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IELTS GUIDES BY KENNEDY

from forum:

www.writefix.com - ok na ok to. as in ginaya ko ung format nya


8.5 nakuha ko sa writing

http://www.world-english.org

www.grammarly.com

http://blog.ieltspractice.com

www.GoodLuckIELTS.com

http://www.ieltspractice.com/package.php?
utm_campaign=RTI_FV&utm_source=Blog&utm_medium=20151
110

http://www.ielts-exam.net/ielts-preparation-tips/IELTS-tip-1.html

https://www.britishcouncil.ae/en/exam/ielts/courses-
resources/videos

http://takeielts.britishcouncil.org/prepare-test/practice-
tests/reading-practice-test-1-academic

What'sintheexam?

Paper Content Time

Listenin 40questions Approximately30minutes(plus10minutestransfertime)


g

Reading 40questions 60minutes


Writing 2tasks 60minutes

Speakin 3parts 1114minutes


g

IELTSListening:Threethingsthatcango
wrong
MostpeoplefindtheListeningtestmorestressfulthantheReadingtest.
Thatsbecausewhenyouarereading,youhavethetextsinfrontofyouand
youcanrefertothemmorethanonce.Whenyouarelistening,ifyoumiss
ananswer,itsgoneandbecauseyouonlyheartherecordingonce,you
cannevergetitback.Soyouneedtoworkoutsomestrategiesinadvance.
1.Makenotesbeforeyoulisten
ImaginethatyouarelisteningfortheanswertoQuestion3,andyou
suddenlyheartheanswertoQuestion6.Thismeansyouhavebeenfocusing
sohardononequestionthatyouhavemissednotonlythatone,buttwo
more!
Onewaytoavoidthisistomakenotesonthequestionpaperasyoulisten.
Dontworryifyournotesareuntidy;theimportantthingisnottogetleft
behind.Attheend,youhavetenminutestotransferyouranswerstothe
answersheet(atwhichtimeyoudoneedtobeneatandtidy).
ThekeytodoingwellintheListeningtestistomakeitatwostageprocess.
Firstlistenandmakenotes,thentransferyouranswerstotheanswerpaper.
2.Beaccurate
IntheListeningtest,youneedtobeveryprecisewhenansweringthe
questions.Forexample,letssaythequestionpaperasksyoutocompletethe
phraseintheandtheanswerismorning.Whenyouwritethe
informationontheanswersheet,onlymorningwillbemarkedcorrect.If
youwritethemorningorinthemorningyouwillnotbegivenapoint
(despitethefactthatyouknowtheanswer).
3.Ifindoubt,guess
Ifyourenotsureoftheanswer,itsimportanttoguess.Therearetwo
reasonsforthis:
Youdonotlosepointsforhavingthewronganswer,sothereisnorisk.
Leavingspacescangetyouintotroubleasyoumightwriteacorrect
answerinthewrongplacelater.
Finally,makesurethatTestDayisnotthefirsttimeyoudoanIELTS
Listeningtest.Trytodoatleastfourorfivepracticetestsinadvance.

