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SCHOOL OF MECHANICAL AND BUILDING SCIENCES

CURRICULUM

and

SYLLABI

B.Tech Civil Engineering


Curriculum - B.Tech. Civil Engineering
Breakup of courses

Category Curriculum Credits

University Core 33

University Elective 6

Programme Core 128

Programme Elective 15

Total 182

Breakup of Category

Curriculum
Category Curriculum % Recommended %
Credits

Engineering 115 66.1 64

Humanities 11 6.3 8

Management 9 5.2 8

Sciences 39 22.4 20

Sub Total 174

University Elective 6

Co / Extra curricular activity 2

Total 182 100 100

2
CURRICULUM
University Core
Course
Course Title L T P C Area Pre-requisite
Code

VIT EPT (or)


ENG101 English for Engineers I 2 0 2 3 Humanities
ENG001

ENG102 English for Engineers II 2 0 2 3 Humanities ENG101


CHY104 Environmental Studies 3 0 0 3 Science -
CHY101 Engineering Chemistry 3 0 2 4 Science -
FRE101/
GER101/ 2 0 0 2
Foreign Language Humanities -
JAP101 /
CHI101
Multivariable Calculus and
MAT114 3 1 0 4 Science -
Differential Equations
Computer Programming and -
CSE101/
Problem Solving 2 0 2 3 Engineering
ITE101
Problem Solving using C
PHY101 Modern Physics 3 0 2 4 Science -

Hum121 Ethics and values 3 0 0 3 Management -

CLE498 Comprehensive Examination - - - 2 Engineering -


CLE497 Co/ Extra curricular activity - - - 2 - -

Total Credits: 33

University Elective*

Course
Course Title L T P C
Code

University Elective I 3 0 0 3

University Elective II 3 0 0 3

Total Credits: 6

3
Programme Core
Course
Course Title L T P C Area Pre-requisite
Code
MAT104 Probability and Statistics 3 1 0 4 Science MAT101
MAT105 Differential and Difference Equations 3 1 0 4 Science MAT101
Complex variables and partial
MAT201 3 1 0 4 Science MAT105
Differential Equations
MAT205 Applied Numerical methods 3 1 0 4 Science MAT201
PHY102 Material Science 3 0 2 4 Science -
Materials and Instrumental -
CHY102
Techniques 3 0 2 4 Science
MEE107 Engineering Drawing 0 0 4 2 Engineering None
MEE102 Workshop Practice I 0 0 2 1 Engineering None
MEE104 Workshop Practice II 0 0 2 1 Engineering MEE102
CLE201 Engineering Mechanics 2 1 0 3 Engineering MAT101
CLE202 Engineering Geology 2 0 0 2 Engineering None
CLE203 Strength of Materials 2 1 2 4 Engineering MAT101
Construction Materials and 3 0 0 3 Engineering None
CLE204
Technology
CLE205 Soil Mechanics 2 1 2 4 Engineering MAT101
MEE206 Fluid Mechanics 2 1 2 4 Engineering None
CLE206 Concrete Technology 2 0 2 3 Engineering CLE204
CLE207 Surveying 2 1 2 4 Engineering MAT101
CLE208 Structural Analysis 2 1 0 3 Engineering CLE203, CLE201
CLE209 Building Drawing 0 0 4 2 Engineering MEE101, CLE204
CLE301 Reinforced Concrete Structures 2 1 2 4 Engineering CLE203, CLE208
CLE216 Advanced Structural Analysis 2 1 2 4 Engineering CLE208
CLE302 Highway Engineering 2 1 0 3 Engineering CLE204
CLE214 Hydraulic Structures and Machinery 2 1 2 4 Engineering MEE206
CLE303 Foundation Engineering 2 1 0 3 Engineering CLE204
CLE304 Fundamentals of Structural Designs 3 0 0 3 Engineering CLE203, CLE208
CLE217 Environmental Engineering 3 0 2 4 Engineering CHY104
CLE305 Quantity Surveying and Estimating 2 0 0 2 Engineering CLE209
Approval of
CLE398 Mini Project 0 0 4 2 Engineering
PM/FA is required
CLE399 Industrial Internship 0 0 4 2 Engineering None
CLE401 Design of Steel Structures 3 0 2 4 Engineering CLE304
3 0 2 4 Engineering CLE202, CLE214,
CLE316 Water Resources Engineering

CLE211 Construction Management 3 0 0 3 Management CLE204

HUM101 Psychology and Sociology 3 0 0 3 Humanities None

CLE319 Operations Research 3 0 0 3 Management MAT104


CLE499 Project Work 20 Engineering -
Total Credits: 128

4
Programme Electives (5 courses x 3 = 15 credits)

Course Area
Course Title L T P C Prerequisite
Code
CLE306 Advanced Fluid Mechanics 2 1 0 3 Engineering MEE206
CLE307 Advanced Surveying 3 0 0 3 Engineering CLE207
CLE210 Air and Noise Pollution 2 1 0 3 Engineering CHY-104
CLE308 Applications of Matrix Methods in Structural
2 1 0 3 Engineering CLE208
Analysis
CLE309 Architecture and Town Planning 3 0 0 3 Engineering None
CLE218 Atmospheric Processes and Climate Change 3 0 0 3 Science None
CLE310 Design of Concrete Structures 2 1 0 3 Engineering CLE301
CLE311 Earthquake Engineering 2 1 0 3 Engineering CLE301
CLE213 Economics 3 0 0 3 Management None
CLE312 Economics and Business Finance for Civil
3 0 0 3 Management None
Engineers
CLE313 Environmental Impact Assessment 3 0 0 3 Engineering CHY104
CLE212 Fundamentals of Energy, Environment and
3 0 0 3 Engineering None
climate Change
CLE215 GIS and Remote Sensing CLE202,
2 0 2 3 Engineering
CLE207
CLE315 Ground Improvement Techniques 3 0 0 3 Engineering CLE205
CLE402 Ground water Engineering 3 0 0 3 Engineering CLE316
CLE325 Highway Pavement Design 2 1 0 3 Engineering CLE302
CLE317 Hydrology 3 0 0 3 Engineering None
CLE314 Industrial Wastes Treatment and Disposal 2 1 0 3 Engineering CHY104
CLE318 Mass Transport Management 2 1 0 3 Engineering None
Operation and Management of Irrigation
CLE403 2 1 0 3 Engineering CLE316
Systems
CLE320 Pollution Control and Monitoring 2 1 0 3 Engineering CHY104
CLE219 Renewable Sources of Energy 2 1 0 3 Engineering CHY104
CLE404 Seismic Design of Structures 2 1 0 3 Engineering CLE301
CLE205,
CLE405 Soil Dynamics and Machine Foundation 2 1 0 3 Engineering
CLE303
CLE321 Structures on Expansive Soils 2 1 0 3 Engineering CLE205
MAT104,
CLE322 Systems Approach in Engineering Design 2 1 0 3 Engineering
MAT105
CLE406 Traffic Engineering 2 1 0 3 Engineering CLE302
CLE323 Transport Planning and Management 2 1 0 3 Engineering None
CLE407 Transportation Engineering 3 0 0 3 Engineering CLE302
CLE324 Natural Disaster Mitigation and Management 3 0 0 3 Engineering None
Engineering CLE205,
CLE409 Advanced Foundation Engineering 2 1 0 3
CLE303
CLE327 Solid Waste Management 3 0 0 3 Engineering CHY104
CLE326 Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering 3 0 0 3 Engineering CLE205
Global Position System (GPS) 3 0 0 3 Engineering None

Total Credits: 15

5
CLE 201 ENGINEERING MECHANICS

Course Prerequisites: MAT-101

Objectives:
1. To calculate the reactive forces
2. To analyse the structures
3. To know the geometric properties of different cross sections
4. To know the method of virtual work

Outcome: Student will be able to


1. Formulate the equilibrium forces
2. Identifying the method of analysis to be used
3. Understand the principles of Virtual work
4. Calculate the sectional properties of the different geometric shapes

Contents:
Introduction To Mechanics & Equilibrium of Forces
Structural Analysis
Friction
Properties of Surfaces and Solids
Virtual Work
UNIT I
Fundamental Principles - Vectorial Representation of Forces and Moments Coplanar forces - Resolution and
Composition of forces and equilibrium of particles - Forces of a particle in space - Equivalent system of forces -
Principle of transmissibility - Single equivalent force - Free body diagram - Equilibrium of rigid bodies in two
dimensions and three dimensions

UNIT II
Plane trusses - Method of joints - Method of sections Tension coefficient method.

UNIT III
Characteristics of dry friction Problems involving dry friction Wedges Frictional forces on Square threaded screws
Flat belt Journal bearing Collar bearing Pivot bearings and Discs Rolling resistance problems involving
sliding and rolling frictions.
UNIT IV

Centroid - First moment of area Theorems of Pappus and Guldinus Second moment of area moment and Product
of inertia of plane areas Transfer Theorems - Polar moment of inertia Principal axes Mass moment of inertia

UNIT V
Definition of work and virtual work Principle of virtual work for a particle and rigid body Principle of virtual work
for system of connected rigid bodies Degrees of Freedom - Conservative forces Potential energy Potential energy
criteria for equilibrium Types of equilibrium

Text Book:
1. Timoshenko.S & Young.D.H, (1998), Engineering Mechanics, McGraw Hill International Edition.

Reference Books:
1. Tayal.A.K (2002), Engineering Mechanics Statics and Dynamics , Umesh publications.
2. Irving H. Shames (2003), Engineering Mechanics - Statics and Dynamics, Prentice-Hall of India private limited.
3. Lakshmana Rao (2004), Engineering Mechanics Statics & Dynamics, Prentice-Hall of India.

Mode of Evaluation: Assignment, Seminar and Written Examination.

6
CLE 202-ENGINEERING GEOLOGY
L T P C
Course Prerequisites: NONE 2 0 0 2

Objectives:
1. The overall objective of the lecture portion of Engineering Geology is to demonstrate the importance of
Geology in making engineering decisions
2. Introduce the fundamentals of the engineering properties of earth materials for the use of civil
engineering constructions
3. Develop quantitative skills and a frame work for solving basic engineering geology problems

Expected Outcome: Students will be able to


1. Characterise of the engineering properties of rocks and soils
2. Assess the geological hazards
3. Use seismic and electrical methods to investigate the subsurface and
4. Develop a native construction plan incorporating all relevant aspects of geology

UNIT I: Minerals and Rocks


Relevance and importance of Engineering Geology of Civil Engineers, Minerals, their physical properties - rock
forming minerals, physical and engineering properties of igneous, metaphoric and sedimentary rocks.

UNIT II: Interior and Structures of earth


Earths interior based on seismic models, plate tectonics and continental drift, study of earths structures fold, faults
and joints, geological factors affecting Civil Engineering constructions, geological maps, and their uses

UNIT III: Weathering and Soils


The atmosphere, rock decay and weathering, soil origin and formation classification and its engineering importance,
slope stability rock and soil slopes stability analysis landslides - cause and remedial measures

UNIT IV: Ground Water


Characteristic of ground water, hydrogeological cycle, types of aquifers, water level fluctuations, surface and
subsurface geophysical methods, groundwater contamination, artificial recharge of groundwater and harvesting of
rainwater.

UNIT V: Earth Processes and Remote sensing


Brief description on geological hazards -cause and formation of flood, cyclone, Volcano, earthquake, tsunami,
Introduction to Remote sensing and Geographical Information System

Text Books:
1. Chenna Kesavulu N (2009), Textbook of Engineering Geology, Macmillan Publishers India Ltd, 2nd Edition
2. Parbin Singh,(2010), Engineering & General Geology, S.K.Kataria and Sons- Delhi, 7th Edition

Reference Books:
1. Garg. S.K. (2004), Physical and Engineering Geology, Khanna Publishers. Delhi
2. Blyth Edward Arnold F.G.H (1998), A Geology for Engineers, (7th Edition)
3. H.H.Reed and F. Rutly (1960), Elements of Mineralogy, Thomas Murby, London.
4. G.W.Tyrrell (1978), The Principles of petrology, Asia Publishing House, Bombay
5. M.P.Billings (1972), Structural Geology, Prentice Hall, Eaglewood Cliffs
6. David. .K. Todd John Wily & Sons Inc, Ground Water Hydrology (2005), 3rd Edition, New York

Mode of Evaluation: Assignment, Seminar and Written Examination.

7
CLE 203 STRENGTH OF MATERIALS
L T P C
2 1 2 4
Course Prerequisites: MAT-101

Objectives:
1. To know the concept of stresses and strains
2. To know the concept of shear force and bending moment
3. To draw the SFD & BMD
4. To calculate deflection in beams and trusses

Expected Outcome : Students will be able to


1. Understand the concepts of stress and strain
2. Determine the internal forces in the beams
3. Formulate the expressions for deflection
4. Identify the behaviour of columns

UNIT I : Stresses and Strains


Stress and strain - Hookes law -tension -compression and shear- composite bars- elastic constants- principal stresses
and strains, Mohrs circle, torsion, solid and hollow circular shaft simple problems.

UNIT II: Shear Force and Bending Moment


Types of beams and supports, shear force and bending moment diagram, bending stress and shear stress in beams.

UNIT III: Deflection of Beams


Theory of bending, deflection of beams by Macaulays method, moment area method and conjugate beam method.

UNIT IV: Strain Energy


Stain energy, Castiglianos theorem, calculation of deflection in statically determinate beams and trusses, Unit load
methods, Williot Mohrs diagram.

UNIT V: Theory of Columns


Theory of columns long column and short column, Eulers formula, Rankines formula, Secant formula, beam
column.

Text Book :
1. S.Ramamrutham & R.Narayanan (2005), Strength of Materials, Dhanpat Rai publications.

Reference Books:
1. Gere & Thimoshenko (2004), Mechanics of Materials, CBS Publishers & Distributors.
2. R.K.Bansal (2005), Strength of Materials, Laxmi Publications.
3. Kukreja C.B. (2005), Structural Mechanics, Vol. I, (Determinate Structures), Standard Publisher
Distributors, New Delhi.
4. Billings (2006), Structural Geology, Prentic-Hall of India.

Mode of Evaluation: Assignment, Seminar and Written Examination.

8
CLE 203 STRENGTH OF MATERIALS LAB
Course Prerequisites: MAT-101

Objectives:
1. To gain experience regarding the determination of creep property of the materials and understand how this
property varies with time
2. To provide an opportunity to learn how to measure hardness of materials and analyze how heat treatment
affects the hardening
3. To impart knowledge on phase development of two isomorphous metals
4. To determine the phases present in a material using XRD graph

Expected Outcome: Student will be able to


1. Interpret the hardness curve measured after heat treatment
2. Correlation between material structure and its creep property
3. Index XRD plot and determine the phases
4. Perform non destructive failure analysis
Details of Experiments

I. TEST ON METALS

1. Tension Test (IS 432 Part 1 : 1982)


2. Shear Test
3. Hardness test (Rockwell IS 1586:1988, Brinell IS 1500 : 1983)
4. Torsion Test (IS 15453 2004)
5. Impact Test (Charpy IS 1499 -1977, Izod IS 1598-1977)
6. Cold Bend Test
7. Ductility Test (IS 432 Part I : 1982)
8. Fatigue Test

II. TESTS ON TIMBER (IS1708 Part 5 : 1986)

III. TESTS ON STRUCTURAL COMPONENTS

1. Spring Test
2. Column Test
3. Beam Test (IS 456 2000)
4. Deflection Test (IS 456 2000)

Reference Books:
1. Strength of Materials Lab Manual Prepared by VIT Staff.
2. H.E.Davis, Trophell, G.E. & Hanck, G.F.W. (1998), The Testing of Engineering Materials, McGraw Hill
International Book Company.
3. Timoshenko, S.P. & Young, D.H. (1998), Strength of Materials, East West Press Limited.
4. Relevant BIS Codes

Mode of Evaluation : Experiments/Record Work/Oral/Practical Examinations.

9
CLE 204 CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGY
L T P C
Course Prerequisites: NONE 3 0 0 3

Course Objectives:
1. To teach students about the Physical and Mechanical properties of construction materials and
their respective testing procedure.
2. To teach students about the building materials available in market to be used for many
components of building industry.
3. To teach students about the principles and methods to be followed in constructing various components of a building.
4. To teach students about the deterioration and repair of buildings.

Course Outcomes:
1. Learn and identify the relevant physical and mechanical properties pertaining to the construction industry.
2. Demonstrate the relevant BIS testing procedure to be carried out to ascertain the quality of building
materials.
3. Develop ability to choose the modern construction material appropriate to the climate and functional
aspects of the buildings.
4. Ability to supervise the construction technique to be followed in brick, stone and hollow block masonry,
concreting, flooring, roofing, plastering and painting etc.
5. Learn about the causes of deterioration, crack pattern, and assessment of damages.
6. Learn about the construction techniques in repairing of buildings.

