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Stages of

ChiLd
DeVElopMenT
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Physical measured by height/weight


Cognitive thinking/intellectual growth
Psychosocial relationships/relations/communication
Physical Development
Brain and Nervous System
The infant's experiences help to "fine-tune" the brain's responses to
stimulation.

Motor Abilities
Brain maturation allows the

development of
motor skills
from reflexes to coordinated motor

abilities, including grasping and walking.


Cognitive Development
Cognitive Skills
The infant progresses from knowing his or her world only through
immediate experiences that helps her to "experiment"

Language
Babies cry is his or her first

language
Psychosocial Development
Personality Development
The infant's transition from total dependence to increasing

INDEPENDENCE.

Understanding Self and Others


Much more attentive to the reactions
of others.

Parent-
Parent-Infant Interaction
Parents and infants respond to each other first by

synchronizing their behavior.


We should
start
thinking
now?
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PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT
Brain and Nervous System
The brain develops faster than any
other part of the body, attaining
90 percent of its adult weight
Motor Abilities and Perception
Large body movements, such as
running and jumping,
improve dramatically. Fine motor skills,
such as writing and drawing, develop more
slowly.
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COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT
Cognitive Skills
The child becomes increasingly able
To use mental representation
and SYMBOLS.

Language
Language abilities develop rapidly;
By age of 6, the average child knows
14,000 words and demonstrates
extensive grammatical knowledge.
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PSYCHOSOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

Personality Development
The child to boldly and exuberantly initiates
new activities.

Understanding Self and Others Parent


They engage in increasingly complex and
imaginative types of play, sometimes by them
selves and, increasingly, with others.

Child Interaction
As children become more independent and
try to exercise more control over their
environment, the parents' role in supervising the child's
activities becomes more difficult.
The School Years (Age 7 through 11)
PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT

Growth
Increased strength and heart and lung
capacity give children the endurance to
improve their performance in skills such
as swimming and running.
Motor Skills
Slower growth might contribute to
children's increasing control over their
bodies.
The School Years (Age 7 through 11)
COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT

Concrete Operational Thought


Children develop the ability to
understand logical principles.
An Information-Processing View
Children are able to organize their
knowledge.
Language
Children's increasing ability to
understand the structures and
possibilities of language.
The School Years (Age 7 through 11)
PSYCHOSOCIAL DEVELOPMENT
Personality Development
Understanding of cause and effect and their
awareness of the actions and attitudes of others
make them more susceptible to reinforcement.

The Peer Group


The peer group becomes increasingly important
to children.

Social Systems and the Child


Children are increasingly aware of, and involved
in family life, as well as in the world outside
the home, and therefore are more likely to feel the
effects of family, economic, and political
conditions.
Adolescence (Aged 10 through 18)
PHYSICAL
DEVELOPMENT

Physical Growth
At some time between the ages of 9 and 14,

puberty begins with increases in male


and female hormone levels.

Changes in Sex Organs and


Secondary Sex Characteristics
Toward the end of puberty, the young
potential
person's

reproductive capacity
Adolescence (Aged 10 through 18)
COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT
Formal Operational Thought
By the end of adolescence, many young
people can understand and create
general principles and use scientific reasoning.

Adolescent Egocentrism
Their feelings of invincibility and uniqueness
may prompt them to underestimate
risks, for example, with regard to sexual
relationships and drug use.
Adolescence (Aged 10 through 18)
PSYCHOSOCIAL DEVELOPMENT
Identity
Development of the young person's
own sense of self.

Peers
The peer becomes increasingly
important to "try out" new behaviors
and explore different facets of their
personality, and to interact with
members of the opposite sex.

Parent-Child Relationships
Increased assertiveness or lack of self-discipline
and self-control.
CDAs Role in CD
Understanding child is apriority.
The child needs YOU.
CD helps to empathize with the role of
nature, in play, in his life.
The child is your mirror.
The hardest job kids face today is learning
Good Manners without seeing any.
Franklin P. Jones