IELTSSpeaking:Lostforwords?
Ihavenoexperienceofthesubject,sohowcanIrespond?
Ioftengetthisquestionfromcandidates.Theyworrytheydonothave
knowledgeofsomeofthetopicsthatexaminersmightaskthemabout,for
exampleafavouritebuilding,aneyecatchingadvertisementoramemorable
trip.Maybeyoufeelthesameway?
ThefirstthingtounderstandisthatIELTSisnotatestofknowledgeor
experience.Ifyoudonothavetheknowledgeorexperienceofaspecific
area,thatsnotaproblem.Therearenocorrectorincorrectanswers
expectedintheIELTSspeakingtest.
ThefirstpointtorememberisthatallIELTSquestionsarecheckedand
trialedmanytimesallaroundtheworldtoensurethattheyarefairandequal
nomatterwherethetestisconducted.YoumighthaveheardthatCambridge
Examinationscanspendtwotofouryearsintestingtheirexamquestions!
Soyoucanbe100%surethatthereisaneffectivewayofansweringthe
questionwhateveryourlevelofknowledge.
Thismeansyoumustavoidirrelevantanswerssometimesitseems
candidatesassumethatiftheydontknowanythingaboutaspecifictopic
theycantalkaboutadifferentbutsimilartopic.Thatisadangeroustactic.If
youranswerisconsideredunrelatedbytheexaminer,thatspecificresponse
cannotbeusedtoassessyourspeakingtestscore,andyouwillgenerateno
marks.
Sohowcanyourespondifyoudonotknowanythingaboutaspecific
subjectbeingaskedabout?Letslookattwooptions.
Oneoptionistoadmitthatyoudonotknowmuchthisisanopportunity
tousesomesignpostinglanguagethathelpsyourlistenerunderstandwhat
youwillsaynext.Forexample,assumeyouhavebeenaskedaboutaneye
catchingadvertisement.StartbysayingThatsaninterestingquestion,I
haveneverthoughtaboutthatbefore,but.Thenstarttalkingaboutany
advertisementyoucanremember(afterall,whatseyecatchingtoone
personmaynotbetoanother).Youcoulddescribetheadvertisementfrom
foregroundtobackgroundorfromlefttoright,highlightingthekeyfeatures.
Anotheroptionistotalkaboutanexperiencethatafamilymemberora
friendmighthavehad.Youcandothisifthetopicistotalkabouta
memorabletripyouhavemade,forexample.Youmaynothavehadthe
chancetomakeanytrips,butyourecallyourfathertalkingabouthis
favouritejourneys.Youcantelltheexamineryoudonothaveany
experienceofthisthemebutyouwouldliketoshareyourfathers
experience.Doingthis,youarestillfollowingtheinstructionsandsticking
tothetopic.

IELTSPreparation:Getthebandscoreyou
needinjustonemonth
CantfindagoodplacetostudyforIELTS?StrugglingtofitIELTSprep
intoyourschedule?DrAmmarHadiKadhim,aneurosurgeonlivinginIraq,
offersasolution.Heachievedthebandscoreheneededwithjustone
monthspracticeusingRoadtoIELTS.Hereshisstory
WouldyoubelievemeifItoldyouthatIpassedtheIELTStest
successfullyfromthefirsttrialwithnoIELTSexperienceeverbefore
EXCEPTwiththeRoadtoIELTSwhichIsubscribedtojust2months
beforetheexamdate?Ionlyhad2monthsbecauseIamaverybusy
neurosurgeon.Otherwise,onemonthofconcentratedRoadtoIELTS
practicecouldbesufficient.
Iwasconfusedatfirst.WhatshouldIread?HowshouldIpractiseandtrain
myselftogettherequiredscore?IaminIraqand,actually,thereareno
coursesorinstitutionsthatareeasilyaccessibleforIELTStraining.Isaidto
myself,whoisthebesttotrainmeotherthanIELTSpeoplethemselves
theBritishCouncil!RoadtoIELTSisjustwhatIshouldspendmylimited
trainingtimewith,andthatwasmywisedecision.
RoadtoIELTSisverywellstructuredandwithitsprogressivechallenging
levelsensuresasolidbasetoanswerthemostdifficultquestions.Ithelped
mebeorientedonthedayoftest,knowwhatthetrickswillbeandhowto
dealwiththem.
ReadingandListeningmodulestrainingisfantasticandsoefficient.
WritingandSpeakingmodulestraininghelpsalotinunderstandingthekey
topassthesetestssuccessfullygreatdealoftips,andchallengingtests.
Myscoresare:Listening:8.5,Reading:8.5,Writing:7.0,Speaking:7.0,
Overall:8.0Primarylanguage:ArabicTestDate:Jan10,2015
ThankyouforRoadtoIELTS.

In Listening, use the example at the beginning of the first section to


familiarize yourself with the sound, the situation, and the speakers.
Keep listening until the recording stops, looking only at the questions that
relate to the part being played.
There are often pauses in the recording between different sections. Use
these to prepare for the next set of questions.
Answer Listening questions in the order they appear on the Question
Paper. Remember that they normally follow the order of the
information in the recording.
At the end of the recording you have some time to transfer your answers
to the Answer Sheet. Check your grammar and spelling as you do
so.
In Academic Reading, begin by going quickly through each passage to
identify features such as the topic, the style, the likely source, the
writers purpose and the intended reader.
As you read, dont try to understand the precise meaning of every word
or phrase. You dont have time, and those parts of the text might not
be tested anyway.
Reading tasks sometimes have an example answer. If this is the case,
study it and decide why it is correct.
Some tasks require you to use words from the text in the answer; in
others you should use your own words. Check the instructions
carefully.
The instructions may also include a word limit, e.g. Use no more than
three words. Keep to this by avoiding unnecessary words in your
answer.
In Academic Writing, you must always keep to the topic set. Never try to
prepare sections of text before the exam.
Keep to the suggested timing: there are more marks possible for Task 2
than Task 1.
Organize and link your ideas and sentences appropriately, using a wide
range of language and showing your ability (in Task 2) to discuss
ideas and express opinions.
If you write less than 150 words in Task 1 or less than 250 in Task 2 you
will lose marks, but there is no maximum number of words for either.
When you plan your essay, allow plenty of time at the end to check your
work.
In Speaking, dont try to give a prepared speech, or talk about a different
topic from the one you are asked to discuss.
Always speak directly to the Examiner, not to the recording equipment.
Whenever you reply Yes or No to the Examiners questions, add more
details to your answer. In each case, aim to explain at least one
point.
Remember that you are not being tested on your general knowledge but
on your ability to communicate effectively.
Organize and link your ideas and sentences appropriately, talking clearly at
normal speed and using a wide range of structures and vocabulary.

IELTSExamTips
Listening
Read the instructions and questions carefully before you listen.
Try to get an idea of the situation. Who are the speakers? Where
are they? Why are they speaking?
Remember, you will only hear the audio once. You will need to
read, write and listen all at the same time.
Listen for 'signpost words' such as however, although and
finally. They help you to anticipate what the speaker will
say.
Reading
Skim through each text to try to get a basic understanding of
what it is about. What is the text about? Who was it written
for?
Carefully read the title and any sub-heading.
What is the main point of each paragraph? Each paragraph
contains a single main idea. The questions will focus on
these main ideas.
Remember questions appear in the same order as the answers
in the text.
Writing
IELTSTask1:
Howtorespondwhengiven2datasources
Article contributed by Ryan Higgins, ieltsielts.com
One of the most common questions I am asked as an IELTS
instructor is how to link multiple data sources together. Often,
students find it difficult to express the relationship between more
than 1 data source. In this article, written exclusively for
www.ExamEnglish.com, I am going to offer some insights
regarding Task 1 response writing when given more than 1 data
source to analyze.
To get us started, lets look at the following example table and
graph:
Gla
sg
ow
ag
e
de
mo
gra
phi
cs
(19
98)

0-12
13-
19
20-
34
35-
49
50-
64
64+

When looking at these 2 data sources, a few things should jump


out as us. Firstly, according to the table, in 1998 Glasgow had a
population that was heavily weighted with people aged between
35 and 64. Many would rightfully call this an aging population.
Our graph shows a steady rise in average annual hospital visits
between 1980 and 2010. So the obvious link between the 2 data
sources is that as Glasgow residents get older, hospital visitation
increases.
Students rarely have problems making these sorts of connections
between data. They do have problems, however, when it comes
to relaying this information accurately in writing. So what is the
ideal Task 1 structure when you are given multiple data sources?
The best way to respond to a Task 1 question is to allot a
paragraph to each data source and an additional paragraph to
describing the relationship between them. Thus, in the case of
this table and graph, our basic Task 1 writing structure is going to
have 3 paragraphs and look like this:
Paragraph 1 Analyzing data source 1 (table)
A sentence describing the first data source and the broad trend
it depicts
A sentence outlining the minor and minute details of the data
source
Another sentence outlining the minor and minute details of the
data source (if needed)
Paragraph 2 Analyzing data source 2 (graph)
A sentence describing the second data source and the broad
trend it depicts
A sentence outlining the minor and minute details of the data
source
Another sentence outlining the minor and minute details of the
data source (if needed)
Paragraph 3 Brief description of the relationship between the
data types
A sentence explaining the relationship between the sources
A sentence for further explanation (if needed)
A sentence elaborating or commenting on what this relationship
means or what perhaps caused it
A sentence summarizing, predicting or commenting on the data
presented
In both paragraph 1 and 2, we are simply going to recite each
data source individually, stating precisely what each source
shows. In paragraph 3, we interpret the data source relationship.
So, in the case of our Glasgow example above, wed write our
response something like this:
The table presents Glasgow age demographics in 1998 and
appears to reveal an aging population within the city. Children
and teenage Glasgow residents make up 14 and 12 percent of
Glasgows overall population respectively. People between 20
and 34 account for 16 percent of the total Glasgow population
and this figure grows by increments of 4 percent for the following
2 demographics, those between 35 and 49 and those between 50
and 64. The elderly demographic is equal to that of Glasgow
children.
The chart shows the average annual number of hospital trips a
Glasgow person makes. The figures given between 1960 ad
1980 appear to only waver slightly, at roughly 2.3 trips per year.
However, a steady climb is seen over the next 30 years, with
Glasgow people ultimately reaching 3.2 annual hospital visits in
2010.
What you can see above is a clear picture of both data sources.
By simply reading the description, a person could recreate the
table and graph this data comes from.
Now to show the relationship between the 2 data sources, we
would commence writing our third paragraph:
It is clear when looking at the table and graph comparatively that
Glasgow has an aging population and that this is cause for the
increased annual hospital visits. It is assumed baby-boomers
play cause to this abnormal weighting. As these older Glasgow
demographics continue to age, it is expected that the annual
number of hospital visits will also rise.
What you can see here is 3 sentences. The first outlines the
nature of the relationship between the 2 data sources. The
second provides a quick comment on the possible cause and the
third gives a prediction for what the future of the data might look
like.
Thus basically our overall response involves 2 paragraphs that
present information and 1 paragraph that interprets it. Lets read
through our entire response from start to finish:
The table presents Glasgow age demographics in 1998 and
appears to reveal an aging population within the city. Children
and teenage Glasgow residents make up 14 and 12 percent of
Glasgows overall population respectively. People between 20
and 34 account for 16 percent of the total Glasgow population
and this figure grows by increments of 4 percent for the next 2
demographics, those between 35 and 49 and those between 50
and 64. The elderly demographic is equal to that of Glasgow
children.
The chart shows the average annual number of hospital trips a
Glasgow person makes. The figures given between 1960 ad
1980 appear to only waver slightly, at roughly 2.3 trips per year.
However, a steady climb is seen over the next 30 years, with
Glasgow people ultimately reaching 3.2 annual hospital visits in
2010.
It is clear when looking at the table and graph comparatively that
Glasgow has an aging population and that this is cause for the
increased annual hospital visits. It is assumed baby-boomers
play cause to this abnormal weighting. As these older Glasgow
demographics continue to age, it is expected that the annual
number of hospital visits will also rise.
As you can see, responding to Task 1 questions that pose more
than 1 data source are much easier when you employ an
effective writing structure.
Good luck with your exam!

IELTSWriting:FREETask2activities
WhatdoIhavetodoinWritingTask2?
TheBritishCouncilsTakeIELTSwebsitestatesthatInTask2youwillbe
askedtowriteanessayinresponsetoapointofview,argumentorproblem.
Youshouldfindtheissuesinterestingandeasytounderstand.
Examplesare:
Ismoneyorjobsatisfactionmoreimportanttoconsiderwhenchoosinga
career?
Apersonsworthnowadaysseemstobejudgedaccordingtosocialstatus
andmaterialpossessions.Oldfashionedvalues,suchashonour,
kindnessandtrust,nolongerseemimportant.Towhatextentdoyou
agreeordisagreewiththisopinion?
HowcanIpractise?
ForthewholeofthemonthofNovember2015,Clarityisoffering
FREEmaterialstohelpyouwithWritingTask2.Theseinclude:
understandingthewritingprocess
learninghowtobrainstormandplanyourTask2essay
learninghowtoimproveyourspelling
studyingessaysfromotherstudentsbothgoodandlessgood
lookingatteachercommentsonthoseessays.

IELTSWriting:Boostyourscorebyreading
Readingandwritingcannotbeseparatedfromeachother:themoreindepth
readingyoudo,themoreindepthwritingyouwilleventuallydo.The
UniversityofWashingtonpointstoaclearlinkbetweenreadingandwriting.
Readingexposesyoutodifferentstyles;itshowsyouhowgrammarisused
correctly;andithelpsyoutobuildvocabularyanduseitaccurately.Butto
getthemaximumbenefitforyourIELTSWritingtest,youneedtouse
readingasasourceforfocusedwritingactivities.Readonforanexampleof
howyoucandothis.
Task
InIELTSAcademicWritingTask1,youwilldescribeachartoraprocess.
Wheredoyoufindthelanguagetodothis?Letsstartbyreadingthisarticle
fromtheUKsIndependentnewspaperonthetopicoftheglobalmiddle
class.Heresyourtask:
Printoutthearticleandreadit.
Takeapenandunderlineeverymentionofquantitiesorproportions,or
howtheychange(forexample,88%of,justoveratenth,rose
significantly)
Nowcopydowneachsentencethatincludesoneoftheseexamples,and
writeaparallelsentenceonadifferenttopicunderneathit.Inthis
exercisewearefocusingonlanguage,ratherthantheinterpretationof
thegraph.Soitdoesntmatterwhetheryoursentencesaretrueornot;
whatsimportantisthatyoupractiseusingthewords.
Example
Originalsentence:Themiddleincomepopulationnearlydoubledbetween
2001and2011.
Parallelsentences:ThepopulationofrhinosinKenyanearlydoubled
between2005and2015.
Overthesameperiod,thepopulationofelephantsmorethandoubled.
Herearethreemoreoriginalsentencestogetyoustarted.
Themiddleclassesamounttojustoveratenthoftheglobalpopulation.
By2011,overhalfoftheworldspopulationlivedonalowincome.
InAfricaandCentralAmerica,middleclasspopulationsbarelyrose.

IELTSReading:Sixhandytips
Youhave60minutestoanswer40questions.Thatmeans90secondsper
question,excludingreadingtime!Soyoumustnotwastetimeon
questionsyoudontseetheanswerto.Skipthem,moveonandcome
backtothemlater.

Questionsareusuallyinthesameorderastheanswersinthetext.This
meanstheanswertoquestion1willbeearlierinthetextthanthe
answertoquestion2.Bearthisinmindasyoulookforanswers.
Thereadingpassagesgenerallygofromeasiertoharderandsodothe
questions.Sodontpanicifyoufindthelatertextsandquestionsmore
difficulttheyaresupposedtobe!
So,followingonfromtip3,dotheearlierquestionsfirsttogeteasymarks
andgainconfidence.
Becausethequestionsusuallyparaphrasetheinformationinthetext,you
needtoreadformeaning,notforexactwording.Sodontmakethe
mistakeofjustlookingforthesamewordsinthequestionasinthe
text.
Somecandidatesfinditbettertoreadthequestionsbeforethetext;others
prefertoreadthepassagefirstthenlookatthequestions.Practisetrying
bothwaysandseewhichsuitsyoubest.

IELTSListening:Help!Idontunderstand
theaccent!
Theproblem
IELTSisaninternationaltest,soyoumightheararangeofdifferentaccents,
includingAustralian,British,NewZealandandNorthAmerican.Remember
thatyouonlyheartheaudioonceintheListeningtestsoyouneedtobe
absolutelyconfidentthatyoucanpickouteverydetailfirsttime.An
unfamiliaraccentcangetinthewayofthat.Whiletherewillnotbeany
extremeaccents,youshouldatleastbefamiliarwitharangeofstandard
accents.
Thesolution
StartbyreadingthisextractfromareportfromtheUSLibraryofMedicine:
Itiswellknownthatthereisaprocessingcostwhenlisteningtospeechin
anaccentotherthanonesown,butrecentworkhassuggestedthatthiscost
isreducedwhenlisteningtoafamiliaraccentwidelyrepresentedinthe
media,and/orwhenshortamountsofexposuretoanaccentareprovided.
Thismeansthatshortamountsofexposuretoanunfamiliaraccentreally
canhelpyoutounderstandit.Soitssensibletospendsometimelistening
tothemostcommondialectswhenyouarepreparingforthetest.Itsnot
difficulttofindradiostationsonlinethatenableyoutodothis.
Herearesomeexamples:
ABCRadiofromAustralia
CBCRadiofromCanada
BBCRadio4fromtheUK
Itseasytofindothers,andyoumayevenfinditinterestingtolistentosome
moreunusualaccentssuchasLouisianaorCaribbean.Infact,youcanhave
lotsoffunfindingradiostationsworldwideontunein.com!
AnotherapproachistolistentosomeTEDtalks.TEDspeakerscomefrom
manydifferentcountries,andoftenthetalkshavetranscripts,soyoucan
checktheaccuracyofyourlistening.HerearethreeexamplesfromtheTop
20TEDtalks:
KenRobinson:Howschoolskillcreativity(Britishaccent)
AmyCuddy:Yourbodylanguageshapeswhoyouare(NorthAmerican
accent)
PranavMistry:ThethrillingpotentialofSixthSensetechnology(Indian
accent)