Contents:
Properties & Testing of Materials
Properties of Miscellaneous Materials
Brick Masonry
Thermal Insulation Materials
Repairs and Rehabilitation of Structures

UNIT I: Sources of Aggregates & Properties


Physical and Mechanical properties of construction materials - commonly used types of stones - Tests for
stones, road aggregates and concrete aggregates, properties of sand, BIS specification for testing of
aggregates Bricks Properties and testing methods for Bricks.
UNIT II: Modern Construction Materials
Structural Steel and Aluminium Roofing Material Physical descriptions of asbestos sheets, GI sheets,
tubes and light weight roofing materials - Timber - Types, Seasoning and various products Modern
materials Neoprene, thermocole, decorative panels and laminates, architectural glass and ceramics,
ferrocement, PVC, polymer base materials, fibre reinforced plastics.
UNIT III: Flooring & Roofing Materials
Principles of construction Bonding Reinforced brick work Stone masonry Hollow block masonry -
Pointing - Plastering DPC Floor and Roof Construction: Floors, General Principles Types of floors
Floor coverings Types of roofs.
UNIT IV: Prefabricated buildings
Sound insulations Ventilations Fire resisting construction Prefabricated panels and structures
production, transportation and erection of structures

UNIT V: Construction Damages & Repair Techniques


Causes of deterioration crack pattern Assessment of damages methods of repairs and rehabilitation.

10
Text Book :
1. S.C. Rangwala (2002), Building Materials, Charotar Publishing House.

Reference Books:
1. Arora.S.P & Bindra.S.P. (2002), Building Construction.
2. Sharma & Kaul (1998), Building Construction, S.Chand & Company Pvt, New Delhi.
3. Shetty, M.S (2002), Concrete Technology, S. Chand & Company Ltd.

Mode of Evaluation: Assignment, Seminar and Written Examination.

11
L T P C
CLE 205 SOIL MECHANICS 2 1 2 4

Course Prerequisites: MAT-101

Objectives:
1. To impart the fundamental concepts of soil mechanics
2. To understand the bearing capacity
3. To know the importance of index properties like grain size, consistency limits, soil classification
4. To understand the concept of compaction and consolidation of soils

Expected Outcome : Students will be able to


1. Identify the properties for good foundation sites
2. Students should be able to find permeability of soil.
3. Know the importance engineering properties such as Consolidation, Shear strength.

UNIT I : Weight volume relations and Index properties


Importance of geotechnical engineering 3-phase diagram Weight-volume relations Index properties of soils
Simple soil engineering tests - Atterbergs limits Classification of soils Theory of compaction.

UNIT II: Soil water and Permeability


Soil water - Effective and neutral stresses Flow of water through soils Permeability Darcys law Seepage and
flow-nets - Quick sand.

UNIT III: Stress distribution in soils


Vertical pressure distribution = Boussinesqs equation for point load and uniformly distributed loads of different
shapes Newmarks influence chart Westergaards equation Isobar diagram Pressure bulb - Contact pressure

UNIT IV: Compressibility and Consolidation


Compressibility e-log p curve Preconsolidation pressure - Primary consolidation Terzaghis consolidation theory -
Laboratory consolidation test Determination of Cv by Taylors and Casagrandes methods

UNIT V: Shear strength of soils


Stress analysis by Mohrs circle - Mohrs strength theory Shear strength of soils Mohr-Coloumb strength envelope
Laboratory shear tests Direct shear test Triaxial compression Unconfined compression test Vane shear test
Shear strength of saturated cohesive soils Shear strength of cohesionless soils - conditions for liquefaction

Text Book:
1. Dr.K.R.Arora (2001), Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering, Standard Publishers, Delhi 110 006.

Reference Books:
1. Shashi K Gulhati & Manoj Datta (2005), Geotechnical Engineering Principles and Practices Pearson Education
Ltd.
2. Prasad (2006),Soil Dynamics & Earth Quake Engineering, Prentice-Hall of India.
3. Varghese (2006), Foundation Engineering, Prentice Hall of India.
4. Donald P Coduto (2002), Geotechnical Engineering Principles and practices, Pearson Education Ltd.

Mode of Evaluation: Assignment, Seminar and Written Examination.

12
CLE 205 SOIL MECHANICS LAB

Course Prerequisites: MAT-101

Objectives:
1. To gain experience regarding the determination of properties of different types of soils and understand how
they behave
2. To provide an opportunity to learn how to measure the shear strength of the soil and its importance
3. To impart knowledge about the foundation engineering

Expected Outcome : Student will be able to


1. Determine the index properties of the soil
2. Classify the soil
3. Indetify the suitability of the soil for different foundations

Details of Experiments

1. Determination of Moisture Content. (IS 2720 Part 2 1973 Water Content)


2. Determination of Specific Gravity & Relative Density for sand. (IS 2720 part 3 section 1 & 2 specific gravity,
IS 2720 Part 14 1983 determination of density index)
3. Sieve Analysis for Coarse Grained soil (IS 2720 Part 4 -1985 grain size analysis)
4. Consistency Limits and Indices (IS 2720 part 5 1985 determination of liquid limit & plastic limit)
5. Standard Proctors Compaction Test (IS 2720 part 15 1986 consolidation properties)
6. Field Density Test (IS 2720 Part 27 & 28 1975 Dry density in place by sand replacement & core cutter
method)
7. Permeability Test (IS 2720 Part 17 & 36 1987 Determination of permeability)
8. Unconfined Compression Test for Cohesive Soil (IS 2720 Part 10 1991 Unconfined Compressive Strength)
9. Vane Shear Strength for Cohesive Soil (IS 2720 Part 30 1980 Laboratory vane shear test)
10. Direct Shear Test on Sand (IS 2720 Part 13 1986 Direct shear test)
11. California Bearing Ratio Test (IS 2720 Part 16 -1987 laboratory determination of CBR)
12. Triaxial Compression Test (IS 2720 Part 11 & 12 1983 Triaxial test)
13. Consolidation Test (Consolidation Properties)

Reference Books:
1. Geo technical Lab Manual Prepared by VIT Staff.
2. Lambe T.N. (1997), Soil Testing for Engineers, John Wiley Ltd.
3. T.K.Bowles (1998), Engineering Properties of Soils and their measurements, Tata McGraw Hill Publications

Mode of Evaluation : Experiments/Record Work/Oral/Practical Examinations.

13
MEE206 FLUID MECHANICS 2 1 2 4

Prerequisite None
Objectives: 1. The aim of this course is to introduce and explain basic fundamentals of Fluid
Mechanics, which is used in the applications of Aerodynamics, Hydraulics, Marine
Engineering, Gas dynamics etc. Also to learn fluid properties and hydrostatic law to
understand the importance of flow measurement and its applications in Industries and
to obtain the loss of flow in a flow system.
2. The development of boundary layers and advancement of practical hydraulics and
understanding the concept of advanced fluid mechanics.
Expected Student will be able to
Outcome: 1. To find frictional losses in a pipe when there is a flow between two places.
2. Calculate the conjugate depths in a flow.
3. Analyse the model and the prototype.
4. Find the dependent and independent parameters for a model of fluid flow.
5. Explain the various methods available for the boundary layer separation.
Unit I Fluid Properties and Hydrostatics
Density Viscosity Surface tension compressibility capillarity Hydrostatic forces on plane
inclined and curved surfaces buoyancy centre of buoyancy metacentre.
Unit II Fluid Dynamics
Control volume Fluid Kinematics - Types of flows; Steady flow, Unsteady flow, Uniform and Non
Uniform flow, Rotational flow, Irrotational flow, 1-D, 2-D, 3-D flows Streamline and Velocity
potential lines- Euler and Bernoullis equations and their applications moment of momentum
Momentum and Energy correction factors Impulse Momentum equation-Navier-Stokes Equations-
Applications.
Unit III Open Channel Flow
Flow through pipes Open Channels and Measurement pipe flow: Darcys law Minor losses Multi
reservoir problems pipe network design Moodys diagram Hagen Poiseuille equation Turbulent
flow.
Specific Energy Critical flow concept specific force Hydraulic jump uniform flow and gradually
varying flow concepts. Measurement of pressure flow velocity through pipes and open channels.
Unit IV Dimensional Analysis
Dimensional homogeneity Raleigh and Buckingham theorems Non-dimensional numbers Model
laws and distorted models-Unit quantities-Specific quantities
Unit V Boundary layers
Boundary layers Laminar flow and Turbulent flow Boundary layer thickness momentum
Integral equation Drag and lift-Separation of boundary layer-Methods of separation of boundary layer
Text Books
1. Dr.R.K.Bansal, (2000), Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machines, Laxmi Publication (P) Ltd., New
Delhi.
References
1. P.N.Modi and S.M.Seth (1999), Hydraulics and Fluid Mechanics including Hydraulic Machines,
Standard Book House, Naisarak, Delhi.
2. Vijay Gupta and S.K.Gupta, (1999), Fluid Mechanics and Applications, New-Age International Ltd.
3. D.S. Kumar,(2004), Fluid Mechanics and Fluid Power Engineering, Katson Publishing House,
Delhi.
4. V.L. Streeter, (2001), Fluid Mechanics, McGraw Hill Book Co.
Mode of Evaluation Quiz/Assignment/ Seminar/Written Examination

14
MEE206L FLUID MECHANICS LAB
Objectives: 1. To enable students understand the properties of fluid, types of fluid and
types of flow.
2. To teach students about flow measuring devices such as orifice meter
and venture.
3. To help the students acquire knowledge about flow through pipes.
Expected Student will be able to
Outcome: 1. Analyze various flow problems and fluid characteristics.
2. Determine the losses of flow through various mediums like pipes.
3. Apply the concept of fluid mechanics to design various systems.
Experiments
1. Flow through Orifice
a) Constant Head Method
b) Variable Head Method
2. Flow through Mouth Piece
a) Constant Head Method
b) Variable Head Method
3. Flow through Triangular Notch
4. Flow through Rectangular Notch
5. Flow through Venturimeter
6. Flow through Orifice Meter
7. Flow through Pipes
8. Flow through Annulus Double pipe
9. Reynolds apparatus
10. Verification of Bernoullis Apparatus
11. Measurement of lift and drag of an aerofoil
12. Measurement of static pressure distribution around an aerofoil using wind tunnel
apparatus.
References Lab Manual Prepared by VIT Staff
Mode of Evaluation Experiments/Record work/Oral/ Practical Examination

15
CLE207 SURVEYING 2 1 2 4

Course Prerequisites MAT-101

Objectives 1. To teach the students basics of surveying and expose different techniques of
surveying.
2. To help the students to learn about Tacheometry, geodetic surveying, satellite
surveying
3. To teach students about types of errors encountered in different types of
surveying
Expected Outcomes Student will be able to:
1. Learn about basics involved in different types of surveying like tape, compass,
leveling, and Theodolite (total station).
2. Demonstrate skills in performing measurement of distance,angles, leveling, and
curve setting.
3. Develop skills for estimating distance between given points, area of a given plot
and earthwork involved in cuttings and fillings.
4. Develop skill to carry out tachometry, geodetic surveying wherever situation
demands.
5. Develop skills to apply error adjustment to the recorded reading to get an
accurate surveying output.
UNIT I Plane Surveying and Theodolite
Introduction to plane surveying, Chain and tape measurement, electronic distance measurement Meridians,
Azimuths and bearings Theodolites Temporary and permanent adjustment Horizontal and Vertical angle
measurements Electronic total station.
UNIT II Levelling and Contouring
Differential levelling, longitudinal & cross section levelling, refraction & curvature correction, reciprocal
leveling - Tacheometry Stadia tacheometry, tangential tacheometry & substance tacheometry- Contouring.
UNIT III Calculation of Earthwork and GPS
Area, volume calculation of earth work Plane table surveying - Introduction to Global positioning system
GPS surveying methods.
UNIT IV Curve Surveying
Definitions, designation of curve, elements of simple curve - settings of simple circular curve, compound and
reverse curve- transition curve Introduction to vertical curves.
UNIT V Geodetic surveying
Introduction to geodetic surveying, Triangulation surveying base line measurement & correction, satellite
station. Surveying adjustments principle of least square and adjustment of triangulation network.
Text Books
1. Punmia B.C. (1994), Surveying and Levelling, Vol. I & II, Laxmi Publications.
2. Subramaniyan R. (2007), Surveying and Levelling, Oxford University Press.
References
1. Roy S.K. (2004), Fundamentals of Surveying, Prentice Hall of India.
2. Kanetkar T.P. (1998), Surveying and Levelling, Part I & II, Pune.
3. Satheesh Gopi (2005) GPS Principles and Applications, Tata Mc Graw Hill publishing company Ltd.
Mode of Evaluation: Assignment/ Seminar/Written Examination.

16
CLE207 SURVEYING LABORATORY

Objectives 1. To help students to understand basics of linear and angular measurements in field using
surveying equipments.
2. To enable students in leveling techniques and contour map development.
3. To teach students to tacheometry.

Expected Outcome Student will be able to:


1. Develop skills to use electronic instruments for distance measurement.
2. Develop skills to use theodolite for horizontal and vertical angle measurement.
3. Develop skill to measure distance and angle with total station.
4. Learn to set out curves in filed.
5. Develop skills to prepare contour and topographic maps for different terrains.

Details of Experiments
1. Angle measurements using Theodolite (Horizontal & Vertical Angle)

2. Fly levelling Longitudinal & Cross Sectional levelling

3. Stadia tacheometry

4. Tangential Tacheometry

5. Curve setting Simple Circular Curve

6. Contouring

7. Distance & angular measurement with Total Station

8. Co-ordinates and distance measurement with GPS.

References
1. Surveying Practical Manual-I & II Prepared by VIT Staff.
2. Kanetkar.T.P. (1998), Surveying and Levelling, Vol. I and II., United Book Corporations.
3. Punmia (1994), Surveying and Levelling, Vol. I and II., Laxmi Publications.
Mode of Evaluation: Experiments/Record Work/Oral/Practical Examinations.

17
CLE 206 CONCRETE TECHNOLOGY
L T P C
2 0 2 3
Course Prerequisites: Construction Materials and Technology (CLE 204)

Objectives:
1. To know the types of cement, mineral and chemical admixtures, aggregates
2. To understand the properties of concrete.
3. To know the methodology of mix design.
Expected Outcome : Students will be able to
1. Identify the suitability of materials for the construction works.
2. Implement the special concreting methods required for Cold weather and Hot weather regions.

UNIT I: Properties of Cement


Cement - Manufacturing, Types of cement Properties of Cement - Testing of Cement Field Testing Laboratory
Testing methods Setting properties of cement soundness of cement fineness and compressive strength of cement
cement mortar tests - Heat of Hydration

UNIT II: Aggregates


Fine aggregate and coarse aggregate Properties and testing methods Bulking of Sand sieve analysis fineness
modulus - properties and uses.

UNIT III: Concrete Production


Selection of materials for concrete - water cement ratio - Properties of fresh concrete - workability measurement of
workability process of manufacture of concrete Statistical and quality control of concrete

UNIT IV: Strength of concrete


Strength of concrete gain of strength with age testing of hardened concrete - Compressive strength - Tensile
strength Flexural strength modulus of elasticity of concrete Introduction to NDT Techniques Stress and Strain
characteristics.

UNIT V: Mix design & Different types of concrete


Concrete mix design concepts variables in proportioning methods of mix design Indian Standard method, Factor
affecting the test results, Introduction to high performance concrete, high strength concrete, light weight concrete, Fibre
reinforced concrete

Text Books:

1. Shetty M.S. (2002), Concrete Technology, S. Chand & Company Ltd.


2. P.K.METHA (2005), Concrete: Microstructure, properties and Materials, Mcgraw-Hill.

Reference Books:
1. Neville.A.M. (2003), Properties of Concrete, Standard Publishers Distributors.
2. Varghese (2005), Limit State Design & Reinforced Concrete, Prentice-Hall of India.
3. IS : 12269-1987, Specification for 53 grade ordinary Portland Cement, BIS, New Delhi
4. IS : 383 1970, Specification for Coarse and fine natural sources for Concrete, BIS, New Delhi

Mode of Evaluation: Assignment, Seminar and Written Examination.

18
CLE 206 CONCRETE TECHNOLOGY LAB
Course Prerequisites: Construction Materials and Technology (CLE 204)

Objectives:
1. To gain experience regarding the determination of properties of different building materials
2. To provide an opportunity to learn how to measure the parameters which governs the quality of the materials
3. To impart knowledge in the area of finding the quality of the road materials

Expected Outcome : Student will be able to


1. Implement good quality construction techniques
2. Identify the quality of the materials used for construction
3. Identify the proportion of the mix design
4. Perform non destructive failure analysis

Details of Experiments

I. Tests on cement-specific gravity, fineness, soundness, consistency, initial and final setting time, compressive
strength of cement (IS : 4031)

II. Test on fine aggregate sieve analysis specific gravity bulking of sand (IS: 383 - 1970)

III. Test on coarse aggregate - sieve analysis specific gravity (IS : 3068 -1986)

IV. Concrete mix design ACI & IS methods (IS : 10262)

V. Tests on fresh and hardened concrete Slump test (IS : 7320 - 1974), Vee-bee test
(IS : 10510 - 1983), compaction factor test (IS : 5515 - 1983). Tests on cubes and cylinders
(IS : 456 - 2000) Determination of Youngs Modulus compressive strength, split tensile strength (IS : 5816 -
1999) and flexural strength of concrete

VI. Durability related properties (IS : 1126 - 1974)

VII. Introduction of Non-destructive tests (IS : 13805 - 1993)

Reference Books:

1. Concrete and Highway Engineering Laboratory Manual Prepared by VIT Staff.


2. Shetty.M.S (2002), Concrete Technology, S. Chand & Co., Ltd, Ramnagar.
3. IS: 10262 1987, Indian Standard specification for Methods of Mix design.
4. IS: 383 1987, Indian Standard specification for Test for Fine and Coarse aggregates.

