bank

and

trying

to

appear stern.

whilst

he

bathed, then after-

" You talk so much, you re-

wards he would grab his victim,

mind

me

of

the

Demon

drag him into the water and

Chandavarman."

 

eat him up.

 

" Who

was

this

demon?"

One day a priest was wander-

piped up little Radha, hoping

ing through

the

forest,

and

that

grandfather would

 

tell

from the low

branches

of a

them a story.

 

tree the Wicked Demon sprang

Grandfather put down

his

on his back, and ordered the

paper

with

a

sigh.

" Once

poor priest to carry him down

upon a time," he began, by the

to the river.

The priest, who was just

as

talked too much.

When they

inquisitive as all grandchildren,

reached the river, the priest was

started to ask a tot of questions

quite content

to sink on

the

to which the demon answered

ground and rest his weary back.

with loud guffaws of laughter.

But once the Wicked Demon

** Tell me," said the priest as

was well and truly in trie water,

they neared the river, " Why

the

priest jumped to his feet

are the sotes of your feet so

and made off, knowing the silly

soft and pink?" "

 

demon would never am after

That's

my

great secret,"

him on dry earth.

roared the demon.

"

I

made a

The Wicked Demon stood

vow centuries ago never to walk

in

the river watching the dis-

on dry earth with wet feet."

appearing figure of a good meal, and cursing himself for having

The priest chuckled to himself as he realised that the demon

talked too much.

In His Defence

Sunder

was

a

rustic

and

into the pot to see what smelt

Sunder shouted at the cat,

rather

that.

one One day Sunder decided

a

at

dull

witted

so nice.

to make some ghee,

but

not

which was far too occupied to

possessing

a

suitable

pot,

take

any

notice

of him.

So

borrowed a nice earthenware

Sunder took

orf one

 

of

his

pot

from

a neighbour.

The

chappals and hurled

it

at

the

neighbour wasn't too happy at

cat.

It was an unlucky throw,

lending

the

pot

and

made

for it missed the cat and

hit

Sunder promise

to

return

it

the pot, which broke into two.

within two days.

 

Knowing that his neighbour

When

the ghee was made,

Sunder stood the pot on the

would be more than angry over the broken pot. Sunder found

table and

rubbed

his

hands

some glue,

and

managed to

with satisfaction.

Now he kept

stick the pieces together again.

a cat, which was forever hungry.

Sunder waited until it was dark

The

cat

smelling the ghee,

 

befofe

he returned

the

pot,

jumped on to the table and

hoping

that

his neighbour

delicately put one of its paws

wouldn't notice that it had been

broken.

But

the

neighbour

say that your neighbour must

had sharp eyes, and shouted at

have broken the pot after you

Sunder.

" Hey! That pot has

returned it, or thr^e, you can

been broken.

What are you

swear you never borrowed the

going to do about it?"

 

pot."

Sunder didn't wait

to

hear

Sunder

thought

this

all

anymore,

but

bolted

out

of

sounded very good, and went

the house.

 

home repeating

these golden

Two

days

later,

Sunder

words of advice.

received a summons to appear

When the case was heard in

before the magistrate for wil-

court,

the

magistrate asked

fully breaking his neighbour's

Sunder what he had to say in

earthenware pot.

Sunder was

his defence.

Sunder stood up,

 

and

puffing

out

his

chest,

indignant that anyone should

exclaimed

in

a

loud

voice,

make a fuss over an old pot,

" Your

Honour,'

1

swear the

then he remembered that there was an old lawyer in the village,

pot was already broken when 1

who gave advice at a small fee.

borrowed it, and I am sure my neighbour broke

it

after

1

So Sunder went to the lawyer and asked how he could defend

returned it.

And what is more.,

 

himself against

this

charge.

I never borrowed the pot."

The lawyer having collected his

With that Sunder sat down

fee of one rupee said.

" There

with a grin from ear to ear,

are only three ways in which

waiting

for

the

magistrate to

dismiss

the

case.

Instead

of

 

you can answer this charge. One, you can swear that the pot

which, the magistrate fixed him

was already broken when you

with a baleful look and in an "

borrowed it.

Two,

you

can

icy

voice

said.

