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Stop Motion

What is stop motion?


-Stop motion animation refers to taking a number of photographs of an object or
character. Each photograph you capture, you move the object or character slightly. The
end result involves playing the images one after another.

How is stop motion used?


-Stop motion is used to create animation. It play images sequentially, so it looks as if
objects or characters are moving on their own.

Why should stop motion be used in the classroom?


Students can take control of their learning
Involves students in the process of planning and brainstorming
Students can be creative
Promotes collaboration, problem solving skills and patients
It allows writing to become meaningful
It is engaging to students

Ways stop motion can be implemented in the classroom:


Students can use stop motion animation to describe climate changes
Students can write stories and then use stop motion to create an animation of their
stories
Students can use stop motion to re-enact a particular historical event
Students can use stop motion to re-enact a fairy-tale or myth
Students can illustrate math concepts using stop motion
Students can use stop motion to capture the life cycle of a plant
They can use it to illustrate the difference between geographical concepts

Resources to implement stop motion in the classroom:


The Stop Motion Classroom website lists some possible materials you might need
to implement stop motion animation into your classroom
The iKit Movie website that can be used to teach younger students how to use
stop motion animation
The Lucky To Be in First website informs individuals about a product called
animation studio that can be purchased and used to create stop motion animation
in the classroom. The website also has stop motion animation lesson ideas.
Research:
Kamp, B. L., & Deaton, C. M. (2013). Move, stop, learn: Illustrating mitosis
through stop-motion animation. Science Activities: Classroom Projects And
Curriculum Ideas, 50(4), 146-153.

Kamp and Deaton (2013) provided students with the opportunity to use Stop
Motion Animation. High school students enrolled in biology were given the task to create
a stop motion animation video illustrating Mitosis. The Stop Motion project was used to
actively involve student in the learning process rather than just having them memorize
the process of Mitosis. Students were able to model the cellular division process in
groups. The project required students to utilize their knowledge of cell division and the
steps involved in the process of Mitosis. Teachers reported that this activity helped build
students teamwork skills, allowed students to take ownership of their learning and
engaged students.

Hoban, G., & Nielsen, W. (2010). The 5 Rs: A new teaching approach to
encourage slowmations (student-generated animations) of science
concepts. Teaching Science, 56(3), 33-38.

The article discusses steps on how to implement slow-motion (acknowledged as a


simplified way to implement stop motion animation) into the classroom for primary and
secondary students. The article focused on explaining how to implement stop motion by
using the 5Rs teaching approach for creating a slow motion. The 5R teaching approach is
typically used as a summative assessment task to determine childrens understanding of a
learned topic. The article also provides an example on how slow-motion was used by
primary students to illustrate life cycles. The article states that Hoban (2007) and Hoban,
McDonald and Ferrys (2009) research has indicated that students find the process of
slow motion engaging and helps them to acquire better understanding of learned concepts
because they have to reflect upon and illustrate their learning when developing slow-
motion projects.

Resources:
Dragon Frame . (2016). What is stop motion animation. In Introduction to Stop Motion.
Retrieved November 12, 2016, from
http://www.dragonframe.com/intro_to_stop_motion.php

Hoban, G., & Nielsen, W. (2010). The 5 Rs: A new teaching approach to encourage
slowmations (Student-Generated Animations) of Science Concepts. Teaching
Science, 56(3), 33-38.
Jumping Jax Designs . (2016, April). Stop motion animation in the classroom. In Lucky
to be first. Retrieved November 4, 2016, from
http://luckytobeinfirst.com/2016/05/stop-animation-classroom.html

Kamp, B. L., & Deaton, C. M. (2013). Move, stop, learn: Illustrating mitosis
through stop-motion animation. Science Activities: Classroom Projects And
Curriculum Ideas, 50(4), 146-153.

Kaplan Early Learning Company. (2016). Using stop-motion animation to teach


elementary concepts. In Kaplan. Retrieved November 6, 2016, from
https://www.kaplanco.com/ii/using-stop-motion-animation?CategoryID=13

Katch, K. (2016, May 1). Stop motion animation in the classroom. In Discovery
Education . Retrieved November 5, 2016, from
http://blog.discoveryeducation.com/blog/2016/05/01/animation/