Mode of Evaluation : Experiments/Record Work/Oral/Practical Examinations.

19
CLE 208 STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS
L T P C
Course Prerequisites: Engineering Mechanics (CLE 201) Strength of Materials 2 1 0 3
(CLE 203)

Objectives:
1. To understand the methodology of analysis
2. To know the different techniques available for the analysis of structures
3. To identify the best suitable method of analysis

Expected Outcome : Students will be able to


1. Understand the three moment theorem and its applications.
2. Use strain energy concepts in the analysis
3. Understand the importance of the force method and deflection method
4. Use the and influence line diagram.

-
UNIT I: Theorem of Three Moments
Static indeterminancy - Theorem of three moments- analysis of propped cantilevers- fixed & continuous beam -
bending moment and shear force diagram.

UNIT II: Strain Energy Method


Static indeterminancy - Strain energy method - analysis of indeterminate structures, beams, pin jointed and rigid jointed
structures - temperature effect - bending moment and shear force diagram.

UNIT III: Slope Deflection Method


Kinematic indeterminancy- Slope deflection method - analysis of continuous beams and portals - bending moment and
shear force diagram.

UNIT IV: Moment Distribution Method


Moment distribution method - analysis of continuous beams and portals - bending moment and shear force diagram.

UNIT V: Influence Line


Influence line - influence lines for bending moment and shear force, Muller Breaslaus - principle, determinate and
indeterminate beams - Maxwells reciprocal theorem,

Text Books:
1. Vazirani & Ratwani (2003), Analysis of Structures, Vol. 1 & II , Khanna publishers.

Reference Books:
1. S.Ramamrutham (2004), Theory of structures, Dhanpat Rai publications.
2. C.S.Reddy (2002), Structural Analysis, Tata McGraw Hill.
3. L.S.Negi (2003), Structural Analysis, Tata McGraw Hill Co.
4. Rajasekharan & Sankarasubramaiam (2000), Computational Structural Mechanics, Prentice-Hall of India.
5. B.C.Punnia, Ashok kumar Jain & Arun Kumar Jain (2005), Theory of Structures, Laxmi Publications, India.

Mode of Evaluation: Assignment, Seminar and Written Examination.

L T P C
20
CLE 209 BUILDING DRAWING 1 0 2 2

Course Prerequisites: Engineering graphics I (MEE101) and Construction Materials and Technology (CLE 204)

Objectives:
1. To understand the regulations as per National Building Code
2. To identify the functional requirements and building rules.
3. To understand the sketches and working drawings

Expected Outcome : Students will be able to

1. Implement the regulations for layout planning and preparation of drawings.


2. Prepare building drawings for residential building and hospital buildings.

Details of Experiments:
PART A

Building Regulations as per National Building Code. Layout planning, preparation of line sketches and working
drawing in accordance with functional requirements and building rules for the following types of building.

a) Residential buildings Flat-roof and pitched roof Apartments/Flats in multi-storeyed buildings.

b) Schools, Hospitals, Dispensaries and Hostels.

c) Industrial buildings workshop with trussed roof Factory buildings with flat & pitched roofs.

PART B

Detailed Drawings (Plan, Elevation and section for the following);

1) Simple residential buildings with flat and pitched roof.

2) Hospital Buildings provisions for differently able persons

3) Workshop Trussed roof-North light roof truss.

4) Detailed drawings for doors, windows, rolling shutters and collapsible gates.

5) Planning, design and detailed drawings of staircase.

Reference Books:
1. Verma (1998), Civil Engineering Drawing
2. Padmini Murugesan (1997), Civil Engineering Drawing, Prithiba Publishers and Distributors.

Mode of Evaluation : Record Work/Oral/ Examinations.

21
CLE301 REINFORCED CONCRETE STRUCTURES
Course Prerequisites: Strength of Materials (CLE 203) and Structural Analysis (CLE 208) L T P C
2 1 2 4

Objectives:
1. To know the basic concept of structural design
2. To understand the usage of IS codes
3. To understand the concepts detailing & drawing

Expected Outcome : Students will be able to


1. Identify and calculate the different types of loadings
2. Identify the method of analysis
3. Draw the Bending Moment & Shear Force diagrams
4. Design the structures and draw the reinforcement detailing

UNIT I : Design of Beams (Working Stress Method)


Behaviour of R.C. beam in bending, concept of working stress method - design of rectangular beam, T-beam, Ell-
beam, shear reinforcement Crack width.

UNIT II: Design of Slabs and Compression Members (Working Stress Method)
Design of different types of slabs - design of columns, - long column & short column, axially & eccentrically loaded
columns by working stress method.

UNIT III: Design of Beams (Limit State Method)


Concept of limit state method - design of rectangular - Tee & Ell beams for flexure, shear, torsion.

UNIT IV : Design of Slabs and Compression Members (Limit State Method)


Limit state design of one way slab & two way slab - design of axially and eccentrically loaded short & long column.

UNIT V: Design of Foundation (Limit State Method)


Design of footing by limit state method - square and rectangular footing for axially and eccentrically loaded columns,
combined footing.

Text Books:
S.Ramamrutham & R.Narayanan (2004), Design of reinforced concrete structures, Dhanpat Rai Publishing Co.

Reference Books:
1. Varghese (2005), Advanced Reinforced Concrete Design, Prentice-Hall of India.
Gurcharan Singh (2005), Design of R.C.C. Structures in S.I.Units, Standard Publishers Distributors.
B.C.Punmia (2003), Design of reinforced concrete structures, Lakshmi Publishers.

Mode of Evaluation: Assignment, Seminar and Written Examination.

22
REINFORCED CONCRETE STRUCTURES LAB
Course Prerequisites: Strength of Materials (CLE 203) and Structural Analysis (CLE 208)

Objectives:
1. To know the basic concept of structural design
2. To understand the usage of IS codes
3. To understand the concepts detailing & drawing

Expected Outcome : Students will be able to


1. Identify and calculate the different types of loadings
2. Identify the method of analysis
3. Draw the Bending Moment & Shear Force diagrams
4. Design the structures and draw the reinforcement detailing

Design and Drawing Details of the following RCC Structures

1. Working stress and limit state method - Typical building consisting of roofs, slabs, beams, columns and
joint detailings
2. Isolated and Combined footing.

Text Books:
S.Ramamrutham & R.Narayanan (2004), Design of reinforced concrete structures, Dhanpat Rai Publishing Co. Devdas
Menon
Reference Books:
1. Varghese (2005), Advanced Reinforced Concrete Design, Prentice-Hall of India.
2. Gurcharan Singh (2005), Design of R.C.C. Structures in S.I.Units, Standard Publishers Distributors.
3. B.C.Punmia (2003), Design of reinforced concrete structures, Lakshmi Publishers.

Mode of Evaluation: Record Work/Oral/ Examinations.

23
CLE 216 ADVANCED STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS
L T P C
Course Prerequisites: Structural Analysis (CLE 208) 2 1 2 4

Objectives:
1. To understand the behaviour of indeterminate structures
2. To know the concepts of elastic analysis and plastic analysis
3. To understand the concepts of matrix analysis of structures.

Expected Outcome : Students will be able to


1. Identify the method of analysis for indeterminate structures
2. Know the importance of the shape factor and its importance
3. Distinguish determinate and indeterminate structures
4. Perform matrix methods of analysis

UNIT I: Analysis of Arches (9 hours)


Two hinged and three hinged parabolic arches - circular arches, cables - tension forces in towers - influence
line for horizontal thrust and bending moment.

UNIT II: Plastic Analysis (9 hours)


plastic moment of resistance - shape factor, collapse load - analysis of continuous beams and portals
limiting conditions for applications

UNIT III: Flexibility Matrix method (9 hours)


Concept of flexibility matrix - analysis of continuous beams - plane frames and pin jointed plane trusses.

UNIT IV: Stiffness Matrix method (9 hours)


Stiffness matrix for beam element - analysis of continuous beams - plane frames & pin jointed plane trusses.

UNIT V: Approximate methods for multistoried frames (9 hours)


Substitute frame method - portal method - cantilever method and Kanis method.

Text Book:
1. V.N.Vazirani & M.M.Ratwani (2000), Analysis of Structures, Khanna Publishers, New Delhi.

Reference Books:
1. R.L.Jindal (1996), Indeterminate Structures, Tata McGraw Hill Publishing House.
2. Negi.L.S (2002), Theory & Problems in Structural Analysis, Tata McGraw Hill Publishing House.
3. G.S.Pandit & Gupta S.P (1998), Structural Analysis (A matrix approach), Tata McGraw Hill
Publishing Ltd.

Mode of Evaluation: Assignment, Seminar and Written Examination.

24
CLE216 ADVANCED STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS LAB

Course Prerequisites: Structural Analysis (CLE 208)

Objectives:
1. To understand the concept of computer aided analysis and design
2. To understand the details of the reinforcement
3. To understand the concepts of analysis of space frames using software

Expected Outcome : Student will be able to:


1. Analyse and design different types of structures using software
2. Interpretation of results with respect to nature of forces

Details of Experiments:
Analysis of the following concrete structures using software:

1. Continuous Beam
2. Plane truss
3. Plane frame
4. Gable frame

Reference Books:
1. V.N.Vazirani & M.M.Ratwani (1998), Analysis of Structures, Khanna Publishers.
2. R.L.Jindal, Indeterminate Structures (1995), Tata McGraw Hill Publishing House.
G.S.Pandit & Gupta S.P.S. (1998), Structural Analysis (A matrix approach), Tata McGraw Hill
Publishing Ltd.
4. Wang C.K. (1996), Matrix Method of Structural Analysis, Jon Wiley publications.

Mode of Evaluation : Experiments/Record Work/Oral/Practical Examinations.

25
CLE302 HIGHWAY ENGINEERING

Course Prerequisites: Construction Materials & Technology (204)


L T P C
2 1 0 3
OBJECTIVES:
This course is taught to impart the knowledge in Traffic Engineering, Highway geometrics, materials, construction and
design.

OUTCOMES :
Upon completion of this course, the students will be able to
1. Design highway pavement geometrics.
2. Understand the procedure to collect the traffic data for design and traffic management.
3. Understand the need for traffic management.
4. Test the highway materials as per recommendation.
5. Do structural design flexible and rigid pavements.

UNIT I Highway and Traffic Planning


Introduction to Transportation modes Highway alignment and field surveys Master Plan Transport Economics
Traffic Studies Volume, speed, origin and destination studies

UNIT II High Geometrics


Highway classification (Rural and Urban roads), Road Geometrics Highway cross section elements Camber Sight
Distance, Horizontal Alignment Design, Super Elevation, Extra widening, Transition curves, Set back distance, Design
of Vertical curves

UNIT III Traffic Engineering


Characteristics of traffic elements Design of Intersections, Interchanges, Parking Layout & Road
signs Urban traffic management - Traffic regulation and control, Accidents, Causes and
Preventions
UNIT IV Highway Materials and Construction
Material requirement for pavements Soil classification for Highway Soil tests CBR and Plate Load Test,
Aggregate materials testing and specification, Bitumen material testing and specification Concrete Mix Design,
construction of bituminous and rigid pavements, Highway Maintenance Material recycling

UNIT V Highway Design


Pavement Analysis Factors affecting pavement thickness Soil Wheel load Temperature Environmental factors;
Flexible Pavement Design Axle Load surveys CBR method of Design, Rigid Pavement Design IRC method.

Reference Books:
1. S.K.Khanna, C.E.G.Justo, (2001) Highway Engineering, Nem Chand & Bros, Roorkee.
2. Rao.G.V., (2005) Principles of Transportation and Highway Engineering, Tata McGraw Hill Co.
3. L.R.Kadiyali, (2003) Principles and Practice of Highway Engineering, Khanna Publishers.
4. Partha Chakroborthy, Animesh Das, (2005) Principles of Transportation Engineering, Prentice-Hall of India.

Mode of Evaluation: Assignment, Seminar and Written Examination.

26
L T P C
CLE 214 HYDRAULIC STRUCTURES AND MACHINERY 2 1 2 4

Course Prerequisites: Fluid mechanics (MEE206)

Objectives:
1. To understand the working principles of hydraulic machinery
2. To know the design of used for supplying water and generating power and also various structures designed for
storage and for the development of irrigation system.
3. To know the irrigation systems and its applications

Expected Outcome : Students will be able to


1. Identify the pump required for different purposes
2. Classify the turbines and explain design criteria based on water availability
3. Design the head work and escape in an irrigation system
4. Design the drops and outlet for the cannel system

UNIT I: Impact of Jet on Vanes and Pumps (9 hours)


Impact of Jet on flat and curved vanes Pumps-Types, Centrifugal Pump-Velocity triangle, characteristic
curves, specific speed, applications, Reciprocating pump Types Indicator diagram-Acceleration and
friction, air vessels.

UNIT II: Turbines (9 hours)


Classification - Pelton Turbine, Francis Turbine, Kaplan Turbine-Velocity Triangle, Characteristic Curves-
Specific Speed -Governing of Turbines.

UNIT III: Irrigation Structures (9 hours)


Diversion headwork components weir Design of vertical drop weirs Blighs theory Khoslas theory,
Divide wall, fish ladder Design criteria, U/s & D/s protection works. Types of canals, Head regulators
cross regulator - canal falls canal transitions cross drainage works, Evacuation & flood proofing,
sediment control and silt exclusion devices.

UNIT IV: Dams and Reservoirs (9 hours)


Reservoir yield- storage capacity, Strategies & operation, Sedimentation- causes, effect & control
measures.Dams, factors governing their selection-Classification, Elementary design of gravity dam -
Earthern dam, arch dams- spill ways, energy dissipators, spill way gates Important Dams in India.
UNIT V: Hydropower Structures (9 hours)
Components penstock - pumping storage pipe line engineering cavitation water hammer remedies.

Text Book:
S.K. Garg (1997), Irrigation Engineering & Hydraulic Structures, Khanna Publishers.

Reference Books:
1. V.T.Chow (1996), Open Channel Hydraulics, McGraw Hill Publishing Co.
2. Modi & Seth (2001), Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machinery, Standard Publications.

Mode of Evaluation: Assignment, Seminar and Written Examination.

27
CLE 214 HYDRAULIC STRUCTURES AND MACHINERY LAB

Course Prerequisites: Fluid mechanics (MEE206)

Objectives:
1. To understand the properties of fluid, types of fluid and the Types of flow.
2. To study about the flow measuring devices such as orifice meter, venturimeter.
3. To acquire knowledge about the flow through pipes

Expected Outcome : Student will be able to:


1. Analyze various flow problems and fluid characteristics.
2. Determine the losses of flow through various mediums like pipes.
3. Apply the concepts of fluid mechanics to design various systems like aerospace systems.

List of Experiments:

Fluid Machinery
13. Performance Characteristics of a Centrifugal Pump (Rated Speed)
14. Performance Characteristics of Centrifugal Pump (Variable Speed)
15. Performance Characteristics of a Jet Pump
16. Performance Characteristics of a Self Priming Pump
17. Performance Characteristics of a Reciprocating Pump
18. Performance Characteristics of a Submersible Pump
19. Performance Characteristics of a Gear Pump
20. Characteristics Test on Pelton Turbine
21. Characteristics Test on Francis Turbine
22. Characteristics Test on Kaplan Turbine

Mode of Evaluation : Experiments/Record Work/Oral/Practical Examinations.

Reference Books:

1. Fluid Mechanics & Machinery Laboratory Manual Prepared by VIT Staff.


Dr.R.K.Bansal (2004), Fluid Mechanics & Hydraulic Machines, Laxmi Publication (P) Ltd., New Delhi

28
CLE 303 FOUNDATION ENGINEERING

Course Prerequisites: Soil Mechanics (CLE 205) L T P C


2 1 0 3

Objectives:
1. To understand the design aspects of foundation
2. To evaluate the stress developed in the soil medium
3. To study the stability of slopes

Expected Outcome : Students will be able to


1. Know the Soil Investigation techniques
2. Conduct the field test like SPT, PLT, DCPT etc.
3. Find the safe bearing capacity of soil
4. Calculate the Load carrying capacity of pile foundation

UNIT I : Soil Exploration and Types of Foundations


Objective of site investigation - Reconnaissance Detailed site investigation - Methods of exploration Depth of
exploration Factors governing location and depth of foundation Types of Foundations Selection of Foundation

UNIT II : Bearing Capacity and Settlements of Shallow Foundations


Terzaghis theory of bearing capacity General and local shear failure - Effect of Watertable Plate load test
Standard Penetration Test Design of Footings Settlement of footings - Immediate and Time dependent settlement
Permissible limits Differential Settlement.

UNIT III: Pile Foundations


Classification and selection of piles Static and dynamic formulae for single pile capacity Efficiency and capacity of
pile groups Design of Pile group Settlement of Pile Groups Load test on piles

UNIT IV : Slope Stability


Failur of infinite and finite slopes Swedish circle method Factor of safety - Slope stability of earth dams.

UNIT V: Theories of Earth Pressure


Definitions Earth pressure at rest Rankines active and passive earth pressures - Coulombs earth pressure theories
Types of retaining walls

Text Book:
1. Varghese.P.C.(2006), Foundation Engineering, Prentice-Hall of India Private Limited.

Reference Books:
1. Shashi K. Gulhati & Manoj Datta (2005), Geotechnical Engineering, Tata McGraw Hill Ltd.
2. Donald.P.Coduto (2005), Geotechnical Engineering Principles & Practices, Prentice-Hall of India.
3. Swami Saran (1998), Analysis and Design of sub structures, Limit State Design, Oxford & IBH Publishing Co. Pvt
Ltd.,, New Delhi.

Mode of Evaluation: Assignment, Seminar and Written Examination.

29
CLE304 FUNDAMENTALS OF STRUCTURAL DESIGNS

Course Prerequisites: Strength of materials (CLE 203) and Structural Analysis L T P C


(CLE 208) 3 0 0 3

Objectives:
1. To understand the concepts of steel design
2. To have an idea about earth retaining structures
3. To know the concepts of an analysis and design of water retaining structures

Expected Outcome : Students will be able to


1. Design retaining wall structures
2. Understand the basic behaviour of water tank
3. Know the details of connections for steel structures
4. Know the design of steel columns, lacing and battes

UNIT I: Retaining Walls (RCC)


Design of cantilever and counter fort retaining walls.

UNIT II : Water Tanks (RCC)


Design of under ground and over head rectangular tanks - circular tank, domes - design of staging and foundation.

UNIT III: Steel Sections and Types of Connections


Introduction - properties of Indian Standard Rolled Steel Sections - permissible stress in tension, compression and
shear. Riveted and bolted connections permissible stresses, efficiency - design for axial and eccentrically loaded
members.

UNIT IV: Compression and Tension Members


Design of simple and built-up sections - battens and lacings - column splicing - column base & footing - tension
members, tension splicing.

UNIT V: Detailing of RCC Structures


Design and drawing details of the following RCC structures- Composite constructions

1. Typical building floors consisting of slabs & beams


2. Isolated and combined footings
3. Cantilever and counter fort retaining walls.
4. Water Tanks

Text book :
1. S.Ramamrutham & R.Narayanan (2004), Design of reinforced concrete structures, Dhanpat Rai Publishing Co.
Reference Books:
1. Sushil Kumar (2003), Treasure of RCC design, Standard Book house.
2. N.Krishnaraju (1999), Design of R.C structures, CBS Publishers and distributors.
3. Ramchandra (1996), Design of Steel Structures, Vol. I, Standard Book house, New Delhi.
4. IS : 800 draft code.

Mode of Evaluation: Assignment, Seminar and Written Examination.

30
CLE217 ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING
3 0 2 4

Course Environmental studies (CHY104)


Prerequisites
Objectives 1) To teach students the basic principles and concepts of unit operations and
processes involved in water and wastewater treatment.
2) To develop a students skill in the basic design of unit operations and processes
involved in water and wastewater treatment.
3) To develop a students skill in evaluating the performance of water and wastewater
treatment plants.
Expected Student will be able to:
1. Demonstrate an ability to recognize the type of unit operations and processes
Outcomes involved in water and wastewater treatment plants.
2. Recognize that water supply and sanitation is an important professional and
ethical responsibility of civil and environmental engineer.
3. Demonstrate an ability to choose the appropriate unit operations and processes
required for satisfactory treatment of water and wastewater.
4. Demonstrate an ability to design individual unit operation or process appropriate
to the situation by applying physical, chemical, biological and engineering
principles.
5. Involve in mega projects where water and wastewater treatments are essential.
6. Prepare the layout of water and wastewater treatment plants.
7. Demonstrate ability in monitoring of water and wastewater treatment plants.
8. Demonstrate ability in design of water and wastewater treatments units in a cost
effective and sustainable way and evaluate its performance to meet the desired
health and environment related goals.
9. Recognize the importance of wastewater treatment to protect the water resources
which is facing a continuous degradation in water quality.
10.
UNIT I Water treatment
Population forecast and water demand Water treatment Objectives Unit operations and processes in surface
water treatment Principles, functions and design of flash mixers, flocculators, sedimentation tanks and sand
filters Aeration iron and manganese removal, Defluoridation and demineralization water softening
Disinfection, Water treatment Typical layouts and water distribution.
UNIT II Primary Waste Water Treatment
Characteristics of sewage, Quantity and flow variation, Primary treatment: Principles, functions and design of
screen, grit chambers and primary sedimentation tanks.
UNIT III Secondary Treatment of Waste Water
Activated Sludge Process and Trickling filter; Other treatment methods Stabilisation Ponds and Septic tanks
Advances in Sewage Treatment, waste water reuse and recycling
UNIT IV Sources and characteristics of Sludge
Thickening Sludge digestion Biogas recovery - Drying beds Conditioning and Dewatering Sludge
disposal, Sewage treatment Typical layouts.
UNIT V Waste Water Disposal Methods
Dilution Self purification of surface water bodies Oxygen sag curve disposal to lakes and sea, Land disposal
Sewage farming Deep well injection Soil dispersion system.
Text Books
1. Droste R.L., (1997)., Theory and Practice of water wastewater treatment, John Wiley & sons
2. Garg S.K., (2001), Environmental Engineering, Vols. I and II, 12th Edition, Khanna Publishers, New Delhi
References
1. Peavy H.S.,.Rowe D.R and George Tchobanoglous (2001), Environmental Engineering, McGraw-Hill
Company, New Delhi.
2. Metcalf and Eddy (2003), Wastewater Engineering, Treatment and reuse, Tata McGraw-Hill Edition, Fourth
edition.
3. Rangwala (1999), Water supply & Sanitary Engineering, Charotar Publishing House, Anand-16th Edition.
Mode of Evaluation: Assignment/ Seminar/Written Examination.

31
CLE217 ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY

Objectives 1.To understand the concepts estimating different parameters of the water quality
2.To identify the ill effects of environmental pollution
3.To understand different parameters governing the sanitary and drainage system
Expected Student will be able to:
Outcomes
1. Estimate the parameters of the water quality
2. Implement new environmental techniques to avoid pollutants
List of Experiments:
01. Determination of pH, Turbidity and conductivity (IS 3025 Part 11, 10 and 14)
02. Determination of Hardness (IS 3025 Part 21)
03. Determination of Alkalinity (IS 3025 Part 23)
04. Determination of Chlorides (IS 3025 Part 32)
05. Determination of Sulfates (IS 3025 Part 24)
06. Determination of fluoride (Standard Methods for examination of Water & Wastewater, APHA)
07. Determination of Optimum Coagulant
08. Determination of residual chlorine and available chlorine in bleaching powder (IS 3025 Part 25
and 26)
09. Determination of Oil, and Grease (IS 3025 Part 39)
10. Determination of suspended, settleable, volatile and fixed solids (IS 3025 Part 15, 17, 18, and 19)
11. Determination Dissolved Oxygen and BOD for the given sample (IS 3025 Part 38 and 44)
12. Determination of COD for given sample (IS 3025 Part 58)
13. Determination of SVI of Biological sludge
14. Determination of MPN index of given water sample (IS 5401 Part 1)
References

1. Environmental Engineering Lab Manual Prepared by VIT Staff.


2. Standard Methods for examination of Water and Wastewater, APHA, AWWA and WPCF, 20th
Edition.
3. KVSG Muralikrishna (1997), Chemical analysis of water and soil - a laboratory manual,
Environmental Protection Society
Mode of Evaluation: Experiments/Record Work/Oral/Practical Examinations.

32
CLE 305 QUANTITY SURVEYING AND ESTIMATING
L T P C
2 0 0 2
Course Prerequisites: Building Drawing (CLE 209)

Objectives :
1. To understand the types of estimates
2. To identify the methods used for different structural components
3. To understand rate analysis and process of preparation of bills

Expected Outcome: Students will be able to


1. Prepare a detailed estimate for different types of structures
2. Prepare valuation reports and cost quality control

UNIT I : Analysis of Rates


Rate analysis & preparation of bills Data analysis of rates for various items of works abstract estimates for Building
projects

UNIT II : Quantity Estimation for Building


Estimation of building Procedure of estimating, Types of estimates, detailed estimate of buildings including sanitary
& electrical fittings.

UNIT III : Quantity Estimation for Roads


Estimate of R.C.C and Steel works - Scheduling - Slab - beam - column, Road earthwork fully in banking, cutting,
partly cutting & partly filling. Detailed estimate for WBM, Bituminous road.

UNIT IV : Valuation
Valuation- rent fixation, tenders, - contracts accounting procedure, measurement book, stores, cost & quality control
PWD & CPWD practice Software Applications for Estimation of Buildings.

Reference Books:
1. B.N.Datta (1998), Estimating and costing, Charator Publishing House.

2. Vajarani (1997), Estimating and costing, Khanna Publishers.

Mode of Evaluation : Assignment, Seminar and Written Examination.

33
CLE 401 DESIGN OF STEEL STRUCTURES
L T P C
Course Prerequisites: Fundamentals of structural design (CLE 304) 3 0 2 4

Objectives:
1. To understand the concepts of steel design
2. To know the analysis and design of plate girder and gantry girder and its applications
3. To identify the different types of roofs and roofing system

Expected Outcome : Students will be able to


1. Design a simple beam and built up beam
2. Design plate girders
3. Design roof trusses
4. Design overhead water tanks.

UNIT I: Simple and Built-up Beams


Design of beams - simple and built-up beams - laterally supported and unsupported beams, concept of shear.

UNIT II: Plate Girders


Plate girders - design of plate girders- curtailment of flange plates- design of stiffeners and splices- gantry girder.

UNIT III: Roof Trusses


Roof Trusses - calculation of dead load- live load & wind load, Design of joints- supports- members for pitched roof
truss, purlins.

UNIT IV: Water Tanks


Overhead water tanks - design of rectangular water tank- cylindrical water tank and pressed steel tanks- design of
staging and foundation Maintenance of Water tanks.

UNIT V: Design and Drawing of Steel Structures


Design and drawing details of the following steel structures:
Column and base plate - Plate girder & Gantry girder - Simple roof trusses - Over head water tanks.

Text Book:
1. Ramachandra (2002), Design of Steel structures, Vol. I & Vol. III, Standard Publishers Distributors.

Reference Books:
1. V.N. VajraniI & M.M. Ratwani (2000), Design and Analysis of Steel Structures, Khanna Publishers
2. I. Csyal (2005), Design of Steel Structures, Standard Publishers Distributors, New Delhi.
3. Ramchandra (2006), Non Linear Analysis of Steel Structures, Standard Publishers Distributors.
4. IS: 800 Draft mode.
Mode of Evaluation: Assignment, Seminar and Written Examination.

34
CLE 316 WATER RESOURCES ENGINEERING L T P C
3 0 2 4

Course Prerequisites: Engineering Geology (CLE 202) Hydraulic Structures and Machinery (CLE 214)

Objectives:
1. To get the exposure about the developments of water resources for the purpose of controlling & utilising water
for a variety of purposes
2. to understand the concepts of irrigation, water supply, flood control, navigational improvement,
3. To have idea about land drainage & pollution control etc.

Expected Outcome : Students will be able to


1. Identify the different types & methods of irrigation for better water management
2. Know the occurrence & distribution of natural waters of the earth
3. Implement the practices of structural design facilities for water resources project
4. Implement and study the planning and management for single & multi purpose projects

UNIT I: Irrigation Practices


Need for Irrigation in India-Scope- Soil moisture & Plant growth - crop water requirements-Irrigation Scheduling-
Irrigation efficiencies, Duty-Delta-base period-relation between them, Surface & subsurface irrigation method,
Irrigation water Quality..

UNIT II: Surface Water Hydrology


Hydrological Cycle - Types & forms of precipitation- rainfall measurements - interpretation of rainfall data. Missing
rain fall data - Runoff- runoff cycle, infiltration indices, Hydrograph analysis - Unit hydrograph, applications.
UNIT III: Ground Water Hydrology
Ground water-Aquifers, Permeability & transmissibility- steady flow towards a well in confined & water table aquifer-
Dupits & Theims equation - measurement of yield of an open well - Tube well & infiltration gallaries. interference
among wells-well losses, comparison of well and flow irrigation
UNIT IV: Canal Irrigation
Sediment Transport- Importance & Mechanics of transport, bed load & suspended load- Estimation, Design of channels
in India- Regime channels- Kennedy and Laceys theory, Water logging- causes- effects- control measures, canal lining,
Land Reclamation,

UNIT V: Minor Irrigation Structures (Design & Drawing)


Tank sluice (Tower head type) - Tank surplus weir- Canal regulator cum road way - canal drop & aqueducts.

Text Book:

Mays L.W. (2001), Water Resources Engineering, first edition, John Wiley Publications, Singapore
Garg. S.K. (1998), Irrigation Engineering & Hydraulics structures, Khanna Publishers

Reference Books:
1. Majumdar (2005), Irrigation Water Management, Prentice-Hall of India.
2. Punmia. B.C. (1997), Irrigation and Water Power Engineering, Laxmi Publications
3.Sharma, S.K. (1996), Irrigation Engineering, S. Chand & Co. Pvt. Ltd

Mode of Evaluation: Assignment, Seminar and Written Examination.

35
CLE 316 WATER RESOURCES ENGINEERING LABORATORY
Course Prerequisites: Computer soft skills

Objectives:
1. To familiraize the students about various flow software
2. To provide students a detailed knowledge about water resources sotware packages such as Mod
Flow, etc

Expected Outcome: Upon completion course students will enable to:

1. Model reservoir component based on the analysis done using software


2. Estimate seepage losses and reservoir losses.

Details of the experiments

1. Mod flow
2. Seepage analysis using software
3. Reservoir operation losses
4. Flood analysis

References Books:
1. Garg.S.K., Irrigation Engineering and Hydraulic Structures, Khanna Publishers.
2. Punmia.B.C., Irrigation and Water Power Engineering, Laxmi Publications.
3. Sharma.S.K., Irrigation Engineering, S.Chand & Co. Pvt Ltd.

36
CLE211 CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT

Course Pre-requisites : Construction Materials and Technology (CLE 204) L T P C


3 0 0 3

Objectives:
1. To provide techniques to develop personal skills of practical use in the Management and implementation of Civil
Engineering projects
2. To know the Management techniques, the development of personal, interpersonal and Project Management skills
3. To know the project management skills
4. To provide a fundamental of understanding of the social, economic, resource management within which the
Construction Project takes place.

Expected Outcome : Students will be able to


1. Implement generic and special Construction Project Management skills to a higher level
2. Understand the special management skills required in multidisciplinary and global Construction Industry
3. Integrate and apply theoretical concepts, ideas, tools and techniques to Construction practice.

UNIT I: Principles of Management


Definition Importance Functions of Management Relevance to government and Quasi Government departments
Private Contractors Contracting firms Organisational structure.
UNIT II: Construction Planning and Labour Welfare
Collection of field data Preliminary estimates Approval and sanction of estimates Budget provisions Scheduling
using MS project software - Relationships between management and labour Problems Labour legislations
Minimum Wages act Industrial Psychology Safety procedures in construction MS Project Application.
UNIT III: Management Techniques
Concepts of Network Network methods CPM/PERT Cost control Principles Control by graphical representation,
by bill of quantities and by network analysis.
UNIT IV: Project Management
Tendering - Arbitration - International projects Detailed Project Reports (DPR) / Build Own Operate (BOO) / Build
Own Operate Transfer (BOOT) Projects / Build Operate and Transfer (BOT) case studies.
UNIT V: Accounts and Stores
Measurements of work Checking Types of bills Mode of payment Claims Banking settlements Types of
accounts - Cash book Storing Maintenance Inspection - Inventories Transfer of surplus and accounting of shortage
stores Procedures adopted in PWD and CPWD.
Text Book:
1. Sengupta (2002), Construction Management, Tata McGraw Hill.
2. Construction Management and accounts (2002) by J.L. Sharma, Satya Publications

Reference Books:
1. Subramaniam (2001), Construction Management, Anuradha Agencies.
2. Joseph.L (2000), Essential of Management, Prentice Hall of India.
3. Mote Paul and Gupta (2001), Management Economics, Tata McGraw Hill.
4. Manie (2005), Essentials of Management, Prentice Hall of India.

Mode of Evaluation: Assignment, Seminar and Written Examination.

37
CLE306 ADVANCED FLUID MECHANICS
L T P C
Course Prerequisites: Fluid Mechanics (MEE206) 2 1 0 3

Objectives:
1. To give an idea about the flow in higher speeds and various laws involved in high speed flows
2. To understand the measurement techniques in compressible and incompressible flow

Expected Outcome : Students will be able to


1. Know about the ideal flow principles such as source, sink, doublet etc,.
2. Apply the principles of separation, vortex lattice to real life situations
3. Work with wind tunnel and apparatus used in wind tunnel for measuring the velocity

UNIT I: Potential Flow


Ideal fluid flow Rectilinear flow - source, sink, doublet, circulation - combination of flow.

UNIT II: Flow Around Immersed Bodies


Incompressible Fluid Flow Flow over two dimensional & 3 dimensional bodies - stream line & Bluff bodies - Airfoil,
types & characteristics - Kormans Vortex trial, Kutta conditions, Circulation separation- Prandtls theory - Biot
Savarts Law, Vortex Lattice.

UNIT III: Compressible Flow


Compressible Fluid Flow Navier stokes equation - Continuity equation - Law of thermodynamics - Mach number,
Subsonic, & Supersonic flow - Normal Shock & Oblique shock - Expansion waves, applications.

UNIT IV: Flow Measurements


Wind tunnel Measurement of flow, Pitot tube - types of wind tunnels - model testing - measurement of supersonic -
flow using shadow graph technique - Schleiren technique

UNIT V: Viscous Flows


Viscous flow Stress components of real fluid - stress and analysis in fluid motion - Navier stokes equation steady
motion between parallel plates - flow between concentric cylinders, vorticity, energy dissipation - flow past a fixed
sphere.

Text Books:
1. Yuan. S.W. (1998), Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics, Prentice Hall of India Pvt., Ltd.
2. Mohanty (2005), Fluid Mechanics, Prentice-Hall of India.

Reference Books:
1. Frank Charlton (1999), A Text Book of Fluid Dynamics, CBS Publishers.
2. Fay (2004), Introduction to fluid mechanics, Prentice Hall of India Pvt Ltd.

Mode of Evaluation: Assignment, Seminar and Written Examination.

Recommended by the Board of Studies on : 31/10/09


Date of approval by the Academic Council : 21/11/09

38
CLE 307 ADVANCED SURVEYING

L T P C
3 0 0 3
Course Prerequisites: Surveying (CLE 207)

Objectives:
1. To introduce advanced surveying techniques
2. To give a basic understanding of linear and angular measurements
3. To give an idea about surveying techniques

Expected Outcome : Students will be able to


1. Understanding of principles of surveying & levelling
2. Prepare contouring and topographic maps
3. Managing and controlling area to be surveyed effectively to minimize the error.
4. Underlying principles governing error in measurement
5. Know the electronic principles on distance measurement.
6. Basic knowledge on Hydrographic surveying.

UNIT: 1 GPS Principles


EDM Principle, sources and error, GPS Principles, Errors, Differential GPS, Instruments and Setting out of tunnel,
bridge.

UNIT : 2 Map Projection


Fundamental properties of Map projection Classification of Map projection- Principles of selecting map projection,
Surveying and map projection

UNIT : 3 Basics of Photogrammetry


Principles of photography instruments photographic measurements vertical photographs stereoscopic viewing
and parallax.

UNIT : 4 Types of Photogrammetry and Interpretation


Photomaps & Mosaics Tilted photographs Oblique and panoramic photographs Terrestrial photogrammetry
around controls photographic interpretations.

UNIT : 5 Astronomical Surveying


Field Astronomy, measurement of time, determination of Azimuth, Latitude and longitude.

Text Book:
1. Bannister, A., Raymond, S., Baker, R., (2006), Surveying, Pearson Education

Reference Books:
1. Chandra, A.M. (2002), Higher Surveying, New Age International Publishers
2. Punmia P.C. (2004) Surveying - volume 3, Lakmi publications.
3. Wolf, P.R., (1998), Elements of Photogrammetry, Mc.Graw Hill International Book Company

Mode of Evaluation: Assignment, practical and Written Examination.

39
CLE210 AIR AND NOISE POLLUTION
Course Prerequisites: Environmental studies (CHY-104) L T P C
2 1 0 3
Objectives:
1. To understand the aspects of atmospheric pollution
2. To know about the issues such as atmospheric composition, monitoring, acidic deposition, urban air quality
3. To understand the use of models in air pollution studies

Expected Outcome : Students will be able to


1. Describe the main chemical components and reactions in the atmosphere and examine the factors responsible
for perturbing these
2. Implement the methods for monitoring and modeling spatial and temporal patterns of pollution
3. Explore air pollution issues at a range spatial scales and how these are relaxed.
4. Assess the environmental impacts of atmospheric pollution.

UNIT I: Sources and Effects of Air Pollution


Classification of air pollutants Particulates and gaseous pollutants Sources of air pollution Source inventory
Effects of air pollution on human beings, materials, vegetation, animals global warming-ozone layer depletion,
Sampling and Analysis Basic Principles of Sampling Source and ambient sampling Analysis of pollutants
Principles.

UNIT II: Transport of Air Pollution


Elements of atmosphere and dispersion of pollutants Meterological factors Wind roses Lapse rate - Atmospheric
stability and turbulance Plume rise Dispersion of pollutions Gaussian dispersion models Applications.

UNIT III: Control of Air Pollution


Concepts of control Principles and design of control measures Particulates control by gravitational, centrifugal,
filtration, scrubbing, electrostatic prescipitation Selection criteria for equipment, gaseous pollutant control by
adsorption & absorption, condensation, combustion Pollution control for specific major industries.

UNIT IV: Air Quality Management


Air quality standards Air quality monitoring Air pollution control efforts Zoning Town planning regulation of
new industries Legislation and enforcement Environmental Impact Assessment Methods.

UNIT V: Noise Pollution & Control


Sound and Noise: Sources of noise pollution environmental and industrial noise; effects of noise pollution -
fundamentals of sound generation - propagation, sound measurement - sound level meters types, components, Noise
prevention & control measures, environmental and industrial noise - noise control legislation.
Text BookS:

1. Noel De Nevers (2000), Air Pollution Control Engineering, 2nd Edition, McGraw Hill International Edition.
2. Singal, S.P. (2000), Noise Pollution and Control, First Edition, Narosa Publishing House, New Delhi.

Reference Books:

1. Rao C.S. (2006) Environmental Pollution Control Enginering, 2nd edition, New Age International, Newdelhi
2. W.L.Heumann (1997), Industrial Air Pollution Control Systems, McGraw Hill, New York.
3. Rao M.N., & Rao H V N. (1996), Air Pollution Control, Tata-McGraw Hill, New Delhi.

Mode of Evaluation: Assignment, Seminar and Written Examination.

40
CLE 308APPLICATIONS OF MATRIX METHODS IN STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS
Course Prerequisites: Structural analysis (CLE208) L T P C
2 1 0 3

Objectives:
1. To understand the basic concepts of Matrix Methods of Structural Analysis
2. To distinguish between force method and displacement method
3. To understand the behaviour of plane trusses & plane frames

Expected Outcome : Students will be able to


1. Know the concept of static and kinematic indeterminacy
2. Understand the concept of flexibility method and stiffness method
3. Analyse plane trusses & plane frames
4. Know the use of software package STAAD PRO.

UNIT I: Introduction to Flexibility Matrices and Stiffness Matrices


Static and kinematic indeterminacy - properties of stiffness and flexibility matrices - concept of co-ordinates - solution
of simple problems.

UNIT II: Analysis of Beams


Flexibility and stiffness matrices for beams - solution of problems - bending moment diagram

UNIT III: Analysis of Plane Truss


Flexibility and stiffness matrices for plane truss - solution of problems - internal forces due to thermal expansion - lack
of fit.

UNIT IV: Analysis of Plane Frame


Flexibility and stiffness matrices for plane frame - solution of problems bending moment diagram.

UNIT V : Use of Software Packages


Analysis of beam, plane truss & plane frame by STAAD-PRO.

Text BookS:
1. Mukkopadhyay M and Sheikh A.H (2004) Matrix and Finite element analyses of structures, First edition, Ane
Books Pvt. Ltd.
2. Pandit G.S., & Gupta S.P. (1998), Structural Analysis (A matrix approach), Tata McGraw Hill Publishing Ltd.

Reference Books:
1. J.S.Przemieniecki (1995), Theory of Matrix structural Analysis, McGraw-Hill,
2. Meek,J.L. (1997), Matrix Structural Analysis.
3. Kanchi (1995), Matrix Structural Analysis, Wiley Eastern Ltd., New Delhi.

Mode of Evaluation: Assignment, Seminar and Written Examination.

41
CLE309 ARCHITECTURE AND TOWN PLANNING
L T P C
Course Prerequisites: NONE 3 0 0 3

Objectives:
1. To give an idea of Architectural aspects and to understand the history of Romans, Greek, and South Indian
Architecture.
2. To know the different type of architectures and its importance
3. To understand the basic principles of town planning

Expected Outcome : Students will be able to


1. Know the Architecture that can enhance the building in terms of appearance and utility
2. Solve the problem that are coming in Town Planning level
3. Know the different qualities of architecture

UNIT I: Introduction to Architecture


Fundamentals concepts of architecture Principles of planning Qualities, Strength, Refinement, Repose, Scale,
Proportion, Colour, Solids and Voids and Symmetry.

UNIT II: Historical Architecture


The Physical and non-physical factors Moulding Greek, Roman, and European history South Indian, Moghul
periods in Indian History.

UNIT III: Interior Decorations


Interior Planning and treatment Use of natural and synthetic building materials Thermal and Accoustical materials
Lighting & illumination .

UNIT IV: Planning and Concepts of Town Planning


Planning Surveys Importance of Climate topography, drainage and water supply in the selection of site for the
development Residential Commercial Industrial Public Transportation, Basic amenities and services.

UNIT V: Country Planning and Housing


Town Planning rules and building bylaws High towns Replanning Satellite towns Examples of planned cities
and housing in India Applications of GIS in town planning & RS.

Text Book:
1. De Charia & Callender (2002), Architecture, Mc. Graw Hill.

Reference Books:
1. Gallion (2001), Urban pattern City planning and design, Charotar Publishing House.
2. Modak & Ambedkar (2001), Town and Country Planning and Housing.

Mode of Evaluation: Assignment, Seminar and Written Examination.

42
CLE218 ATMOSPHERIC PROCESSES AND CLIMATE CHANGE 3 0 0 3

Course Prerequisites None

Objectives To enable a comprehensive understanding of:


1. The evolution of the earths atmosphere
2. Characteristics of the terrestrial atmosphere
3. Homogeneous and heterogeneous processes in the atmosphere
4. Recent advances made in the understanding of the atmospheric processes leading to climate
change
Expected Outcomes Student will be able to:
1. Acquire a basic understanding of the evolution of the earths atmosphere
2. Learn about the structure and composition of the various atmospheric layers
3. Gain a basic grounding on atmospheric chemical cycles
4. Understand how atmospheric chemical processes are linked to the dynamics
5. Gain an insightful understanding of the physico-chemical processes leading to climate
change.

UNIT I Atmospheric Systems


Origins of the Earths Atmosphere. Layers of the Atmosphere. Earth Atmosphere System. Solar and Terrestrial Radiation.
Absorption of Radiation by gases.

UNIT II Atmospheric Flows


The ideal Gas law, Atmospheric Composition, Hydrostatic balance, Derivation of the Potential Temperature, States of
stability of the Atmosphere, Parcel Concepts. General Circulation and Geostrophic flows. Quantification of dry and moist
adiabatic Lapse Rates.

UNIT III Atmospheric Chemistry


Atmospheric Chemical Reactions. Chemical Kinetics, Bimolecular Reactions, Photo dissociation. Stratospheric Ozone,
Chapman Chemistry, Catalytic Cycles, Homogeneous and Heterogeneous pathways for Ozone destruction. The Antarctic
Ozone Hole. Basics of the Acid Rain Problem.

UNIT IV Aerosol and Cloud facings


Basic aerosol properties and distributions. Continental and Maritime Aerosol. Homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation.
Formation of Cloud droplets. Aerosol and precipitation.
UNIT V Climate Change
Global Climate: A simple model to estimate Green House Effect. Possible Effects of Global Warming Climate Predictions:
Key attributes of Global Climate Models.
Text Book
Russell D. Thomson (1998), Atmospheric processes and systems, Rutledge Taylor and Francis Group
References
1. Gilbert M. Masters (2005),Introduction to Environmental Engineering and Science, Prentice-Hall of India
2. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change: The Third Assessment Report (2007). Cambridge University Press.
3. Plus, Journal Articles from J. Geophys. Res., Climate Change, Geophysical Res. Letts. Etc.
Mode of Evaluation: Assignment/ Seminar/Written Examination.

43
CLE 310 DESIGN OF CONCRETE STRUCTURES

Course Prerequisites: Reinforced Concrete Structures (CLE 301) L T P C


2 1 0 3
Objectives:
1. To understand the design of columns and footing
2. To understand the design of bridges
3. To know the importance of the shear wall and its applications

Expected Outcome : Students will be able to


1. Design columns
2. Design raft foundations
3. Design Bridges
4. Implement the analysis and design of shear walls

UNIT I: Design of Compression Members


Short and Long Column - Design of short column and long column - uniaxial bending - biaxial bending (using SP : 16)

UNIT II: Design of Foundations


Design of Foundation - Design of combined footing Raft

UNIT III: Design of Slabs


Yield Line Theory Virtual work method Isotropic slab Orthotropic slab Design of slab

UNIT IV: Design of Bridges


Bridges classification of bridges IRC code Pigeauds method Coulombs method design of slab bridge T-
beam bridge

UNIT V: Design of Shear Walls


Shear Walls Design of walls & shear walls effect of creep and shrinkage

Text Book:
1. N. Krishnaraju (1998), Advanced Concrete Design, CBS Publishers and distributors, Delhi.

Reference Books:
1. Jain & Jaikrishna (1997), Plain and reinforced concrete, Vol. II, Nemi chand Bros., Roorkee.
2. Dunham (1997), Advanced Concrete Design.
3. Mallick & Rangasamy (1995), Reinforced concrete design, Khanna publishers, Delhi.
4. Varghese (1997), Advanced Reinforced Concrete Design, Prentice-Hall of India.

Mode of Evaluation: Assignment, Seminar and Written Examination.

44
CLE311 EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING
Course Prerequisites: Reinforced Concrete Structures (CLE 301) L T P C
2 1 0 3

Objectives:
1. To understand the concept of seismology
2. To know the basic principles of structural dynamics
3. To get an idea of about the applications of structural dynamics in earthquake engineering
4. To know about the earthquake disaster management.

Expected Outcome : Students will be able to


1. Evaluate the behaviour of structures under dynamic loadings
2. Understand the concept of response of structures
3. Design of earthquake resistance structures

UNIT I: Elements of Earthquake origin & Propagation


Elements of Seismology - Earthquakes -Structure of the Earth -History of the Earth -Earthquake Mechanism -
Propagation of Seismic Waves -Earthquake Phenomena -Earthquake Measurements -Definitions of magnitude,
intensity, epicenter etc; Plate tectonics, seismographs, liquefaction, Types, effects and controlling factors .
UNIT II: Theory of Vibration Effects
Dynamic Loads.-D'Alembert's Principle and inertia forces-Stiffness and flexibility of elastic structures -Theory of
Vibrations - Free vibrations of single and multiple degree freedom systems -computations of dynamic response to time
dependent forces- mass and stiffness matrices - natural frequencies - Plate Tectonics Theory.

UNIT III: Earthquake Resistant Design


Principles of Earthquake Resistant Design - Response spectrum theory. Time Acceleration method Application of
response spectrum theory to seismic design of structures.

UNIT IV: Earthquake Damages


Earthquake Damages to Various Civil Engineering Structures - Case Histories Earthquake-Earthquake response of
structures Soft storey collapse Slender structures, unsymmetrical structures
UNIT V: Methods of disaster prevention.
Earthquake resistant building Regulations specification guidelines for construction Materials selection .

Text Book:
1. A K. Chopra (2003), Dynamics of Structures Theory and Applications to Earthquake Engineering, Second
Edition, Printice-Hall India Pvt Ltd.

Reference Books:
1. Pauley & Priestly (1995), Seismic design of reinforced concrete and masonry buildings, John Wiley & Sons.
2. Stratta.J.L. (2000), Manual of Seismic Design, Prentice-Hall India Pvt Ltd.
3. Kramer.S.L. (2000), Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering, Prentice-Hall India Pvt Ltd.
4. Agarwal & Shrinkhardo (2006), Earthquake Resistant design of a structures, Prentice-Hall India.
5.
Mode of Evaluation: Assignment, Seminar and Written Examination.

45
CLE 213 ECONOMICS L T P C
3 0 0 3
Course Prerequisites: NONE

Aims and Objectives


1. To understand concepts of demand and demand forecasting techniques.
2. To understand the elements of cost functions and need for cost control and cost reduction.

Learning Expected Outcome


1. Apply the concept of demand in finding and analyzing determinants of demand and forecasting demand;
2. Estimate production and cost functions and thereby control cost of production;
3. Analyse the type of competition in which the firm is working and can formulate suitable strategy to win the
competition;
4. Formulate appropriate pricing strategies to achieve firms objective
Unit1: Introduction
Introduction: The Scope and Method of Managerial economics Fundamental Economics concepts Managerial
Economics with other subjects - Objectives of the Firm

Unit2:Demand and Supply Analysis


Meaning, Types and Determinants Demand estimation- Demand elasticities for decision making Business and
Economic forecasting: Qualitative and Quantitative methods Supply analysis: Meaning, elasticities and determinants
Market equilibrium and price determination

Unit3: Production Economics


Production and Production function Types Estimation Returns to Scale Economies and Diseconomies of Scale
and Economies of Scope.
Factor Inputs - Input-Output Analysis

Unit4:Market Structure
Perfect Competition Imperfect Competition: Monopoly Monopolistic Oligopolistic Strategy, Cartels, Cournot,
Kinked Demand and Price Leadership. Oligopolistic Rivalry & Theory of Games Measurement of economic
concentration Policy against monopoly and restrictive trade practices - Competition Law Pricing Practices:
Objectives Determinants Pricing Methods Government Policies and Pricing

Unit5:Introduction to Macroeconomics
Circular Flow of Income and Expenditures Components of National Income and its significance - Measuring Gross
Domestic Product (GDP) Inflation and Business Cycles Government Fiscal and Monetary Policy - Balance of
payments - Foreign exchange markets
Text Book
1. P.L. Mehta Managerial Economics Analysis, Problems and cases, Sultan Chand & Co. Ltd., 2001

Reference Books
1. Peterson and Lewis: Managerial Economics, 4th Ed., Prentice Hall , 2004
2. Dholakia and Oza: Microeconomics for Management Students, 2nd Edition, Oxford University Press
3. Gregory Mankiw: Principles of Microeconomics, Havcourt Asia Publishers, 2001
4. Mote and paul Managerial Economics, Tata McGraw Hill, 2001
5. Varshney R land Maheswari K L Managerial Economics, Sultan Chand, 2000
7. G. S. Gupta - Managerial Economics, Tata McGraw Hill, 1990
Mode of Evaluation: Seminar, Written Report etc.

46
CLE312 ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS FINANCE FOR CIVIL ENGINEERS
L T P C
Course Prerequisites: NONE 3 0 0 3

Objectives:
To bring about an exposure to construction economics, financing and accounting methods and their usefulness in
controlling constructions projects.
.
Expected Outcome :
To study the elements of construction economics
To study the need for financial management and means of achieving the same
To study a few accounting methods
To study the elements of lending to contractors

Unit - I Introduction
Role of civil engineering in industrial development - Advances in civil engineering and engineering economics -
Support matters of economy as related to engineering Market demand and supply choice of technology and quality
control and quality production - Audit in economic, Law of returns governing production.

Unit II Economics of Ecology


Urban land use and values - Construction development in housing, transport and other infrastructures - Economics of
ecology, environment, energy resources, local material selection, form and functional designs - Construction workers -
Urban problems - Poverty - Migration - Unemployment - Pollution.

Unit III Financial Management


The need for financial management - Types of financing - Short term borrowing - Long term borrowing - Leasing -
Equity financing - Internal generation of funds - External commercial borrowings - Assistance from government
budgeting support and international finance corporations - analysis of financial statement - Balance Sheet - Profit and
Loss account - Funds flow statement - Ratio analysis - Investment and financing decision - Financial control Job control
and centralized management.

Unit IV Accounting
General overview - Cash basis of accounting - Accrual basis of accounting - Percentage - Completion method -
Completed contract method - Accounting for tax reporting purposes and financial reporting purposes.

Unit V
Loans to contractors - Interim construction financing - Security and risk aspects.

Text book:
Warneer Z, Hirsch, "Urban Economics", Macmillan, New York, 1993
Prasanna Chandra, "Project Management", TMH, 1997

References
Kwaku A, Tenah, Jose M.Guevara, "Fundamental of Construction Management and Organisation", Prentice -
Hall of India, 1995
Chitkara.K.K., "Construction Project Management", Tata McGraw Hill, 1998

Mode of Evaluation: Assignments, Seminars and Written Examination.

47
CLE313 ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT
L T P C
3 0 0 3
Course Prerequisites: Environmental Studies (CHY104)

Objectives:
1. To introduce the relevant legal systems and to examine the processes by which normative rules are adopted
and enforced
2. To develop an understanding of the use of EIA procedures and methods within the project and planning cycle
to promote more sustainable forms of development
3. To promote more effective use of Environmental Management Systems and implementation of Environmental
requirements.

Expected Outcome : Students will be able to


1. Apply the main procedures and methods which are used at different stages in EIA process in Project Appraisal,
Decision making and implementation
2. Develop on Environmental Management Systems
3. Develop Environmental law principles in the Regional and International context

UNIT I: Overview
Impact of development on environment and Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) and Environmental Impact
Statement (EIS) Objectives Historical development EIA capability and limitations Legal provisions on EIA.

UNIT II: EIA Methods


Methods of EIA Strengths, weaknesses and applicability Appropriate methodology Case studies.

UNIT III: EIA Procedures


Socio Economic Impact Assessment of Impact on land, water and air, energy impact; Impact on flora and fauna;
Mathematical models; public participation Reports Exchange of Information Post Audit Rapid and
comprehensive EIA.

UNIT IV: Quantitative Methods


Use the mathematical models in EIA Water quality, air quality and noise; assumptions and limitations. Basic tenets of
Global Climate Models

UNIT V: Infrastructure Development Projects and Impacts


Case studies highway, airport, dams, power plans, etc, Plan for mitigation of adverse impact on environment options
for mitigation of impact on water, air and land, flora and fauna; Addressing the issues related to the project affected
people, climate impacts and EIA

Text Books:
1. Anjaneyalu,Y. (2002), Environmental Impact Assessment Methodologies, B.S. Publications, Hyderabad.
2. Canter R.L. (1991), Environmental Impact Assessment, McGraw Hill Inc., New Delhi.

Reference Books:
1. Environmental Assessment Source book (1991), Vol.I, II & III., The World Bank, Washington, D.C.
2. Judith Petts (1999), Hand book of Environmental Impact Assessment, Vol.I & II, Blackwell Science.

Mode of Evaluation: Assignment, Seminar and Written Examination.

48
CLE212 FUNDAMENTALS OF ENERGY, ENVIRONMENT AND CLIMATE CHANGE

L T P C
Course Prerequisites: NONE 3 0 0 3

Objectives: To enable a comprehensive understanding of:


1. The Earths Energy Budget, Environment and the processes leading to climate change.
2. The inter-relatedness of the Terrestrial Energy-Environment-Climate System
3. The perturbing effects of anthropogenic activities on this system
4. A meaningful climate change quantification, and thence the means of ameliorating adverse climate change
impacts
Expected Outcome s : Clearly, the Expected Outcome s directly relate to the objectives, and upon completion of the
course, the students shall be able to:
1. Acquire a basic understanding of the terrestrial eco-system comprising of 3 principal components : Energy,
Environment and Climate Change
2. Comprehend a global picture of the inter-relatedness of the Energy-Environment-Climate system
3. Assess as qualified professionals, the perturbing effects of human activities on the earths climate
4. Acquire the necessary skills to predict emerging climate change trends globally as well as within the Indian
Subcontinent
5. Acquire the requisite professional skills to undertake policy decisions on the use and efficient management of
the Earths resources, vis--vis the possible environmental impacts on a local, regional and global scale.
Finally, the students shall be suitably equipped to advise or implement policies at the decision-making level on
the use and appropriateness of extant technologies that can arrest adverse climatic impacts.
Unit I : Overview
Overview on the Earths energy requirement vis--vis Climate Change. Origins of the terrestrial atmosphere. Earths
early atmosphere. Introduction to Climate. Layers of the atmosphere. Composition of the present day atmosphere. Post
Industrial Revolution Scenario.
Unit II : Energy Balance
Energy Balance: Earth Atmosphere System. Solar and Terrestrial Radiation. Absorption of Radiation by gases. Energy
balance. Solar variability and the Earths Energy Balance Basic concepts only.
Unit III : Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate
Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate: The Global Temperature Record. Green House Gas theory. Possible effects of
Global Warming Indian Context. The Ozone depletion problem. Atmospheric Aerosol and Cloud Effects on Climate.
Unit IV : Environmental Variability
Environmental Variability: Natural and Anthropogenic. Effects of urbanization, Landscape changes, Influence of
Irrigation, Desertification and Deforestation.
Unit V : Safeguarding Future Climate
Safeguarding Future Climate. The role of International Bodies. Kyoto and Montreal Protocol. Intergovernmental Panel
on Climate Change (IPCC 2007). The Stern Report. Carbon Credits. Indian Context .Alternative. Predicting Future
Climate Change : Global Climate Models.
Text Books
1. Climate and Energy Systems. A review of their interactions. Jill Jaeger. John Wiley. 1983
2. Policy interventions to promote energy efficient and environmentally sound technologies in SMI. Asian Institute of
Technology. 2002
References:
1. Human Impacts on Weather and Climate. W.R. Cotton and R.A. Pielke. Cambridge University Press. 1995
2. Introduction to Boundary Layer Meteorology. B. Stull. John Wiley 1988.
3. Plus, Journal Articles from J. Geophys. Res., Climate Change, Geophysical Res. Letts. Etc.
Mode of Evaluation: Assignments, Seminars, Written Examination

49
CLEE215 GIS AND REMOTE SENSING 2 0 2 3

Course Prerequisites Engineering Geology & Surveying

Objectives 1. To understand the basic concepts of remote sensing


2. To know the applications of Geographic information systems in Civil Engineering
Expected Outcomes Student will be able to:
1. Identify the basic remote sensing concepts and its characteristics
2. Implement the photogrammetry concepts and fundamentals of Air photo
Interpretation
3. Use various analysis and interpretation of GIS results

UNIT I Introduction to Remote Sensing


Energy Sources and Radiation principles electromagnetic radiation characteristic of real remote sensing system,
platforms, sensors, satellite, Indian Remote Sensing satellite.
UNIT II Photogrammetry
Geometric elements of a vertical photograph Ortho photos, Flight planning - Stereoscopic plotting instruments.
UNIT III Image interpretation
- Elements of image interpretation, concepts of digital image processing image Rectification and Restoration, Image
enhancement, Image classification. Application of Remote sensing in Civil Engineering.

UNIT IV Introduction to GIS


Introduction to GIS - history of development of GIS - elements of GIS, Computer hardware - Software. Data Input,
Verification, data storage and database management and output.
UNIT V GIS Analysis and Applications
Map Overlay - Vector and raster data model, mapping concept, development of map overlay, overlay operation
Errors and quality control Current issues and Trends in GIS application in Civil Engineering.
Text Books
1. Bhatta. B (2008), Remote Sensing and GIS, Oxford University Press.
2. Anji Reddy.M. (1998), Remote Sensing and Geographical information systems.
References
1. Lillesand, T.M. & Kiefer R.W. (2007), Remote Sensing and image interpretation, John Wiley & Sons (Asia),
Newyork.
2. Burrough P.A. (2004), Principle of Geographical Information Systems for land resources assessment,
Clarendon Press, Oxford University Press.
3. Clarke Parks & Crane (2005), Geographic Information Systems & Environmental Modelling, Prentice-Hall of
India.
4. Wolf Paul (1998), Elements of Photogrammetry, McGraw Hill, New Delhi.

Mode of Evaluation: Assignment/ Seminar/Written Examination.

50
CLE215 GIS REMOTE AND SENSING LABORATORY

Objectives 1. To understand the process of digitizing the maps


2. To know about the Arc View Software
Expected Outcomes Student will be able to:
1. Develop models using GIS and Remote Sensing
2. Implement the photogrammetry concepts and fundamentals of Air photo
Interpretation

Details of Experiments:
Analysis of the following Geographical Map

1. Importing Scanned and geo coding Map in to Arc Map


2. Registration & Geo referencing
3. Delineation of Study area from the Scanned Map
4. Digitizing the features of in Arc Map
5. Creation of attribute and metadata in Arc Catalog
6. Creation of Layers
7. Overlaying of layers by using Geoprocesing wizard
8. Attribute and Spatial data tagging

References
1. GIS Practical manual prepared by VIT staff
2. Lillesand, T.M. & Kiefer R.W. (1998), Remote Sensing and image interpretation, John Wiley & Sons,
Newyork.
3. Burrough P.A. (2000), Principle of Geographical Information Systems for land resources assessment,
Clarendon Press, Oxford.
4. Wolf Paul (1998), Elements of Photogrammetry, McGraw Hill, New Delhi.

Mode of Evaluation: Submission of mini project

51
CLE315 GROUND IMPROVEMENT TECHNIQUES

Course Prerequisites: Soil mechanics (CLE 205) L T P C


2 1 0 3

Objectives:
1. To give an overview of latest ground improvement techniques
2. To understand the problems related to soil and select the best method

Expected Outcome : Students will be able to


1. Identify the problems in Expansive soils
2. Implement the stabilization methods
3. Apply grouting and dewatering techniques

UNIT I: Problematic soils Ground Improvement Techniques


Role Problems in Soils-methods of ground improvement-selection of ground improvement techniques-stabilization of
expansive soil.

UNIT II: Dewatering Techniques


Introduction-Well points-Vaccum / electro osmatic methods- Analysis of seepage-Two Dimensional Flow- heat
treatment, ground freezing.

UNIT III: Stone Columns and Sand Drains


Types of Soils-Consolidation, dynamic compaction-Vibro flotation- Compaction piles, Sand drains-Preloading-Stone
column, Construction methods -Merits and demerits of various techniques,

UNIT IV: Grouting


Injection methods-monitoring: - Cement lime, Lime-flyash and chemical stabilization, Deep mixing Techniques.

UNIT V : Reinforces earth Geosynthetics


Concepts -materials, Types and application of reinforced earth Introduction to Geosynthetics -geo-textiles-separation
and road work Case studies.

Text Book:
1. Shashi K Gulhati & Manoj Datta (2005), Geotechnical Engineering, Tata Mc-Graw Hill Companies, New Delhi.

Reference Books:
1. R.E.Peck, W.E.Hansen & T.H.Thornburn (1998), Foundation Engineering, Jon Wiley Publication.
2. S.P.Brahma, Foundation Engineering (1998), Tata McGraw-Hill Publications.

Mode of Evaluation: Assignment, Seminar and Written Examination.

52
CLE 402 GROUNDWATER ENGINEERING
L T P C
Course Prerequisites: Water Resources Engineering (CLE316) 3 0 0 3

Objectives:
1. To educate on ground water movement analysis & predictions
2. To understand the concept to increase ground water potential
3. To identify the sources of the ground water

Expected Outcome : Students will be able to


1. Identify the ground water flow & prediction
2. Implement the Methods of improving the ground water potential
3. Manage the ground water sources

UNIT I: Occurrence and Movement of Groundwater


Introduction to Hydrologic cycle Origin and Age of groundwater, classification of groundwater, aquifer - water table -
Darcys Law, Coefficient of Transmissibility and storage - Flow rates and equation.

UNIT II: Well Hydraulics


Geophysical methods, study of radial flow - well flow, Multiple well system - characteristic well losses, open well, tube
well, well depth, well screen - head losses through the screen gravel packing and formation stabilisation.
UNIT III: Analysis and Evaluation of Pumping Test
Definition of terms - static water level, pumping level, drawdown residual, drawdown pumping rate - automatic water
level recorder - time drawdown analysis - distance drawdown analysis, Jacobs methods, pumping test methods.
UNIT IV: Pollution of Groundwater
Measures of water quality- chemical analysis - graphical representation, physical analysis, biological analysis -
Pollution in relation to water use - sources, municipal, industrial, agricultural, evaluation of pollution potential. Saline
Water intrusion in coastal aquifers .
UNIT V: Groundwater Modeling and Management
Groundwater flow Modelling Porous media models Analog models Electric analog models Digital computer
models Basin Management Hydrological Equilibrium equation Salinity balance Conjunctive use of surface and
groundwater resources.
Text Book:
1. David Keith Todd (1990), Groundwater Hydrology, Second Edition, John Wiley & Sons Singapore.
Reference Books:
1. Raghunath H.M. (1991), Groundwater, Second Edition, Wiley Eastern Limited,New Delhi.
2. Abdel-Aziz ismail kashef (1990), Groundwater Engineering, McGraw-Hill International Editions, Newyork.

Mode of Evaluation: Assignment, Seminar and Written Examination.

53
CLE325 HIGHWAY PAVEMENT DESIGN
L T P C
Course Prerequisites: Highway Engineering (CLE 302) 2 1 0 3

Objectives:
1. To understand various analysis and design procedures of pavement
2. To identify different methods of maintenance and evaluation of pavement
3. To know the different methods of rehabilitation of highway pavements.

Expected Outcome : Students will be able to


1. Implement new concepts in highway pavement design
2. Identify the factors governing the design
3. Implement maintenance and evaluation procedure of the pavement
4. Implement different construction and rehabilitation measures involved

UNIT I : General Principles of Pavement Design


Components of a road and functions factors affecting pavements stability equivalent single wheel load vehicle and
traffic factors moisture factors climate factors soil factors stress distribution in different conditions modulus of
elasticity of various layers.

UNIT II: Rigid Pavement Design


Stresses in concrete pavement IRC method design of steel reinforcements design of different joints in concrete
pavements and their functions construction of concrete pavements and their functions.

UNIT III: Flexible Pavement Design


Empirical method using soil classification tests estimation of CBR value method of designing pavement plate
bearing test method Ashpalt Institute method AASSO method Burmister design method.

UNIT IV: Pavement Evaluation


Distresses in flexible pavements distress in rigid pavements service ability index structural evaluation of flexible
and rigid pavements evaluation by deflection measurement strengthening of pavements flexible overlays rigid
overlays.

UNIT V: Stabilisation
Stabilisation with special reference to Highway pavements choice of stabilisers Testing and Field control Geo
synthetics Types - Use of Geo synthetics in roads.

Text Books:
1. S.K. Khanna & E.G. Justo (1998), Highway Engineering, Nemchand Brothers, Roorkee.
2. Pratab Chraborthy & Animesh Das. (2004), Principles of Transportation Engineering, Tata McGraw Hill Co.

Reference Books:
1. S.K. Sharma (1998), Principles, Practice and design of highway Engineering, S. Chand & Co Ltd, New Delhi.
2. S.Prakash & V.K.Puri (2000), Soil Dynamics and Design Foundations, McGraw Hill Publications.

Mode of Evaluation: Assignment, Seminar and Written Examination.

54
CLE317 HYDROLOGY
L T P C
Course Prerequisites: NONE 3 0 0 3

Objectives:
1. To understand the planning and construction of irrigation structures
2. To have an idea about the construction of highway culverts and bridges
3. To understand the measures of flood control and economic functioning of hydrologic structures.

Expected Outcome : Students will be able to


1. Know the precipitation potential & analysis of precipitation data
2. Get exposure about the stream flow measurements & runoff computations
3. Implement the hydraulic principles involved as well as its applications to engineering problems

UNIT I: Introduction and Hydro Meteorology


Definition Development of hydrology hydrologic design Hydrologic failures Importance in Engineering
Hydrological budget. Weather and hydrology General circulation Temperature humidity Wind Diurnal and
monsonic wind systems.

UNIT II: Precipitation and Runoff


Formation of precipitation forms of precipitation types of precipitation Rainfall measurement gauges recorders
processing precipitation data check for consistency supply of missing data Aerial mean mass curve technique
Intensity duration frequency curves.

UNIT III: Abstraction, infiltration and evaporation


Process of evaporation, transpiration Infiltration factors affecting evaporation Measurement of evaporation and
infiltration indices Hortons equation.

UNIT IV : Hydrograph
Runoff - Factors affecting runoff measurement stream gauging stage discharge relationship Hydrograph
components Hydrograph separation Unit hydrograph Derivation of unit Hydrograph S. Hydrograph Synthetic
hydrograph Instantaneous Unit Hydrograph (IUH)

UNIT V: Flood Analysis


Empirical methods statistical methods flood routing routing through reservoir routing through channels flood
forecasting, water shed management.

Text Book:
1. Chow, V.T. Applied Hydrology, Mcgraw Hill Company

Reference Books:
1. R.K. Linely, et al (1997), Hydrology for Engineers, McGraw Hill Publishing Company.
2. Varshney R.S. (1995), Engineering Hydrology.
3. Subramanya (1998), Engg Hydrology, Tata McGraw Hill Co., Graw Hill Co.
4. Das (2005), Hydrology & Soil Conservation Engineering, Prentice-Hall of India.
5. Mutraja, K.N. (1992), Applied Hydrology, Tata McGraw Hill Publishing Company.

Mode of Evaluation: Assignment, Seminar and Written Examination.

55
CLE314 INDUSTRIAL WASTES TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL

L T P C
Course Prerequisites: Environmental studies (CHY 104) 2 1 0 3
Version No. : 1.01

Objectives:
1. To know the various processes of wastewater treatment and the engineering requirements for that treatment
facilities.
2. To provide adequate knowledge about phenomena of atmospheric environment and treatment, sources,
characteristics and treatment processes of various types of industries.

Expected Outcome : Students will be able to


1. Implement sophisticated wastewater supply technology
2. Give solutions for biological treatment and biosensors applied to biological process control
3. Use new techniques for collection, recycling and disposal of solid wastes and sludge

UNIT I: Industrial Pollution


Types of industries and industrial pollution Characteristics of industrial wastes Population equivalent Bioassay
studies effects of industrial effluents on streams, sewer, land, sewage treatment plants and human health Hazardous
Wastes Environmental legislations related to prevention and control of industrial effluents and hazardous wastes
Pollution Control Boards.

UNIT II: Waste Management Approach


Waste management approach Waste Audit Volume and strength reduction material and process modifications
Recycle, reuse and byproduct recovery Applications.

UNIT III: Liquid Waste Treatment Techniques


Equalisation Neutralisation removal of suspended and dissolved organic solids - Chemical oxidation Removal of
dissolved inorganics Combined treatment of industrial and municipal wastes Residue management.

UNIT IV: Industrial Solid Waste Treatment


Physico-chemical treatment solidification incineration Secured land fills Legal Provisions.

UNIT V: Case Studies of Industrial Pollution Control


Sources & their Characteristics, waste treatment flow sheets for selected industries such as textiles, tanneries, dairy,
sugar, paper, distilleries, steel plants, refineries, fertilizer, thermal power plants.

Text Book:
1. M.N.Rao & A.K.Dutta (1995), Wastewater Treatment, Oxford IBH Publication.
2. Nelson, L. Nemerow (2000), Liquid Waste of Industry, Theories, Practices and Treatment, Addison-Wesley
Publishing Company, London.

Reference Books:
1. T.T.Shen, 1999, Industrial Pollution Prevention, Springer publications.
2. R.L.Stephenson & J.B.Blackburn Jr. (1998), Industrial Wastewater Systems Hand book, Lewis Publishers, New
Yark.

Mode of Evaluation: Assignment, Seminar and Written Examination.

56
CLE318 MASS TRANSPORT MANAGEMENT
L T P C
Course Prerequisites: NONE 2 1 0 3

Objectives:
1. To understand the concepts of mass transport system in urban area
2. To know the importance of MRTS
3. To study the factors governing route selections

Expected Outcome : Students will be able to


1. Implement new methods in finance management
2. Manage the organizational structures
3. Prepare route surveys and planning

UNIT I: Importance of MRTS


Structures of urban areas provision of transport facilities different mass transportation systems basic management
issues.

UNIT II: Organizational Structures


Organizational structures management by objectives delegation of powers man power planning.

UNIT III: Financing-Budgeting


Methods of financing budgeting and recounting fare structures replacement programmes, fare collected system
revenue leakage and prevention. Incentives public relations.

UNIT IV: Route Surveys


Route surveys and planning preparation of schedules and duty roasters travel time accident studies.

UNIT V: Accessories for MRTS


System evaluation measures utility designs depot locations bus terminals organisation and operation store
inventories.

Text Book:
1. Stephen Gelaister (1995), Fundamentals of Transport economics, Basicl Balckwell, Oxford.

Reference Books:
1. P.C. Stubs et al (1995), Transport Economics, George Allen and Ulbwin, Boston.
2. Louss F. Chon & Farry R. Moroy (1996), Environmental Analysis of Transportation System, A Willy
Interscience Publication, John Wiley & Sons, New York.

Mode of Evaluation: Assignment, Seminar and Written Examination.

57
L T P C
2 1 0 3

CLE403 OPERATION AND MANAGEMENT OF IRRIGATION SYSTEMS

Course Prerequisites: Water Resources Engineering (CLE316)

Objectives:

1. To help the students to understand the principles and operations of various methods of water management in
irrigation system.
2. To teach students about the principles of water logging and water shed management.
3. To teach importance of the reservoir planning, water laws, operational strategies and farmers role in operation and
management of irrigation systems.

Outcomes: Students shall be able to

1. Develop the skills to compute the irrigation demand and suggest proper methods of meeting the demand from
available supply.
2. Demonstrate the conjunctive use of surface and ground water by selecting proper irrigation system with its optimal
operating strategy.
3. Develop skills for managing water logged areas and proper utilization of water available in water shed.
4. Learn to suggest or design proper water conveying systems, scheduling of water releases to command area from
impounded reservoir etc.
5. Develop skill in reservoir planning and its optimal operational strategy with farmers participation in line with
existing water laws.
6. Develop enough skills in preliminary designing of main canals, laterals and field channels, water control and
regulating structures to meet outcome number 5

UNIT I
Irrigation System Requirements: Irrigation system requirements gravity and lift irrigation supply and demand of
water cropping pattern estimation of total and peak crop water requirements effective and dependable rainfall
allowable deficits irrigation efficiency.

UNIT II
Irrigation Scheduling: Frequency of irrigation methods of scheduling irrigation developing typical schedules case
studies water conveyance systems water measurements.

UNIT III
Management: Structural and non structural strategies in water use and management conjuctive use of surface and
ground water.

UNIT IV
Operation: Operational plans main canals, laterals and field channels water control and regulating structures
physical and administrative control water law.

UNIT V
Farmers involvement: Farmers role in system operation farmers committee for water distribution, On-farm
management and maintenance of the irrigation system Government farmer partnership in irrigation.

Reference Books

1. Mays,L.W., Water Resource Systems Management Tools, McGraw Hill Co., 2004.
2. R.T. Gandhi, Et. Al. (1998), Handbook on Irrigation Water Requirements, Water Management division,
Department of Agriculture, Ministry of Agriculture, New Delhi.
3. R.E. Robinson, C.M. Laurizen & D.C. Muckel (1998), Distribution control and Measurement of Irrigation Water
on the farm, USDA, Misc.
4. W.E. Code (1997), Farm Irrigation Structures, Colorado State University Bulletin, 495.

58
CLE319 OPERATIONS RESEARCH
L T P C
3 0 0 3
Course Prerequisites: MAT 104, MAT 105

Objectives:
1. To understand the concepts of mathematical, computational and communicative skills needed for the practical
application of OR
2. To give you a broad appreciation of contiguous disciplines which are important in OR
3. To illustrate the use of OR tools in a wide range of applications

Expected Outcome : Students will be able to


1. Apply different operational research methods for practical applications
2. Identify the importance of the optimization and its necessity
3. Implement CPM and PERT concepts in construction

UNIT I: Introduction to Operation Research


Introduction to Operations Research - Linear Programming - Mathematical Formulation Graphical method Simplex
method Duality Two Phase Simplex method - Transportation problems Northwest Corner method Vogels
Approximation method MODI method Assignment problems Applications.

UNIT II: PERT CPM


Sequencing Problem with N jobs and 2 machines, 3 machines and M machines. Network models Basic Concepts
Construction of Networks Project Network CPM and PERT - Critical Path Scheduling Crashing of Network.

UNIT III: Inventory Models


Inventory models Various Costs and ConceptsEOQDeterministic inventory methods Production models
Stochastic Inventory models Buffer stock.

UNIT IV : Simulation models


Queuing models Poisson arrivals and Exponential service times Single channel models and Multi channel models.
Simulation Basic concepts Advantages and Disadvantages Random number generation Monte-Carlo Simulation
Simulation models.

UNIT V: Decision and Replacement models


Decision models Game theory Two person zero sum game Graphic solution - Property of dominance Algebraic
solution. Replacement models Items that deteriorate with time - When money value changes Items that fail
completely Individual replacement and Group replacement.

Text Book:
1. Kanti Swarup, Gupta P.K., and Manmohan (1995), Operations Research, S.Chand &sons.

Reference Books:
2. Hamdy Taha (1995), Operations Research, PHI.
3. Hira & Gupta (1998), Operations Research,S.Chand & Sons.

Mode of Evaluation: Assignment, Seminar and Written Examination.

59
CLE320 POLLUTION CONTROL AND MONITORING
L T P C
Course Prerequisites: Environmental studies (CHY 104) 2 1 0 3

Objectives:
1. To understand the factors that must be satisfied for potable water, land and air for the removal and treatment
of pollutants.
2. To provide a strong link between the Pollution Damage, Public Authority Control Systems and Technical
Control Systems
3. To know the relationship between social, legislative and biological constraints in a modern developed society

Expected Outcome : Students will be able to


1. Describe the principles of the biological and chemical treatment processes that are required to ensure adequate
quality and quantities of potable water.
2. Implement the principal techniques currently in use for wastewater treatment and to review operational
procedures for the plant involved.
3. Use advanced methods for monitoring and modeling spatial and temporal patterns of pollution

UNIT I: Water Pollution & Control


Natural process-pollution due to industrial, agricultural and municipal wastes-limitations of disposal by dilution-BOD
consideration in streams Oxygen Sag Curve-Water pollution control legislation.

UNIT II: Air Pollution and Control


Pollution and their sources-effects of pollution on human health, vegetation and climate-prevention and control of
particulate-industry and air-pollution surveys and sampling-Air quality monitoring- air pollution control legislation.

UNIT III: Noise Pollution and Control


Sound and Noise: Sources of noise pollution environmental and industrial noise; effects of noise pollution;
fundamentals of sound generation, propogation etc; sound measurement; sound level meters types, components,
Measures for prevention and control of noise; environmental and industrial noise; noise control legislation.

UNIT IV: Solid Waste Management


Source characteristics quantities collection methods and disposal techniques sanitary landfill incineration and
pyrolysis, composting, aerobic and anaerobic- economics of composting; recycling and reuse.

UNIT V: Environmental Sanitation


Relation of food to disease-principles of food sanitation-sanitation of kitchens, restaurants and other catering
establishments-quality changes in milk-milk as carrier of infection-pasteurisation of milk-HTST and LTLT processes
cattleshed sanitation. Orientation of buildings with respect to the direction of prevailing winds and solar movement.
Air movement inside the buildings for a healthy residential environment.

Text Books:
1. Peavy, H.S., Rowe,D.R and George Tcnobanoglous (2001), Environmental Engineering, Mc-Graw Hill company,
New Delhi.
2 Rao C.S. (1996), Environmental Pollution Control Engineering, Wiley Eastern Ltd., New Delhi.

Reference Books:
1. Vesilind (1997), Introducing to Environmental Engineering, PWS Publishing Company.
2. Gerard Kiley (1997), Environmental Engineering, Irwin McGraw-Hill.

Mode of Evaluation: Assignment, Seminar and Written Examination.

60
CLE219 RENEWABLE SOURCES OF ENERGY
L T P C
Course Prerequisites: Environmental studies (CHY 104) 2 1 0 3

Objectives:
1. To create an awareness about the different forms of Energy and then utilization for sustainability
2. To give an idea about the utilization of waste as renewable energy for the future generations to come.

Expected Outcome : Students will be able to


1. Identify the forms of energy and then use as energy resource
2. Implement the methods involved in converting source to energy
3. Design the plant, based on the principles and form of resources

UNIT I: Solar Energy


Primary energy sources, direct energy conversion, comparison with conventional energy, conversion devices. Solar
energy Principles of solar energy collection, solar radiation, measurements, instruments, data and estimation, type of
collectors, characteristics and design principles of different types of collectors, testing of collectors.

UNIT II: Application of Solar Energy


Solar thermal applications - water heaters and air heaters performance and applications - simple calculations - solar
cooling, solar drying, solar ponds, solar tower concepts, solar furnace.

UNIT III: Wind and Tidal Energy


Energy from the wind - general theory of wind mills - design aspects of horizontal axis and vertical axis wind mills,
applications - Energy from tides and waves - working principles of tidal plants and ocean thermal energy conversion
plants - power from geothermal energy - principle of working of geothermal power plants.

UNIT IV: Energy from Waste


Energy from bio-mass, bio-gas plants - various types - design principles of bio-gas plant applications- Energy from
wastes wastes burning power plants - utilization of industrial and municipal wastes - energy from the agriculture
wastes.

UNIT V: Energy Conversion Systems and Applications


(Description, Principles of working and basic design aspects only) Magnetohydrodynamic systems- thermo electric
generators, thermionioc generators - fuel cells, solar cells, types, emf generated, power output - losses and efficiency
and applications.

Text Books:
1. GD Rai (1990), Non Conventional Energy Sources, Khanna Publishers.
2. Bent Sorensen (2004), Renewable energy, third edition, Elsevier academic press.

Reference Books:
3. Rao & Puinlekar (1992), Unconventional Energy Systems, Khanna Publishers.

Mode of Evaluation: Assignment, Seminar and Written Examination.

61
CLE404 SEISMIC DESIGN OF STRUCTURES 2 1 0 3

Course Prerequisites Reinforced Concrete Structures (CLE301)

Objectives 1. To make the students understand the fundamental concepts in the analysis of the
structures subjected to seismic forces.
2. To enable the students to do a competent design & detailing of seismic resistant
structures.
Expected Outcomes Student will be able to:
1. Understand the concepts of theory of vibrations, free vibrations of different degree
of freedom and dynamic response to time dependent forces.
2. Learn about the computation of design moments and shears for framed structure as
per IS:1893 and its detailing
3. Understand the estimation of member forces in single-storied R.C.C., design and
detailing of members.
4. Understand the principles of earthquake design
5. Learn about the application of response spectrum theory to seismic design of
structures.
6. Understand the concepts of earthquake resistance design and code provisions for
design of building as per IS 1893 and IS 13920.
7. Learn about the interactions of frame and shear wall.
UNIT I Principles of Earthquake Resistance Design
Importance of Earthquake Resistant Design Seismic Forces modes of propagation Factors influencing
seismic vulnerability - Characteristics of earthquake Earthquake response of structures - Application of
response spectrum theory in seismic design - Concept of earthquake resistance design Codal provisions for
seismic design of structures IS 1893 and IS 4326.

UNIT II Dynamics of Structures


Theory of Vibrations - Free and forced vibrations - single degree and multi degree of freedom systems -
computations of dynamic response to time dependent forces.

UNIT III Design of Moment Resisting Frames


RC framed structures Shear wall structures- Computation of design moments and shear forces as per IS: 1893 -
detailing of reinforcement as per IS 13920. Approximate methods in Analysis
UNIT IV Design of Beam Column Junctions
Elastic and Inelastic deformations of structures ductility of the composite system - design of axial and flexural
members beam column junction detailing.
UNIT V Design of Shear Walls
Unreinforced and reinforced masonry shear walls analysis and design of reinforced concrete shear walls-
Bearings, Friction dampers, Tuned mass dampers
Text Book
1. S.K. Duggal (2007), Earthquake Resistant Design of Structures, Oxford university press.
References
1. Arya A.S. et.al. (1995), Earthquake Engineering, Sarita Prakasham, Meerut.
2. R.Park & T.Paulay (1996), Design of Reinforced Concrete Structure Elements, John Wiley & sons.
3. V.N. Vazirani & M.M.Ratwani (1998), Concrete Structures, Khanna Publishers.
Mode of Evaluation: Assignment/ Seminar/Written Examination.

62
CLE405 SOIL DYNAMICS AND MACHINE FOUNDATIONS

Course Prerequisites: Soil Mechanics (CLE 205); L T P C


Foundation Engineering (CLE 303) 2 1 0 3

Objectives:
1. To understand the fundamentals of soil dynamics
2. To know the behaviour of the machine foundations and its design
3. To understand the techniques of isolation

Expected Outcome : Students will be able to


1. Solve geotechnical earthquake Engineering problems
2. Identify the pattern of wave propagation, Attenuation of Seismic waves
3. Study the parameters of the soil under dynamic conditions
4. Design Vibration Isolation

UNIT I: Types of Vibratory Motion


-Vibratory motion-Terminology- Single degree freedom system -Free and Forced vibrations with and without damping;
Transient response of single degree freedom system.

UNIT II: Wave Propagation in Soil media


Wave propagation in an elastic homogeneous isotropic medium - Rayleigh, Shear and compression waves - waves in
elastic half space and its equation.

UNIT III: Dynamic Properties of Soils


Coefficient of elastic, uniform and non-uniform compression and shear - effect of vibration on the dissipative properties
of soils - determination of dynamic properties of soil Codal provisions.

UNIT IV: Design Procedures of Machine Foundations


Dynamic loads - simple design procedures for foundations under reciprocating machines - machines producing impact
loads - rotary type machines- Codal provision.

UNIT V: Vibration Isolation


Vibration Isolation Technique; Mechanical isolation - Foundation Isolation - isolation by location - isolation by barriers
- active and passive isolation tests.

Text Book:
1. Swami Saran (1999), Soil Dynamics and Machine Foundations, Galgotia Publications Pvt Ltd.

Reference Books:
1. Srinivasulu.P. & Vaidyanathan.C. (1998), Hand book on Machine Foundations, McGraw Hill Publications.
2. S.Prakash & V.K.Puri (1997), Soil Dynamics and Design Foundation, McGraw Hill Publications.
3. I.S.Code Provisions I.S.2974, 1987 Part I to IV Practice of Design and Construction of Machine Foundations.
4. Shashi K Guhati & Manoj Datta (2005), Geotechnical Engineering, McGraw Hill Ltd.

Mode of Evaluation: Assignment, Seminar and Written Examination.

63
CLE321 STRUCTURES ON EXPANSIVE SOILS

Course Prerequisites: Soil Mechanics (CLE 205) L T P C


2 1 0 3
Objectives:
1. To understand the problems related to expansive soils
2. To identify preventive measures structures founded on expansive soil

Expected Outcome : Students will be able to


1. Know the physical & mineralogical properties of expansive soil
2. Predict heave and shrinkage
3. Conduct tests for identification of swelling soil
4. Design suitable foundations on expansive soil

UNIT I: Origin and Occurrence of Expansive Soils


Occurrence and distribution in India -moisture equilibrium-Soil, structure, environmental interaction - Distress
symptoms case histories.

UNIT II: Identification of Expansive Soils


Soil Structure - Clay Mineralogy; Swell potential - Field exploration - laboratory tests for identification.
UNIT III: Prediction of heave Osmotic and matric suction
Methods of prediction of heave - Empirical methods - double and oedometer tests - soil moisture suction - field
observations - shrinkage.

UNIT IV: Remedial foundation Techniques


Design considerations-Individual and continuous footings - stiffened mats, under reamed piles, Codal provisions.

UNIT V: Chemical stabilization and Special Foundation


Mechanical alteration Sand cushion technique - CNS concept Chemical stabilization with lime, flyash and cement
Special foundations Under-reamed piles Straight-shafted drilled piers - Belled piers Granular pile-anchors.

Text Book:
1. Swami Saran (1998), Analysis and Design of sub structures, Limit State Design, Oxford & IBH Publishing Co.
Pvt Ltd.,, 66, Janpath, New Delhi 110 001.

Reference Books:
1. F.H.Chen (1995), Foundations in Expansive Soils, Elseivier Publications.
2. R.E.Peck, W.E.Hansen &T.H.Thornburn (1996), Foundation Engineering, John Wiley.
3. Varghese.P.C. (2005), Foundation Engineering, Prentice-Hall India Pvt Ltd.

Mode of Evaluation: Assignment, Seminar and Written Examination.

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CLE322 SYSTEMS APPROACH IN ENGINEERING DESIGN

Course Prerequisites: MAT 104, MAT 105 L T P C


2 1 0 3
Objectives:
1. To impart the knowledge about the optimisation techniques
2. To have knowledge about different programming methodologies
3. To understand the concept of random variables.

Expected Outcome : Students will be able to


1. Implement the linear programming techniques
2. Identify the non-linear programming and its importance
3. Solve problems using dynamic programming and network analysis

UNIT I : Economics and Planning


The system concept definition characteristics structures classification. Need for overall systems approach
organisation of systems Heirarchial structures subunits Interaction and coordination in decision making
Application to planning process planning goals Delphi technique Interactive nature of planning Economics of
planning scale values.

UNIT II: Optimization


Optimization in system design-Problem formulation classification Linear programming Simplex algorithm primal
dual concept Transportation and assignment problem Application of water resources Industrial estate and real
estate development Minimising cut and full haul costs.

UNIT III: Non Linear Optimization


Non-linear optimization-Calculus methods Lagrange multiplier Khun tucker criteria Newton Rapson Technique
Non linear programming search technique Gradient method Random walk Gradient projection Application to
structural design of members and retained walls.

UNIT IV: Dynamic Programming and Network Analysis


Dynamic programming and network analysis-Least cost through a network Irrigation and pipe line system
transportation construction.

UNIT V: Random Variables


Random variables-Probability distribution, - Rectangular, normal, log normal, binomial, poisson and exponential
conditions probability Bases law expected values and variance Introduction to structural reliability and life
prediction.

Text Book:
1. Stark; R.M. & Nichlos (2002), Mathematical Foundation for design of civil Engineering systems, McGraw Hill Co.

Reference Books:
1. James C. Emers (2001), Organisational planning and concrete system Theory and Technology, Macmilan & Co.

Mode of Evaluation: Assignment, Seminar and Written Examination.

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CLE406 TRAFFIC ENGINEERING

L T P C
Course Prerequisites: Highway Engineering (CLE 302) 2 1 0 3

Objectives:
1. To study the concepts of traffic engineering and its facilities
2. To understand the methods for efficient management of traffic in urban roads
3. To understand the design principles of pavement

Expected Outcome : Students will be able to

1. Perform traffic studies


2. Know importance of traffic management
3. Identify the specification of traffic facilities
4. Design different types of pavements

UNIT I: Traffic studies


Road user and Vehicle Characteristics - Traffic Studies -Traffic volume and composition - speed, Headway -
Concentration and Delay & Flow principles - Capacity and level of service.

UNIT II: Traffic Facilities


Signals - Islands - Types and General layout of at-grade and grade separated intersections.

UNIT III: Traffic Regulations and Management


Traffic signs and markings - Parking practices - Traffic management measures.

UNIT IV : General Principles and Flexible Pavement Design


Factors affecting pavements stability equivalent single wheel load vehicle, soil, traffic & Climatic factors - stress
distribution in different conditions - CBR method of design - AASSO method & Burmister design method

UNIT V: Rigid Pavement Design


Stresses in concrete pavement IRC method design of steel reinforcements Function of joints, design of joints in
concrete pavements - Joint Fillers and sealant.

Text Book:
1. Kadiyali.L.R. (2000), Traffic Engineering and Transportation Planning, Khanna Publishers.

Reference Books:
1. S.K. Sharma (1998), Principles, Practice and design of highway Engineering, S. Chand & Co Ltd, New Delhi.
2. S.K. Khanna & E.G. Justo (1998), Highway Engineering, Nemchand Brothers, Roorkee.
3. Pratab Chraborthy & Animesh Das (2004), Principles of Transportation Engineering, Tata McGraw Hill Co.

Mode of Evaluation: Assignment, Seminar and Written Examination.

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CLE323 TRANSPORT PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT

Course Prerequisites: NONE L T P C


2 1 0 3
Objectives:
1. To understand the concepts of distribution and transport planning
2. To know the importance of zoning
3. To evaluate transport planning alternates

Expected Outcome : Students will be able to


1. Study the trip generation, distribution and assignment of traffic
2. Economical evaluate the transportation planning alternates

UNIT I: Transport Planning Process


Scope interdependence of land use and traffic systems approach to transport planning survey of existing
conditions and forecasting future conditions. Transport survey definition of study area zoning survey types and
methods inventory on transport facilities inventory of land use and economic activities.

UNIT II: Trip Generation


Factors governing trip generation and attraction rates multiple linear regression analysis category analysis critical
appraisal of techniques.

UNIT III: Distribution Methods


Uniform factor method, average factor methods gravity model and its calibration opportunity model.

UNIT IV: Trip Assignment and Modal Split


Traffic assignment general principles assignment techniques all nothing assignment multiple root assignment
capacity restraint assignment diversion curves Modal split advantages and limitations.

UNIT V: Evaluation Techniques


Economic evaluation techniques performance evaluation rating and ranking methods case studies in evaluation
rating and ranking methods case studies in evaluation of transport projects land use transport models transport
planning for medium and small sized towns.

Text Book:
1. L.R. Kadiyali (2001), Traffic Engineering and Transport planning, Khanna Publishers, New Delhi.

Reference Books:
1. Paul.H.Wright (1995), Transportation Engineering Planning & Design, John Wiley & Sons, New york.
2. John W Dickey (1995), Metropolitan Transportation Planning, Tata McGraw-Hill publishing company Ltd, New
Delhi.

Mode of Evaluation: Assignment, Seminar and Written Examination.

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CLE407 TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING

Course Prerequisites: Highway Engineering (CLE 302) L T P C


3 0 0 3
Objectives:
1. To understand various transportation modes
2. To know the various components involved in their respective modes and their basic design concepts.
3. To understand the techniques involved in harbour layout.

Expected Outcome : Students will be able to


1. Know various highway constructions techniques and its maintenance
2. Understand the components of railway engineering and their functions
3. Identify the requirements of an Airport and Harbour

UNIT I: Highway Geometric Design (9 hours)


Introduction to Transportation Systems, Highway Engineering Classification of Roads, Highway Planning - Road
cross section - camber, gradient, Super elevation - Sight distance - Horizontal and Vertical curve.

UNIT II: Materials and Constructions (9 hours)


Bitumen and bituminous mixes sources, composition, characterization, various forms - Tests on bitumen- Aggregate
test, mix design - Types of pavement - pavement construction and maintenance.

UNIT III: Railway Engineering (9 hours)


Requirements of railway alignments Survey - Typical cross section of a railway track Components and their
functions Points & Crossings Stations Selection of site Station yard and layout.
UNIT IV: Airport Engineering (9 hours)
Typical layout of Airports Component parts Objectives of components Runways Taxiways Aprons Landing
aids Requirement of airport site General principles of layout.

UNIT V: Harbour Engineering (9 hours)


Classification of Harbour basin, general layout of harbours Docks Different components of docks.

Text Book:
1. Vazirani.V.N & Chandola.S.P.(2000), Transportation Engineering Vol. I & II, Khanna Publishers,
New Delhi

Reference Books:
1. Rao.G.V. (2004), Principles of Transportation and Highway Engineering, Tata McGraw Hill Co.
2. Khanna.S.K, Arora.M.G & Jain.S.S (2000), Airport Planning and Design, Nem Chand & Bros, Roorkee
3. Rangwala.S.C, Rangwala.K.S (2004), Principles of Railway Engineering, Charotar Publishing house.
4. Chakraborthy & Das (2005), Principles of Transportation Engineering, Prentice-Hall of India.

Mode of Evaluation: Assignment, Seminar and Written Examination.

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CLE324
NATURAL DISASTER MITIGATION AND MANAGEMENT 3 0 0 3

Course Prerequisites None

Objectives 1. To teach students about types of natural and environmental disasters.


2. To help students to develop skills in various stages of disaster preparedness,
mitigation and management.
3. To teach the students the methodologies for disaster risk assessment.
Expected Outcomes Student will be able to:
1. Learn about the types of natural and environmental disasters and its causes.
2. Learn about organizational and Administrative strategies for managing disasters.
3. Learn about the early warning systems, monitoring of disasters effect and necessity of
rehabilitation.
4. Learn about the engineering and non-engineering controls of mitigating various
natural disasters.
5. Understand the key roles of capacity building to face disaster among government
bodies, institutions, NGOs, etc.
6. Learn methodologies for disaster risk assessment with the help of latest tools like
GPS, GIS, Remote sensing, information technologies, etc.

UNIT I Natural Disasters Overview

Introduction- Natural Disasters around the world- Natural Disaster Risk Assessment- Earth and its characteristics
Human Dimensions of Global environment Change Disaster mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery-
comprehensive emergency management Early warning systems and Disaster Preparedness Rehabilitation,
Vulnerable Populations - Logistics and Services, Food, Nutrition and Shelter -Role of UN Red cross and NGOs.

UNIT II Natural Hazards


Introduction and Review - Natural Disasters -Principles, Elements, and Systems - Geological-Geomorphological
aspects, - Earthquake-Geology, Seismology, Characteristics and dimensions Landslides- Human impact on the
mountainous terrain and its relationship with Rainfall, liquefaction etc- Tsunami - Nature and characteristics.

UNIT III Climate system aspects and Processes


Oceanic, Atmospheric and Hydrologic cycles - Severe Weather & Tornadoes , Cyclones, Floods and Droughts -
Global Patterns - - Mitigation & Preparation Drought Famine- nature and dimensions Drought Assessment
and Monitoring.

UNIT IV Natural Disaster Communication


Mapping - Modeling, risk analysis and loss estimation Natural disaster risk analysis - prevention and mitigation -
Applications of Space Technology (Satellite Communications, GPS, GIS and Remote Sensing and Information /
Communication Technologies ( ICT ) in Early warning Systems - Disaster Monitoring and Support Centre
Information Dissemination, mobile communication etc.
UNIT V Administrative mechanisms
Community and Social organizations Education and Training Establishment of capacity building among
various stake holders Government - Educational institutions Use of Multi-media knowledge products for self
education.
Text Book

1. Kovach, Robert L. Earth's Fury (1995), An Introduction to Natural Hazards and Disasters, Englewood Cliffs,
N.J., Prentice Hall.

69
ADVANCED FOUNDATION ENGINEERING 2 1 0 3

Course Soil Mechanics (CLE205) & Foundation Engineering (CLE303)


Prerequisites

Objectives
1. To impart the students fundamental principles of shallow foundations and the theories to
compute their bearing capacity
2. To teach the students about some special types of shallow foundations like mats and
combined footings
3. To equip them with skills to compute settlements of shallow foundations
4. To teach them about pile foundations and different aspects of pile foundations

Expected Student will be able to:


Outcomes 1. Learn the basics of different types of shallow foundations
2. Learn to compute the bearing capacity of shallow footings in various types of soils and
situations
3. Learn about special footings like mats and also about computation of settlements of
shallow foundations
4. Equip with the knowledge of special geotechnical conditions that call for the design of
pile foundations, negative skin friction and pullout capacity

UNIT I Introduction to Shallow Foundations


Terzaghis bearing capacity theory Meyerhofs analysis for bearing capacity of rectangular footings Footings
with eccentric or inclined loading Bearing capacity of footings on layered clay Bearing capacity of footings on
sand overlying soft clay.
UNIT II Special Footings
Rectangular combined footing Trapezoidal combined footing Mat foundations Application of Winklers
model to mat foundations- Design
UNIT III Settlement of Shallow Foundations
Immediate or elastic settlement of footings on saturated clay Elastic settlement of sandy soil Strain influence
factor Schmertmann and Hartman method Primary consolidation settlement.
UNIT IV Machine Foundations
Basic definitions and concepts - Free and forced vibrations - Barkans analysis.
UNIT V Pile Foundations
Load-carrying capacity of single piles in sands and clays Pile point resistance and skin friction resistance Pile
groups in sands and clays Pullout resistance of piles Consolidation settlement of pile groups Negative skin
friction - Design
Text Book

1. Gopal Ranjan and A. S. R. Rao. (1993), Basic and Applied Soil Mechanics, Wiley Eastern.

References
1. Bowles, J. E. (1982) Foundation Analysis and Design, McGraw Hill.
2. Murthy, V. N. S. (2000), Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering, Vol II, Saikripa Technical Consultants,
Bangalore.

Mode of Evaluation: Assignment/ Seminar/Written Examination.

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