Don't you

 

dare come into this court tell-

IN NEXT ISSUE

 

ing a pack of lies.

You will

 

not only pay for a new pot,

   

but

I

fine you

ten rupees for

THE FIRST HERO OF EVEREST

The graphic story thai led to the conquest of the world's

perjury." Sunder left the court, mum- bling vile curses on all lawyers

most formidable mountain

and magistrates who treated an honest man so shabbily.

 

THE Ml

NSTREL

 

Long ago,

in

the town

of

It was the same for the next

Novgorod, in far away Russia,

three

days

and,

sighing un-

there lived

a minstrel

named

happily, he took his balalaika

Sadko.

He earned

his

living

and went to Lake Ulmen, just

by

playing on

 

a

balalaika, a

outside the city. ' There he sat

kind of guitar, to entertain the

and played to himself all day.

guests

at

the

great

banquets

At dusk, the waters of the lake

which

the nobles

gave.

As

began to swirl and foam and

long as there were

plenty

of

Sadko, terrified, turned and ran

feasts

and

dances,

he

made

back to Novgorod.

enough

money to

live com-

Next day, again, he sat by

fortably.

Lake Ulmen and

played

his

However, the day came when

balalaika and again, at sunset,

no one hired

Sadko

to

play.

the water roared and foamed

and

Sadko rushed

Novgorod.

back

to

On the third day, when the water grew dark and began to churn into great waves, Sadko

played

on.

Then,

to

his

amazement, out of the waves

the figure of the King of the

Blue Seas appeared.

" I have come to thank you, "

Sadko," he roared.

I

have

been holding a feast and your

music, for the past three days, has charmed and delighted us.

Return home now and you will

at once be invited

to play at

the feast of a great merchant.

Many other rich merchants and nobles will be there and you

will

hear

them

all

boasting

about

their

wonderful

pos-

sessions.

" You,

Sadko,

must boast,

' 1 have no possessions,

but 1

know

that

in

Lake Ulmen

there

are

fish

of pure gold.'

Wager your head on it, as

you

have nothing else to wager, and

they will wager their shops, with

all

the

contain,

precious wares they in the market-place.

Then, take a silken net, come

down here

and

cast times into the lake."

it

three

With that,

the

king disap-

He was so successful that he

peared

beneath the water and

sailed back to Russia, his ships

Sadko, greatly surprised

re-

laden with gold and silver and

turned home.

pearls.

All

was

fine

until

a

Immediately, he was asked to

great storm blew

up.

play at the feast of a

rich mer-

" We have journeyed far and

chant.

He accepted and every-

have paid the King of the Blue

thing happened as the

King of

Seas

no

tribute,' 1

said Sadko,

the Blue Seas had said. Sadko's

so they threw gold and silver

wager was accepted and he led

overboard, but still the storm

the merchants down to the lake.

continued.

Three times he cast his silk net

" It is not gold or silver, but

into the water and each time he

one

of

us

the

king wants,"

drew up a golden fish.

The

said Sadko at last, so each man

astonished

merchants had

to

wrote his name

on a tablet of

hand

over

their

shops

and

lead and threw it overboard.

goods.

All of them floated but Sadko's.

Now Sadko held great feasts

That sank to the bottom, so

and he soon became as boastful

Sadko took his

balalaika and

as

the

others.

One

day

he

made his men put him over-

boasted that he could buy up

board, clinging to an oak plank.

all the goods in Novgorod for

a whole month, so great was

He sank to the bottom of the sea and there was the King of

his wealth.

If he lost, he

would

the Blue Seas, waiting to wel-

come him.

I

am

glad

you

pay tribute,"

pay the city of Novgorod thirty

thousand roubles.

days,

 

"

have come to

For the first few

his

said the king.

"

Play for me

servants bought up everything

for sale, but always more was

frittering away his wealth need-

to dance." Sadko played and the king

and his court danced.

As the

brought from the cities around and Sadko realised that he was

dancing grew livelier the whole ocean shook and the ships were

lessly, so he paid the city thirty

thousand roubles, took all the goods he had bought and s sailed

dashed by great waves. As Sadko played an old man crept up to him and whispered

away,

to

sell

them in

lands

in

his

ear,

" If you

wish

to

across the sea.

