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Exploration & Production

GENERAL SPECIFICATION

GS EP EXP 211

Plant integrity
Minimum inspection requirements

03 10/06 Re-direction of Floating Production Units Requirements to GS EP LSO 301


02 10/05 Addition of EP root to GS identification
01 09/03 Change of group name and logo
00 01/03 First issue
Rev. Date Notes

This document is the property of Total. It must not be stored, reproduced or disclosed to others without written authorisation from the Company.
Exploration & Production

General Specification Date: 10/06

GS EP EXP 211 Rev: 03

Contents

1. Objectives ................................................................................................................ 4

2. Scope ....................................................................................................................... 4

3. Application............................................................................................................... 4
3.1 National Legislation ...........................................................................................................4
3.2 Risk Based Inspection .......................................................................................................4

4. Reference documents............................................................................................. 5

5. Pressure Systems Equipment................................................................................ 6


5.1 Pressure Vessels...............................................................................................................6
5.2 Heat Exchangers ...............................................................................................................7
5.3 Steam Boilers and Fired Heaters.......................................................................................8
5.4 Tanks .................................................................................................................................9
5.5 Gas Cylinders ..................................................................................................................11
5.6 Piping...............................................................................................................................12
5.7 Corrosion Monitoring .......................................................................................................14
5.8 Pressure Safety Devices .................................................................................................14
5.9 Flares...............................................................................................................................15

6. Well Control Equipment........................................................................................ 16

7. Pipelines ................................................................................................................ 17
7.1 General ............................................................................................................................17
7.2 Design Review.................................................................................................................17
7.3 Inspection Scope .............................................................................................................18

8. Surface structures................................................................................................. 19
8.1 General ............................................................................................................................19
8.2 Inspection Scope .............................................................................................................20

9. Sub-sea structures................................................................................................ 20
9.1 Offshore Jackets..............................................................................................................20
9.2 Inshore or Swamp Sub-Sea Structures ...........................................................................22
9.3 Other Sub-Sea Structures and Equipment ......................................................................23

10. Lifting equipment .................................................................................................. 24


10.1 General Lifting Equipment ...............................................................................................24

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10.2 Cranes .............................................................................................................................25


10.3 Drilling Related Lifting Equipment....................................................................................27

11. Helicopter Refuelling Stations and Portable Tanks ........................................... 27


11.1 Helicopter Refuelling Stations - Pressure System Inspection..........................................27
11.2 Portable Tanks.................................................................................................................27

12. Marine terminal facilities ...................................................................................... 28


12.1 Jetties ..............................................................................................................................28
12.2 Loading Arms...................................................................................................................29
12.3 Mooring Buoys.................................................................................................................29

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1. Objectives
This General Specification provides the basis for defining the minimum inspection requirements
necessary to assure the integrity of plant and structures.
It is the responsibility of each operational subsidiary to determine and apply the optimum level
of inspection to assure plant integrity and therefore these minimum requirements should only be
seen as a safety net below which integrity standards must never fall.
2. Scope
The scope of this document covers the following Plant and Structures:
x Pressure Systems
x Well Control and Drilling Equipment - See note
x Pipelines
x Surface and Sub-Sea Structures
x Lifting Equipment
x Helicopter Refuelling Systems and Portable Tanks
x Marine Terminal Facilities
Note: While the integrity of drilling equipment is under the responsibility of Drilling and Logistic
Departments and the integrity of well control equipment is under the responsibility of
production/completion departments, some elements of inspection may be delegated to the
integrity department. The responsibility for integrity of drilling and well control equipment shall
be formally agreed & recorded within each subsidiary.
3. Application
The requirements of this document apply to:
x All new projects planned, designed and constructed by and for the COMPANY
x All oil and gas installations, operated by the COMPANY.
Any deviation from the minimum inspection requirements stipulated hereafter must be cleared
through a formal Request for Exemption according to CR EP TDO 004.

3.1 National Legislation


In many Countries national legislation may dictate both which items of plant are subject to
statutory inspection and, the inspection programme which must be adhered to. In such cases
the Head of Integrity must comply with these requirements to ensure the plant can operate
within the law of the land.
In the case where there is a conflict between national legislation and this General Specification,
it is the national legislation that MUST apply.
In the case where national legislation falls short of these minimum COMPANY inspection
requirements, it is the COMPANYs requirements that must apply.

3.2 Risk Based Inspection


In order to focus inspection effort in the most efficient manner, a Risk Based Inspection (RBI)
approach is the integrity strategy recommended for certain specific categories of plant and

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structures. Where an approved formal Risk Based Inspection (RBI) approach is taken, its output
replaces the minimum requirements specified in this General Specification.
However where an approved formal RBI approach is NOT applied then the minimum inspection
requirements identified within this General Specification must be adhered to.
Attention is raised that an inspection plan designed according to RBI may be more stringent for
some equipment and less for others depending on their criticality, than the requirements in this
General Specification.

4. Reference documents
The reference documents listed below form an integral part of this General Specification. Unless
otherwise stipulated, the applicable version of these documents, including relevant appendices
and supplements, is the latest revision published at the EFFECTIVE DATE of the CONTRACT.

Standards

Reference Title
EN 1968 Guidance of the inspection requirements BS 7020

Professional Documents

Reference Title
Not applicable

Regulations

Reference Title
Not applicable

Codes

Reference Title
Not applicable

Other documents

Reference Title
Not applicable

This document is the property of Total. It must not be stored, reproduced or disclosed to others without written authorisation from the Company.

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Total General Specifications


Reference Title
Not applicable

5. Pressure Systems Equipment


Pressure Systems Equipment is the collective term for all Pressure Vessels, Tanks and their
associated Piping and fitting including Pressure Safety Valves.

5.1 Pressure Vessels


5.1.1 General
For the purpose of this General Specification Pressure Vessels shall mean Unfired Pressure
Vessel, Heat Exchangers and Boilers. The minimum acceptable inspection requirements to
assure the integrity of Pressure Vessels in general are given in Table 5.1(note).
Specific written schemes of examination shall be prepared for each individual Pressure Vessel.
Risk Based Inspection (RBI) approach is the integrity strategy recommended by the COMPANY.
For Pressure Vessels a criticality assessment should be carried out to identify the consequence
and probability of failure for each Pressure Vessel section.
Where an approved formal Risk Based Inspection (RBI) approach is taken, its output replaces
the minimum requirements specified in Table 5.1.
The output from criticality assessments or the minimum requirements specified in Table 5.1,
together with local legislation shall then enable the formulation of a written scheme of
examination for each Pressure Vessel.

5.1.2 Design Assessment


All pressure vessels must be designed to allow internal inspection. Where physical entry is not
possible due to the vessel size, 12 head-holes (as a minimum) should be fitted. Where vessels
are large and complex (separators, columns, etc.) the provision of multiple manholes should be
considered, in particular where vessel internals render thorough internal inspection difficult.
The design of pressure vessel insulation shall take into account the need for inspection access.
Insulation for personnel protection shall be minimised and alternative means of protection such
as guards and warning signs shall be provided where safety permits. This will both allow
inspection and avoid under insulation corrosion which is a major industry concern.
On systems which must be insulated for process reasons, removable sections of insulation shall
be designed and fitted to allow access to monitor internal corrosion. These shall be specifically
positioned at areas most at risk such as boots, other low points, dead legs, areas of high flow
areas, etc.

5.1.3 Inspection Scope


Unless a formal RBI Approach has been adopted, pressure vessels shall be subjected to their
first in-service inspection within two years of start-up. This first in-service inspection shall
include both an external and internal detailed visual examination including wall thickness
measurements where there is potential for internal corrosion.

(note)
: Table numbering identical to paragraph one

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Internal inspection will clearly require the shutdown, isolation and depressurisation of the
Pressure Vessel. This task will require detailed planning, preparation of isolation and spading
procedures and the purchase of gaskets. Although this will normally be performed by production
and maintenance/facilities engineering personnel, it shall be driven by the Integrity Department.
Vessel internals shall also be removed as necessary to facilitate internal inspection. Again this
will need careful planning and preparation. For complex separators and columns this may
involve many days of effort. It may also require the replacement of internal components like filter
cartridges.
Major or internal inspections shall be performed both before and after any cleaning. The volume
and type of deposits and debris shall be assessed and analysed. In addition to internal visual
examination, major inspections should also include surface NDE of Pressure Vessel seam
welds and shell attachments. Where vessels are internally clad, the cladding seam and nozzle
welds should be inspected by Dye Penetrant. Internally lined vessels should be inspected for
holidays in the coating. Additional inspection tasks and techniques shall be performed as
identified by criticality assessments.
Subsequent Intermediate or external inspections shall be performed on-stream at a frequency
not exceeding two years. Subsequent major or internal inspections shall be performed off-line at
a frequency not exceeding four years.
Again these frequencies may be extended where a formal criticality assessment has been
performed and RBI scheme developed.
Where detailed internal inspection of Pressure Vessels is considered impossible or impractical,
their integrity MUST be proven by other means such as comprehensive NDE or pressure
testing. In this case, the scope and frequency of such alternative means shall constitute the
written scheme of inspection for the equipment.
Where Pressure Vessels are insulated, major inspections shall involve the removal of sections
of insulation on carbon steel vessels to inspect for Under Insulation Corrosion and on Stainless
steel vessels to inspect for Stress Corrosion Cracking.
Where Pressure Vessels are buried such as NGL Bullets, Cathodic Protection (CP) levels shall
be monitored at a maximum frequency of three monthly. Internal inspections shall be performed
as per non-buried vessels except that ultrasonic techniques shall be deployed internally to
identify external corrosion. Acoustic Emission (AE) could be used as an alternative.

5.2 Heat Exchangers


5.2.1 General
In addition to the general requirements of Table 5.1, Heat Exchangers shall be subject to
additional requirements as specified in Tables 5.2 (a-e) dependant on their individual design. It
must be stressed that these requirements are in addition to and NOT as an alternative to the
general requirements of Table 5.1.
Heat Exchangers are generally designed to Pressure Vessel codes complemented by the
standard of the Tubular Exchanger MANUFACTURERS Association (TEMA). Where Risk
Based Inspection assessments are performed each side of the exchanger shall be calculated
uniquely. It is perfectly possible for the tube side of a exchanger to be assessed as high
criticality whereas the shell side is assessed as low.

5.2.2 Inspection Scope


What makes exchangers unique from Pressure vessels is their tubes or their plates. Exchanger
tubes should be internally inspected using borescopes or fibrescopes to identify internal

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corrosion at the tube ends. This will require the shutdown, isolation and depressurisation of the
exchanger and the removal of channel ends. Where corrosion is noted it is recommended that
full tube inspection is performed using Eddy Current or Ultrasonics (IRIS).
Exchanger tubes should also be inspected externally. This will either require the removal of inlet
and outlet piping on fixed tube sheet exchangers or the withdrawal of the complete tube bundle
where the design allows.
In addition to external corrosion, exchanger tubes may be susceptible to fatigue cracking at tube
sheets and impingement baffles, and fretting at baffle plates.
Where possible plate exchangers should be completely dismantled to allow internal inspection
with a specific view to gasket deterioration. Great care is needed to ensure the plates are
correctly replaced and re-tightened to the correct position.
On Solid/Compact type plate exchanges which are not possible to dismantle, inspection may be
limited to external only. On such exchangers inspections shall be performed in conjunction with
VENDORS guidance.

5.3 Steam Boilers and Fired Heaters


5.3.1 General
In addition to the general inspection requirements of Table 5.1, Steam Boilers and Fired
Heaters shall be subject to additional requirements as specified in Tables 5.3 (a-b) dependant
on their individual design. It must be stressed that these requirements are in addition to and
NOT as an alternative to the general inspection requirements of Table 5.1.
Steam Boilers generally fall into two categories, Fire Tube or Water Tube. The majority of the
Steam Boilers utilised in the Oil and Gas Industry are Fire Tube where the heat source or fire is
contained within the boiler tubes and the outer boiler shell is a pressure vessel. For the purpose
of this referential Glycol regenerators shall be considered as Fire Tube Boilers.
Large Water Tube Boilers are generally used for power generation but small package water
tube boilers can also be found in the Oil and Gas Industry. Water tube boilers are normally gas
or oil fired and the internal walls are lined with refractory brick.
Fired heaters are normally used as part of oil or condensate stabilisation plant or glycol re-
boiling. Their design is similar to a water tube boiler where heat is applied to the outer skin of
the tubes and the process fluid is contained within the tubes.
Boilers and heaters can be dangerous! There have probably been more accidents
relating to boilers than to any other single item of plant within a Pressure System. For
this reason the inspection of boilers is heavily regulated in the majority of countries.
Because of this heavy regulation there is limited value in performing formal criticality
assessment of Steam Boilers. However the criticality process should be run to identify the likely
modes of failure and therefore the optimum inspection techniques. Frequency of inspection will
almost always be determined by national legislation.

5.3.2 Inspection Scope


Unless directed by more stringent national legislation, Steam Boilers shall be subject to their
first detailed internal inspection within 18 months from start-up.
Thereafter the frequency of subsequent detailed internal inspection shall not exceed 3 yearly. It
should be noted that steam boilers may be started-up long before the actual Oil and Gas Plant
to provide steam for well clean-up or other utility services. The date of first in-service inspection
shall therefore be 18 months from the initial commissioning of the boiler.

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External on-stream inspections shall continue at a frequency of 18 months and shall include a
detailed external inspection of the boiler and its supports. The condition of the refractory brick or
lining on water tube boiler should also be checked at this time using thermographic equipment
to identify hot spots.
Pressure Safety Valves (PSVs) are integral to the safety of steam boilers. Again it is likely that
their inspection and overhaul is subject to statutory legislation. Unless directed by more
stringent local legislation, Steam Boiler PSVs shall be subject to overhaul and inspection within
18 months from start-up.
Good quality Boiler Feed Water (BFW) chemistry is vital to the safe operation of steam boilers
especially on water tube boilers. As a minimum oxygen and pH levels shall be monitored and
controlled on a daily basis. Inadequate BFW can result in caustic corrosion, acid corrosion,
pitting and general corrosion, stress corrosion cracking and embrittlement. The BFW records
should be reviewed are part of the preparation for boiler inspections.
Good quality Fuel Gas composition is also important for the safe operation of steam boilers.
Incorrect composition can cause poor combustion which in turn can result in can result in
carbon deposits and hence overheating of the combustion chambers, furnace or tubes.
In addition to the above requirements the tube bundle within fired heaters shall be checked for
creep, external wastage and internal corrosion at a frequency not exceeding 3 yearly.
The shells of Fire Tube will be insulated for heat conservation and personnel protection. Due to
the cyclical nature of most boilers, they are highly susceptible to Under Insulation Corrosion
(UIC). Major inspections scopes shall therefore include partial removal of insulation to check for
UIC.