 

escape and return to your home,

" Please tell me how," said

the wedding, so that he could serenade his bride.

Sadko.

That night, when he went to

" The king will offer you a lovely princess as your bride,"

bed,

deep

once sleep and when he awoke

a

he

fell

at

into

said

the old

man.

" Do

not

he was lying on the outskirts

refuse

or you will anger him

of Novgorod.

Sailing

up the

but do not kiss her, or even

river towards

 

him

came

his

touch her, or you will never

ships.

The sailors rejoiced

to

escape.

Then break the strings

see him for they had left him

of your balalaika and tell the

in the middle of the ocean and

king you must return home for

they thought that he had been

some more."

 

drowned

in

the

storm.

They

Sadko did as the old

man

sailed

together

 

into

the

city,

told him.

He pretended to be

where they unloaded the ships

delighted

with

the

lovely

and found that Sadko was far

princess whom the king offered

richer than when he went away.

as

his

bride,

but he

told

the

Sadko, however, was content

king that he was sad, for the

now to stay at home and

he

 

strings

of his balalaika

had

never again sailed out on to

broken and

he

must

return

home

for some more,

before

the blue sea in search of wealth or adventure.

THE KIND

LITTLE SISTER

 

Once upon a time on a tropi- cal island in the Pacific Ocean, there lived three sisters. One day they decided to go fishing and taking some taro, the root of

be

that can

a case they felt hungry, they set

plant

eaten,

in

off along a forest path in single

file.

By and by, the eldest sister,

who was some way ahead of

the others, came across a snake that was lying on the path. The

snake raised its head and said,

"I am very hungry.

Will you

chew a little of the taro in your hand, so that I can eat it?"

"Certainly not," replied the "My food is not for any-

girl.

thing

as

nasty

as

a

snake,"

and so saying she walked away.

Presently,

the second

sister

came to where the snake was

lying across

the

path.

The

snake raised its head and said,

"Would you chew a little of the

The snake raised

its head

taro root you are holding and

and said, "Do not be afraid."

give it to me, for I am

very

 

hungry?"

"I will do no such

thing,"

 

replied the girl.

"This food is

mine and I have no intention of sharing it with anybody else,

especially a snake."

 

It was not long before the

 

third and youngest sister came skipping down the path. The snake raised its head and

said, "Do not be afraid of me.

1 only wish to eat some of the

taro you are holding in your

hand. Perhaps you could chew

some of it for me."

 

"You

can

certainly

share

some of my

taro with

me,"

replied the girl.

She sat down beside the snake

 

and

chewed the

root

until

it

was soft enough for the snake

 

to eat.

When it had finished

 

-

.

A

i

eating

she asked

like some more.

if it would

"I am

 

"No thank

you," replied the snake.

no longer hungry, but tell me,

where were you going to when I stopped you?"

"I was going to the river to fish", replied the young girl.

you can."

"Well,

here

is

a

piece

of

There was no sign of her

advice that you would be wise

sisters when the young girl rea-

to

listen to,"

said

the snake.

ched

the

river,

so she settled

"When you hear the noise of

down on the bank and cast out

thunder once in the heavens,

the noise of thunder twice, then

her fishing line.

Suddenly, she

heard a roll of thunder and she

you can fish, but if you hear

remembered what the snake had

climb the nearest hill as fast as

told her. She carried on fishing,

but suddenly there was a second

slithered

out

of

the

under-

roll

of thunder and

the

sky

growth.

 

became very dark.

Within a

 

"Well,

where

 

are

your

few minutes the rain was pou-

sisters?" it said.

 

ring down and the water was

 

"I do not know," replied the

rapidly rising in the river. Re-

girl,

with

tears

in

her

eyes,

membering the snake's words

"perhaps they have been swept

the girl picked up her

basket

out to sea by the great flood,"

of fish and hurried to the nea-

rest hill.

 

"No - doubt they have," said

been kind to me when I begged

To thank the snake for war-

As she looked down on the

forest around her she saw great

the snake, "but if only they had

trees being swept away by floods of water and all the animals rushing for shelter.