5.4 Tanks
5.4.1 General
For the purpose of this General Specification Tanks shall include Fixed Roof Tanks, Floating
Roof Tanks and Cryogenic Tanks. The minimum acceptable inspection requirements to assure
the integrity of Tanks are given in Table 5.4.
Specific written schemes of examination shall be prepared for each individual Tank. Risk Based
Inspection (RBI) approach is the integrity strategy recommended by the COMPANY. A criticality
assessment therefore should be carried out to identify the consequence and probability of
failure for each Tank.
Where an approved formal Risk Based Inspection (RBI) approach is taken, its output replaces
the minimum requirements specified in Table 5.4.
The output from criticality assessments or the minimum requirements specified in Table 5.4,
together with local legislation shall then enable the formulation of a written scheme of
examination for each Tank.

5.4.2 Inspection Scope


Where tanks are fitted with Cathodic Protection (CP) systems, its performance shall be
monitored within one year from tank erection (not start-up) then annually thereafter. Impressed
current CP systems shall be monitored using instant - off methods. The wastage of sacrificial
anodes shall be assessed as part of any survey to predict when retrofits may be needed.
Where the CP system is an impressed current type, it is recommended that the output of the
Transformer/Rectifiers (T/R) is monitored at a frequency not exceeding 2 weekly. The
performance of the CP systems should include the analysis of the T/R output.

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Unless a formal RBI Approach has been adopted, Tanks shall be subjected to their first in-
service inspection within 30 months of start-up. This first in-service inspection shall however be
limited to an external visual examination including wall thickness measurements where there is
potential for internal corrosion.
On floating roof tanks the condition of the roof seal and roof drains shall be carefully checked for
damage and leakage as part of the external visual inspection.
On all tanks, atmospheric vents, flame arrestors and vacuum breakers shall be checked to
ensure they are clean, free of debris and operational annually. During major inspections flame
arrestors and vacuum breakers shall be dismantled for thorough inspection prior to reassembly.
Unless a formal RBI Approach has been adopted, the first in-service internal inspection shall be
performed within five years of start-up unless a specific problem is identified during the initial
external inspection. Subsequent internal inspections shall also be performed at 5 yearly
intervals.
Where a formal criticality assessment has been performed and RBI scheme developed, the
minimum acceptable inspection requirements specified in Table 5.4 may be extended.
Internal inspection will clearly require the shutdown, isolation, draining and most likely cleaning
of the Tank. This task will require detailed planning, preparation of isolation and spading
procedures and the purchase of gaskets. Although this will normally be performed by production
and maintenance/facilities engineering personnel, it shall be driven by the Integrity Department.
Internal inspections shall be performed both before and after any cleaning. Note, in certain
circumstances it may be unsafe to entry an enclosed space until cleaning has taken place
however it may be possible to take samples of any deposits prior to cleaning. The volume and
type of deposits and debris shall be assessed and analysed and evidence of bacteria initiated
corrosion shall be inspected for, particularly at any areas of liquid interfaces.
In addition to internal visual examination, major inspections should also include surface Non
Destructive Examination (NDE) of selected welds on tank floor and lower walls. Tank floors
should also be subject to vacuum testing of selected lap joints, ultrasonic wall thickness survey
to identify under floor corrosion and holiday detection of coating tanks. Where floor coatings are
found to be in very poor condition and will need replacing, NDE shall be performed after shot
blasting. Where the floor coating are generally found to be in good condition then Eddy Current
or MFL Inspection should be performed to avoid coating damage.
Where Tanks Vessels are insulated, major inspections should involve the removal of sections of
insulation on carbon steel vessels to identify Under Insulation Corrosion and on Stainless steel
vessels to identify Stress Corrosion Cracking.
For large storage tanks, the acoustic emission (AE) inspection technique may be used to
prioritise internal inspection. Where AE results prove positive they may also be used along with
CP results and external wall thickness results to defer internal inspections to a maximum of
10 years.
Where internal tank interventions are necessary they must be adequately planned. Preparation
works must involve the purchase of replacement floor plates and coatings. Preparation
procedures shall also include extensive cleaning together with safe removal and disposal of the
tank debris. It is recommended that a tank debris survey is undertaken prior to commencement
on the intervention work to select the optimum cleaning and disposal strategy. For floating roof
tanks the integrity of roof supports and the dryness of roof buoyancy spaces should be
confirmed as part of the preparatory works.

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5.5 Gas Cylinders


5.5.1 General
Gas Cylinders are generally small, enclosed metal vessels used to store and transport
compressed gases or gas liquefied under pressure. They are mainly used in the Oil and Gas
Industry for storage of inerting and purging gas, cutting, heating and welding gases, and testing
gases. Gas Cylinders may also be used as part of fixed fire fighting appliances and for the
storage of air in breathing apparatus.
Also included within this category are Sample Cylinders. These are used for the collection and
transportation of various fluids and gases prior to laboratory analysis.
The minimum acceptable inspection requirements to assure the integrity of Gas Cylinders are
given in Table 5.5.
In the majority of cases cylinders used in the Oil and Gas Industry are rented from the Gas
Supply COMPANY. In this case it is the responsibility of the Gas Supply COMPANY to inspect
the Gas Cylinders they fill and supply and thus assure their integrity. Where Gas Cylinders are
rented it shall be the responsibility of the COMPANY to ensure that the supply VENDORS are
performing their inspection duties. This shall be controlled by the Supply Contracts and
Purchase Orders, audit and by certification of incoming cylinders.
For COMPANY owned cylinders, the Integrity Department shall be responsible for their
inspection and integrity. The initial task shall be the setting-up of a register of all COMPANY
owned cylinders and the safe storage of their original certification. Cylinders shall either be
registered by Serial Number or alternatively by allocated Tag Numbers.
Recorded shall be the makers name and mark, the original serial number and any other
identification number, the fabrication specification, the maximum working pressure and original
test pressure. The tare weight, dates and details of any damage, date of initial manufacture,
date of initial and subsequent inspection and the nature of the contained gas shall also be
recorded.
For COMPANY owned cylinders written schemes of examination shall be prepared for each
type of cylinder dependant on their design and the type of gas stored. Guidance of the
inspection requirements are given in European Standard EN 1968 or equivalent. A criticality and
RBI approach is NOT recommended for Gas Cylinders.

5.5.2 Inspection Scope


Three categories of inspection shall be performed on Gas Cylinders to assure their integrity:
x General Visual Examination at filling
x Thorough examination
x Thorough examination plus hydro test.
All thorough inspection and testing shall be performed by a qualified competent CONTRACTOR
and audited the Integrity Department.
General Visual Examinations must be performed each time the cylinder is filled. The inspection
shall be limited to external only and shall check for any external damage or corrosion.
Thorough examination of Sample Cylinders shall be performed at a maximum of 3 yearly
intervals. This inspection shall include a detailed external and internal visual examination plus a
pressure test.

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Thorough examination of Gas Cylinders shall be performed at a maximum of 5 yearly intervals.


This inspection shall include a detailed external and internal visual examination plus a Tare
Weight test. Gas Cylinders shall also be subject to pressure test at 5 or 10 year intervals
depending on the whether the contents are deemed to be corrosive or not.
Gas Cylinders that are used for fire fighting purposes may be exempt from 5 yearly thorough
examinations providing that they are subject to full external examinations every year. Subject to
satisfactory annual external examinations the frequency of thorough examination and pressure
test may be extended to 20 years.
Normally the Safety Department will manage the annual examination of fire fighting gas
cylinders, but in all cases the responsibility for the examination of all gas cylinders shall be
formally agreed and recorded within each subsidiary.

5.6 Piping
5.6.1 General
For the purpose of this General Specification Piping shall mean all pipes, fittings, valves,
supports but excluding pipelines and Risers. The minimum acceptable inspection requirements
to assure the integrity of Piping are given in Table 5.6.
Specific written schemes of examination shall be prepared for each individual Piping system.
However since both the consequence and probability of failure will change over the length of
each Piping system, the first task in preparing inspection programmes is to sub-divide each
Piping system into distinct portions or Subsystem. Demarcation of each Subsystem shall be
drawn to reflect changes in consequence and probability of failure.
Risk Based Inspection (RBI) approach is the integrity strategy recommended by the COMPANY.
For Piping Systems a criticality assessment should be carried out to identify the consequence
and probability of failure for each subsystem.
Where an approved formal Risk Based Inspection (RBI) approach is taken, its output replaces
the minimum requirements specified in Table 5.6.
The output from criticality assessments or the minimum requirements specified in Table 5.6,
together with local legislation shall then enable the formulation of a written scheme of
examination for each Piping Subsystem.

5.6.2 Design Assessment


Flowlines require extensive monitoring and therefore must be installed at ground level. Where
this is not possible due to equipment layout, access platforms must be installed.
Selective internal corrosion of weld roots is a recognised problem in both hydrocarbon and
water injection flowlines. Although this should be designed out by avoiding excessive velocities,
balanced weld root metallurgy and effective chemical treatment, it remains a serious potential
area of risk and as such must be included in the inspection programme.
In order to facilitate future inspection of flowline weld roots, it is recommended that welds most
at risk have their weld caps partially ground flush thus allowing monitoring of the root area by
ultrasonic compression wave - this must be done during fabrication.
The design of piping insulation shall take into account the need for inspection access. Insulation
for personnel protection shall be minimised and alternative means of protection such as guards
and warning signs shall be provided safety permits. This will allow both inspection and avoid
under insulation corrosion which is a major industry concern.

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On insulated piping systems which are susceptible to internal corrosion, there will be a need to
routinely remove sections of insulation to facilitate inspection. In such cases consideration shall
be given to incorporating removable sections of insulation into the initial design. These shall be
specifically positioned at areas most at risk such as boots, other low points, dead legs, areas of
high flow areas, etc. Note, where removal insulation sections are installed, care shall be taken
to ensure such designs do not pose an additional risk to the piping integrity by allowing water
ingress and subsequently Under Insulation Corrosion.
Piping supports often receive little design attention in relation to allowing water ingress
especially where insulated or fitted with PFP. Commissioning inspection shall carefully address
this matter.

5.6.3 Inspection Scope


Unless a formal RBI Approach has been adopted, Piping Systems shall be subjected to their
first in-service inspection within two years of start-up. This first in-service inspection should
include both an external detailed visual examination and wall thickness measurements where
there is potential for internal corrosion or erosion including weld root monitoring on flowlines.
External visual inspections shall include examination for evidence of coating or insulation
breakdown that may lead to external corrosion, adequacy of small bore piping support and
effectiveness of pipe supports. Additional inspection tasks and techniques shall be performed
as identified by criticality assessments.
On buried Piping Systems, Cathodic Protection (CP) shall be monitored over the complete
length of the buried section at a maximum frequency of two yearly. Impressed current CP
systems shall be monitored using instant - off methods. The wastage of sacrificial anodes shall
be assessed as part of any survey to predict when retro fits may be needed.
Where the CP system is an impressed current type, it is recommended that the output of the
Transformer/Rectifiers (T/R) is monitored at a frequency not exceeding 2 weekly. The
performance of the CP systems should include the analysis of the T/R output.
Internal piping inspection shall be limited to specific areas where localised corrosion is possible,
for example, the inside and directly downstream of choke valves where on-stream monitoring is
ineffective. A specific inspection monitoring programme shall be put in place to reflect the
specific site conditions.
Unless a formal RBI Approach has been adopted, subsequent intermediate inspections shall be
performed at a frequency not exceeding two years and shall involve a general visual survey of
the complete piping subsystem to identify and external defects.
Unless a formal RBI Approach has been adopted, subsequent major inspections shall be
performed at a frequency not exceeding four years and should involve a close visual inspection
of the complete piping system and wall thickness measurements where there is potential for
internal corrosion or erosion. Additional inspection tasks and techniques shall be performed as
identified by criticality assessments.
Where piping systems are insulated, major inspections shall involve the removal of sections of
insulation on carbon steel piping to identify Under Insulation Corrosion and on Stainless steel
piping to identify Stress Corrosion Cracking. Note that systematic inspection ports or windows
are NOT recommended.
Piping systems shall be checked for vibration especially next to reciprocating pumps or
compressors. Small bore and thin piping is particularly susceptible to fatigue cracking and
therefore should be subject to surface NDE to identify surface cracking where vibration is
observed.

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5.7 Corrosion Monitoring


On piping systems, pipelines and pressure vessels which have the potential for internal
corrosion, a combination of corrosion probes and chemical analysis shall be utilised to give a
general indication of the corrosive behaviour. The information gleaned from corrosion
monitoring techniques shall be used together with inspection results to help determine
preventative treatment and the efficiency of such treatment. The type of corrosion anticipated
shall determine the number, type and position of probes installed together with any other
chemical analysis. Specific programmes shall be prepared to determine the frequency at which
monitored shall be performed.
Corrosion Monitoring readings and subsequent analysis shall be performed by either the
Integrity Department or the Laboratory/Treatment Department.
It is however the responsibility of the Head of Integrity to assess the results of all corrosion
monitoring together with all other inspection results to produce an overall consolidated
assessment of corrosion and recommend changes as necessary to any treatment procedures.

5.8 Pressure Safety Devices


5.8.1 General
For the purpose of this General Specification Pressure Safety Devices shall mean Pressure
Safety Valves (PSVs), and Bursting Discs. The term PSV shall include Pressure Safety Valves,
Thermal Safety Valves, Stream Safety Valves, Relief Valves and Vacuum Breakers. Hydraulic
spill valves integral to pumps are NOT considered to be PSVs and these shall be maintained
along with their associated equipment. The minimum acceptable inspection requirements to
assure the safe operation of such devices are given in Table 5.8.
Specific written schemes of examination shall be prepared for each individual PSV based upon
both their consequence and probability of failure and their service history.
Risk Based Inspection (RBI) approach is the integrity strategy recommended by the COMPANY.
For PSVs a criticality assessment should be carried out to identify the consequence and
probability of failure for each valve.
Where an approved formal Risk Based Inspection (RBI) approach is taken, its output replaces
the minimum requirements specified in Table 5.8.
The output from criticality assessments or the minimum requirements specified in Table 5.8,
together with local legislation shall then enable the formulation of a written scheme of
examination for each PSV.

5.8.2 Design Reviews


PSVs need to be overhauled on a regular bases. Duplicate PSV with locked open isolation
valves should therefore be installed on equipment that can not be shutdown in normal
production mode. This could be particularly important where RBI leads to longer major
inspection intervals.

5.8.3 Inspection Scope


Bursting Discs shall be subject to removal and close visual examination at a maximum
frequency of 4 yearly except where based upon specific MANUFACTURERs recommendations.
Unless a formal RBI Approach has been adopted, PSVs shall be subjected to their first in-
service inspection within two years of start-up. In-service inspections shall include the removal
of the valve and its pre-pop. Following the pre-pop the PSV shall be dismantled and then

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subject to detailed internal and external examination. Consumable parts shall be replaced
together with non-consumable parts as necessary before the PSV is re-assembled and function
tested.
Prior to any overhaul campaign, consumable spares shall be purchased for all PSVs. Selected
none-consumable spares may also be purchased depending on the redundancy of each valve.
Prior to dismantling, PSVs shall be subject to a pre-pop test to determine how they would have
performed in-service. The results of the Pre-pop shall be recorded in the PSV overhaul report. A
satisfactory test is one where the PSV lifts within +5% and -10%. Since the pre-pop results will
be used to partly determine the date of next inspection, care shall be taken whilst handling the
PSV to ensure the condition at pre-pop remains representative of how it would have performed
in-service.
If heavy fouling is observed when the PSV is removed no pre-pop test shall be performed. In
this case the pre-pop shall be automatically determined to be unacceptable. The nature of the
fouling shall be investigated and measures taken to prevent future occurrences.
Following the pre-pop test, each PSV shall be dismantled and overhauled. Any damage to the
valve body or any of its components shall be brought to the attention of the Integrity
Department. All consumable part shall be replaced and non-consumable parts replaced as
necessary. A satisfactory PSV is one where the overall condition is good and no non-
consumable spares are needed.
PSVs shall be reassembled, calibrated and function tested preferably in the presence of the
Integrity Department. The PSV overhaul report shall be prepared by the Valve Technician and
signed off by the Integrity Department.
Where a criticality approach is taken the date of next inspection shall be determined by the RBI
rules.
Unless a formal RBI Approach has been adopted, the date of next inspection shall be
determined by the current frequency modified by r One Year depending of the observed
condition and performance of the PSV during overhaul. When a PSV is found to be in a
generally satisfactory condition, did not require non-consumable spares and performed
satisfactorily during pre-pop, its date of next inspection shall be increased by one year up to a
maximum ceiling value of four years where permitted by local legislation.
When a PSV is found to be in a generally poor condition, or required the replacement of non-
consumable spares, or was found to be out with +5% and -10% during pre-pop, its date of next
inspection shall be reduced by one year down to a minimum of one year. When the condition of
a PSV or its performance is found to be borderline, its overall frequency of inspection shall
remain the same.
Even where criticality assessments are performed the frequency of inspection for PSVs fitted on
Steam Boilers shall be fixed at a maximum frequency of 18 months. The inspection interval of
other PSVs may also be fixed depending on local legislation.
In situ testing of PSVS such as Trevitest can be considered subject to the competence of the
CONTRACTOR and their testing procedures. Adoption of such a strategy should be approved
by DGEP/TDO/EXP.

5.9 Flares
5.9.1 General
Flare systems comprise of piping, pressure vessels, support structures, ignition systems and
finally flare tips. Since the majority of these components are included within other sections of

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this General Specification, this section shall only focus on the inspection requirements for flare
tips and its surrounding piping and structure.
Flare tips may be either atmospheric or sonic type. For either type the inspection strategy and
frequency shall be the same. A criticality or RBI approach is NOT recommended due to their
high probability of in-service degradation. The minimum acceptable inspection requirements to
assure the safe operation of Flare Tips and their associated components are given in Table 5.9.

5.9.2 Design Review


The repair and eventual change-out of flare tips is almost inevitable over the life of the field.
Flare tips must therefore be designed to be replaced. The operation and test of flare tip
replacement handling equipment shall therefore be tested are part of the flare pre-
commissioning works. Since this will involve various items of lifting and structural equipment,
the Head of Integrity shall pay special attention to this activity.

5.9.3 Inspection Scope


Inspections shall involve both an in-service external examination performed at a maximum
frequency of annually and a detailed thorough inspection performed at a maximum frequency of
four annually. The initial thorough inspection shall be performed within 2 years from start-up.
For Cold Flares which do not continuously burn, detailed thorough inspections shall only be
performed where a problem has been identified during in-service inspections.
Annual on-stream inspection should be performed at a safe distance from heat radiation using
visual aids such as binoculars or telescopic still or video cameras. Helicopters can also be
utilised where normal access is insufficient or the presence of suspected defects needs to be
confirmed. Alternatively flare flow conditions can be adjusted to highlight suspected defects.
Thorough inspections shall be performed during plant shutdowns. Great care must be taken to
assure any access structure including gratings and handrails are safe and suitable for use prior
to performing the actual tip inspection. These preliminary structural inspections may be
performed by specialist abseiling teams.
Once access to the flare tip is considered safe, it shall be thoroughly inspected both visually and
by supplementary NDE. This shall include any equipment associated with flare tip handling. In
situ repairs of lifting/handling points may be require PRIOR to the removal of the tip.
As part of any flare tip major inspection, in-line flame arrestors where fitted shall be dismantled
to allow internal examination.

6. Well Control Equipment


For the purpose of this General Specification, Well Control Equipment shall include all surface
control equipment up to and including the X Mas Tree.
Due to its critical nature, all Well Control Equipment shall be subject to fixed prescriptive
inspection and test to assure its integrity. A RBI approach is NOT recommended for Well
Control Equipment.
Surface Wellheads and Xmas Trees (Surface Barriers), after transfer from Drilling to Field
Operations shall be subject to regular tests and inspection defined in accordance with
COMPANY Rules.

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7. Pipelines
7.1 General
The minimum acceptable inspection requirements to assure the integrity of Pipelines are given
in Table 7. These requirements have been prepared for all types of pipelines installed either
offshore or on land.
Specific written schemes of examination shall be prepared for each individual pipeline from pig
launcher to receiver although pig traps themselves shall be assessed as Pressure Vessels -
Reference Section 5.1. Since both the consequence and probability of failure will change over
the length of each pipeline, the first task in preparing inspection programmes is to sub-divide
each line into distinct portions. Demarcation of each portion shall be drawn to reflect changes in
consequence and probability of failure.
Risk Based Inspection (RBI) approach is considered to be optional for pipelines. Where such an
approach is taken, a criticality assessment should be carried out to identify the consequence
and probability of failure for each pipeline portion.
Where an approved formal Risk Based Inspection (RBI) approach is taken, its output replaces
the minimum requirements specified in Table 7. Conversely such RBI schemes may increase
the inspection requirements especially where pipelines carry inert fluids which are deemed
critical in terms of economic impact.
The output from criticality assessments or the minimum requirements specified in Table 7,
together with local legislation shall then enable the formulation of a written scheme of
examination for each Pipeline.

7.2 Design Review


Pipelines (export, trunk and remote flowlines) shall be designed to allow their integrity to be
verified throughout their operational life. Generally this will mean they must be designed to allow
both operational and intelligent pigging. Where the design does NOT allowing intelligent pigging
the method of integrity verification shall be explained within the project SOR.
Pipeline bend radii shall be sufficient to allow passage of intelligent pigs, only barred tees shall
be installed on pipelines and pig traps. Sufficiently long horizontal pig traps shall be installed
with adequate lifting facilities and access space to allow the handling and insertion of intelligent
pigs. Lay-down areas or deck hatches shall also be installed to facilitate pig handling. Sufficient
pig detection equipment shall be installed including at intermittent platforms or stations.
Pipeline markers capable of detection by intelligent pig should be installed at regular intervals
along the pipeline. These may simply be short pup pieces.
Future Emergency Pipeline Repair Schemes (EPRS) shall be reviewed as part of the pipeline
technical review. Adequate surplus materials must be procured at the project stage to ensure
that an emergency repair can be performed.
Cathodic Protection (CP) systems shall be designed with test points along onshore lines.
Systems shall allow on/off potential surveys to be performed.
Corrosion monitoring devices shall be installed at pipeline ends at a position representative of
the anticipated corrosion. On pipelines susceptible to Top of Line (TOL) Corrosion consideration
shall be given to installing corrosion monitoring devices such as Ultrasonic Mats on pipeline
doglegs. The interrogation and monitoring devices shall be located on the adjacent platform.
The primary function of such devices shall be to detect TOL corrosion and assess the
effectiveness of chemical treatment.

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7.3 Inspection Scope


A range of differing inspections shall be performed on Pipelines but intelligent pigging is the
primary means for assuring pipeline integrity.
Due to a number of recent case histories within the group, it is advised that all strategic
pipelines should be intelligently pigged prior to start-up in order to provide a baseline reference
for future inspections. In addition to intelligent pigging, gauging and calliper pigs shall be run to
prove the future pigability of the pipeline. This will normally be the responsibility of the Project
and included in the pipeline commissioning scope of work.
The first in-service intelligent pigging run should be performed within two to three years of
pipeline start-up depending on corrosion studies. Subsequent intelligent pig runs should be
performed at a frequency not exceeding 5 years. Where detailed corrosion studies have been
performed and the risk of internal corrosion is minimal, the frequency of intelligent pigging may
be increased to a maximum of 10 years providing regular external CP monitoring is performed
and is effective.
Where it can be proven that there is NO possibility of internal corrosion and providing
regular external CP monitoring is performed and is effective, the need for intelligent
pigging may be waived.
On Pipelines where the design does not allow conventional intelligent pigging such as flowlines,
consideration shall be given to modifying the line to enable such inspections or using riser
umbilical pigs. Where this is considered impossible or impractical, their integrity Must be proven
by other means such as pressure testing. Such pressure tests should normally be performed at
1.1 times the current maximum operating pressure.
The topsides or above ground sections of pipelines conveying corrosive products shall be
inspected to give a general inferred internal condition on the remaining pipeline. Both ultrasonic
wall thickness measurements and corrosion monitoring techniques shall be utilised. Unless a
formal RBI Approach has been adopted, these ultrasonic wall thickness measurements shall be
performed at a maximum frequency of 2 yearly.
The frequency of corrosion monitoring shall be determined by a specific programme and could
include monitoring by Electric Resistance probes, Corrosion Coupons, Iron Content and residual
corrosion inhibitor. It should however be noted that this type of inspection will not identify all
types of corrosion on the remaining pipeline and must be used in addition to intelligent pigging,
Not as an alternative.
In most assessments the riser portion of the pipeline will be ranked as the most critical. For this
reason the atmospheric riser sections including the splash zone shall be visually inspected at a
maximum frequency of two yearly. The use of abseiling techniques should be considered to
prevent the need for expensive scaffold.
In general sub-sea risers and their supports and guides together with their associated dog leg
expansion spools shall be inspected at a maximum frequency of 2 yearly. For risers containing
inert fluids or low pressure oil this may be extended to 5 yearly inline with the jacket inspection
programme.
Remote sections of sub-sea pipelines shall be inspected by Side Scan Sonar at a maximum
frequency of 3 yearly to identify any general areas of concern. Where areas of concern are
identified, these shall be subject to detailed visual inspection by ROV together with platform
500 metre zones, crossings and any other significant pipeline feature. Once every 5 years the
complete pipeline shall be subject to detailed visual inspection by ROV. In the case of where
comprehensive inspection history exists, complete ROV pipeline inspections may be waived.

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For pipelines containing inert fluids, Side Scan Sonar need only be performed every 5 years.
Again any areas of concern shall be inspected by ROV together with platform 500 metre zones,
crossings and any other significant pipeline feature. Complete inspection of pipelines containing
inert fluids shall be performed every 10 years.
Shore approaches shall be inspected at a maximum frequency of 2 yearly to assure adequate
burial by either acoustic or magnetic means. Surveys shall be performed from both land at low
tide and from sea at high tide to ensure full coverage and overlap. For pipelines containing inert
fluids, shore approaches shall be inspected at a maximum frequency of 5 years.
Onshore land pipelines shall normally be buried by design. Pipeline routes or Rights of Way
(ROW) shall be routinely patrolled at a maximum frequency of yearly to identify any potential
areas of concern. Where ROW are open to the public such as road crossings, patrols shall be
performed at a maximum frequency of 6 monthly.
Pipeline river crossings shall be surveyed at a maximum frequency of 2 yearly to assure
adequate burial by either acoustic or magnetic means. For pipelines containing inert fluids, river
crossings shall be inspected at a maximum frequency of 5 years.
Cathodic Protection (CP) shall be monitored over the complete length of all onshore pipelines at
a maximum frequency of two yearly. On offshore pipelines Cathodic Protection (CP) shall be
monitored over the complete length of each pipeline at a maximum frequency of five yearly. This
will either be performed as dedicated surveys or as part of other surveys such are jacket and
pipeline ROV inspections. In the case of where comprehensive inspection history exists,
complete pipeline CP inspections may be waived.
In general land lines shall be protected by impressed current CP systems and offshore pipelines
shall be protected by sacrificial systems. Impressed current CP systems shall be monitored
using instant - off methods. The wastage of sacrificial anodes shall be assessed as part of any
survey to predict when retro fits may be needed.
Where the CP system is an impressed current type, it is recommended that the output of the
Transformer/Rectifiers (T/R) is monitored at a frequency not exceeding monthly. The
performance of the CP systems should include the analysis of the T/R output.
The performance of pipeline Emergency Shutdown Valves (ESDs) including HIPPS (if fitted)
shall be monitored by means of functional testing at a maximum frequency of yearly. The
tightness of such valves shall also be assessed. A performance standard shall be prepared and
used to determine the acceptance criteria for the function & leak test. The execution of such
tests shall normally be performed by the Production Department but are included in this
referential for completeness.

8. Surface structures
8.1 General
Surface structures whether installed onshore or offshore shall be classified under three
categories based upon their importance and their consequence of failure:
x Primary Structures (Special and First Category) - Deck and module main and secondary
girders, columns, gantries, flare stacks, crane pedestals and booms, helidecks, drilling
derricks, etc.

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x Secondary Structures (Second Category) - Stiffening elements, supports, pipe racks and
all structural elements not considered as primary
x Tertiary Structures (Non Structural) - Catwalks, hand-rails, stairs, ladders, grating,
flooring, etc.
Although detailed inspection shall be focused on primary structures, routine general visual
inspections shall be performed on all structures in accordance with the minimum acceptance
requirements given in Table 8.
The Structural Engineering Department based either in the subsidiaries or the Head Office shall
be responsible for holding and maintaining up to date the topsides structural design model
together with the weight control model. These models shall be used to identify the most critical
members and joints within the structure. The Head of Integrity in conjunction with the Senior
Structural Engineer shall prepare an inspection programme based upon the structural loading.

8.2 Inspection Scope


Once identified, highly stressed areas should be routinely subject to detailed surface inspection
at an inspection frequency not exceeding 5 years. Eddy Current method is recommended since
it avoids the need for removal of paint. Any defects identified shall then be verified by MPE prior
to repair.
The remainder of the Primary and Secondary shall be subject to routine general visual
examination at an inspection frequency not exceeding 2 years. When this general visual
inspection identifies areas of high vibration, the associated joints shall also be subject to
detailed inspection. The use of abseiling techniques should be considered to prevent the need
for expensive scaffold.
Tertiary Structure shall by subject to annual general visual inspection to assure personnel
safety. Special attention shall be given to tertiary structures in the splash zone area which are
subject to regular wave loading and marine corrosion.

9. Sub-sea structures
9.1 Offshore Jackets
9.1.1 General
The minimum acceptable inspection requirements to assure the integrity of Offshore Jackets are
given in Table 9.1. These requirements have been prepared for jackets installed in offshore
environments.
The Structural Engineering Department based either in the subsidiaries or the Head Office shall
be responsible for holding and maintaining up to date the jacket structural design model
together with the weight control model. These models shall be used to identify the most critical
members and joints within the structure. The Head of Integrity in conjunction with the Senior
Structural Engineer shall prepare an inspection programmed based upon the structural loading.
Risk Based Inspection (RBI) approach is considered to be optional for deep water Jackets
operating in a harsh environment.
For such jackets a criticality assessment can be carried out to identify the members which are
most critical to the integrity of the jacket and hence the overall integrity of the installation. These
members may be critical because of a high degree of functionality or because of a high level of
stress, low fatigue or because they contain a joint which was repaired at the fabrication yard.

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Where an approved formal Risk Based Inspection (RBI) approach is taken, its output replaces
the minimum requirements specified in Table 9.1.
The output from criticality assessments or the minimum requirements specified in Table 9.1,
together with local legislation shall then enable the formulation of a written scheme of
examination for each offshore jacket.

9.1.2 Design Review


The jacket design shall compensate for areas such as piles sleeves and splash zones which are
unable to be inspected. Nodes and riser clamps shall avoid these areas if at all possible.
Since Flooded Member Detection (FMD) is the preferred means of jacket inspection, all
members should normally be designed as non-flooded. Where flooded or grouted members are
incorporated in the design specific studies shall be undertaken to determine how they will be
inspected in-service.
Pressio-detection may be used as an alternative to FMD. Such systems must obviously be
incorporated into the original jacket design but offer the advantage of remote monitoring.
For large Jackets where ROV surveys are deemed to be the primary sub-sea inspection tools,
provision shall be made on the topsides for an ROV lay-down area with suitable power and
services.
In areas of harsh operational environments such as the North Sea, facilities to monitor the
actual environmental conditions may be installed on representative structures. These could then
be used to validate and fine tune the structural loading and thereafter determine the most
suitable inspection programme.

9.1.3 Inspection Scope


The first in-service inspection of any offshore jacket should be performed one year from the
topsides installation. This will ensure the fully loaded jacket has endured one complete
environmental cycle before inspection and the Cathodic Protection has had time to polarise.
Offshore Jacket sub-sea inspections shall be preferably be performed and recorded using
Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs). Alternately divers could be used with head mounted video
cameras. Atmospheric jacket sections shall be surveyed using abseiling techniques to prevent
the need for expensive scaffold.
Offshore Jacket inspection campaigns shall be planned over five yearly cycles. The atmospheric
sections of the jacket shall be inspected yearly and shall include all structural components and
appurtenances not limited to primary, secondary and tertiary structure, risers, J tubes, cassions,
conductors and their associated supports.
Global visual sub-sea inspections shall be performed at a maximum frequency of 2 yearly and
shall also contain the above components and appurtenances. This frequency may be extended
out to a maximum of 5 yearly providing the platforms operate in benign environmental
conditions and have no history of structural damage.
It is recommended that global inspections include Flooded Member Inspection (FMD) as an
enhancement of visual inspection and as an alternative to detailed weld inspection. It should be
noted that in certain regulatory regimes such as the North Sea, detailed studies are required to
justify the waiving of detailed weld inspection.
Where FMD is not performed, detailed inspection of critical welds shall be performed at a
maximum frequency of 5 yearly unless otherwise waived following the completion of a detailed
criticality assessment.

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Where excessive marine growth is noted, this shall be expertly assessed following each ROV
inspection to assess its effect on jacket loading. When the marine grown exceeds the limits
allowable in the platform design, it shall be removed by either ROVS or divers. Consideration
shall be given to the installation of marine growth removal/prevention equipment but their
performance will be linked to the specific local environment - trial installations are recommended
before any large-scale implementation is performed. Marine Growth cleaning may be necessary
to facilitate effective inspection especially on critical components such as riser clamps and
welds.
Global visual sub-sea inspections shall include a scour survey around the platform legs and
lower members - results must be compared against design parameters. This survey shall also
check the seabed for dropped objects. Where new dropped objects are found, the members
above shall be checked for damage.
The platform stability shall be assured by a range of surveys performed one year from topsides
installation then 2 yearly thereafter. This will include a platform level/settlement survey,
measurement of the air gap and audit of the weight control process.
Where significant changes are noted in jacket loading such as addition or redistribution of
weight, reduction in air gap, differential settlement, changes in wind and wave loading or any
structural damage, excessive marine growth, the original jacket design model shall be revised
accordingly and re-run. Output from this model shall be used to update the written scheme of
examination as necessary. A formal review of the above parameters should be performed at a
maximum frequency of 5 yearly.
Cathodic Protection (CP) shall be monitored over the complete as part of the jacket ROV survey
during the Global Inspection. In general jackets shall be protected by sacrificial systems and the
wastage of sacrificial anodes shall be assessed as part of any survey to predict when retro fits
may be needed.

9.2 Inshore or Swamp Sub-Sea Structures


9.2.1 General
Unlike Offshore structures, inshore or swamp sub-sea structures are normally relatively small
and of simple design, subject to light loading and are almost always unmanned. Both the
probability and consequence of failure are therefore of a difference order to that of Offshore
Structures hence they are subject to significantly different inspection requirements to assure
their integrity.
The minimum acceptable inspection requirements to assure the integrity of Inshore Structures
are given in Table 9.2. These requirements have been prepared for jackets installed in inshore
or swamp environments and must not be applied for Offshore Structures.
The relatively low cost of inspection means that little benefit will be obtained by the application
of a RBI approach. Written schemes of examination shall therefore be based upon the minimum
requirements given within Table 9.2 together with local legislation.

9.2.2 Inspection Scope


Inshore or Swamp Platform Structural inspection campaigns shall be planned over five yearly
cycles. The atmospheric sections of the structure shall be inspected yearly and shall include all
structural components and appurtenances not limited to primary, secondary and tertiary
structure, risers, J tubes, caissons, conductors and their associated supports.

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Poor visibility may prevent general visual inspections of sub-sea sections of the structure
therefore these areas shall be inspected using abseiling techniques during neap tides at a
maximum frequency of yearly.
Scour surveys shall be performed either by sonar equipment or by simple soundings. Sonar
equipment can also be used to conduct seabed debris surveys. Where visibility permits the use
of air divers should be considered to perform general visual inspections. These sub-sea
inspections shall be performed at a maximum frequency of 2 yearly.
Platform level and differential settlement surveys shall be performed at a maximum frequency of
2 yearly.
Where excessive marine growth is noted, this shall be expertly assessed following each
inspection to assess its effect on structural loading. Consideration shall be given to the
installation of marine grown removal/prevention equipment.
Cathodic Protection (CP) shall be monitored over the complete structure at a maximum
frequency of two yearly. In general structures shall be protected sacrificial systems and the
wastage of sacrificial anodes shall be assessed as part of any survey to predict when retro fits
may be needed.

9.3 Other Sub-Sea Structures and Equipment


9.3.1 General
Other sub-sea structures and equipment such as sub-sea wells, templates, termination units,
manifolds, etc. shall be subject to regular sub-sea inspection to assure their integrity. The
minimum acceptable inspection requirements to assure sub-sea structures and equipment are
given in Table 9.3.
The individual nature and service of such structures and equipment means that little benefit will
be obtained by the application of a RBI approach. Written schemes of examination shall
therefore be based upon the minimum requirements given within Table 9.3 together with local
legislation.

9.3.2 Inspection Scope


Like sub-sea jackets other sub-sea structures and equipment shall be subject to a general
external visual examination by ROV at a frequency not exceeding 2 yearly. The main purpose of
the inspection is to identify leaks, major damage and debris which may result in future failure.
Together with the general ROV inspection, the Cathodic Protection (CP) level shall be
measured and the depletion of sacrificial anodes assessed. Any scouring around the seabed
shall also be assessed.
Where excessive marine growth is noted, this shall be expertly assessed following each ROV
inspection to assess its effect on sub-sea structure loading.
Damage and debris as a result of fishing activities is a major concern for remote sub-sea
structures. Where debris is found it shall be carefully removed to ensure that no permanent
damage has occurred.
The seabed around the sub-sea structure shall be accurately measured to check for scour.
Changes in seabed shall be trended and preventative action taken as necessary to prevent
excessive scour.

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10. Lifting equipment


10.1 General Lifting Equipment
10.1.1 General
Lifting Equipment is a generic name used to describe many differing types of appliances and
gear used for the function of lifting. For the purpose of this General Specification, Lifting
Equipment has been split into three different categories, General Lifting Equipment, Cranes and
Drilling Associated Hoisting Equipment.
Analysis of accidents in the Oil and Gas Industry show that a significant number are related to
the failure of Lifting Equipment. Due to this high incidence of failures and because of the
difficulty associated with predicting the external factors which can influence failure, a strict
prescriptive inspection frequency shall be adhered to for all Lifting Equipment. A RBI approach
is therefore not recommended for Lifting Equipment.
In the majority of Countries in which the COMPANY Operates, national legislation shall dictate
both the scope and frequency of Lifting Equipment Inspection. In addition to any national
legislation, the minimum acceptable inspection requirements to assure the integrity of Lifting
Equipment are given in Table 10.1.

10.1.2 Inspection Scope


Prior to first use every individual item of Lifting Equipment must be:
x Inspected for damage and where applicable function tested
x Individually identified
x Check against their original load test certificates
x Registered (including its location) and colour coded.
Colour coding shall be used to show that each item of Lifting Equipment has been inspected
within its required frequency. Coloured cable markers are a good alternative to paint. As a
minimum, four unique colours should be used. Care shall be taken to co-ordinate colour coding
with CONTRACTORS and other operators.
It shall be the responsibility of the user to make a general visual inspection of the lifting
equipment and to ensure it is correctly colour coded prior to each use. Defective or none
colour coded equipment must not be used and shall be either placed in quarantine or suitably
labelled Do Not Use.
Following re-inspection, defective equipment that is deemed non-repairable must be destroyed.
It shall never be retained for non-lifting or alternative use. Repaired Lifting Equipment must be
thoroughly examined and load tested prior to re-use. The repair of lifting equipment must be
controlled by the Integrity Department.
In-service inspection of Lifting Equipment must be performed by a competent person and shall
normally be performed by an independent agency or society. Prior to inspection campaigns all
loose equipment shall be returned to it normal place of storage such as a rigging loft. Equipment
shall be cleaned and prepared for inspection.
Where CONTRACTORS bring their own lifting equipment to site, their inspection shall be the
responsibility of the CONTRACTOR. The inspection standard applied by the CONTRACTOR
shall be equal or greater than this standard. This standard shall be monitored by regular audit
by COMPANY Inspection personnel. Audits shall be performed systematically at a frequency
not exceeding 12 monthly.

This document is the property of Total. It must not be stored, reproduced or disclosed to others without written authorisation from the Company.

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10.1.3 Lifting Appliances


Lifting Appliances are defined as any mechanical device capable of raising or lowering a load.
Examples are chain blocks, pull lifts, rope hoists, winches, etc.
In-service inspection of Lifting Appliances shall be performed at a maximum frequency of
Annually and shall include a thorough examination plus a function test.

10.1.4 Lifting Gear


Lifting Gear is defined as any device whatsoever which is used to connect a load to a lifting
appliance. Examples are wire slings, chain slings, shackles, eyebolts, lifting and runway beams,
padeyes, davits, etc.
In-service inspection of Lifting Gear shall be performed at a maximum frequency of Annually
and shall include a thorough examination.

10.1.5 Wire Ropes (Including Lifeboat Fall Wires)


In-service inspection of Wire Ropes whether moving or static shall be performed at a maximum
frequency of 6 monthly and shall include a thorough examination over the complete rope length.
During the 6 monthly inspection the Wire Rope Wedge Socket shall also be subject to MPE.
In addition wire ropes shall be subject to annual representative sample tests or electromagnetic
inspection. Where such annual tests are not performed, wire ropes must be completely replaced
every two years.

10.1.6 Elevators/Lifts/Personnel Baskets


In-service inspection of Elevators/Lifts/Personnel Baskets shall be performed at a maximum
frequency of 6 monthly and shall include a thorough examination. Lift wire ropes shall be
inspected in accordance with the above paragraph. Brake mechanisms shall be maintained,
inspected and function tested in accordance with MANUFACTURERs instructions.

10.1.7 Webbing/Polyester Fibre Slings


In-service inspection of Webbing/Polyester Fibre Slings shall be performed at a maximum
frequency of 6 monthly and shall include a thorough examination over the complete sling length.

10.1.8 Transportation Containers


In-service inspection of Container lifting slings and their lifting points shall be performed at a
maximum frequency of 6 monthly and shall include a thorough examination. In addition the
container lifting points shall be subject to annual MPE and a two annual load test in accordance
with BS 7020.

10.1.9 Lifting Frames for Transportation Tanks and Gas Bottles


In-service inspection of Lifting Frames slings and their lifting points shall be inspected at a
maximum frequency of 6 monthly and shall include a thorough examination. In addition the
Frame lifting points shall be subject to annual MPE and a two annual load test in accordance
with BS 7020.

10.2 Cranes
10.2.1 General
For the purpose of this General Specification, Cranes shall include Pedestal Cranes, Mobile
Cranes, Overhead Travelling Cranes and for completeness Fork Lifts.

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It is likely that in the majority of Countries in which the COMPANY Operates national legislation
shall exist to dictate both the scope and frequency of Crane Inspection. It should be noted that
this legislation may not be dedicated to the Oil and Gas Industry but part of Construction Works
or other legislation where cranes are more commonly used. In addition to any national
legislation, the minimum acceptable inspection requirements to assure the integrity of Lifting
Equipment are given in Table 10.2.

10.2.2 Inspection Scope


All Cranes shall be subject to a general visual inspection by the crane driver either daily or
before use. The results of this daily inspection shall be recorded in the crane log book normally
in the form of a signed check list.
On a weekly basis the crane driver shall inspect the moving and static wire ropes along their
entire working length. The crane alarms and limit switches shall be function tested along with its
brake and load cell. On lattice structure cranes the complete boom section shall be visually
inspected for damage. All weekly checks shall also be recorded in the crane log book by the
crane driver.
At a six monthly frequency the complete crane together with all other Lifting Equipment fitted to
or associated with the crane shall be subject to a thorough examination. Lattice structure booms
shall also be subject to a general visual inspection every six months AND during boom
changes.
In-service inspection of Wire Ropes whether moving or static shall be performed at a maximum
frequency of 6 monthly and shall include a thorough examination over the complete rope length.
During the 6 monthly inspection the Wire Rope Wedge Socket shall also be subject to MPE.
In addition wire ropes shall be subject to annual representative sample tests or electromagnetic
inspection. Where such annual tests are not performed, wire ropes must be completely replaced
every two years.
Annually 10% of lattice structure node welds shall be subject to surface NDE either by Eddy
Current or MPE. Where defects are suspected great care shall be taken to confirm they are real
prior to performing any repairs.
Five yearly Cranes and all their components shall be subject to a detailed examination and load
test. The detailed examination shall include the dismantling of specific components such as
hooks, ball swivels, pins, etc. followed by their surface NDE. Lattice boom structures shall be
shot blasted and subject to 100% surface NDE.
In addition to the above requirements, the slew rings on pedestal cranes shall be subject to
annual bearing grease analysis, rocking movement measurements and 20% of the slew ring
bolting shall be subject to surface NDE. During major 5 yearly crane inspections the slew ring
bearing may require to be replaced.
Where the replacement of the slew ring is deferred, this decision should be made based upon
the satisfactory results of annual checks plus a thorough review of the cranes loading history -
such decisions should also be formally recorded. Cranes which have integral ultrasonic/eddy
current crack detection equipment fitted to their slew ring bearing may have their change-out
indefinitely extended providing all other inspections are performed with satisfactory results.
Where cranes are hired they shall be subject to a thorough pre-hire inspection followed by
12 monthly detailed audits. The Integrity Departments shall be responsible for performing both
pre-hire inspection and routine audits.
Forklifts shall be subject to similar inspections as cranes. It shall be the responsibility of the
forklift driver to perform and record daily and weekly inspections in a suitable log book.

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10.3 Drilling Related Lifting Equipment


Drilling Associated Hoisting Equipment is defined as all specific lifting equipment associated
with drilling activities and included within the scope of API Spec. 8A - Specification for Drilling
and Production Hoisting Equipment. Examples are drawworks, crown blocks, travelling blocks,
hooks, elevators, links, etc.
In-service inspection of Drilling Associated Hoisting Equipment shall be performed at a
maximum frequency of 6 monthly and shall include a thorough examination and NDE of load
bearing areas. In addition, Drilling Associated Hoisting Equipment shall also be subject to
annual or 5 annual complete disassembly and detailed internal inspection including MPE of all
load bearing components in accordance API Specification 8A.
It should be noted that the drilling CONTRACTOR shall normally be responsible for the
inspection of Drilling Associated Hoisting Equipment. Therefore the responsibility of the Integrity
Department shall be to audit the drilling CONTRACTOR to ensure that their inspection
programme complies with the requirements of API and any local legislation, and is being
implemented.

11. Helicopter Refuelling Stations and Portable Tanks


Helicopter Refuelling Stations and their associated equipment shall be subject to regular
inspections and checks with the involvement of other COMPANY entities such as Maintenance
and Logistics together with outside bodies such as the helicopter operator, Certifying Authorities
and Aviation Authorities as necessary.
The aim of such inspections are to ensure that the Jet Fuel Systems used to refuel helicopters
are safe and that there fuel is clean and free from contamination. Inspections shall be
performed in accordance with ICAO annex 14 or CAP 437 - Offshore Helicopter Landing Areas:
A guide to Criteria, Recommended Minimum Standards and Best Practice, and any additional
national legislation or regulations.
Routine quality checks together with the maintenance of Helicopter Refuelling Stations shall be
the responsibility of the Head of Logistics and Maintenance Departments. They shall therefore
be responsible for the preparation and execution of routine inspection programmes.
Routine checks performed at daily, weekly and monthly frequencies shall be performed in
accordance with CAP 437 by either the Helicopter Landing Officer (HLO) or dedicated
maintenance personnel appointed by the Head of Logistics.
The Head of integritys responsibility shall be limited to the integrity of the Jet Fuel pressure
system and the Portable Fuel Tanks.

11.1 Helicopter Refuelling Stations - Pressure System Inspection


The written schemes of inspection from the Helicopter Refuelling Stations Pressure Systems
shall be performed in accordance with Section 2 of this General Specification together with any
recommendations in CAP 437. Execution of inspections will be co-ordinated with aviation
authorities as necessary.

11.2 Portable Tanks


There are two main aspects to the inspection of Portable Tanks. Firstly there is the tank and
associated equipment and secondly there is the tanks Lifting Equipment and Frame. This
Section of the General Specification only covers the tanks and associated equipment since the
inspection of the tanks lifting equipment is covered in Section 10.1.

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Portable Tanks used for the transportation of dangerous liquids as defined by the International
Marine Organisation (IMO) shall be subject to regular prescriptive inspections. The scope of that
inspection shall be determined by the type of tank and the nature of fluid being transported. In
addition to any national legislation, the minimum acceptable inspection requirements to assure
the integrity of Portable Tanks are given in Table 11.2.
By definition Portable Tanks must have a capacity of more than 450 litres and their shells must
be fitted with structure and equipment suitable for transport of dangerous liquids having vapour
pressure of not more than 3 bar absolute at a temperature of 50C.
IMO Type 1 Portable Tanks are tanks fitted with a relief device (PSV) and having a Maximum
Allowable Operating Pressure (MAOP) of 1.75 bar.G or greater.
IMO Type 2 Portable Tanks are tanks fitted with a relief device (PSV) and having a Maximum
Allowable Operating Pressure (MAOP) of equal to or above 1.0 bar.G but below 1.75 bar.G.
Jet Fuel Portable Tanks are tanks used for the transportation of Jet Fuel and designed and
fabricated in accordance with CAP 437 requirements.
Non-Hazardous Portable Tanks are tanks used to store inert and non pressurised fluids.

12. Marine terminal facilities


12.1 Jetties
12.1.1 General
Jetties are part of Marine Terminal Facilities and their primary function is to ensure safe mooring
and berthing of tankers during their loading and unloading. For the purpose of this General
Specification Jetties shall include all above water and sub-sea structures, tertiary structures,
Cathodic Protection (CP) Systems and energy absorbing fenders.
Jetties are basically structures and the general requirements given in Section 9.2 shall apply. A
prescriptive inspection scheme shall be followed in accordance with Table 12.1 and any local
Marine Authority requirements.

12.1.2 Inspection Scope


Above water structures shall be generally be inspected annual unless the environment is
considered to be benign from both a loading and corrosive point of view. In such cases
inspection of primary structures may be extended to 2 yearly. In all cases Tertiary Structure
shall be inspected annually to ensure personnel safety.
The scope of Sub-Sea structures shall depend on both the environmental conditions and the
water clarity. Splash Zones shall be subject to annual general visual inspection together with
energy absorbing fenders.
Poor visibility may prevent general visual inspections of sub-sea sections of the structure
therefore these areas shall be inspected using abseiling techniques during neap tides. Scour
surveys shall be performed either by sonar equipment or by simple soundings. Sonar
equipment can also be used to conduct seabed debris surveys.
Where visibility permits the use of air divers should be considered to perform general visual
inspections.
Where excessive marine growth is noted, this shall be expertly assessed following each
inspection to assess its effect on structural loading. Consideration shall be given to the
installation of marine grown removal/prevention equipment.

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Cathodic Protection (CP) shall be monitored over the complete structure at a maximum
frequency of yearly. In general structures shall be protected sacrificial systems and the wastage
of sacrificial anodes shall be assessed as part of any survey to predict when retro fits may be
needed.
Where the CP system is an impressed current type, it is recommended that the output of the
Transformer/Rectifiers (T/R) is monitored at a frequency not exceeding 2 weekly. The
performance of the CP systems should include the analysis of the T/R output.

12.2 Loading Arms


Loading Arms are flexible piping mechanisms used to connect Jetty Piping to tankers. The
design of each arm will depend on the type of fluid being transferred. Loading Arms by design
will be located at the end of jetties and exposed to the marine environment also their failure may
have serious safety, environmental and financial consequences.
Due to their difficult working environment and their high consequences if failure, Loading Arms
shall be subject to a strict prescriptive inspection schedule in accordance with Table 12.2.
Prior to every use each Loading Arm shall be subject to a general visual inspection primarily to
check for damage and evidence of leakage by the operations personnel. Sealing faces shall be
also be carefully checked for both damage and corrosion. The function of Loading Arms shall
also be checked to ensure all joints are free to move together with their emergency disconnect
mechanism. VENDORS guidelines and recommendations shall also be followed.
Annual inspections shall be performed by the Integrity Department and shall involve a Detailed
External Examination of the Loading Arm together with all its components.
Major inspections shall be performed at a frequency not exceeding 5 yearly. In addition to a
Detailed External Examination, a limited internal inspection of the piping shall be performed at
the inlet and outlet and at selected swivel joints as necessary.
Inaccessible internal areas shall be surveyed by ultrasonic inspection or radiography. In the
event that Stress Corrosion Cracking is credible, surface NDE shall be performed. Any
insulation shall be removed to check for Under Insulation Corrosion.
In addition to the above scope written Schemes of Examination shall be performed taking into
account VENDORS Maintenance and Inspection recommendations.

12.3 Mooring Buoys


12.3.1 General
Mooring buoys are part of Offshore or Terminal Facilities. Their function is to moor tankers
during loading or offloading operations from fixed sub-sea pipelines. A single or duel mooring
line is used to hold the tanker in position downstream of the buoy while a floating hose is used
to transfer the product. The underside of the buoy is anchored to the seabed and remains
stationary while the topsides of the buoy rotates by means of a slew ring bearing. The underside
of the buoy is also connected to the Pipeline End Manifold (PLEM) via submarine hoses.
Due to their difficult working environment and their high consequences if failure, Mooring Buoys
shall be subject to a strict prescriptive inspection schedule in accordance with Table 12.3.

12.3.2 Inspection Scope


Prior to every use, Mooring Buoys shall be subject to a general visual inspection primarily to
check for damage and evidence of leakage by the Marine Operations personnel. Trim and
freeboard levels shall also be monitored as they can give an indication of sub-surface damage.

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Floating hoses and mooring lines together with their terminations must also be checked for
wear, kinks and general damage prior to every use.
At a frequency not exceeding annually the complete buoy and all its associated surface and
underwater components shall be subject to a general visual inspection. The surface inspection
of the buoy shall include a measurement of its trim and freeboard together with an internal
inspection of its buoyancy tanks.
In order to assess the condition of the buoy slew ring bearings, a torque test shall be performed
in accordance with the VENDORS recommended procedure. If necessary, VENDOR assistance
shall be used to perform torque tests. Grease samples shall also be taken and analysed to
identify possible wear within the bearing.
Floating hoses shall be inspected along their complete length. This can be performed by
recovering the hose to a support vessel, by towing the complete hose onshore for inspection, or
by performing an in-situ inspection by divers. End connection and their sealing faces shall be
closely examined and breakaway couplings shall be inspected in accordance with VENDORs
recommendations.
Mooring ropes or Hawser shall be replaced annually. It is recommended that used Hawsers be
returned to their VENDOR for destructive testing. When it can be proven that the condition of
the mooring rope was satisfactory for service, the replacement frequency may be increased to a
maximum of 2 yearly. This shall only be applicable when the same VENDOR is used to supply
the Hawsers. In the event that the inspection frequency is extended to 2 yearly then the
Hawsers shall be subject to an annual detailed visual inspection.
Underwater inspection shall be performed by divers also at a frequency not exceeding annually.
The underwater inspection of the buoy body shall include a general visual inspection, an
assessment and cleaning as necessary of marine growth, and measurement of Cathodic
Protection levels and anode depletion.
Underwater inspection shall also include the visual inspection of the submarine hoses from the
Pipeline End Manifold (PLEM) to the underside of the buoy body. Special attention shall be paid
to the connections for signs of possible leakage and the tightness of bolted connections shall be
checked.
Anchors together with their connecting chains or wires shall also be inspected over their
complete length. Any excessive marine growth shall be cleaned off to prevent additional drag.
The anchors shall be checked for slippage and the chain curvature and lay down shall be
compared against the design position.
Diver shall inspect the Pipeline End Manifold (PLEM) and the Emergency Sub-Sea Shutdown
Valves if fitted. They shall also witness their function test.
Together with mooring Hawsers, Floating hoses and submarine hoses shall be replaced at fixed
intervals as recommended by OCIMF. Floating hoses including the Tanker rail hose shall be
removed from service after 30 months of operation. Subject to satisfactory test they may be
returned to service for a second 30 month period of operation. Between operational periods
floating hoses may be stored for a maximum period of 24 months. Submarine hoses shall be
changed out after 72 months of operation.
Replacement Hawsers and hoses shall be purchased, inspected and tested in accordance with
the recommendations given by the OCIMF. Adequate inspection and Quality Control is essential
and must be included in the terms and conditions of the Purchase Order.
At a ten yearly frequency it is recommended that the Mooring Buoy is removed from service for
a thorough inspection and overhaul in a dry dock. Such overhauls shall normally include the

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replacement of the slew ring bearings together with the re-painting of the complete buoy body.
This inspection may be extended based upon the completion of satisfactory annual inspections.

This document is the property of Total. It must not be stored, reproduced or disclosed to others without written authorisation from the Company.

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[The numbering of the tables below follows the one of the paragraph with the same heading]
Table 5.1 - Pressure Vessels (General)

Rule or
Inspection Type/Integrity Tasks When Comments
Guidance
Pre Start-up Phase
Construction Inspection
Manufacture and hence QA of Pressure Vessels shall be the responsibility of Project. This section is therefore limited to
modification and repairs of Pressure Vessels. Individual Quality Plans shall be prepared for each modification or repair. The level
of Quality Control shall be determined in accordance with the General Specification for Pressure Vessels.
Commissioning/Baseline Inspection
Verification of Technical Records and Registration in Plant Before Start-up R
Inventory
External General Visual Inspection and Photography R
Wall Thickness Measurements (where internal corrosion is R
identified as a possible mode of failure)
Preparation of Vessel Inspection Drawings with inspection R
points.
Internal General Visual Inspection and Photography With Comm. Team R
Operational Phase
First In-Service Inspection
Detailed External Inspection of shell, nozzles, piping and Not > 2 Years R Date of first inspection may be
trim, supports, foundations, associated access platforms and extended based upon RBI
structures assessment results
Wall Thickness Measurements (where internal corrosion is R
identified as a possible mode of failure) at key points on Shell
and Nozzles
Detailed Internal Inspection prior to any cleaning including R
the assessment and analysis of debris
Detailed Internal Inspection after any cleaning R
Surface NDT of internal seam welds and shell attachment R
welds
Holiday detection of internal linings R
Removal of selected sections of insulation to identify Under R
Insulation Corrosion or Stress Corrosion Cracking
Subsequent In-Service Inspection (Intermediate)
Detailed External Inspection of Shell, nozzles, piping and Not > 2 Years R Date may be extended based
trim, supports, foundations, associated access platforms and upon RBI assessment results
structures
Subsequent In-Service Inspection (Major)
As per First In-Service Inspection Not > 4 Years R Date may be extended based
upon RBI assessment results
Ad-Hoc
Scope to be determined by specific event As required N/A
Inspection Reviews
Following a significant change in the operating parameters or the environment
Following abnormal incidents such as damage, leaks, plant upsets, extreme
environmental events, etc.
Where unexpected inspection results are reported which could affect other plant

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Table 5.2a - Heat Exchangers - Fixed Tube sheet

Rule or
Inspection Type/Integrity Tasks When Comments
Guidance
First In-Service Inspection and Subsequent Major Inspections
Removal of channel end and internal inspection of tube endsFirst in-service Not R Four yearly thereafter. Date
by borescope/fibrescope. >2 Years, may be extended based upon
Subsequent Not > 4 RBI assessment results
Removal of shell inlet and outlet piping to allow external Years R
inspection of tubes, impingement and baffle plates and
internal shell
Leak test for exchanger tubes R
Ad Hoc
Eddy Current or Internal Rotating Inspection System (IRIS) Note special cleaning may be required and this must be
inspection of complete tubes where corrosion or fretting is performed by the inspection VENDOR to avoid dispute
suspected or observed
Following poor thermal efficiency or leakage As required

Table 5.2b - Heat Exchangers - Removable Bundle

Rule or
Inspection Type/Integrity Tasks When Comments
Guidance
First In-Service Inspection and Subsequent Major Inspections
Removal of channel end and internal inspection of tube ends First in-service Not Four yearly thereafter. Date
R
by borescope/fibrescope. >2 Years, may be extended based upon
Subsequent Not > RBI assessment results
Withdrawal of tube bundle from shell and external inspection 4 Years R
of bundle and baffle plates and internal inspection of shell
Leak test for exchanger tubes R
Ad Hoc
Eddy Current or IRIS inspection of complete tubes where Note special cleaning may be required and this MUST be
corrosion or fretting is suspected or observed performed by the inspection VENDOR to avoid dispute
Following poor thermal efficiency or leakage As required

Table 5.2c - Heat Exchangers - Air Coolers

Rule or
Inspection Type/Integrity Tasks When Comments
Guidance
First In-Service Inspection and Subsequent Major Inspections
Removal of header plugs (10%) and internal inspection of First in-service Not R Four yearly thereafter. Date
tube ends by borescope/fibrescope and header boxes. >2 Years, may be extended based upon
Subsequent Not > 4 RBI assessment results
Years
Ad Hoc
Eddy Current or IRIS inspection of complete tubes where As required Note special cleaning may be required and
corrosion is suspected or observed this MUST be performed by the inspection
VENDOR to avoid dispute
Following poor thermal efficiency or leakage As required

Table 5.2d - Heat Exchangers - Plate Type

Rule or
Inspection Type/Integrity Tasks When Comments
Guidance
First In-Service Inspection and Subsequent Major Inspections
All plates shall be fully dismantled and thoroughly cleaned to First in-service Not R Four yearly thereafter.
allow detailed close visual inspection of the plates for pitting. > 2 Years, Date may be extended

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Draw bolts shall be inspected for elongation by checking the Subsequent Not > 4 R based upon RBI
overall length and using thread gauges. They shall also be Years assessment results
checked for possible cracking.
For plate exchangers which can not be dismantled, inspection R
may be performed by a combination of borescope/fibrescope
inspection and pressure test in accordance with VENDORS
instructions.
Ad Hoc
Following poor thermal efficiency or leakage As required

Table 5.2e - Heat Exchangers - Cryogenic

Rule or Comments
Inspection Type/Integrity Tasks When
Guidance
First In-Service Inspection and Subsequent Major Inspections
Inspection programmes for specialist heat exchangers shall be First in-service Not R Four yearly thereafter.
prepared in conjunction with the MANUFACTURERs instructions > 2 Years, Date may be extended
Subsequent Not > 4 based upon RBI
Years assessment results

Ad Hoc
Following poor thermal efficiency or leakage As required

Table 5.3a - Steam Boilers - Fire Tube

Rule or
Inspection Type/Integrity Tasks When Comments
Guidance
First In-Service Inspection and Subsequent Major Inspections
Detailed internal and external examination of the furnace chamber Not > 18 Months R
to identify overheating, deformation and cracking from
commissioning and
External visual examination of boiler tubes for blisters and other Not > 36 Months R
deformation together with wall thickness measurements thereafter
Visual examination of stay tubes for elongation, buckling and R
deformation
Internal examination of exhaust/flue box structure and tubes R
Subsequent In-Service Inspection (Intermediate)
Detailed External Inspection of Shell, nozzles, piping and trim, Not > 18 Months R Including a 36 monthly
supports, furnace, flue, foundations, associated access platforms partial removal of thermal
and structures insulation
Ad Hoc
Following problems with the control of BFW and fuel gas supply As Required

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Table 5.3b - Steam Boilers - Water Tube Boilers, Fired Heaters and Reboilers

Rule or
Inspection Type/Integrity Tasks When Comments
Guidance
First In-Service Inspection and Subsequent Major Inspections
Thermographic survey of outer shell to identify any damage to the Not > 18 Months R
refractory lining from
commissioning and
Detailed External and Internal examination of stream drums Not > 36 Months R
External visual examination of boiler tubes for blisters and other thereafter R
deformities
Pressure test of steam coil G
Internal examination of exhaust/flue box structure and tubes R
Overall measurement of Fired heater and Reboiler tube bundle
lengths to identify creep
Ultrasonic Wall Thickness measurement of Fired heater and
Reboiler tubes
Subsequent In-Service Inspection (Intermediate)
Detailed External Inspection of Shell, nozzles, piping and trim, Not > 18 Months R
supports, furnace, flue, foundations, associated access platforms
and structures
Ad Hoc
Following problems with the control of BFW and fuel gas supply As Required

Table 5.4 - Tanks

Rule or
Inspection Type/Integrity Tasks When Comments
Guidance
Pre Start-up Phase
Construction Inspection
Manufacture and hence QA of Tanks shall be the responsibility of Project. This section is therefore limited to modification and
repairs of Tanks. Individual Quality Plans shall be prepared for each modification or repair. The level of Quality Control shall be
determined in accordance with the General Specification for Tanks.
Commissioning/Baseline Inspection
Verification of Technical Records and Registration in Plant Before Start-up R
Inventory
External General Visual Inspection and Photography R
Preparation of Tank Inspection Drawings with inspection points R
Wall Thickness Measurements of walls (where internal corrosion With R
is identified as a possible mode of failure) and floor Commissioning
Team
Confirm operation of atmospheric vents, flame arrestors and
vacuum breakers
Internal General Visual Inspection and Photography R
Witness Cathodic Protection baseline survey together with R
commissioning of impressed current transformer rectifiers

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Rule or
Inspection Type/Integrity Tasks When Comments
Guidance
First In-Service Inspection
Cathodic Protection (CP) survey of complete Tank Floor Not > 1 Year R Within 1 year for tank
erection
Confirm operation of atmospheric vents, flame arrestors and R May be performed by
vacuum breakers. Production or
Maintenance.
Detailed External Inspection of shell, nozzles, piping and trim, Not > 30 Monthly R
supports, foundations, associated access platforms and
structures
Check condition of roof seal on floating roof tanks R
Wall Thickness Measurements of walls (where internal corrosion R
is identified as a possible mode of failure)
Acoustic emission (AE) of tank floor to identify corrosion or Not > 5 Years G Date of first inspection
leakage may be extended based
upon RBI assessment
Detailed Internal Inspection before and after any cleaning R results.
including the assessment and analysis of debris
Acoustic emission may
Wall Thickness Measurements of floor R be used to identify the
most suitable tank of
Surface NDT of selected internal wall and floor seam welds R
further internal inspection.
Leak test of floor seam welds using a vacuum box R Internal inspection of the
acoustically worst tank
Holiday detection of tank floor coating where applicable R may be used to defer
other internal inspections
Thermographic survey of outer shell to identify any damage to the R depending on results.
insulation (for cryogenic tanks)
Internal inspections may
Removal of selected sections of insulation to identify Under R be deferred to a
Insulation Corrosion or Stress Corrosion Cracking maximum of 10 years
based upon satisfactory
external inspection
results including 30
monthly AE.
Subsequent In-Service Inspection (Intermediate)
Cathodic Protection (CP) survey of complete Tank Floor Not > 1 Year R
Detailed External Inspection of Shell, nozzles, piping and trim, Not > 30 Monthly R
supports, foundations, associated access platforms and
structures
Check condition of roof seal on floating roof tanks R
Wall Thickness Measurements of walls (where internal corrosion R
is identified as a possible mode of failure)
Subsequent In-Service Inspection (Major)
As per First In-Service Inspection Not > 5 Years R Date may be extended
based upon RBI
assessment results
Ad-Hoc
Scope to be determined by specific event As required N/A
Inspection Reviews
Following a significant change in the operating parameters or the environment R
Following abnormal incidents such as damage, leaks, plant upsets, extreme R
environmental events, etc.
Where unexpected inspection results are reported which could affect other plant R

This document is the property of Total. It must not be stored, reproduced or disclosed to others without written authorisation from the Company.

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Table 5.5 - Gas Cylinders


Rule or
Inspection Type/Integrity Tasks When Comments
Guidance

Pre Start-up Phase


Construction Inspection
Manufacture and hence QA of Gas Cylinders shall be the responsibility of Project. Gas Cylinders shall never be modified or
repaired.
Commissioning/Baseline Inspection
Verification of Technical Records and Registration in Plant
R
Inventory
Wall Thickness Measurements (where internal corrosion is Before Start-up
R
identified as a possible mode of failure)
Preparation of Vessel Inspection Drawings with inspection points. R
Operational Phase
Sample Cylinders
Detailed External Inspection of shell, threaded connections and
Prior to Filling R
fittings
Detailed Internal Inspection prior to any cleaning including the
R
assessment and analysis of debris
Detailed Internal Inspection after any cleaning R
Wall Thickness Measurements (where internal corrosion is
Not > 3 Years R
identified as a possible mode of failure)
Thread Inspection using GO/NO GO Gauges R
Pressure Testing for 2 minutes < 130 litres capacity and 10
R
minutes > 130 litres capacity
Gas Cylinders
Detailed External Inspection of shell, threaded connections and
Prior to Filling R
fittings
Detailed Internal Inspection prior to any cleaning including the
R
assessment and analysis of debris
Detailed Internal Inspection after any cleaning R
Wall Thickness Measurements (where internal corrosion is Not > 5 Years
R
identified as a possible mode of failure)
Thread Inspection using GO/NO GO Gauges R
Tare Weight Test
Pressure Testing for 2 minutes < 130 litres capacity and 10 For Corrosive Service or
Not > 5 Years R
minutes > 130 litres capacity Permanent Liquefied Gas
Pressure Testing for 2 minutes < 130 litres capacity and 10 For Non Corrosive
Not > 10 Years R
minutes > 130 litres capacity Service
Ad-Hoc
Scope to be determined by specific event As required N/A
Inspection Reviews
Following a significant change in the operating parameters or the environment
Following abnormal incidents such as damage, leaks, etc.
Where unexpected inspection results are reported which could affect other plant

This document is the property of Total. It must not be stored, reproduced or disclosed to others without written authorisation from the Company.

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Table 5.6 - Piping Systems


Rule or
Inspection Type/Integrity Tasks When Comments
Guidance

Pre Start-up Phase


Construction Inspection
Manufacture and hence QA of piping systems shall be the responsibility of Project. This section is therefore limited to modification
and repairs of piping systems. Individual Quality Plans shall be prepared for each modification or repair. The level of Quality
Control shall be determined in accordance with the General Specification for Piping.
Commissioning/Baseline Inspection
Verification of Technical Records and Registration in Plant
R
Inventory
Wall Thickness Measurements (where internal corrosion or
R
erosion is identified as a possible mode of failure) at key points
Selective grinding of flowline weld caps to facilitate ultrasonic
Before Start-up G
weld root monitoring
Preparation of piping isometric Inspection Drawings with
R
inspection points.
Witness Cathodic Protection baseline survey together with
R
commissioning of impressed current transformer rectifiers
Operational Phase
First In-Service Inspection
Specific inspection
Selective Internal Inspection of choke valves and adjacent
As Required G programme should be
downstream piping
prepared
Detailed External Inspection of piping, fittings, valves, supports,
R
foundations and associated structures
Wall Thickness Measurements (where internal corrosion or
R Date may be extended
erosion is identified as a possible mode of failure) at key points
based upon RBI
Surface NDE of Small Bore piping welds where vibration is Not > 2 Years assessment results
R
observed
Removal of selected sections of insulation to identify Under
R
Insulation Corrosion or Stress Corrosion Cracking
Cathodic Protection (CP) survey of complete piping system R
Subsequent In-Service Inspection (Intermediate)
Date may be extended
General External Inspection of piping, fittings, valves, supports,
Not > 2 Years R based upon RBI
foundations and associated structures
assessment results
Subsequent In-Service Inspection (Major)
Date may be extended
As per First In-Service Inspection Not > 4 Years R based upon RBI
assessment results
Ad-Hoc
Scope to be determined by specific event As required N/A
Inspection Reviews
Following a significant change in the operating parameters or the environment
Following abnormal incidents such as damage, leaks, plant upsets, extreme
environmental events, etc.
Where unexpected inspection results are reported which could affect other plant

This document is the property of Total. It must not be stored, reproduced or disclosed to others without written authorisation from the Company.

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Table 5.8 - Pressure Safe Devices

Rule or
Inspection Type/Integrity Tasks When Comments
Guidance
Pre Start-up Phase
Construction Inspection
Manufacture and hence QA of Pressure Safety Devices shall be the responsibility of Project. This section is therefore limited to
modification and repairs of Pressure Safety Devices. Individual Quality Plans shall be prepared for each modification or repair.
The level of Quality Control shall be determined in accordance with the General Specification for Pressure Safety Devices.
Commissioning/Baseline Inspection
Verification of Technical Records and Registration in Plant Before Start-up R
Inventory
General External Visual Inspection R
Internal Visual Inspection and Witness of Function Test With Comm. Team R
Operational Phase
First In-Service Inspection (General PSVs)
General External Inspection Not > 2 Years R Date of first inspection
may be extended based
Witness Pre Overhaul Test (pre-pop) R upon RBI assessment
Internal Visual Inspection R results

Witness Final Function Test R


Subsequent In-Service Inspection (General PSVs)
As per First In-Service Inspection Previous frequency R Date may be extended
plus 1 year up to a based upon RBI
max. of 4 years assessment results
First and Subsequent In-Service Inspection (Steam Boiler PSVs)
As per general PSVs Not > 18 Monthly R Date is fixed
First and Subsequent In-Service Inspection (Bursting Discs)
General External Inspection Not > 4 Years R Date of Bursting Disc
inspection may be
Internal Visual Inspection R extended based upon
MANUFACTURERs
recommendations for the
specific service.

Ad-Hoc
Scope to be determined by specific event As required N/A
Inspection Reviews
Following a significant change in the operating parameters or the environment
Following abnormal incidents such as damage, leaks, plant upsets, extreme
environmental events, etc.
Where unexpected inspection results are reported which could affect other plant

This document is the property of Total. It must not be stored, reproduced or disclosed to others without written authorisation from the Company.

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General Specification Date: 10/06

GS EP EXP 211 Rev: 03

Table 5.9 - Flares

Rule or
Inspection Type/Integrity Tasks When Comments
Guidance
Pre Start-up Phase
Construction Inspection
Manufacture and hence QA of Flares shall be the responsibility of Project. This section is therefore limited to modification and
repairs of Flares. Individual Quality Plans shall be prepared for each modification or repair. The level of Quality Control shall be
determined in accordance with the General Specification for Flares.
Commissioning/Baseline Inspection
Verification of Technical Records and Registration in Plant Before Start-up R
Inventory
External General Visual Inspection and Photography With Comm. Team R
Witness commissioning and function test of flare tip change-out R
handling equipment
Preparation of Vessel Inspection Drawings with inspection points Before Start-up R
Operational Phase
First In-Service Inspection
Detailed External Visual of support structure, floor grating, ladders Within 2 Years R
and handrails.
Internal and external examination of in-line Flame Arrestors
(where fitted)
Thorough visual examination of flare tip including measurement of R
any damage or distortion noted
Surface NDT of flare tip welds and major support structure welds R
Visual inspection of refractory tiles where applicable R
Visual inspection associated pilot and ignition equipment R
Subsequent In-Service Inspection (Intermediate)
Remote Visual Inspection using binoculars or telescopic Not > Yearly R
equipment
Subsequent In-Service Inspection (Major)
As per First In-Service Inspection Not > 4 Years R
Ad-Hoc
Scope to be determined by specific event As required N/A
Inspection Reviews
Following a significant change in the operating parameters or the environment
Following abnormal incidents such as damage, leaks, plant upsets, major plat blow-
downs, extreme environmental events, etc.
Where unexpected inspection results are reported which could affect other plant

This document is the property of Total. It must not be stored, reproduced or disclosed to others without written authorisation from the Company.

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General Specification Date: 10/06

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Table 7 - Pipelines

Rule or
Inspection Type/Integrity Tasks When Comments
Guidance
Pre Start-up Phase
Construction Inspection
Manufacture and hence QA of pipelines shall be the responsibility of Project. This section is therefore limited to modification and
repairs of pipelines. Individual Quality Plans shall be prepared for each modification or repair. The level of Quality Control shall be
determined in accordance with the General Specification for Pipelines.

Commissioning/Baseline Inspection
Verification of Technical Records and Registration of Technical Before Start-up R
Details in Plant Inventory
Preparation of Inspection Drawings with component identification R
Verification of installation and as-built survey. For offshore During Survey R
pipelines - witness or review of ROV as-laid survey, for shallow
pipelines, shore approaches and river crossings - review of
magnetic/acoustic location and burial surveys, and for land
pipelines - physical survey of the Right of Way.
External General Visual Inspection of offshore risers shall be During Jacket R
performed during as-installed jacket survey Survey
External General Visual Inspection of topsides and above ground Before Start-up R
sections and Wall Thickness Measurements (where internal
corrosion is identified as a possible mode of failure)
Baseline Inspection by Intelligent Pig G
Review the baseline gauging and calliper survey of the pipeline, R
Assess pigging facilities for future pigging operations and confirm
tightness of trap isolation valves
Witness Cathodic Protection baseline survey together with R
commissioning of impressed current transformer rectifiers
Operational Phase
First In-Service Inspection
Land Pipeline Right of Way (ROW) Survey Within 6 Months or R Public ROW - 6 months
1 Year of start-up COMPANY ROW - 1
Year
External General Visual Inspection of Riser Splash Zone and Not > 2 yearly R
Atmospheric Section
Wall Thickness Measurements (where internal corrosion is Not > 2 year from R
identified as a possible mode of failure) of topsides, atmospheric start-up
riser and above ground sections
External General Visual Inspection of sub-sea risers shall be Not > 2 yearly R
performed during first in-service jacket survey
Initial in-service intelligent pigging survey Within 2 - 3 Years R To be determined by
of start-up corrosion study.
Offshore Remote Pipelines - General Side Scan Sonar plus ROV Not > 2 year from R
survey of specific pipelines details plus areas of concern start-up
Offshore 500 metre zones, pipeline crossings and other pipeline
features
Shore Approaches and River Crossings - Magnetic, acoustic R
burial survey plus visual inspection at low tide/dry season
Cathodic Protection (CP) survey of complete pipeline R
ESD Valve performance testing Not > 1 yearly R

This document is the property of Total. It must not be stored, reproduced or disclosed to others without written authorisation from the Company.

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GS EP EXP 211 Rev: 03

Table 8 - Pipelines

Subsequent In-Service Inspections


Land Pipeline Right of Way (ROW) Survey 6 Monthly or 1 R Public ROW - 3 Monthly
Yearly COMPANY ROW - Yearly
External General Visual Inspection of Splash Zone Not > 2 yearly
External General Visual Inspection and Wall Thickness Not > 2 yearly R
Measurements (where internal corrosion is identified as a
possible mode of failure) of topsides, atmospheric riser and above
ground sections
External General Visual Inspection of sub-sea risers shall be Not > 2 yearly R May be extended to 5 yearly on
performed during first in-service jacket survey inert liquid or LP Oil pipelines
Intelligent pigging survey Not > 5 yearly R May be extended to 10 yearly
where corrosion risk is minimal
and waived where there is NO
risk of corrosion.
Shore Approaches and River Crossings - Magnetic, acoustic Not > 2 yearly R May be extended to 5 yearly on
burial survey plus visual inspection at low tide/dry season inert liquid pipelines
Cathodic Protection (CP) survey of complete onshore pipeline Not > 2 yearly R
Cathodic Protection (CP) survey of complete offshore pipeline Not > 5 yearly R May be extended to 10 yearly
on inert liquid pipelines.
May be waived for long
(> 100 km) pipelines with good
history.
ESD Valve performance testing Not > 1 yearly R
Offshore Remote Pipelines - General Side Scan Sonar of Not > 3 yearly R May be extended to 5 yearly on
complete pipelines inert liquid pipelines
Offshore Remote Pipelines - ROV Survey of complete pipelines Not > 5 yearly R May be extended to 10 yearly
on inert liquid pipelines.
May be waived for long
(>100km) pipelines with good
history.
Offshore Remote Pipelines - ROV survey of specific areas of Not > 2 yearly R May be extended to 5 yearly on
concern identified by Side Scan Sonar inert liquid pipelines
Offshore 500 metre zones, pipeline crossings and other pipeline Not > 2 yearly R
features - ROV survey
Ad-Hoc
Scope to be determined by specific event As required N/A
Inspection Reviews
Following a significant change in the environment conditions, extreme environmental
events, dropped objects, vessel collisions, observed damage

This document is the property of Total. It must not be stored, reproduced or disclosed to others without written authorisation from the Company.

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General Specification Date: 10/06

GS EP EXP 211 Rev: 03

Table 8 - Surface Structures

Rule or
Inspection Type/Integrity Tasks When Comments
Guidance
Pre Start-up Phase
Construction Inspection
Manufacture and hence QA of surface structures shall be the responsibility of Project. This section is therefore limited to
modification and repairs of surface structures. Individual Quality Plans shall be prepared for each modification or repair. The level
of Quality Control shall be determined in accordance with the General Specification for Structures.

Commissioning/Baseline Inspection
Verification of Technical Records and Registration of Technical Before Start-up R
Details in Plant Inventory.
Pre float-out General Visual Inspection of complete structure Before Float-out R Performed at fabrication
site
Comprehensive pre float-out photographic survey R Performed at fabrication
site
Preparation of Inspection Drawings with component identification Before Start-up R
Operational Phase
First In-Service Inspection
General Visual Inspection of complete structure Within One Year of R Normally performed by
Topsides abseiling techniques
Installation
Subsequent In-Service Inspection (Intermediate)
General Visual Inspection of Tertiary Structure Not > 1 yearly R Normally performed by
abseiling techniques
General Visual Inspection of complete structure Not > 2 yearly R
Subsequent In-Service Inspection (Major)
Surface NDE (normally Eddy Current) of critical atmospheric Not > 5 yearly R
structural welds
Ad-Hoc
Scope to be determined by specific event As Required N/A
Inspection Reviews
Following a significant change in the environment conditions, extreme environmental
events, dropped objects, vessel collisions, observed damage, and changes in platform
loading

This document is the property of Total. It must not be stored, reproduced or disclosed to others without written authorisation from the Company.

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Table 9.1 - Sub-Sea Structures - Offshore Jackets

Rule or
Inspection Type/Integrity Tasks When Comments
Guidance
Pre Start-up Phase
Construction Inspection
Manufacture and hence QA of jackets shall be the responsibility of Project. This section is therefore limited to modification and
repairs of jackets. Individual Quality Plans shall be prepared for each modification or repair. The level of Quality Control shall be
determined in accordance with the General Specification for Structures.

Commissioning/Baseline Inspection
Verification of Technical Records and Registration of Technical Before Start-up R
Details in Plant Inventory.
Pre float-out General Visual Inspection of complete jacket plus all Before Float-out R Performed at fabrication
appurtenances site
Comprehensive pre float-out photographic survey R Performed at fabrication
site
Preparation of Inspection Drawings with component identification R
Witness commissioning of Meteorological and Meteocean Before Start-up
monitoring equipment.
Measurement and confirmation of Air Gap between topsides and R Performed by jacket
LAT, Platform level suvey, and Conformation of as-installed installation
weight, Centre of Gravity and jacket loading CONTRACTOR and
witnessed by Integrity
Scour survey at jacket legs/pile sleeves After Piling R Dept.
Post installation General Visual Inspection of complete jacket plus R
all appurtenances - Inspection normally performed using an ROV
and recorded on video tape
Operational Phase
First In-Service Inspection
General Visual Inspection of complete sub-sea and atmospheric After One Year R Inspection normally
section of jacket plus all appurtenances and other sub-sea and from Topsides performed using an ROV
atmospheric components Installation and recorded on video
tape.
FMD survey or alternatively pressio-detection of all members and R
appurtenances where applicable
Cathodic Protection (CP) of complete sub-sea section of jacket R
plus all appurtenances and other sub-sea components including
risers
Marine growth survey and assessment R
Seabed/debris survey and scour survey at jacket legs/pile sleeves R
Where installed, download and analysis of Meteorological and
Meteocean and comparison with design parameters.
Measurement and confirmation of Air Gap between topsides and R
LAT
Platform differential settlement/level survey R
Comparison of present weight, Centre of Gravity and jacket R
loading Vs as-installed conditions

This document is the property of Total. It must not be stored, reproduced or disclosed to others without written authorisation from the Company.

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Rule or
Inspection Type/Integrity Tasks When Comments
Guidance
Subsequent In-Service Inspection (Intermediate)
General Visual Inspection of complete atmospheric section of Not > Yearly R
jacket plus all appurtenances and other surface components
Subsequent In-Service Inspection (Major)
As per First In-Service Inspection Not > 2 Yearly R Inspection frequency may
be extended subject to
Surface NDE (normally Eddy Current) of critical atmospheric Not > 5 Yearly R criticality assessment
structural welds studies.
Frequency of inspection
Major Inspection may be
extended to 5 yearly on
platforms operating in a
benign environment.
Surface NDE (either MPE, Eddy Current or ACFM) of critical sub- Not > 5 Yearly R Inspection may be waived
surface structural welds if FMD is performed
2 yearly.
Ad-Hoc
Scope to be determined by specific event As required N/A
Inspection Reviews
Following a significant change in the environment conditions, extreme environmental
events, dropped objects, vessel collisions, observed damage, and changes in platform
loading

This document is the property of Total. It must not be stored, reproduced or disclosed to others without written authorisation from the Company.

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Table 9.2 - Sub-Sea Structures - Inshore and Swamp Structures

Rule or
Inspection Type/Integrity Tasks When Comments
Guidance
Pre Start-up Phase
Construction Inspection
Manufacture and hence QA of inshore jackets shall be the responsibility of Project. This section is therefore limited to modification
and repairs of inshore jackets. Individual Quality Plans shall be prepared for each modification or repair. The level of Quality
Control shall be determined in accordance with the General Specification for Structures.

Commissioning/Baseline Inspection
Verification of Technical Records and Registration of Technical Before Start-up R
Details in Plant Inventory.
Pre float-out General Visual Inspection of complete structure plus Before Float-out R Performed at fabrication
all appurtenances site
Comprehensive pre float-out photographic survey R Performed at fabrication
site
Preparation of Inspection Drawings with component identification R
Measurement and confirmation of Air Gap between topsides and Before Start-up R Performed by jacket
LAT, Platform level suvey, and Conformation of as-installed installation
weight, Centre of Gravity and jacket loading CONTRACTOR and
witnessed by Integrity
Scour survey at jacket legs/pile sleeves After Piling R Dept.
Post installation General Visual Inspection of complete structure R
plus all appurtenances
Operational Phase
First In-Service Inspection
General Visual Inspection of complete sub-sea and atmospheric After One Year R Normally performed by
section of jacket plus all appurtenances and other sub-sea and from Topsides abseiling techniques at
atmospheric components Installation low tide
Cathodic Protection (CP) of complete sub-sea section of jacket R
plus all appurtenances and other sub-sea components including
risers
Marine growth survey and assessment R
Seabed/debris survey and scour survey at jacket legs/pile sleeves R
Platform differential settlement/level survey R
Subsequent In-Service Inspection
General Visual Inspection of complete atmospheric section of Not > Yearly R
jacket plus all appurtenances and other surface components
As per First In-Service Inspection Not > 2 yearly R Frequency of inspection
Major Inspection way be
extended to 5 yearly on
platforms operating in a
benign environment
Ad-Hoc
Scope to be determined by specific event As required N/A
Inspection Reviews
Following a significant change in the environment conditions, extreme environmental
events, dropped objects, vessel collisions, observed damage, and changes in platform
loading

This document is the property of Total. It must not be stored, reproduced or disclosed to others without written authorisation from the Company.

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Table 9.3 - Other Sub-Sea Structures and Equipment

Rule or
Inspection Type/Integrity Tasks When Comments
Guidance
Pre Start-up Phase
Construction Inspection
Manufacture and hence QA of sub-sea structures and equipment shall be the responsibility of Project. This section is therefore
limited to modification and repairs of sub-sea structures and equipment. Individual Quality Plans shall be prepared for each
modification or repair. The level of Quality Control shall be determined in accordance with the General Specification for the related
Structures or Equipment.
Commissioning/Baseline Inspection
Verification of Technical Records and Registration of Technical Before Start-up R
Details in Plant Inventory
Pre float-out General Visual Inspection of complete structure plus Before Float-out R Performed at fabrication
all associated fittings site
Comprehensive pre float-out photographic survey R Performed at fabrication
site
Preparation of Inspection Drawings with component identification R
Conformation of as-installed weight and Centre of Gravity Before Start-up R Performed by jacket
installation
Scour survey After Installation R CONTRACTOR and
Post installation General Visual Inspection of complete structure - R witnessed by Integrity
Inspection normally performed using an ROV and recorded on Dept.
video tape
Operational Phase
First In-Service Inspection
General Visual Inspection of complete sub-sea structure and After One Year of R Inspection normally
equipment plus all associated components and fittings Installation performed using an ROV
and recorded on video
Cathodic Protection (CP) of complete sub-sea structure and R tape.
equipment plus all appurtenances and other sub-sea components
and fittings
Marine growth survey and assessment R
Seabed/debris survey and scour survey R
Subsequent In-Service Inspection
As per First In-Service Inspection 2 Annually R Inspection normally
performed using an ROV
and recorded on video
tape.
Ad-Hoc
Scope to be determined by specific event As required N/A
Inspection Reviews
Following a significant change in the equipment failures and observed leaks

This document is the property of Total. It must not be stored, reproduced or disclosed to others without written authorisation from the Company.

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Table 10.1 - General Lifting Equipment

Rule or
Inspection Type/Integrity Tasks When Comments
Guidance
Pre Start-up Phase
Construction Inspection
Although the purchase of the initial fixed and loose Lifting Equipment shall be the responsibility of Project, replacement Lifting
Equipment will require to be purchased by the subsidiary. It shall therefore be the responsibility of the Head of Integrity to provide
inspection and Quality Control Support Services to the Procurement Department for the replacement purchase of any Lifting
Equipment. Individual Quality Plans shall be prepared for each Purchase Order and the level of Quality Control shall be
determined in accordance with the General Specification for Lifting Equipment.
Commissioning/Baseline Inspection
Verification of Technical Records and Registration in Plant
R
Inventory
Load test by MANUFACTURER and review of test certificate by Before First Use
R
the Integrity Department
Colour Coding R
Operational Phase
In-Service Inspection
Lifting Appliances - Thorough Inspection plus Function Test Not > Yearly R
Lifting Gear - Thorough Inspection Not > Yearly R
Webbing Slings - Thorough Inspection Not > 6 Monthly R
Not > 6 Monthly R
Wire Ropes - Thorough Inspection and MPE of Wedge Socket
When these annual tests
Internal Inspection and Representative Sample Destructive Load are NOT performed Wire
Not > Yearly
Test or Electromagnetic Inspection of complete rope length Ropes shall be replaced
two yearly
Personnel Lifts - Thorough Inspection plus Function Test Not > 6 Monthly R
Brake Mechanism - Maintenance, Inspection and Test As per MANUFACTURERS Recommendations
Transport Containers and Frames - Thorough inspection of lifting
Not > 6 Monthly R
slings and container lifting points
MPE of container lifting points Not > Yearly R
Load Test of Containers together with Lifting Slings Not > 2 Yearly R
Ad-Hoc
Scope to be determined by specific event As required N/A
Inspection Reviews
Following a significant change in the operating parameters or the environment
Following abnormal incidents such as damage, extreme environmental events, etc.
Where unexpected inspection results are reported which could affect other plant

This document is the property of Total. It must not be stored, reproduced or disclosed to others without written authorisation from the Company.

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Table 10.2 - Cranes

Rule or
Inspection Type/Integrity Tasks When Comments
Guidance
Pre Start-up Phase
Construction Inspection
Although the purchase of the initial Cranes shall be the responsibility of Project, replacement components will require to be
purchased by the subsidiary. It shall therefore be the responsibility of the Head of Integrity to provide inspection and Quality
Control Support Services to the Procurement Department for the replacement purchase of any Lifting Equipment. Individual
Quality Plans shall be prepared for each Purchase Order and the level of Quality Control shall be determined in accordance with
the General Specification for Cranes.
Commissioning/Baseline Inspection
Verification of Technical Records and Registration in Plant Before First Use R
Inventory
Witness of in-situ load test R
Commission of Crane together with full functional test of brake,
limit switches, alarms and load cell
Baseline Slew Ring Rocking Checks
Baseline Slew Ring Grease Analysis
Colour Coding R
Operational Phase
In-Service Inspections (General Cranes)
General visual inspection by Crane Driver Daily R Must be Recorded in the
Crane Log Book
General visual inspection of Crane moving and static wire Ropes Weekly R
Function test of crane brake, limit switches, alarms and load cell R
Visual inspection of crane lattice structure
Thorough inspection of complete crane plus all its associated Not > 6 Monthly R
Lifting Equipment
Thorough inspection of complete lattice structure R Also every boom change
Wire Ropes - Thorough Inspection and MPE of Wedge Socket Not > 6 Monthly R
Internal Inspection and Representative Sample Destructive Load Not > Yearly R When these annual tests
Test or Electromagnetic Inspection of complete rope length are NOT performed Wire
Ropes shall be replaced
two yearly
10% NDE of lattice Structure Node Welds Not > Yearly R
Detailed thorough inspection including dismantling of components Not > 5 Yearly R
and subsequent NDE of load bearing components
Load test of crane all its components R
100% NDE of lattice Structure Node Welds R
In-Service Inspections (Pedestal Cranes - Additional Requirements)
Slew ring bearing grease analysis Not > Yearly R
Slew ring bearing rocking tests R
Slew ring bolting NDE of 20% R
Replacement of Slew ring bearing Not > 5 Yearly G See Section 9.2 for notes
on extensions
Ad-Hoc
Scope to be determined by specific event As required N/A
Inspection Reviews
Following a significant change in the operating parameters or the environment
Following abnormal incidents such as damage, extreme environmental events, etc.
Where unexpected inspection results are reported which could affect other plant

This document is the property of Total. It must not be stored, reproduced or disclosed to others without written authorisation from the Company.

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Table 11.2 - Portable Tanks

Rule or
Inspection Type/Integrity Tasks When Comments
Guidance
Pre Start-up Phase
Construction Inspection
Portable Tanks may be purchased either by the Project Group or by the Subsidiary. Where purchased by the subsidiary it shall be
the responsibility of the Head of Integrity to provide inspection and Quality Control Support Services to the Procurement
Department for the replacement purchase of any Portable Tanks. Individual Quality Plans shall be prepared for each Purchase
Order and the level of Quality Control shall be determined in accordance with the General Specification for Portable Tanks & their
Lifting Structures.
Commissioning/Baseline Inspection
Verification of Technical Records and Registration in Plant Before First Use R
Inventory
Load test by MANUFACTURER and review of test certificate by R
the Integrity Department
Wall Thickness Measurements (where internal corrosion is R
identified as a possible mode of failure)
Preparation of Vessel Inspection Drawings with inspection points. R
External and Internal General Visual Inspection With Comm. Team R
Operational Phase
In-Service Inspection - Jet Fuel Portable Tanks
General External and Internal Visual Inspection Not > 6 monthly R In accordance with CAP
437
Function Test of PSV Not > Yearly R
Detailed External and Internal Visual Inspection Not > 30 Monthly R
Overhaul of PSV and subsequent test R
Pressure Test of Tank and its associated piping at MAOP R In accordance with IMO
requirements
Hydrostatic Test of Tank and its associated piping at 1.5 x MAOP Not > 5 Yearly R
Inspection of Lifting Equipment In accordance with Section 4.6.1 and BS 7072
In-Service Inspection - Portable Hazardous Tanks
General External and Internal Visual Inspection Not > 6 monthly R
Detailed External and Internal Visual Inspection Not > 30 Monthly R
Overhaul of PSV and subsequent test R
Pressure Test of Tank and its associated piping at MAOP R In accordance with IMO
requirements
Hydrostatic Test of Tank and its associated piping at 1.5 x MAOP Not > 5 Yearly R
Inspection of Lifting Equipment In accordance with Section 4.6.1 and BS 7072
In-Service Inspection - Portable Non Hazardous Tanks
General External and Internal Visual Inspection Not > 6 monthly R
Detailed External and Internal Visual Inspection Not > 30 Monthly R
Inspection of Lifting Equipment In accordance with Section 4.6.1 and BS 7072
Ad-Hoc
Scope to be determined by specific event As required N/A
Inspection Reviews
Following a significant change in the operating parameters or the environment
Following abnormal incidents such as damage, extreme environmental events, etc.
Where unexpected inspection results are reported which could affect other plant

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Exploration & Production

General Specification Date: 10/06

GS EP EXP 211 Rev: 03

Table 12.1 - Jetty Structures


Rule or
Inspection Type/Integrity Tasks When Comments
Guidance
Pre Start-up Phase
Construction Inspection
Manufacture and hence QA of jetties shall be the responsibility of Project. This section is therefore limited to modification and
repairs of inshore jetties. Individual Quality Plans shall be prepared for each modification or repair. The level of Quality Control
shall be determined in accordance with the General Specification for Structures.

Commissioning/Baseline Inspection
Verification of Technical Records and Registration of Technical Before Start-up R
Details in Plant Inventory.
Pre float-out/Installation General Visual Inspection of complete Before Float- R Performed at fabrication
structure plus all appurtenances out/Installation site
Comprehensive pre float-out/Installation photographic survey R Performed at fabrication
site
Preparation of Inspection Drawings with component identification R
Measurement and confirmation of Position and Level Before Start-up R Performed by jacket
Scour survey at Jetty legs/pile sleeves After Piling R installation
CONTRACTOR and
Post installation General Visual Inspection of complete structure R
witnessed by Integrity
plus all appurtenances
Dept.
Operational Phase
First In-Service Inspection
General Visual Inspection of Tertiary Structure Not > Yearly R Normally performed by
abseiling techniques
General Visual Inspection of complete sub-sea and atmospheric Within One Year of R
section of jetty plus all appurtenances and other sub-sea and Topsides
atmospheric components Installation
Cathodic Protection (CP) of complete sub-sea section of jacket R
plus all appurtenances and other sub-sea components including
risers
Marine growth survey and assessment R
Seabed/debris survey and scour survey at Jetty legs/pile sleeves R
Jetty differential settlement/level survey R
Subsequent In-Service Inspection
General Visual Inspection of Tertiary Structure Not > Yearly R
General Visual Inspection of surface structure of jetty plus all R Can be increased to two
appurtenances yearly in benign
environments
General Visual Inspection of Splash Zones and energy absorbing R
fenders
General Visual Inspection of sub-sea structure of jetty plus all Not > 2 Yearly R
appurtenances
Marine growth survey and assessment R
Seabed/debris survey and scour survey at Jetty legs/pile sleeves R
Cathodic Protection (CP) of complete sub-sea section of jacket Not > Yearly R
plus all appurtenances and other sub-sea components including
risers
Jetty differential settlement/level survey R
Ad-Hoc
Scope to be determined by specific event As required N/A
Inspection Reviews
Following a significant change in the environment conditions, extreme environmental
events, dropped objects, vessel collisions, observed damage, and changes in platform
loading

Table 12.2 - Loading Arms


Rule or
Inspection Type/Integrity Tasks When Comments
Guidance

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Page 51/54
Exploration & Production

General Specification Date: 10/06

GS EP EXP 211 Rev: 03

Pre Start-up Phase


Construction Inspection
Manufacture and hence QA of Loading Arms shall be the responsibility of Project. This section is therefore limited to modification
and repairs of Loading Arms. Individual Quality Plans shall be prepared for each modification or repair. The level of Quality
Control shall be determined in accordance with the General Specification for Loading Arms.

Commissioning/Baseline Inspection
Verification of Technical Records and Registration of Technical Before Start-up R
Details in Plant Inventory.
Pre Installation General Visual Inspection of complete structure Before Installation R Performed at fabrication
plus all appurtenances site
Comprehensive pre Installation photographic survey R Performed at fabrication
site
Preparation of Inspection Drawings with component identification R
Post installation General Visual Inspection of complete structure R
plus all appurtenances
Operational Phase
Operational Inspection
General Visual Inspection of complete structure and associated Before Each Use R Inspection Performed by
components Operations Personnel
Visual inspection of inlet of sealing faces R
Function Test of swivel joints and telescopic joints
In-Service Inspection Minor
Detailed Visual Inspection of complete structure and associated Not > Yearly R
components
Full function test of the loading arm movement together with any R Can be increased to two
quick disconnect system yearly in benign
environments
In-Service Inspection - Major
Detailed Visual Inspection of complete structure and associated Not > 5 Yearly
components
Full function test of the loading arm movement together with any R
quick disconnect system
Limited internal inspection at end connections and removal of R
selected swivel joints
NDE of inaccessible internal part by ultrasonic or radiographic R
examination
Surface NDE where SCC is deemed credible R
Removal of selected sections of insulation to identify Under
Insulation Corrosion or Stress Corrosion Cracking
Additional Checks as recommended by VENDOR R
Ad-Hoc
Scope to be determined by specific event As required N/A
Inspection Reviews
Following a significant change in the environment conditions, extreme environmental
events, dropped objects, vessel collisions, observed damage, and changes in platform
loading

This document is the property of Total. It must not be stored, reproduced or disclosed to others without written authorisation from the Company.

Page 52/54
Exploration & Production

General Specification Date: 10/06

GS EP EXP 211 Rev: 03

Table 12.3 - Mooring Buoys

Rule or
Inspection Type/Integrity Tasks When Comments
Guidance
Pre Start-up Phase
Construction Inspection
Although the manufacture and hence QA of Mooring Buoys shall be the responsibility of Project, the subsidiary shall be
responsible for the regular procurement of replacement hoses and mooring lines. It shall therefore be the responsibility of the
Head of Integrity to provide inspection and Quality Control Support Services to the Procurement Department for the replacement
purchase of any Mooring Buoy Components. Individual Quality Plans shall be prepared for each item to be purchased and the
level of Quality Control shall be determined in accordance with the General Specification for each item of equipment and OCIMF
requirments.
Commissioning/Baseline Inspection
Verification of Technical Records and Registration of Technical Before Start-up R
Details in Plant Inventory.
Pre Installation General Visual Inspection of complete structure Before Installation R Performed at fabrication
plus all appurtenances site
Comprehensive pre Installation photographic survey R
Preparation of Inspection Drawings with component identification R
Torque and trim commissioning measurements Post Installation R
Post installation General Visual Inspection of complete structure R
plus all appurtenances
Operational Phase
Operational Inspection
General Visual Inspection of complete structure and associated Before Each Use R Inspection Performed by
components Operations Personnel
Assessment of Buoy freeboard and trim R
Visual inspection of floating hose and mooring line including their R
terminations
In-Service Inspection - Minor
General Visual Inspection of buoy surface structure and all Not > Yearly R
associated components
Assessment of Buoy freeboard and trim R
Torque tests and grease analysis to assess bearing condition R
Detailed inspection of floating over its complete length together R
with its end terminations and breakaway coupling
Detailed inspection of underwater section of Buoy, including R
marine growth assessment and CP measurements
Detailed inspection of submarine hose R
Function Test of PLEM Emergency Shutdown Valves R
Inspection of Buoy position with reference to PLEM, submarine R
hoses and anchors
Inspection of Anchors and Anchor chains checking for slippage R
Change-out of Mooring Line(s) and scrap R

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Page 53/54
Exploration & Production

General Specification Date: 10/06

GS EP EXP 211 Rev: 03

Rule or
Inspection Type/Integrity Tasks When Comments
Guidance
In-Service Inspection - Major
Change-out of Floating Hose and Tanker Rail Hose. Test in Not > 30 Monthly R Change-out frequency in
accordance with OCIMF requirements and reuse if satisfactory for accordance with OCIMF
nd
a 2 30 Monthly period then scrap. Maximum interim storage recommendations
period is 24 months.
Change-out of Submarine Hoses and scrap Not > 6 years R
Major Overhaul in dry dock including change out of slew ring Around 10 years G May be extended based
bearing upon satisfactory annual
inspections
Ad-Hoc
Scope to be determined by specific event As required N/A
Inspection Reviews
Following a significant change in the environment conditions, extreme environmental
events, dropped objects, vessel collisions, observed damage, and changes in platform
loading

This document is the property of Total. It must not be stored, reproduced or disclosed to others without written authorisation from the Company.

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