When the storm had finished

for food perhaps they would be here now."

ning her, the little girl took two

and the flood water had drained

of

the

largest fish

from

her

away she ran down the hill and

basket and gave them to the

into the forest, calling her sis-

snake.

Gripping the bundle

ters' names as she went.

She

in

its mouth it slithered

back

had

not

gone far

when

the

into the undergrowth and dis-

snake which had spoken to her,

appeared.

WHAT IS EDELWEISS?

 

This

fs

a

Swiss alpine plant

 

which

is equally

at

home in

English

rock gardens. Shaped

like

a

small

rosette,

it

has

narrow leaves covered with long,

 

silky-white hairs. The edelweiss

is

really

a

herb that flowers

every year and is a member of the aster family. The flowers of

this plant are white.

Its name.

Edelweiss, means noble-white.

THE MISTLETOE

AND THE SUN-GOD

This is one of the tales of the gods who lived

 

far above the world, in Asgard,

which was told

by the

Norsemen, the people who

lived

in

Scandinavia over a thousand years ago.

 

Of all the gods who lived in

for it distressed him so much.

Asgard, there was none more

In the dream

he

was killed,

gay and happy than Balder, the

but he never knew who killed

young and handsome sun-god.

him.

He knew only that the

Balder had a twin

brother,

gods could do nothing to save

whose name was Hod.

He was

him from his fate.

 

the god of darkness and he was

 

Balder*s wife 1 went at once to

not gay like his brother, for he

Odin and Frigg, the king and

was blind.

Hod was always

queen

of the gods and

told

sad, for he could

not

see

to

them what

Balder

had

said.

join in the sport and adventures

Odin and Frigg, who were also

of the others and he was very

Balder's parents, called a great

lonely, for the others often for-

council

of

all

the gods and

got about him.

goddesses,

to

discuss

what

However, there came a time

should be done to protect Bal-

when

Balder was

no

longer

der.

happy and carefree.

He grew

Before the council

met, Odin

pale and sad and ceased to join

went up to his watch-tower and

sat

on

the great throne from

in the merry sports of the others.

which he could look down and

His wife asked him what was troubling him and Balder rep-

see all things and he saw that

lied that he had a strange dream

in the underworld, the home of

which came again

and

again

the

dead,

the

great

hall

had

and which he could not forget,

been swept and the tables set

with cups as if for a feast.

It

was clear to

him

that

in the

underworld they were preparing receive an" honoured

to

guest

and it was with a heavy heart

that Odin made his way to the council.

The debate was a long one, for Balder was well loved and

the gods wished to ensure his

safety.

It

was finally decided

that he would only be comple-

tely safe if all things, fire, water,

trees,

plants, rocks,

the

earth

and its metals, birds and ani-

mals, sickness and plagues, pro-

mised

not

to

harm

him,

so

Frigg sent her messengers to al!

of them and each one in turn

promised that no harm should

come to her son.

When

they

were

sure

that

nothing had been left out, they returned to the other gods once

more and the gods were happy

again, for they were sure now

that Balder could not be hurt.

It became a great sport to hurl

sticks

and

weapons at

stones

and

sharp

Balder,

for

they

would only glance off him and

hone would harm him.

Only

Loki

was unhappy.

Loki, the red-haired god of fire

was jealous of the beautiful sun-god.

bright and

Balder,

for

the sun is always brighter and

 

"Here, take this dart and I will guide your aim," said Loki.

better-loved than fire. Always

halla.

Only the mistletoe had

Lbki sought to harm

Balder,

not given its

promise

not

to

but all things had given Frigg

hurt Balder, for it seemed such

their promise

and

he

never

a weak little thing that it could

succeeded.

do no harm and no-one had

At last, angry at

his failure,

bothered to ask

it.

Loki set out

uised

as an

When Loki found this out,

old woma'-

1 something

he cut a little branch of the

: ch b-

looked and

mistletoe and

made it

into

a

ts promise,

sharp-pointed dart.

Then he

ide, asking

went to

find

the

rest

of the

ind, until

gods,

who

were busy playing

tiny

mis-

their favourite game, throwing

und the

weapons

at

Balder while

he

iak

tree

stood there, laughing and un-

: