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Detail in

Contemporary
Concrete
Architecture
Published in 2012 by
Laurence King Publishing Ltd
361373 City Road
London
EC1V 1LR
e-mail: enquiries@laurenceking.com
www.laurenceking.com

Copyright Text 2012


David Phillips and Megumi Yamashita

All rights reserved. No part of this


publication may be reproduced
or transmitted in any form or by any
means, electronic or mechanical,
including photocopy, recording, or
any information storage or retrieval
system, without permission in writing
from the publisher.

A catalogue record for this book is


available from the British Library

ISBN: 978 1 78067 009 6

Designed by Hamish Muir


Illustrations by Advanced Illustrations
Limited
Picture Research by Sophia Gibb

Printed in China
Detail in
Contemporary
Concrete
Architecture

David Phillips
and Megumi
Yamashita

Laurence King Publishing


.
Contents 62 14 Eduardo Souto de Moura 128 30 TNA 192 45 Diener & Diener
Arquitectos Colour Concrete House, Music House for Instrumental
Casa das Histrias Paula Rego, Yokohama, Japan Practice and Choral Rehearsal,
Cascais, Portugal Benedictine Einsiedeln Abbey,
06 Introduction 132 31 Torafu Architects Einsiedeln, Switzerland
66 15 wHY Architecture House in Kohoku, Yokohama,
08 Cultural Buildings Grand Rapids Art Museum, Japan 196 46 HCP
Grand Rapids, Michigan, USA Indian Institute of Management,
10 01 BNKR Arquitectura 136 32 Wood / Marsh Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India
Sunset Chapel, Acapulco, 70 16 UN Studio Merricks House, Mornington
Guerrero, Mexico MUMUTH - Haus fr Musik und Peninsula, Victoria, Australia 200 47 Toyo Ito & Associates
Musiktheater, Graz, Austria Architects
14 02 Bernard Tschumi Architects 140 Commercial and Public Tama Art University Library,
Acropolis Museum, Athens, 74 Residential Buildings Buildings Hachioji, Tokyo, Japan
Greece
76 17 AFF Architekten 142 33 Barbosa & Guimares 204 48 LAN
18 03 C.F. Mller Architects Fichtelberg Mountain Hut, Vodafone Building, Porto, Childrens Toy Library,
Darwin Centre, London, UK Saxony, Germany Portugal Bonneuil sur Marne, France

22 04 Caruso St John 80 18 BAK Arquitectos 146 34 Becker Architekten 208 49 Zaha Hadid Architects
Nottingham Contemporary, Casa de Hormign, Hydro-Electric Power Station, Evelyn Grace Academy, London,
Nottingham, UK Mar Azul, Buenos Aires, Kempten, Germany UK
Argentina
26 05 David Chipperfield Architects 150 35 Bennetts Associates 213 Directory of Details
The Hepworth Wakefield, 84 19 Dosmasuno Arquitectos Mint Hotel Tower of London, 217 Directory of Architects
West Yorkshire, UK 102 Dwellings in Carabanchel, City of London, UK 221 Index and Further Information
Madrid, Spain
30 06 Ellis Williams Architects 154 36 Claus en Kaan Architecten
Oriel Mostyn Gallery, Llandudno, 88 20 EASTERN Design Office Crematorium Heimolen,
North Wales, UK MON Factory / House, Sint-Niklaas, Belgium
Kyoto, Japan
34 07 Foster + Partners 158 37 Heikkinen-Komonen
Masdar Institute, Masdar, Abu 92 21 Ensamble Studio Architects
Dhabi, United Arab Emirates The Truffle, Costa de Morte, Hmeenlinna Provincial
Spain Archive, Hmeenlinna, Finland
38 08 HMC Architects
Frontier Project, Rancho 96 22 Head Architektid & Antn 162 38 Hohensinn Architektur
Cucamonga, California, USA Garca-Abril Hotel am Domplatz, Linz, Austria
Villa Lokaator, Paldiski, Estonia
42 09 :mlzd 166 39 PleskowRael Architecture
Extension to the Historisches 100 23 id-ea Santa Monica Boulevard
Museum, Bern, Switzerland Alam Family Residence, Jakarta, Transit Parkway Wall, Los
Indonesia Angeles, USA
46 10 Nuno Ribeiro Lopes
Volcano Interpretation Center, 104 24 Joseph N. Biondo 170 40 Rafael De La-Hoz Arquitectos
Capelinhos, Faial Island, Azores, House Equanimity, Torres de Hrcules, Los Barrios,
Portugal Northampton, Pennsylvania, USA Cdiz, Spain

50 11 ODonnell + Tuomey 108 25 Mount Fuji Architects Studio 174 41 Scott Brownrigg
An Gaelras Irish Language and Rainy / Sunny House, Tokyo, Bodleian Book Storage Facility,
Cultural Centre, Derry, Japan South Marston, Swindon, UK
Northern Ireland
112 26 Paul Bretz Architectes 178 42 SPASM Design Architects
54 12 Pysall Ruge Architekten House F, Luxembourg, Aon Insurance Headquarters,
Museum of Polish Aviation Rameldange Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Krakw, Poland
116 27 Peter Stutchbury Architecture 182 Educational Buildings
58 13 Ryue Nishizawa Springwater, Seaforth, Sydney,
Teshima Art Museum, Australia 184 43 Aebi and Vincent
Teshima, Kagawa, Japan Schulheim Rossfeld Renovation
120 28 Pezo von Ellrichshausen and Extension,
FOSC House, San Pedro, Chile Bern, Switzerland

124 29 Shubin + Donaldson 188 44 Atelier Bow-Wow


Architects Four Boxes Gallery,
Toro Canyon Residence, Santa Skive, Denmark
Barbara, USA
Introduction Concrete, despite its image as a modern material, was The projects in this book bring together, from around
invented by the Romans. Its use in structures such as the the world, a range of approaches to building with concrete.
Pantheon in Rome allowed for the first time the formation In these projects we can see concrete used in many varied
of large spans. Despite concretes manifold qualities its ways: concrete as structure, concrete as enclosure and
early use was limited, and, like many other technologies, concrete as decoration. There are large public buildings
after the fall of the Roman Empire it was nearly forgotten. and tiny structures that are no more than huts. In each
Over the next thousand years the use of concrete declined case concretes unique properties have been utilized
to almost nothing and extant examples of concrete as a differently. Because concrete is both fluid and rigid there
construction material from this period are infrequent. are two stages to the design of many details. We can think
In 1756 the process of making cement, the key material of these as the detail of construction and the detail of use.
for making concrete, was essentially reinvented. This was Architectural details explain to us how materials come
the work of the pioneering British engineer John Smeaton, together. It is in these junctions that we can observe and
who conducted experiments with hydraulic lime and a then understand the nature of the structure. Many of the
combination of pebbles and powdered brick as aggregate. details are very simple, essentially because concrete as a
Through the nineteenth century concrete continued to be construction material is a very simple material.
developed as a structural construction material. Concretes ability to record as an impression the form
The French architect Auguste Perret was a key figure in of an element that is now absent allows it to become a
the adoption of concrete as a key construction material by transitional material recalling the past in the present. We
the modern movement. Starting in the early twentieth can see concrete being used in this way in the raw
century he, along with his brother Gustave, pioneered simplicity of AFFs forest hut (p76). At first sight it mimics
many of the techniques that characterize contemporary the simple wooden structure that it replaces. It has the
concrete construction. This leading role was obscured in quality of a Dada found object, having the unrefined
the post-war period, the beautiful St. Josephs Church at appearance of something that has just occurred. We then
Le Havre and the reconstruction of his city being discover that it contains in its form a history, a reflection of
overshadowed by the dramatic work of his former the past.
employee Corbusier. Concrete gives the architect the opportunity to shape
The influence of Corbusier allowed concrete to become the structural elements of buildings into complex shapes.
the pre-eminent modern material. The use of concrete as De La-Hozs twin towers (p170) have a dramatic lattice-like
a raw unfinished material was a central theme of much of typographic structural skin that proclaims a message
Perrets post-war work; and the influence can still be seen across the landscape. Likewise in Caruso St Johns
clearly in contemporary projects. Nottingham Contemporary art gallery (p22), a historic
Modern concrete differs from the material used by narrative is etched into the buildings surface as a record of
the Romans in a couple of important ways. The Roman the local lace industry. The patterned surface in scalloped
material was formed as a dry mix that was layered up in panels appears like a curtain just about to shimmer in the
the wall or other structure it was a part of. Its strength wind. Concretes image as a hard material is challenged by
was almost entirely in compression and it did not make many of the projects in this book. The delicate eau-de-nil
use of any additional internal strengthening. In contrast, patina that wraps the skin of Pezo von Ellrichshausens
contemporary concrete is placed into formwork in a fluid FOSC House (p120) confers on it the quality of a ripe fruit.
state. This allows the concrete to be formed into complex Just as softness can be found in concrete so too can
shapes. Modern concrete also makes extensive use of hardness. Souto de Mouras gallery for the display of the
internal steel reinforcement, giving the finished concrete painter Paula Regos work (p62) also uses a coloured
strength in tension in addition to compressive strength. surface, but here the effect is of a tough mineral density.
Today concrete is the most used man-made material in The red pyramid roofs are evocative of objects fashioned
the world. At every scale and in every area of building from the earth. At the Mostyn Gallery (p30) the crystalline-
design concrete fulfils diverse functions. We have buildings faceted cavern that Ellis Williams has designed as the
where concrete is almost the only material used, others central axis has a majestic power that both complements
where it performs a traditional structural role and yet the original gallery spaces and establishes a new language
others where it forms a delicate skin. for the buildings circulation. Here the board-marked
concrete gives an impression of a fissure carved and
impressed into the solid.

6
Since the 1950s Japanese architecture has developed Notes
a distinct language of geometric forms and simple spaces;
concrete has become the principal construction material in US and Metric Measurements
this country that is so challenged by nature. Perhaps best Dimensions have been provided by the architects in metric
represented by the work of Tadao Ando, the origins of this and converted to US measurements except in the case of
architecture are to be found in the influence of Corbusier projects in the USA, which have been converted to metric.
and Louis Kahn. Today a new generation of architects are
reinterpreting these themes and forms. EASTERN Design Terminology
Offices MON House (p88) is an example of this. A subtle An attempt has been made to standardize terminology to
addition to the Kyoto streetscape, this live/work building aid understanding across readerships, for example wood
interacts with its users and the environment to create a is generally referred to as timber and aluminum as
contemporary place for a traditional craft. Pure orthogonal aluminium. However materials or processes that are
forms are here pieced by a series of round openings. peculiar to a country, region or architectural practice that
The quality of concrete as a protective material is have no direct correspondence are presented in the
evident in a number of the projects. In Tanzania SPASMs original.
powerful and serene office building (p178) combines the
vernacular form of a giant sheltering roof with the structural Floor Plans
properties of concrete, to provide a defended and Throughout the book, the following convention of hierarchy
environmentally responsive space in which to work. Here has been used ground floor, first floor, second floor, and
robust details and simple planning generate a modern so on. In certain contexts, terms such as basement level or
architecture without redress to complex technologies. In a upper level have been used for clarity.
very different context concrete also provides a strong and
secure envelope for storage. At the collection of the Bern Scale
Historiches Museum (p42) the architects have utilized the All floor plans, sections and elevations are presented at
concrete walls like a metaphorical protective cloak that conventional architectural metric scales, typically 1:50,
surrounds the precious objects stored within. Enclosing a 1:100 or 1:200 as appropriate. An accurate graphic scale is
small square the building composes a new urban included on the second page near the floor plans of every
environment that advocates potential interactions. project to aid in the understanding of scale. Details are also
Often seen as a material close to stone, cast concrete presented at conventional architectural scales, typically
easily communicates in its appearance and performance a 1:1, 1:5 and 1:10.
relationship with rock formations. In PleskowRaels
highway walls project (p166) concrete is placed in giant
fractured planes, becoming a petrified illustration of
Californias lively geology.
Concretes potential continues to be the propagator of
great architecture. The projects selected for this book
show that concrete remains a material full of latent
possibility and surprise.

David Phillips
Megumi Yamashita

7
8
Cultural
Buildings
0116

9
01 1
BNKR Arquitectura
Esteban Surez (Founding Partner)
and Sebastin Surez (Partner)

Sunset Chapel
Acapulco, Guerrero, Mexico

Client
Private client

Project Team
Esteban Surez, Sebastin Surez,
Mario Gottfried, Javier Gonzlez,
Roberto Ampudia, Mario Gottfried,
Rodrigo Gil, Roberto Ampudia, Javier
Gonzlez, scar Flores, David
Snchez, Diego Eumir, Guillermo
Bastian, Adrian Aguilar

Structural Engineer
Juan Felipe Heredia and Jos Ignacio
Bez

Main Contractor
Fermn Espinosa / Factor Eficiencia

Perched on top of a mountain near to


Acapulco, this funeral chapel has the
appearance of a giant boulder. The
brief was very simple. Three things
were required: the building must make
the best of the sites grand sea views;
the sun should set behind the altar;
and there must be provision for crypts
1 Sitting on top of a to be a part of the geometry of the chapel the east like a natural
around the chapel. However, there mountain, the chapel place, not just in and the vertical hillside a place to
was a problem achieving the first two has a mysterious the place. columns of the walls think and listen.
sense of wonder. 3 The dark of the create a theatre of
demands. Large trees around the site 2 The chapels respect stairway conditions shadows.
and a massive boulder to the west for the environment the visitor for entry 5 The pews for the
around it is evident in to the chapel. congregation are
obscured the view. There was no every element. It seeks 4 The complex stepped up towards
budget for overcoming these
2 4
obstacles. The solution was to raise
the chapel up by more than five
metres (16 feet). To reduce the impact
on the beautiful site, the buildings
overall footprint was reduced to nearly
half that of the main floor.
You enter via a triangular cut. To
reach the place of worship you climb a
stair that hugs the internal walls, and
then, in a single turn through the dark,
you rise through the floor into the light.
The chapel itself is like a cage; the
concrete columns that form the walls
mimic the trees around the site. The
seating is banked in the manner of a
lecture theatre; in the western wall a 3 5
simple metal cross waits for the sun to
go down. Sunset Chapel is a place to
celebrate life.

10
01.01 01.02 01.03
South Facade West Facade North Facade
1:200 1:200 1:200

A A A A

A A A A

A A A A

0 5 10m

0 15 30ft

01.04 01.05 01.06


Upper Floor Plan Access Level Floor Ground Floor
1:200 Reverse Plan Reverse Plan
1:200 1:200

11
01 BNKR Arquitectura Sunset Chapel Acapulco, Guerrero, Mexico

01.07
Detail Section AA
1:50
1 Concrete
2 Pews
3 Stair
4 Drain
5 Metal cross

12
5

13
02 1
Bernard Tschumi Architects

Acropolis Museum
Athens, Greece

Client
Organization for the Construction of
the New Acropolis Museum (OANMA)

Project Team
Bernard Tschumi, Joel Rutten, Adam
Dayem, Jane Kim, Aristotelis
Dimitrakopoulos, Eva Sopeoglou, Kim
Starr, Anne Save de Beaurecueil, Joel
Aviles, Valentin Bontjes van Beek,
Jonathan Chace, Allis Chee, Thomas
Goodwill, Robert Holton, Liz Kim, 2
Daniel Holguin, Michaela Metcalfe,
Justin Moore, Georgia Papadavid, Kriti
Siderakis, Vronique Descharrres,
Cristina DeVizzi, Kate Linker

Structural Engineer
ADK and Arup, New York

Main Contractor
Aktor

The Acropolis Museum is situated


adjacent to the Acropolis on top of an
archeological excavation. More than
100 carefully positioned concrete
columns support its lowest level.
The building is conceived as a base,
1 The giant entrance Acropolis and see the beneath are revealed correct relationship 6 In the main gallery
a middle zone and a top. As you move canopy supported on location from which through large holes cut with each other. the sculptures are
upwards through the building you also three columns draws the statues on display into the floor plates. 5 Rhythmic columns arranged to allow an
visitors into the have come. 4 In the upper gallery recall the classical impression of both
move through time, passing from museum. 3 The museum is fragments of the ordered spaces of the intimacy and
prehistory through to the late Roman 2 From the upper raised up on concrete Parthenon frieze are Parthenon. Natural monumentality.
gallery you can look columns. The displayed so they can light is filtered through
period. At the top of the building there across towards the archaeological remains be viewed in the all of the building.
is a glass gallery, over seven metres
3 5
(23 feet) high, which is rotated 23
degrees from the lower floors to allow
a direct view of the Acropolis. From
here the sculptures taken from the
Parthenon can be viewed, while also
seeing the temple itself beyond. Below
are the main galleries, a multimedia
space, a bar and a restaurant.
The museum rejects monumentality;
instead it focuses the visitors
attention on the extraordinary works
of art that it contains. An air of
transparency pervades the whole at
each level views to the layer above
and the layer below can be seen. The
use of light is a constant theme. As 4 6
most of the works are sculptural there
is extensive use made of filtered
natural light in all the gallery spaces.
This is permitted to penetrate the
building from the upper glazed areas
down to the archaeology below.

14
02.01 02.02
Second Floor Third Floor A A
1:2000 1:2000
1 Public terrace 1 Parthenon Gallery
2 Shop
3 Restaurant
4 Balcony lounge
5 Void
A A
6 VIP area
1

2 3 1

B B B B
5 4
1
6
0 20 40m 1

5
0 60 120ft

1 1
8
2 3 4 1

B B 2 2 B B
5
3
2
6 7
A A 1
A

A A
A

02.03 02.04 02.05


Basement Ground Floor First Floor
1:2000 1:2000 1:2000
1 Excavations 1 Entrance 1 Gallery
2 Offices 2 Lobby 2 Void
3 Deliveries 3 Shop
4 Cafe
5 Glass ramp
6 Auditorium
7 Temporary
exhibition space
8 Void

1 1 1

2 2 2
3 3

4 4

02.06 2.07
0
Section AA Section BB
1:1000 1:1000
1 Parthenon Gallery 1 Parthenon Gallery
2 Gallery 2 Gallery
3 Entrance 3 Glass ramp
4 Excavations 4 Excavations

15
02 Bernard Tschumi Architects Acropolis Museum Athens, Greece

02.08
Gallery Facade
Section
1:50
1 Concrete
2 Steel glazing
channel
3 Glazing
4 Glass fin
5 Steel fixing
6 Marble floor
7 Stainless-steel fin
bracket
8 Suspended ceiling

6 7

16
1 2

6
5

4 7

02.09
Lintel Section
1:5
1 Insulation
1 2 Concrete beam
3 Aluminium cladding
4 Glass fin
5 Mild steel bracket
6 Sunscreen system
7 Glazing

2
02.10
Glazing Fixing
Section
1:5
1 Concrete
2 Insulation
3 3 Steel fixing
4 Glazing
5 Aluminium cladding

17
03 1
C.F. Mller Architects

Darwin Centre
London, UK

Client
The Natural History Museum

Project Team
C.F. Mller Architects (Architect and
Landscape Architect)

Structural Engineer
Arup

Mechanical and Electrical Engineer


Fulcrum Consulting

Main Contractor
BAM Construct UK

This extension to the Natural History


Museum makes a dramatic contrast
to the original terracotta construction
of 1881. The basic form is a giant
eight-storey-high concrete cocoon
placed within a glass box.
The new building has been
designed to provide a home for the
museums unique collection of 17
million insect and three million plant
specimens, and to provide a working
area for taxonomic research. Visitors
are able to take self-guided tours in
1 The intricate 2 When inside the describe the surface. 4 Within the cocoon,
and around the cocoon; this allows detail of Waterhouses surrounding space, 3 Laboratory spaces the exhibition areas
them to observe scientists at work in terracotta facades it is difficult to get a have large windows explain how the
contrast with the sense of the cocoons overlooking the collection is preserved
the research facility and to see the glazed skin of the size, as it cannot be cocoon. The public and used for research.
extent of the collections. Darwin Centre. The seen in its entirety. can look in and see
form of the cocoon can The incised lines of what is happening as
The cocoon is constructed of 300 partially be seen. the expansion joints they visit the museum.
to 425 mm (11 45 to 16 34 inch) thick
2 3
sprayed-concrete walls, with a curved
geometric form. The surface finish is
ivory-coloured polished plaster, giving
the resemblance to a silk cocoon;
across the surface there is a series of
expansion joints, which wrap around
the form like silk threads. The thermal
mass of the reinforced concrete shell
aids the thermal stability, which in turn
reduces the risk of pest infestations
and minimizes energy usage.
The atrium space is dramatic, tall
and filled with daylight, and creates a
link that completes the western side
of the Natural History Museum and
clarifies the circulation patterns within 4
the building. Because of the close
proximity of the glass envelope to the
concrete storage area, it is not possible
see the form in its entirety from any
one place, adding to the impression
of monumentality and tension.

18
03.01
Site Plan B
1:5000
1 Waterhouse 5
Building
2 Darwin Centre

2
B

A 1 A 2 2 4 A A

A 1 A 2 3 2 4 A A

B
5

2 3 2 3
B

4 4
2 0 10 20m 03.02 03.03
Fifth Floor Plan Principal Floor Plan
3 3 1:1000 1:1000
0 30 60ft 1 Waterhouse 1 Waterhouse
Building Building
2 Public access 2 Public access
3 areas areas
3 Collections 3 Collections
4 Laboratories 4 David
3 5 Darwin Phase 1 Attenborough
Studio
5 Spencer Gallery
6 Darwin Phase 1
3

03.04 03.05
Section BB Section AA
3 1 1:500 1:500
1 Spencer gallery 1 Waterhouse
2 Exhibitions Building
3 Collection 2 Public area
2 4 3 4 Work area 3 Collections
4 Work area
5 David
Attenborough
Studio
6 Riser
7 Laboratories
8 Plant
9 Staff room
8

7 6 6 6 2 2
2
7 2 4
2
7 2 2

7 3 4 1

7 3 4

7 3 4

5 3 2

3 3 3
8

8 8 8

19
03 C.F. Mller Architects Darwin Centre London, UK

1 3
2

6 2 5

7
1

8 2 3

03.06 03.07
Construction Detail Double Curved
Not to Scale Glazed Apertures
1 Cocoon doors Detail
2 Bridge deck 1:20
3 Balustrade 1 Recessed fixings
4 Atrium: glazed bolted to concrete
screen shell concealed by
5 Lobby doors plaster reveals
6 Cocoon floor 2 Concrete
7 Cocoon wall 3 Insulation
8 Lobby floor 4 Polished plaster
5 Double curved
glazed panels
laminated and
chemically toughened
separately by hand

20
03.08 03.09
Typical Cocoon Typical Cocoon
Internal Roof Detail 1 Internal Roof Detail 2
1:20 1:20
1 Control joint bead 1 Control joint bead
1 4 trim, double curvature, trim, double curvature,
mechanically fixed mechanically fixed
2 Concrete 2 Concrete
3 Insulation 3 Insulation
4 Polished plaster 4 Polished plaster
5 Double-glazed 5 Double-glazed
3 rooflight rooflight
5
2 2

2 3 2

6
5 1 2 1
9
2 5

3 4

1 2 3
2 3

4
8

10

03.10 cement reinforced Insulation: 50 mm 03.11 03.12


Detail semi-dry bedding (2 inch) expanded Cocoon Wall Detail, Fixing Detail
1:20 5 Stainless-steel polystyrene board Collections Area 1:5
1 Reinforced edge trim 8 Insulation to 1:20 1 Control joint bead
concrete structural 6 Plaster bead / trim basement 1 Control joint bead trim, double curvature,
slab profile Flexi curve 9 Compactor rail trim mechanically fixed
2 Floor build-up: series divided into recessed within depth 2 Concrete 2 Concrete
50 mm (2 inch) screed, areas of 25 metre2 of screed 3 Insulation 3 Insulation
160 mm (6 3/10 inch) maximum (83 foot2). 10 Cementitious board 4 Polished plaster 4 Polished plaster
lightweight reinforced Maximum length 5 5 Compactor rail
concrete metre (16 foot 4 4/5 recessed within depth
3 Glazed lightning inch), mechanically of screed
trench fixed
4 Atrium floor: 7 Cocoon: Insulated
Portland stone 30 mm render, polished
(1 1/5 inch) Whitbed plaster finish (superfine
limestone honed finish. marble and lime
Base: reinforced stuccolustro) on a
screed separating substrate of reinforced
membrane, sand gypsum plaster.

21
04 1
Caruso St John

Nottingham Contemporary
Nottingham, UK

Client
Nottingham City CouncilProject

Project Team
Adam Caruso, Tim Collett, Christiane
Felber, Adam Gielniak, Ah-Ra Kim
Bernd Schmutz, Peter St John,
Stephanie Webs, Frank Wssner

Structural Engineer
Arup

Main Contractor
ROK/SOL Construction

Nottinghams new gallery of


contemporary art is located in a part
of the city called the Lace Market.
The building is arranged on a difficult
steeply sloping site that backs onto a
sandstone cliff; previously it was a
railway cutting. The openings are
edged with warm gold anodized
aluminium frames.
The gallery takes its inspiration from 1 A large canopy entrance, deep within gallery. The concave is established through
the industrial architectural heritage of marks the point of the building to the fluted walls give the a careful interrelation
Nottingham. The building offers a wide entry into the gallery. artworks that the building a strong of scale and rhythm.
This is at the upper building contains. vertical emphasis. 4 Interior circulation
range of interiors, of various sizes and level of the building. 2 The fine lace pattern 3 The strong spaces use the same
proportions. In contrast to the usual From the exterior the that is cast into the relationship between raw material language.
public can see, concrete characterizes the gallery and the
white box these spaces are through the glazed the exterior of the surrounding buildings
reminiscent of the found spaces of a
2 3
factory or warehouse. The upper level
is top lit, then descending through the
gallery the spaces become more
enclosed as if they were caves within
the sandstone cliff.
The cast pattern that is used on the
scalloped panels that form the exterior
walls originated from an example of
Nottingham lace. The lace was first
scanned, then the scale and contrast
of the two dimensional image was
altered. From this modified image a
3D file was create. This was used to
control a milling machine that
produced, 14 metre-long (40 inch)
positive forms. The four latex moulds 4
made from the forms cast all of the
pre-cast elements on the building.
The vertical roof parts are clad in
sheets of the gold anodized aluminium
that is used elsewhere. These have a
gently billowing profile that serves to
stiffen the very thin material.

22
B B B B

B B B B

1 1 1 1

2
2
2 3
2
3 4
3 4
2
3
C C C C
5 6 4 5 6
A A A A
4
5 6 7
7
4

5 7 7

B B B B

B B B B

04.01 04.02 04.03 04.04


Sub-basement Basement Ground Floor Mezzanine
1:500 1:500 1:500 1:500
1 Loading bay 1 Lower yard 1 Lower yard 1 Lower yard
2 Workshops 2 Cafe 2 Gallery 2 Archive / meeting 0 5 10m
3 Lift 3 Bar 3 Education area
4 Services 4 Family changing 4 Stair 3 Office 0 15 30ft
5 Stair place 5 Upper yard 4 WC
5 Lobby 6 Reception / shop 5 Lobby
6 WC 7 Galleries 6 Education
7 Performance
space /gallery

04.05 04.06 04.07


Section AA Section B-B Section CC
1:500 1:500 1:500
1 Plant room 1 Gallery 1 Reception / shop 1
2 Gallery 2 Archive 2 Gallery
3 Education 3 Education 3 Performance
4 WC 4 Cafe space / gallery 2
5 Lobby 5 Lobby 4 Services
6 Stair 6 Performance
space / gallery 3
7 Services 6
4 5

1 1 1 1
1 2

2 3
3
4 5 6

7 4

23
04 Caruso St John Nottingham Contemporary Nottingham, UK 04.10 04.11
Detail Section Detail Section
1:20 1:20
1 Green precast 1 25 mm (1 inch)
panel sedum blanket on 50 mm
2 Restraint for (2 inches) compost
precast panel 2 155 mm (6 inches)
3 Insulation insulation
4 Composite slab on 3 Composite slab on
5 metal decking metal decking
5 Primary steel 4 Stainless steel
3 structural beam precast panel fixing
6 Insulation 5 Primary steel
7 Stainless steel structural beam
precast panel fixing 6 Insulation
8 Golden anodized 7 Restraint for
aluminium coping precast panel
2 9 Double-glazed unit 8 Powder-coated
10 Black polished aluminium frame
precast bench 9 240 mm (9 1/2
4 11 Reinforced inches) aluminium
concrete infill slab mullion
10 Double-glazed
6 curtain wall
11 450 mm (17 3/4
inches) concrete
5 12 Insulation
1
13 Black polished
precast

3
4

04.08 04.09
Detail Plan Detail Plan
1:20 1:20
1 Precast concrete 1 Black polished
panel precast concrete
2 Steel column bench
3 Wood floor 2 Steel column
4 Grill 3 Precast concrete
5 Double-glazed panel
curtain wall 4 insulated golden
6 Restraint for anodized aluminium
precast concrete frame
panels

24
1

3 4

3 2

4 5

6 7

5 6

10

10

11 12 13

11

25
05 1 1 The gallery has
the appearance of a
David Chipperfield Architects collection of solid
boxes that have
accumulated at the
The Hepworth Wakefield turn in the river. This
West Yorkshire, UK gives the impression of
a natural development
of related forms, each
Client a reflection of the other.
2 A footbridge brings
Wakefield Council visitors across the river
to the gallery entrance.
3 Each gallery is
Project Team proportioned to the
David Chipperfield Architects works displayed in it.
The quality of light is
controlled to generate
Structural Engineer different atmospheres.
Ramboll UK Limited

Main Contractor
Laing ORourke Northern Limited

This new structure provided for


the relocation and expansion of
Wakefields existing art gallery. The
site is on the banks of the River
Calder. The gallery houses works by
renowned artist Barbara Hepworth,
who was born in Wakefield, and also
exhibits the existing collection, which
contains works by major British and
European artists.
To fulfill the architects desire to
provide many different types of space,
each with its own atmosphere, the
building is formed from ten trapezoidal
blocks of different sizes. These blocks
are arranged in a seemingly random
way, and have the character and
density of a miniature city. In part they
are a response to the scale and roof
lines of the surrounding small-scale
industrial buildings. With water on
three sides and visibility from all
directions, the building has no formal
front or back elevation. Where the
gallery meets the river, the water laps
and swirls around the walls.
All of the galleries are placed on
the upper floor with the service areas
located below. The exhibition spaces
are sized according to the scale of the
works. On the lower level there are a
performance space, an area for
educational workshops, public
facilities and the administration and
back-of-house areas. The building is
constructed from in-situ cast
concrete, which is pigmented a dark
grey. The windows are set flush to the
surface, giving the buildings exterior a 2 3
taut, membrane-like quality.

26
4
10 A
A
14 1
3 9 12 A
1 1
13 A
13
16 1
5 1
15
1
2 11
A 1
1A
7 A
A 8
6 1 1
8

0 10 20m 05.01 05.02 05.03


Ground Floor Plan First Floor Plan Section AA
1:1000 1:1000 1:500
0 30 60ft 1 Main entrance 1 Gallery 1 Gallery
2 Lobby 2 Lobby
3 Cafe 3 Stair
4 Kitchen 4 Display production
5 Shop 5 Picture hanging
6 Learning rooms
7 Picnic area
8 WCs
9 Multi-purpose
room
10 Office
11 Archive / study
area
12 Staff room
13 Display production
14 Picture hanging
15 Loading bay
16 Store

1 1 1

3 5
2 4

27
05 David Chipperfield Architects The Hepworth Wakefield West Yorkshire, UK

05.04 rolled into final coat


Wall Skylight Detail with 75 mm (3 inch)
1:10 laps. Hydrotech
1 1.5 mm (1/10 inch) structural
zinc capping with butt waterproofing system:
joints and UDS two coats of monolithic
soakers membrane 6125
2 Straps at 400 mm incorporating Flex
(15 3/4 inch) centres Flash F polyester
3 Galvanized steel reinforcement fabric or
fixings Flex Flash UN uncured
4 18 mm (7/10 inch) neoprene rubber
1 WBP plywood, enforcement between
4 5 Insect screen both layers
6
5 2 6 Sealant 16 Eaves beam,
3 8 7 Lightning conductor insulation local to
8 Powder-coated prevent cold bridging
pressed aluminium 17 In-situ concrete
9 flashing 18 Vapour-control
7 9 Rooflights layer
10 180 x 75 mm (7 1/10
x 3 inch) PFC upright
10 11 Internal
sunscreening
15 12 Stop bead
13 Galvanized steel
angle support to wall
lining
14 18 mm (7/10 inch)
16 Fermacell wall lining
15 Hydrogard
protection sheet, brush

12 11

17 18 13

14

05.05 2 Rooflights
1
Roof Skylight Detail 13 Powder-coated
1:10 pressed aluminium
1 In-situ concrete flashing
2 Hydrodrain 200 14 Channel upright to
3 MK separating layer structural engineers
4 1 metre (39 2/5 inch) detail
insulation local to 15 Internal
prevent cold bridging sunscreening
5 EPS insulation 16 Flex Flash UN
6 Hydrotech uncured neoprene
structural rubber enforcement
waterproofing system fully encapsulated in
7 2 coats of monolithic membrane
monolithic membrane 6125
12 6125 incorporating 17 Truss to structural
1 Flex Flash F polyester engineers detail
reinforcement fabric 18 Insulation
between both layers 19 12.5 mm (1/2 inch)
8 Flex Flash UN plasterboard
uncured neoprene 20 Hydrogard
2 13 rubber enforcement protection sheet, brush
3 14 fully encapsulated in rolled into final coat
monolithic membrane with 75 mm (3 inch)
6125 laps
9 Precast planks to 21 Gutter dressed with
5 contractors detail Hydrogard 30
21
10 c.1 metre long (c.39
20 16 2/5 inch) insulation,
7
6 15 local to prevent cold
8 bridging
11 Vapour-control
9 layer

10
4 11

17

18

19

28
05.06 5 Silicone joint
1
1 Window Detail 16 3 mm (1/10 inch)
12 1:10 thick aluminium lining,
1 Fermacell wall powder coated to
lining non-standard RAL
2 13 11
2 25 mm (1 inch) colour
WPB ply soffit board 17 50 x 250 mm (2 x 9
fixed to underside of 4/5 inch) transom
steel brackets and 18 Solar shading /
between studs black-out blind
3 12 mm (1/2 inch) 19 Fixed glazing
3 4 WBP ply fixed to studs 20 Sidetrack of
4 Removable support black-out blind
bracket 21 50 x 250 mm (2 x 9
15 5 Continuous 4/5 inch) transom
14 16 hardwood timber 22 Floor movement
5 6 18 batten joint
17
6 Pressed aluminium 23 40 mm (1 3/5 inch)
cover plate, finish PPC insulation
RAL 9016
7 7 Elevation line of
window reveal
8 20 x 95 x 3 mm (4/5
19 x 3 4/5 x 1/10 inch)
aluminium angle
20 9 Concrete slab
10 Polished screed
11 In-situ concrete
12 Insulation
13 Vapour-control
10 layer
8 14 DPC
22
21

9
23

05.07
Roof Detail
1:10
1 In-situ concrete
2 Vapour-control
layer
3 DPC
4 3 mm (1/10 inch)
thick powder-coated
aluminium profile
5 5 Silicon joint
6 6 Fixed glazing
1 1 7 50 x 250 mm (2 x 9
4/5 inch) mullion
8 10 x 20 mm (2/5 x
4/5 inch) extruded
aluminium channel
9 7 recessed 15 mm (3/5
inch) behind dim-out
guide
9 50 x 250 mm (2 x 9
10 4/5 inch) mullion
10 20 x 200 mm (4/5 x
8 7 9/10 inch) insulation
2 above head
13
3 11 Fermacell wall
4 lining
12 Pressed aluminium
12 access panel PPC RAL
9016, 30 per cent
gloss
13 Sidetrack of
14 black-out blind
14 10 mm (2/5 inch)
recess for fixings

11

29
06 1
Ellis Williams Architects

Mostyn Gallery
Llandudno, North Wales, UK

Client
Mostyn Gallery Trust

Project Team
Dominic Williams, Mark Anstey

Structural Engineer
Buro Happold, Manchester

Main Contractor
R.L. Davies & Son Ltd

The redevelopment and expansion


of the Mostyn Gallery in Llandudno,
North Wales have provided new
exhibition and circulation spaces,
which enhance the visitor experience
whilst retaining the spirit and
atmosphere of the original building.
Before design of the new
development commenced, the
characteristics of the existing galleries
were carefully analyzed. It was
concluded that these were their
natural light and elegant proportions.
The new galleries seek to replicate
these conditions, while also allowing
for the display of all forms of
contemporary work.
1 The rear of the 2 The new tube exuberant atmosphere gallerys presence in
Insertion of a bold atrium space gallery is clad in atrium links all the of expectation. the town.
through the building accommodates gold-anodized parts of the gallery. A 3 The original gallery 4 The gallery shop
aluminum. Carefully dramatic canyon of facade has been leads off from the
movement between the entrance, the composed facades board-marked restored. Above the tube. Here, the
galleries and the social spaces. This integrate the new concrete, spanned by entrance, the control of light, space
galleries into their a faceted bridge, this enhanced spire and materials creates a
space, which the architects have Victorian context. space establishes an announces the delicate atmosphere.
named the tube, is a pure faceted
2 3
sculptural volume bisected by a
bridge. Coming into this geological
space after entering via the Victorian
entrance is an exhilarating experience.
Constructed from board-formed,
in-situ concrete, the large slab
surfaces reveal on examination a
textural detail that describes their
production. Above, large south-facing
roof lights allow light to flood down
through the interior. The subtle control
of illumination is a theme that occurs
throughout this project. In the
galleries, north light is channelled into
the spaces to provide daylight without
glare or excess shadows. 4
The floors through the galleries are
oak boards reminiscent of the
board-marked concrete in the tube.
The original gallerys spire has been
re-clad in gold-anodized aluminum,
creating an external symbol of the
richness within.

30
A B A B

06.01 06.02
Ground Floor Plan First Floor Plan
A B A B 1:500 1:500
1 Shop 1 Cafe
2 Lobby 2 Kitchen
3 Gallery 3 Gallery
1 4 Shop office 4 Lift
1 5 Tube 5 WC
6 Lift 6 Void
2 7 Lockers 7 Gallery office
1 2 3
3 8 Meeting room 8 Plant
9 Gallery
6 10 Gallery
6 4 11 Education
4 7
12 Workshop
13 Plant
5 14 Loading bay
C C C C
9
8 5
6

11 10 6 6 6

10 10 6

A B12 A B
7
13 14 14 8

A B A B
0 5 10m

0 15 30ft

4 4 3 2

1 2 3 1 3 3 3

06.03 06.04 6.05


0
Section AA Section BB Section CC
1:500 1:500 1:200
1 Gallery 1 Workshop 1 Gallery
2 Tube 2 Cafe 2 WC
3 Foyer/shop 3 Gallery 3 Tube
4 Cafe 4 WC 4 Meeting room 2

1 3 4
2

31
06 Ellis Williams Architects Mostyn Gallery Llandudno, North Wales, UK

2 15 16
1 5
3
17
4 6

34
33
36
2
35 35 35
39
37 38
7 42
5 39
4 40 40 40 7 8
3 3
41 6
9
6
43

44

5
8 45
9

10 47 18
19 26
24 25
23
15 13 12 11 46 22
14 16 18 19 48
17 21

20
49
10

20
21 50
11

27
12 37
13
38
14

30 31
28 39
32 40 45
29
43 44

42

41

46

22 47
25 24 33
27 26 23
28 50

48
29
30

51
52
31 53

54
49
35
36
32 32 34

55

32
11

10
19

20
11

18

1
1
2
2
3 13 3 21
4

13 6

13
12 5
15 15
14
22 23
23
7 16 16 7
17
8 17
17
16
9

06.06 21 Erco lighting to allow concrete flow 06.07 6 Carpet tiles


2 06.08 21 140 mm (5 1/2 inch)
Tube Section Oriel 5 with recessed around steelwork Rear Wall Section 27 Primary steel Tube Section rigid insulation
1:50 track 43 100 mm (3 9/10 1:20 structure 1:20 22 Recessed lighting
1 Original masonry 22 In-situ concrete inch) timber board 1 Gold-anodized 28 150 mm (5 9/10 inch) 1 Bauder single-ply strip
wall of 1901 building hand-burnished floor marked in-situ aluminium panels fixed wide vertical membrane 23 Through colour
2 Existing second 23 Rehau underfloor concrete wall to top hats with timber-board marking 2 160 mm (6 3/10 inch) render
floor timber joists heating tubes 44 Shadow gap gold-anodized rivets 29 175 mm (6 9/10 inch) rigid insulation
3 Two 356 x 171 x 24 21 mm (4/5 inch) around bridge 2 45 mm (1 4/5 inch) in-situ black concrete 3 Bauder base layer
51 mm (14 x 6 7/10 x 2 oak engineered boards 45 In-situ concrete aluminium top hat wall membrane
inch) UB perforated 25 Rehau underfloor bridge sections arranged 30 Primary steel frame 4 25 mm (1 inch)
with 25 mm (1 inch) heating tubes with 46 21 mm (4/5 inch) vertically 31 100 mm (3 9/10 inch) WBP deck laid to falls
holes to allow rebar aluminium diffusion oak engineered board 3 45 mm (1 4/5 inch) foil-backed rigid 5 Steel support for
threading plates tread and riser air gap insulation timber joists welded to
4 12.5 mm (1/2 inch) 26 230 x 75 mm (9 1/10 47 Oak handrail 4 Bonded waterproof 32 100 mm (3 9/10 inch) cast-in fixing plates
plasterboard x 3 inch) timber joists 48 18 mm (7/10 inch) membrane jumbo stud 6 200 x 75 mm (7 9/10
secondary ceiling 27 160 mm (6 3/10 inch) plywood on timber 5 150 mm (5 9/10 inch) 33 Garage Street x 3 inch) timber joists
5 Double boarded rockwool insulation carcassing SIP panels 34 In-situ concrete 7 Suspended MF
primary ceiling on 28 50 mm (2 inch) rigid 49 100 mm (3 9/10 6 Timber trimmer to ground beam plasterboard ceiling
acoustic MF insulation on timber inch) vertical reveal 35 16 mm (6/10 inch) 8 Two layers 12.5 mm
suspension system battens timber-board-marked 7 Gold-anodized bored steel piles (1/2 inch) MR
with 100 mm (3 9/10 29 100 mm (3 9/10 in-situ concrete face aluminium window 36 Concrete grout plasterboard
inch) insulation inch) concrete capping 50 Timber-board- frames encasement 9 Female WC
6 Timber-board- layer marked folded soffit of 8 25 mm (1 inch) 37 15 mm (3/5 inch) 10 Tube rooflight
marked in-situ 30 3 mm (1/10 inch) concrete bridge, cast MDF liner to reveal Megadeco boards opening vents
concrete aperture contamination capping in-situ 9 Primary steel frame 38 12 mm (1/2 inch) electrically operated
7 Whitegoods sheet 10 Timber sole plate plywood with wind / rain
recessed linear lamp 31 In-situ concrete bolted down through 39 Shadow gap sensors and manual
fitting with opaque ground beams concrete 40 MDF skirting override
diffuser 32 Branlow self-drill 11 Waterproofing 41 Concrete beam and 11 150 x 50 mm (5 9/10
8 20 mm (4/5 inch) micro piles to 16 metre membrane sealed over block flooring x 2 inch) PPC
toughened glass (52 foot 6 inch) depth concrete wall 42 100 mm (3 9/10 inch) aluminium box
balustrade 33 Powder-coated 12 Drip profile rigid insulation sections
9 Arper Dizzie table aluminium section 13 175 mm (6 9/10 inch) 43 Rehau underfloor 12 Timber-board-
10 Arper Catifa 53 34 Double-glazed unit in-situ black concrete heating tubes marked, in-situ
bi-colour chair 35 Timber-board- wall 44 75 mm (3 inch) concrete blade
11 In-situ concrete marked in-situ 14 150 mm (5 9/10 inch) sand and cement 13 Steel fixing plate
beam flush with cafe concrete blades wide vertical screed tied into reinforcement
floor 36 Insulated sand-blasted 45 Floor paint and cast into walls
12 Removable timber pre-formed aluminium timber-board marking 46 Concrete blocks 14 Tie bolt holes back
boards drainage channel with 15 MF system 47 Membrane dressed filled and colour-
13 21 mm (4/5 inch) Bauder single-ply 16 12.5 mm (1/2 inch) up the wall matched to leave 25
oak engineered boards membrane plasterboard skimmed 48 Primary steel mm (1 inch) circular
14 Rehau underfloor 37 Continuous packing and painted column recess
heating tubes with around sacrificial 17 12 mm (1/2 inch) 49 Steel base plate 15 25 mm (1 inch)
aluminium diffusion Abbey Pinford plywood fixed to ground beam shadow gap
plates propping 18 Shadow gap 50 Accessible void 16 Timber-board-
15 Regupol acoustic 38 500 x 400 x 10 mm 19 Painted MDF 51 100 mm (3 9/10 inch) marked concrete finish
matting strips (19 4/5 x 15 7/10 x 2/5 skirting oversite concrete 17 250 mm (9 4/5 inch)
16 160 mm (6 3/10 inch) inch) plate at 800 mm 20 35 mm (1 2/5 inch) capping layer cast-in-situ concrete
Rockwool insulation (31 1/2 inch) centres profiled metal deck 52 3 mm (1/10 inch) wall
17 50 mm (2 inch) rigid 39 203 x 203 x 46 mm 21 140 mm (5 1/2 inch) sealed contamination 18 Continuous
insulation on timber (8 x 8 x 1 4/5 inch) UB in-situ concrete floor membrane recessed lighting track
battens at 1000 mm (39 4/10 slab 53 50 mm (2 inch) with lamps fitted
18 230 x 75 mm (9 1/10 inch) centres 22 50 mm (2 inch) rigid sand blinding between blades
x 3 inch) timber 40 Shadow gap insulation 54 300 mm (11 4/5 19 Galvanized metal
trimming joists 41 Timber-board- 23 Separation layer inch) hardcore guarding, mechanically
19 Steel fixing plate marked in-situ 24 Rehau underfloor 55 Ground fixed to top of concrete
cast into concrete concrete beam heating tubes contaminated with 20 Bauder membrane
20 Double boarded encasing steelwork 25 75 mm (3 inch) hydrocarbons apron around each
ceiling on MF 42 100 mm (3 9/10 sand and cement post with galvanized
suspension system inch) diameter holes to screed aluminium cowel over

33
07 1
Foster + Partners

Masdar Institute
Masdar, Abu Dhabi, United Arab
Emirates

Client
Mubadala Development Company

Project Team
David Nelson, Gerard Evenden, Ross
Palmer, Austin Relton, Barrie Cheng,
Joern Herrmann, Ho Ling Cheung,
Jeffrey Morgan, Sidonie Immler,
Alison Potter

Structural Engineer
Adams Kara Taylor

Services Engineer
PHA Consult

Main Contractor
Al AhmadiahHip Hing Joint Venture

This building is an initial part of the


new city of Masdar situated near to
Abu Dhabi, and embodies the
sustainable principles of the Masdar
City Masterplan. The campus, of
which it forms part, is being built in 1 The building, installations provide surrounding screens. 4 The projecting oriel traditional feature of
four phases and on completion will designed as a dense power and protection 3 The concrete is windows in the local buildings.
megastructure, is from the sun. tinted a distinctive red residential buildings
provide living and working space for energy self-sufficient. 2 Internal courtyards colour through the use utilize a wave form and
between 600 and 800 postgraduate Over 5000 square between the buildings of local sand. Water are protected by a
metres (53,000 square are shaded from the features in the open contemporary
students. This building is a test bed feet) of roof-mounted sun. Lattice patterns spaces help to cool the reinterpretation of the
for many sustainable technologies photovoltaic are cast by the environment. mashrabiya, a
that, if proven effective, will be used 2 3
in later phases of the development of
the city. These include wind towers,
chilled beams and photovoltaic
panels. The entire campus will be
carbon neutral and produce all its
own energy requirements.
The elements are carefully
positioned so as to provide shade
and reduce cooling loads, while
colonnades at podium level exploit
the benefits of exposed thermal
mass. The facades of the four-storey
residential blocks are made from
glass-reinforced concrete, which has
a strong red colour from the use of
local sand. The windows are protected
from direct light by projecting oriels
4
that are pierced with a traditional
latticed pattern. Elsewhere, walls
make extensive use of a concrete that
includes ground-granulated blast-
furnace slag as aggregate. This, along
with a high level of insulation, further
enhances the environmental
credentials of the project. Green
landscaping and water features, which
provide evaporative heat reduction,
also assist in cooling public spaces.

34
B

3 4
3 B

6 5
2
2

A A A A
1
2 4 B
6

1 B
5

0 20 40m 07.01 07.02


Basement Plan First Floor Plan
1:2000 1:2000
0 60 120ft 1 Basement to 1 Knowledge centre
adjacent plot 2 Laboratory
2 Laboratory high 3 Family residential
bays block
3 PRT station 4 Female residential
4 Clean room block
5 Lab loading bay 5 Male residential
6 Residential loading block
bay 6 PDEC wind tower

ATRIUM
1 BED - A2

1 BED - A1
BALCONY

TERRACE
ATRIUM

1 BED - A1m

ATRIUM

1 BED - A2 BALCONY
1 BED - A1

Floor
Sink

07.03 7.04
0
Long section A-A Section BB
1:1000 1:1000

35
07 Foster + Partners Masdar Institute Masdar, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

07.05 07.06
Window Section Window Section
1:20 1:20
1 90 per cent 1 90 per cent
recycled aluminium recycled aluminium
panel on support panel on support
frame frame
2 Prefabricated 2 Prefabricated
unitized highly unitized highly
insulated aluminium- insulated aluminium-
frame facade, weather frame facade, weather
and airtight and airtight
3 Patterned 3 Patterned
4 glass-reinforced- glass-reinforced-
concrete screen concrete screen
designed by designed by
Jean-Marc Castera Jean-Marc Castera
4 Concrete 4 Glass-reinforced-
5 Insulation concrete panel on
metal frame
suspended from
primary structure
5 Concrete
6 Insulation
1 5
6

2 3

36
5

07.07
Oriel Window Plan
1:20
1 90 per cent
recycled aluminium
panel on support
frame
2 Prefabricated
unitized highly
insulated aluminium
frame facade,
weather- and airtight
7 3 Patterned
glass-reinforced-
1
concrete screen
designed by
Jean-Marc Castera
4 Glass-reinforced-
concrete panel on
metal frame
suspended from
primary structure
5 Concrete
6 Insulation
7 Glass balustrade

37
08 1
HMC Architects

Frontier Project
Rancho Cucamonga, California,
USA

Client
Cucamonga Valley Water District

Project Team
Pasqual Gutierrez, Laurie McCoy,
Raymond Pan, Dexter Galang, Daniel
Sandoval, Eddy Santosa

Structural Engineer
R.M. Byrd & Associates

Main Contractor
Turner Construction Company

The Frontier Project Foundation in


Rancho Cucamonga, California, is a
1300-square-metre (14,000-square-
foot) demonstration building that
showcases environmentally friendly
design technologies. It seeks to show
to both developers and public that
these technologies are economical,
efficient and appropriate. This
ambitious structure uses the latest in
sustainable technology, systems and
products. These include photovoltaic
panels, a green-roof system, a cool
tower and a solar chimney.
1 The Frontier orientation and details terrace area to relax. courtyard, the atrium
The positioning and form of the Projects entrance of the plan. Parts of the roof use exhibition space is
building was the result of extensive facade shows off 2 At night the green-roof technology walled on one side by
many of the alternative buildings layered to insulate and to a canted glazed wall.
study of local environmental technologies that it composition is increase the
conditions. The project also shows utilizes. The buildings enhanced by careful sustainability of the
relation to the path of lighting design. structure.
how sustainable technologies can be the sun dictated the 3 The roof provides a 4 Wrapped around the
incorporated into domestic spaces,
2 4
with a demonstration kitchen and
living room. Internally the building
uses reclaimed redwood from a
local winery.
The walls are constructed using
Insulated Concrete Forms (ICFs).
These are hollow expanded
polystyrene bricks that interlock when
stacked in place. Concrete is then
poured into this permanent formwork,
creating a solid, fully insulated
structure. Engineered webs made
from recycled industrial polypropylene
plastic then connect the ICF surfaces,
making the concrete walls stronger.
The benefits of this method of 3
construction include better energy
efficiency, excellent air quality and a
reduction in construction waste. The
Frontier Project received a Leadership
in Energy and Environmental Design
(LEED) Platinum Certification from the
US Green Building Council.

38
D D 08.01
Ground Floor Plan
1:500
1 Entry hall
2 Receptionist
D D 3 Exhibition
C C 4 Living room
5 Kitchen
6 WC
7 Office
8 Conference
C C 9 Breakout space
10 10 Storehouse
D D 11 Lift
8 1
08.02
First Floor Plan
9 1:500
D D 1 Open office
C C
2 Office
7 3 Hallway
4 WC
4 3
6 5 Conference
C 6 Copy / coffee
C 7 Storage
8 Lift
2
1

B A B A
4
6 2

B A B A
3

4 5
11 B 8
A B A
6 7

0 5 10m
B A B A

0 15 30ft

3 08.03
2 Section AA
1:200
1 Exhibition
2 Roof terrace

08.04
Section BB
1:200
2 1 1 Storage
2 Exhibition
3 Roof terrace

08.05
Section CC
1 1:200
1 Hall
2 Open office
3 Conference
3
08.06
Section DD
1:200
1 Hall
AA CC 2 Open office
3 Conference

1 2 1 2

BB DD
39
08 HMC Architects Frontier Project Rancho Cucamonga, California, USA

08.07 08.09
Parapet Detail 1 Structural Beam to
1:10 ICF Connection
1 Coping Detail
2 GI Clip 1:10
1
3 Plaster stop 1 Roofing turned up
4 Exterior plaster over back side of parapet
paper-backed lath wall
2 5 6 5 Pressure wood 2 Exterior stucco
nailer 3 6 2 3 Base flashing
6 Waterproof 4 Concrete deck
membrane and vertical 5 Suspended ceiling
3 7 overlap each side 6 Concrete
under flashing 4
7 Counter flashing
8 8 Flashing membrane
9 Concrete

08.08
Sill Detail 5
1:10
1 1 Glazing
2 Aluminium sill
3 Sealant
2 4 Corner bead
9 3 5 5 Stucco
4 6 Continuous weep
screed
7 Finished grade
8 Below grade
waterproofing over top 3
of footing
9 Wood shim
10 Concrete

1 4

10

6 08.10
Footing Sloped
Curtain Wall Detail
1:10
1 Floor vent
2 Concrete slab
3 Curtain-wall system
4 Exterior deck
7

40
8 1

5 3 2 1 6
4

08.11
Sloped Curtain Wall
Glazing Sill Detail
1:10
1 Countersunk
anchor
2 Shaped block to
match glazing angle
3 Continuous backer
rod and caulking
4 Finished floor
5 Floor register
6 Flashing
7 Curtain-wall system
8 Concrete

41
09 1
:mlzd

Extension to the
Historisches Museum
Bern, Switzerland

Client
Historisches Museum Bern BHM

Project Team
Daniele Di Giacinto, Pat Tanner,
Roman Lehmann, Claude Marbach,
Lars Mischkulnig, Regina Wger,
Roman Tschachtli, Lukas Gerber,
Lukas Thalmann, Uli Gradenegger,
Andreas Sager, Claudia Gabathuler,
Eva Kiese, Kai Bgli, Katharina
Handke, Marc Doberstein, Monika
Hausammann, Martina Scholze,
Nicole Schneider, Yannick Roschi

Structural Engineer
Tschopp Ingenieure, CH-Bern

This project is an extension to the


Historisches Museum Bern, which
was built by Andr Lambert in 1894 in
a style that evokes Swiss architecture
of the fifteenth and sixteenth
centuries. It is composed of two 1 The steps at the buildings. 3 Through reflections block is illuminated by
distinct elements. The first is a side of the south block 2 The small recessed and shadows the small punched
1000-square-metre (10,765-square- providea place to sit block impressions in building establishes openings.
and observe the city. the concrete imitate direct relationships
foot) temporary exhibition hall located The modelled surfaces the stone construction with its context.
beneath a new civic square; the of the concrete echo of the original 4 The triple-height
the carved stone of museum. stair that connects the
second is a monolithic six-storey adjacent historic floors of the vertical
block along the southern side of the
2 3
site, which houses the Bern city
archives, offices and a library. The
exhibition space under the square is a
double-height black box space
suitable for a range of different visiting
exhibitions. Below the exhibition
space are two levels for the storage of
artifacts in secure, climate-controlled
conditions. This close relationship of
storage and exhibition space
facilitates the easy care and display of
collections.
The second element has two very
different faces. Towards the civic 4
square the building presents a
transparent orthogonal modernist
curtain wall. The activities within the
building are clearly visible. In contrast
the south facade rises up as a folded
cliff of cast concrete, punctured by
small, seemingly random openings
and indentations. This concrete skin
wraps around the building, embracing
and sheltering its contents. Behind the
south wall, in a vertical slot, a
triple-height staircase connects the
floorplates. Outside, a sweep of broad
steps rises up to the square in front of
the glazed north facade.

42
09.01 09.02
Entrance Level Plan Plans of Levels
1:1000 1, 2 and 3
1 Bistro Steinhalle 1:500
restaurant 1 Library and
2 Entrance hall, conference / meeting
Historic Museum space
3 Lift 2 Offices
4 Little Mosersaal
5 Large Mosersaal
1 6 Office and city
2 archive

5 6
1

0 10 20m
2
0 30 60ft

09.03 09.04
Section Section
1:1000 1:1000 2
1 Library, and 1 Exhibition hall
conference space 2 Depot / storage
2 Office 3 Main square
3 Office and city
archive
4 Preparation
5 Depot / storage
6 Main square
7 Half-pace
8 Services

1
2
2
3
6
4
7
5
5 8

2
2

43
09 :mlzd Extension to the Bern, Switzerland
Historisches Museum

09.05
1 Wall and Gutter
Vertical Section
1:10
1 160 mm (6 3/10 inch)
13
2 3 concrete, pigmented
2 20 mm (4/5 inch)
11 6 drainage, air layer
4 5 3 10 mm (2/5 inch)
vulcanized rubber
4 Bituminous sealing
12
two-ply
10
5 160 mm (6 3/10 inch)
Foamglas insulation
6 Primary coat
7 240 mm (9 2/5 inch)
7 concrete
8 Substructure
9 Plasterboard
10 Substructure: metal
sheet
11 Drainage
12 Gutter
13 Plastics coating
8 wall mounting
14 350 mm (13 4/5
inch) concrete,
9 pigmented
14 15 15 160 mm (6 3/10 inch)
16
insulation polystyrene
16 Water barrier
17 17 75 mm (6 inch)
18 substructure
18 2 x 12.5 mm (1/10 x
5/10 inch) plasterboard
19 window
19 Water barrier at
20 architrave
20 Water barrier,
tensed up three sided
22 21 21 Decoration for glass
23 22 Aluminium L-profile
23 Plasterboard
24 Gap
25 Putty gap
26 Cotter
27 C-profile terrain
28 Coating
29 500 mm (19 7/10
inch) gravel

22
23

24

26 25
27

28

29

44
1 09.06 2 80 x 8 x 180 mm
4
Wall Vertical Section (3 1/10 x 3/10 x 7 1/10
1:10 inch) St-FLA
1 Lifting jib 43 14 x 30 mm (3/5 x
2 Chain 1 1/5 inch) elongated
3 Gutter: roof cladder hole vertical
2 with bituminous finish, 44 4 mm (5/32 inch)
stainless-steel metal metal sheet with
decking Spickel
4 60-140 mm (2 2/5- 45 10 x 60 mm (2/5 x
5 1/2 inch) insulation 2 2/5 inch) CNS bolt,
5 Fixing thermal 12 x 40 mm (1/2 x 1 3/5
brake inch)elongated hole
6 Heating cable horizontal
7 300 x 202 mm (11 46 12 x 30 mm (1/2 x
4/5 x 8 inch) concrete 1 1/5 inch) elongated
13 column hole horizontal
6 8 Rainwater pipe 47 Aluminium profile
insulating glazing (EBL RAL)
14 3 9 Swisslamex 48 15 mm (3/5 inch)
15 laminated safety glass substructure, slideable
10 Second position 49 Water gutter, guard
16 screenprint barcode on insulation ,
11 Fourth position removable grid
screenprint frame 50 Construction
4 inside safety glass suspension-lifting jib
17 mechanical fixation roof base with
5 12 60 x 90 mm (2 2/5 counter-sunk screw
x 3 1/2 inch) mullion and ring bolt
structure aluminium 51 120 mm (4 7/10 inch)
roof system concrete pigmented
18 12 11 9 13 160 mm (6 3/10 inch) 52 Mat
in-situ concrete 53 10 mm (2/5 inch)
10 14 10 mm (2/5 inch) drainage
drainage 54 Two-ply water
15 Two-ply bituminous barrier
sealing 55 160 mm (6 3/10 inch)
19 16 160 mm (6 3/10 inch) Foamglas T4 insulation
Foamglas insulation to lay on hot asphalt
17 Primary coat 56 Bituminous sealing
20 18 240 mm (9 2/5 inch) one-ply (temporary
21 7 concrete seal)
19 80 mm (3 1/10 inch) 57 Prime coat
8 substructure 58 190 mm (7 1/2 inch)
20 Plasterboard concrete, down grade
21 Plaster pigmented 2 per cent
22 floor construction 59 60 mm (2 2/5 inch)
22 300 x 60 mm (11 4/5 acoustic panel
x 2 2/5 inch) fixation (Sichtex) coated in
28 23 24
cable duct black
23 Mesh
24 350 x 40 mm (13 4/5
x 1 4/5 inch) cavity, 72
x 313 mm (2 4/5 x 12
3/10 inch) Wrtz cable
29 26 25
duct, screw in bed
cover 600 x 20 mm (23
3/5 x 4/5 inch) artificial
stone
25 Fire protection
cladding 60 minute,
floor insulation
26 Cladding fixing
element 60 minute
30 27 fire-proof rail (HTA
52-34) hot-dip
31 galvanized, concrete
inlay
32 27 Powder-coated
33 cover metal deck
floor construction
28 60 mm (2 2/4 inch)
concrete, coated
38 47
29 240 mm (9 2/5 inch)
concrete
46 50
34 39 30 Installation cavity
41 31 Suspended ceiling
37 42 40 49 51 32 20 mm (4/5 inch)
acoustic insulation
45 52 33 30 mm (1 1/5 inch)
53 sprayed acoustic
54 insulation (Heraklith)
35 floor construction
43 34 60 mm (2 2/5 inch)
55 concrete, coated
35 240 mm (9 2/5 inch)
56 in-situ concrete
36
57 36 60 mm (2 2/5 inch)
acoustic panel
(Sichtex) coated in
black
58 37 Cavity
38 60 x 300 mm (2 2/5
x 11 4/5 inch) electro
channel, cover profile
Cro-Mo
59 39 50 x 5 x 80 mm (2 x
1/5 x 3 1/10 inch) St-FLA
40 3 mm (1/10 inch)
metal sheet
57
41 Vapour barrier

45
10 1
Nuno Ribeiro Lopes

Volcano Interpretation Center


Capelinhos, Faial Island, Azores,
Portugal

Client
Azores Regional Government,
Regional Secretariat for the
Environment and the Sea

Project Team
Sara Moncaixa Potes, Manuel Baio

Structural Engineer
Mrio Veloso

Main Contractors
Consrcio Mota-Engil, S.A. /
Somague-Edior, S.A. /
Marques, S.A.

During the volcanic eruption of


19578, the landscape of the island
of Faial in the Azores was reshaped.
Lava buried the lighthouse that stood
on the tip of the island. In addition,
our understanding of underwater
volcanoes was transformed.
1 The view across the 3 The new building windowless drum,
Within the barren landscape roof of the circular hall emerges from the dark the impression of the
formed by this volcanic action, an towards the ruined soil as if it had been earths power is
lighthouse. discovered rather than emphasized by the
interpretation centre has been 2 The path to the built. Here a giant dramatic curved forms.
constructed, which explains both the exhibition centre takes telescope reaches up
a sharp turn before to the stars.
events that altered the landscape and entering the earth. 4 Within the
the history of the lighthouse. The area
around has been restored and the 2 3
lighthouse preserved in its ruined
state. Visitors approach the site along
a path. On the final approach there is
a choice of surfaces on which to walk
either spaced flagstones or basalt
cobblestones.
The building is set into the original
ground. As you pass through the
exhibitions, you experience the history
of the place in three stages: before,
during and after the eruption. Each
stage is presented in isolation,
allowing it to be contemplated on its
own. The journey begins in a large,
circular foyer, 25 metres (82 feet) in
diameter. This space is constructed
from reinforced concrete, without any
finishing to the surface. A single
central column flares outwards
towards the rim of the drum and 4
supports the giant roof. Progressing to
the final, glazed space you learn about
the power of the earth before
emerging to see the beauty of its
destructive force.

46
A

10.01 10.02
First Floor Plan Ground Floor Plan
A 1:1000 1:1000
1 Entrance 1 Foyer
2 Foyer 2 Bar
C C 5 C C 3 Technical area 3 Store
4
4 Temporary 4 Washroom
exhibition area 5 Management office
5 Temporary 6 Technical area
7
exhibition exit 7 Control room
6 Interpretative 8 Auditorium
exhibition exit 9 Ticket office
2 7 Patio 10 Temporary
B B9 8 3 B B
8 Lighthouse exhibition area
9 Access to dome 11 The Lighthouse
6 exhibition
7 12 The Eruption
exhibition
3 13 The Volcano
1 exhibition
14 Volcanoes of the
World exhibition
15 Azores exhibition
16 Faial exhibition
17 Shop

C C C C
10

6 9
6 15

6 11
4 1 2 3
B B B B
17 6 14 13 4
8 4
16 12 6
7 5
6 A
6
10.03
Section AA
1:500
1 Foyer
0 10 20m A 2 Temporary
exhibition area

0 30 60ft

1 2

10.04
Section BB
1:500
1 Foyer
5 2 Auditorium
3 The Lighthouse
exhibition
3 2 1 4 Volcanoes of the
4 World exhibition
5 Lighthouse

10.05
Section CC
1:500
1 Entrance corridor
2 Technical area

1
2

47
10 Nuno Ribeiro Lopes Volcano Interpretation Center Capelinhos, Faial Island, Azores, Portugal

3 2

7 9

10

11

6 8

10.06
Roof Detail Section
1:20
1 Stainless-steel
casing
2 2 mm (1/12 inch)
thick shot sheet metal
3 PVC screen
4 10 mm (2/5 inch)
thick laminated glass
5 3 coats of paint,
rubber and glass-fibre
mesh
6 Ash deposit
7 Claw part
8 Neoprene screen
9 Stainless-steel
clamp
10 Steel tube
11 Magnetic notifier

48
10.07 10.08
Telescope Telescope Details
Construction 1:20
Sequence 1 Stainless steel
1:200 2 Concrete
1 Building the walls 3 Glass
2 Building the tube
3 Cementing the tube
4 Finishing
4

1 3

49
11 1
ODonnell + Tuomey

An Gaelras Irish Language


and Cultural Centre
Derry, Northern Ireland

Client
Cultrlann U Chanin

Project Team
John Tuomey, Sheila ODonnell,
Willie Carey, Anne-Louise Duignan

Structural Engineer
Albert Fry Associates

Main Contractor
JPM Contracts Ltd

Constructed on a narrow, constrained


site among terraced housing in the
Northern Irish city of Derry, this
cultural centre is an open building that
welcomes visitors in to explore its
interior. At the threshold between the
interior and the exterior, a terrazzo
pavement pushes into the building,
drawing visitors into the glass-roofed
courtyard around which the building is
wrapped. Through this courtyard and
the use of large windows, natural light
is brought into the building at every
opportunity.
The facade is a careful composition
1 The folded entrance 2 Shadows on the 3 The language of 4 The vertical volume
of folded walls that integrate the wall continues the board-marked concrete and red- of the courtyard, with
building into its context. A rhythmic scale and rhythm of concrete surface painted steel continues its theatrical layered
the street. Views from further enhance the within. The courtyard pattern of openings
pattern of windows, framing different the street into the sequential articulation walls are perforated by and stairs, suggests
views of the urban landscape, allows interior court invite the of the facade between galleries from which and reflects the scale
public to enter. wall and window. the activities below of the surrounding city.
the buildings functions to be can be observed.
expressed on the street.
2 4
The complex fractured geometries
of the plan create a rich interior that
reflects the pattern of the city. The
faceted central courtyard, which rises
through the four floors of the building,
is walled with board-marked concrete.
This concrete vocabulary continues
out onto the street facade, further
integrating the interior with the street.
The dimensions of these boards are
the same as the coursing of the
brickwork found in the surrounding
houses. The centre also provides a
shop, cafe, performance space,
backstage facilities, start-up offices,
teaching spaces and offices. 3

50
1

8
5 2
2 1 1 1
1
3 2
3
2
1
4
6
7 1 2 4 3

4
7
9
1
8 4
4
5

5
3
6

6
10 4
7

11 7 6 5 9
8

0 5 10m 11.01 11.02 11.03 11.04 11.05


Ground Floor Plan First Floor Plan Second Floor Plan Third Floor Plan Street Elevation
1:500 1:500 1:500 1:500 1:200
0 15 30ft 1 Entrance terrace 1 Office 1 Teaching room 1 Boardroom
2 Entrance 2 Lobby 2 Lobby 2 Office
3 Shop 3 Projection room 3 External courtyard 3 Lobby
4 Reception 4 Void 4 Staff room 4 Void
5 Substation 5 WC 5 Art and craft room 5 Store
6 Kitchen 6 Make-up room 6 Plant room 6 Plant room
7 Servery 7 Changing room 7 Void 7 Roof
8 Cafe 8 Dimming room 8 External terrace
9 Courtyard 9 Green room
10 Performance
space
11 Backstage

51
11 ODonnell + Tuomey An Gaelras Irish Language Derry, Northern Ireland
and Cultural Centre

11.06 11.07 4 Housing for


Wall Elevation 1 Wall Elevation 2 light-fitting conduit
1:100 1:100 cast in high quality
1 Lightly sand- 1 Lightly sand- board-marked
blasted fair-faced blasted fair-faced concrete wall, 50 x 70
concrete soffit concrete soffit x 100 mm (2 x 2 2/5 x
2 Housing for light 2 High quality 3 9/10 inch) recess for
fitting cast in board-marked lift call button
3 Timber ceiling concrete wall, 50 x 70
4 High quality x 135 mm (2 x 2 2/5 x
board-marked 5 3/10 inch) recess for
concrete wall lift call button.
3 High quality
board-marked
concrete wall, 50 x 70
x 135 mm (2 x 2 2/5 x
5 3/10 inch) recess for
lift call button

4 4

1 1

4 4 3

1
1
2 4

52
11.08
Stair Section
1:50
1 45 mm (1 4/5 inch)
tubular steel handrails
on steel brackets fixed
to uprights 45 mm
(1 4/5 inch) from steel
plate guard 3
2 350 x 20 mm (13 4/5
x 4/5 inch) steel
stringers as structural
support to stair
3 High quality 1
board-marked
concrete wall
4 75 x 19 mm (3 x 3/4
inch) tongued and
grooved character oak
floorboards with sawn
and brushed surface

11.09
Wall Elevation 3
1:100 2
1 Lightly sand-
blasted fair-faced
concrete soffit
2 High quality
board-marked
concrete wall to
coloured finish
3 Housing for cast-in
light fitting

4 4

2 2

1 1

3
2

2 2

53
12 1
Pysall Architekten

Museum of Polish Aviation


Krakw, Poland

Client
Muzeum Lotnictwa Polskiego

Design Author
Pysall Ruge Architekten with
Bartlomiej Kisielewski

Project Team
Justus Pysall, Peter Ruge, Bartlomiej
Kisielewski, Katarzyna Ratajczak,
Mateusz Rataj, Alicja Kepka-Guerrero
2
Structural Engineer
Arup International

Main Contractor
Probadex

Located in Krakw, the Museum of


Polish Aviation is one the most
significant collections of historic
aircraft in the world. The museums
new visitor centre is built on the same
basic 60-metre-square (196-foot-
square) plan as the three existing
hangers; it also adopts the same
12-metre (39-foot) height. Starting
from this form, the new structure was
devised by cutting three wedges into
1 The building sits the ground. punched into the 5 The round cinema
the cube and then bending the cuts lightly on the site in a 2 From each angle the surface. volume inside the
down to form walls. This creates a manner reminiscent of building presents a 4 The scale of the main foyer.
the planes within. The radically different building complements
building with three wings. The building curved lower section silhouette. the exhibits within. The
is entered near the centre; from here of each wall visually 3 The thickness of the large glazed areas
separates the weight walls is expressed by allow views of the
the functions of the three spaces are of the structure from the circular windows open airfield around.
clearly understood. One wing contains
3 4
a 3D cinema and an education space,
another contains the cafe, library and
ticket desk, and the final space is for
the display of the aircraft.
The three wings are formed from a
concrete skin that appears to have
been folded like a giant paper plane.
The open ends of the wings are
glazed, giving views across the
museum grounds. In places the walls
are penetrated by small round
windows. The building pays close
attention to environmental issues. It is
naturally ventilated, and both inside
and outside the materials are left in a
simple, self-finished state, reducing 5
future maintenance costs.

54
1
A A A

A A A

2 2
4 3

3 1 4 1
5
5

A A A

A A A

0 10 20m 12.01 12.02 12.03


Ground Floor Plan First Floor Plan Second Floor Plan
1:1000 1:1000 1:1000
0 30 60ft 1 Education display 1 Library 1 Offices
2 Bookshop 2 Cafe
3 Tickets 3 Foyer
4 Foyer 4 Computer area
5 Cinema 5 Lecture theatre


12.04
South Elevation
1:500

12.05
East Elevation
1:500

12.06
Section AA
1:500
1 Exhibition hall
2 Foyer
3 Cinema
4 Exhibition hall
5 Lecture theatre

4
1 5

2 3

55
12 Pysall Architekten Museum of Polish Aviation Krakw, Poland

12.07 12.08 substructure 12.09 substructure diameter: 1500 mm


Sectional Detail of Sectional Detail of trapezoidal sheet metal Sectional Detail of trapezoidal sheet metal (59 inch)
the External Concrete the External Concrete 5 Fair-faced concrete the External Concrete 5 10 mm (2/5 inch) 15 10 mm (2/5 inch)
Wall, Exhibition Wing Wall and Glass reveal Wall and Roof aluminium sheet, aluminium sheet
(Ground Floor) Facade Connection, 6 Ceiling-high Connection, anodized C0
1:20 Exhibition Wing glazing, laminated Exhibition Wing 6 Pivoting window in
1 Fair-faced concrete, 1:20 glass with PVB foil 1:20 offices
anthracite pigmented 1 400 mm (15 3/4 7 Facade profile, 1 400 mm (15 3/4 7 Roof drainage
2 Heating duct inch) fair-faced aluminium, anodized inch) fair-faced 8 280 mm (11 inch)
3 Steel grid cover concrete, polished C0 concrete, polished fair-faced concrete
4 100 mm (3 9/10 inch) interior wall surface interior wall surface ceiling
reinforced industrial 2 120 mm (4 25/32 2 120 mm (4 25/32 9 Air space with steel
floor, anthracite inch) thermal insulation inch) thermal insulation frame structure and
pigmented, in the 3 1000 mm (39 9/24 3 1000 mm (39 9/24 installations
exhibition wings, inch) substructure in inch) substructure in 10 Trapezoidal sheet
concrete core the air space, the air space, metal
tempering galvanized steel galvanized steel 11 140 mm (1/2 inch)
5 80 mm (5/16 inch) construction, construction, thermal insulation
thermal insulation back-ventilated back-ventilated 12 EPDM sealing
6 EPDM sealing 4 150 mm (5 9/10 4 150 mm (5 9/10 13 50 mm (1 31/32 inch)
7 280 mm (11 inch) inch) fair-faced inch) fair-faced concrete slabs
reinforced concrete concrete, polished concrete, polished 14 Domed rooflight,
ceiling exterior wall surface, exterior wall surface, triple acrylic glass,

3 1
2

5
3
4
1 6
2
5

56
14

13

15

13
12
11
7 10

2 1

57
13 1
Ryue Nishizawa

Teshima Art Museum


Teshima, Kagawa, Japan

Client
Naoshima Fukutake Art Museum

Project Team
Ryue Nishizawa, Yusuke Oshi

Structural Engineer
Sasaki Structural Consultants

Main Contractor
Kajima Corporation

Teshima Art Museum stands on a hill


overlooking the Inland Sea on the
small island of Teshima. The project is
a collaborative work between architect
Ryue Nishizawa and artist Rei Naito,
and is dedicated to housing a single
installation, Matrix, by the latter. The
buildings form is inspired by the
shape of a drop of water, creating a
powerful architectural space that is in
harmony with the undulating
landscape around it.
The concrete shell is four and a half
metres (14 feet 9 inches) high at its
apex, and covers a total floor area of
2334 square metres (25,122 square
feet) without any columns. The
1 The form is a 2 The route to the by the oculi edge surfaces are white, the
building was cast onto formwork continuation of the entrance is a winding across the floor as the edges are also difficult
made from a mound of earth. Steel landscape, but the path through trees. sun moves across the to discern.
pure white surface The narrow entrance sky. 5 The sky is framed in
reinforcing rods were carefully gives it the magical tunnel suggests 4 The scale of the the ocoli, captured as
positioned after the surfaces had been quality of a field of nothing of the interior. interior is hard to judge part of the structure.
snow. 3 Within the space, without the presence
lined with plaster, then the expansive the spots of light cast of visitors. As all the
dry concrete was poured over the top.
2 4
After the concrete had dried, the earth
beneath was removed.
There are two oval-shaped
openings in the shell, which allow
wind, sound and light to enter the
space. On the concrete floor, tiny
pinholes are installed from which
water beads appear periodically. The
droplets slide down the subtly sloped
water-repellent floor. Some droplets
remain separate; others join together
and form bigger drops.

3 5

58
13.01
Site Plan
1:2000

1
13.02
Plan
1:500
1 Entrance
2 Oculus

C C C C

2
B B B B

A A A A

0 5 10m

0 15 30ft

59
13 Ryue Nishizawa Teshima Art Museum Teshima, Kagawa, Japan

60
13.03
Section AA
Section BB
Section CC
1:200
1 Concrete
2 Plaster skin

1 2

1 2

1 2

61
14 1
Eduardo Souto de Moura

Casa das Histrias Paula Rego


Cascais Portugal

Client
Cascais City Hall

Structural Engineers
AFAconsult

Electrical Engineers
Raul Serafim & Associados

Mechanical Engineers
Paulo Queirs de Faria

This distinctive red building is a


museum dedicated to the Portuguese
painter Paula Rego. Located in
Cascais along the coast from Lisbon,
the project was conceived as a part
of the citys tourism strategy that
seeks to establish a contemporary
architectural heritage. The museum
is located within an old wood that is
surrounded by a wall. Naturally the
site contained many beautiful mature
trees, and the desire of the architect to
preserve as many of them as possible
has determined the plan, volume,
height and position of the buildings.
The two pyramid-shaped towers,
which create a negative shape in the
1 The carefully placed softened by the rough 3 The enclosed internal
sky between them, are emblemic of gallery is surrounded textured board courtyard that is
the divergent relationship between by mature trees, their marking from the situated between the
dark trunks silhouetted formwork. A window gallery spaces.
architecture and nature. This idea of against the light red cut into the south west 4 One of the main
contrast has also inspired the exterior walls and roofs. corner connects the gallery spaces for the
2 The hard geometry interior to the exterior. display of the
material, a red-coloured concrete that of the building is permanent collection.
looks almost like terracotta. The walls
2 3
have been cast against shuttering
formed from narrow timber planks,
and it is the impressions of these
planks that provide the rough and
irregular character of the buildings
surface. This surface is further
enhanced by the complementary
shadows cast by surrounding trees.
The museum houses a collection of
more than one hundred works by
Rego. There is also a temporary
exhibition space, a two hundred seat
auditorium, a library, a shop and a
cafe, which opens directly on to
the garden.
4

62
B

14.01
Ground Floor Plan
1:500
1 1 1 Gallery
B 2 Courtyard
3 Loading bay
1 3 4 Lecture theatre
5 Entrance
2 1 6 Library
7 Cafe
8 Office

8
1

1 8

4
A A 6 A A

0 5 10m

B
0 15 30ft

14.02 14.03
Section A-A Section B-B
1:500 1:500
1 Library 1 Gallery
2 Entrance 2 Lecture theatre
3 Lecture theatre 3 Courtyard

2 3

2 1 3 1

63
14 Eduardo Souto de Moura Casa das Histrias Paula Rego Cascais, Portugal

14.04
Roof Detail
1:20
1 Zinc
2 Vapor barrier
1 3 Roofmate 80 mm
2 (3 1/10 inch) ESP
3 4 Paint sealant
5 4
5 Regularization
6 Concrete
7 False ceiling
support
8 False ceiling
9 Acoustic ceiling
6

6
7

1 8
9
2

4 3
2

3 4
5
1

2 6

8
7

13
10
14
11
12
16 15
17

18

14.05 14.06 1 Zinc gutter


1
Wall Detail Roof Planter Detail 12 Void
1:20 1:20 13 Zinc
1 Rock wool 1 Zinc coping 14 Vapour barrier
insulation 60 mm 2 Insulation 40 mm 15 Roofmate 80 mm
(2 4/10 inch) (1 6/10 inch) (3 1/10 inch) ESP
2 Double layer plaster 3 Waterproofing paint 16 Paint sealant
board 12.5 + 12.5 mm 4 Settlement layer 17 Regularization
(1/2 x 1/2 inch) 5 Outer layer 18 Concrete
3 Trough for lighting 6 Composite slab of
rail reinforced concrete
4 3-way linear A/C with metallic formwork
diffuser incorporated
5 Shelf in waterproof 7 Ceiling structure
MDF with steel I profiles
6 Acoustic ceiling 8 Plasterboard
7 Plasterboard 20 20 mm (8/10 inch)
mm (8/10 inch) 9 Acoustic ceiling
8 Concrete 10 Planter for vine

64
14.07
Gallery Section Detail
1:20
1 Zinc coping
1 2 Stainless steel
bracket 40 x 40 mm
(1 4/10 x 1 4/10 inch)
2 ESP
3 3 HS glass 6 + 6 + 6
4 + 3 mm (2/10 + 2/10 +
5 2/10 + 1/10 inch)
4 Stainless steel
profile T with 80 x
80 mm (3 1/10 x 3 1/10
inch)
5 Zinc gutter
6 Acoustic ceiling
7 Plasterboard
20 mm (8/10 inch)
8 Drain pipe
9 ESP 5 mm (2/10
inch) vane
10 Lighting
11 Rock wool
insulation 60 mm
(2 4/10 inch)
12 Double-layer
plasterboard 12.5 +
6 12.5 mm (1/2 x 1/2 inch)
13 Galvanized steel
7 profiles for attaching
drywall
14 White marble
skirting board
15 Bedding mortar
16 Screed
8 17 Filling in lightweight
concrete
18 Concrete
19 Vane 5 mm (2/10
inch)
20 Marble
21 Mortar
22 Drainage panel

9
10

11

12

13

19 14
20
15
16
17

18
22

21

65
15 1
wHY Architecture

Grand Rapids Art Museum


Grand Rapids, Michigan, USA

Client
Grand Rapids Art Museum

Project Team
Kulapat Yantrasast (Partner), Yo-ichiro
Hakomori (Partner), Aaron Loewenson
(Project Architect), Megan Lin,
Jenny Wu

Structural Engineer
Dewhurst Macfarlane and Partners

Main Contractor
Rockford / Pepper Construction

The new Grand Rapids Art Museum


occupies a single city block in the
centre of Grand Rapids. Its iconic role
as a symbol of the city and of civic
pride is tempered by the humanistic
engagement with art that it affords
its visitors.
A large canopy projects out, offering
shelter while also capturing views of
the city. The entrance facade extends
in three sections into the park beyond,
seeking to attract and capture visitors
into a welcoming embrace. These
projecting sections house a museum
1 At the museum night sky. social spaces have extensive use is made
cafe and other areas with which the entrance, a massive 2 At the side, the been designed to of natural light.
public can engage without necessarily canopy protrudes into monumental scale of encourage interaction
the city. Above, the the museum is broken and multiple uses.
visiting the museums galleries. brightly illuminated down to address the 4 The galleries focus
Behind the glass and translucent tower proclaims the urban grain of the on providing flexible
cultural intentions of surrounding streets. space to display
screens of the facade, the galleries are the building across the 3 Around the building, artworks. In all areas
housed in a three-level tower. At the
2 3
top of this tower are skylights, which
allow filtered natural light to penetrate
down into the galleries. At night these
skylights become likw beacons,
expressing the museums cultural
activities across the city.
The Grand Rapids Art Museum
has as one of its central design
philosophies the conservation of
energy. Natural light has therefore
been used wherever possible
throughout the structure. This and
other energy conservation strategies
have lead to the building obtaining
LEED (Leadership in Energy and
Environmental Design) certification. 4

66
B C D

15.01
Second Floor Plan
1:1000
1 Gallery
2 Lift
B C D 3 Stair

15.02
First Floor Plan
1:1000
1 Gallery
2 Library

15.03
Ground Floor Plan
1:1000
1 Lobby
2 Auditorium 15.04
3 Gallery Lantern Section AA
4 Museum shop 1:1000
5 Cafe 1 Gallery
A 1 A 1 A 1 A 6 Dining court 2 Auditorium
7 Offices 1 1 1
8 Sculpture court 15.05
2 9 Reflecting pool Reflecting Pool
1 1 1 Section B-B
1:1000
1 1 Gallery
3 3

15.06
Lobby Section C-C
1:1000
1 Gallery
2 Lobby

15.07
Canopy Section D-D
1:1000
1 Gallery
2 Lobby
3 Sculpture court

2 1 1 1
A A A A

1
1

1 1

1 2

6
1

1 1
8
7 9 4 1 1

2 3

A A 2 3 A A

B C D

B C D
0 10 20m

0 30 60ft

67
15 wHY Architecture Grand Rapids Art Museum Grand Rapids, Michigan, USA

12 1

11

4
5

10

7 9 7 6

15.08 15.09 2 Prefinished


1 in 152 mm (6 inch) leg
Balcony Detail Concrete Roof / aluminium sun shades at 813 mm (32 inch) on
1:10 Curtain Wall Detail 13 33 mm (1 5/16 inch) centre for 6 mm (1/4
1 13 mm (1/2 inch) 1:20 insulated glass in inch) diameter bolts
tempered glass guard 1 Single-ply prefinished aluminium used for blocking
rail membrane over curtain wall system attachment
1 2 10 mm (3/8 inch) insulation 14 Outline of
21 wood flooring directly 2 Two layers of 64 connector between
adhered to 203 mm mm (2 1/2 inch) steel tube column and
(8 inch) concrete polyisocyanurate, with curtain wall mullion
2 structural floor slab tapered expanded 15 406 x 102 x 2840
3 1010 mm (40 inch) polystyrene insulations mm (16 x 4 x 112 inch)
20 wide aluminium guard sandwiched between steel tube columns
rail shoe. Clear layers secured at bottom of
anodized aluminium 3 76 mm (3 inch) steel concrete beam above
19 3 brake. Metal cover roof deck with steel L angles:
sheet over 4 Steel roof beams at 102 x 102 x 8080 mm
4 Sealant column locations with (4 x 4 x 318 inch), one
5 Reinforced concrete steel plates at ends each side of column.
18 slab and beam 5 Framing at 406 mm L-angles welded to
6 Return gypsum (16 inch) on centre, weld plate and to side
4 board c.178 mm (c.7 bracing at 1220 mm wall of column
inch) in at side returns (48 inch) on centre 16 3 mm (1/8 inch)
at concrete beam 6 51 mm (2 inch) 2# prefinished formed
6 5 7 Mechanical grille density polyurethane aluminium fascia
and frame spray foam, with 25 panel. Closure at
8 Firr-out beam with mm (1 inch) cover coat curtain wall
17 16 mm (5/8 inch) over for exposed 17 Embedded steel
gypsum board over to application weld plate cast into
align with face of 7 Motorized bottom of concrete
gypsum-board wall sunshade beams at centreline of
finish beyond finish 8 Suspended tube column locations
9 Mechanical duct glass-fibre reinforced- 18 Steel plate
behind grille concrete panel ceiling embedded in back
7 8 10 Outline of system. Brace side of concrete fascia
16 cast-in-place concrete suspension system to beam. Plates located
beam at south end of structure above at centreline of roof
balcony, to align with 9 Permanent shade beams
masonry wall. pocket edge moulding 19 Concrete fascia
11 13 mm (1/2 inch) secured to edge of beam
10 9 gap for glass and cap suspension system 20 254 mm (10 inch)
15 rail 10 127 mm (5 inch) square embedded
14 12 Face of wall beyond removable closure steel weld plates at
cover strip 1200 mm (48 inch)
11 152 mm (6 inch) maximum on centre
12 wide prefinished 21 Continuous steel L:
13 11 aluminium enclosure 152 x 102 x 8 mm (6 x
over sunshade ends at 4 x 5/16 inch). Welded
vertical mullion to weld plates in
locations beam. Holes provided

68
4

2 9 8

3
5 10 12 4
4
11
1

15 14
13

13
1

11
12
10

9 8 7
3 3 4 5

15.10 plate into concrete sill head and jamb by Masonry Tech. Inc.)
Exterior Concrete beam with 13 x 105 8 6 mm (1/4 inch) 10 Stainless-steel drip
Guard Rail Detail mm (1/2 x 4 1/8 inch) reveal created between sill
7 1:20 headed stud at 305 materials 11 105 mm (4 1/8 inch)
1 Roof flashing mm (12 inch) on centre 9 White oak veneer concrete sill
membrane over 12 Ends of flashing and hardwood trim 12 Fluid-applied (or
blocking and extended fitted into top inside 10 Reinforced concrete single sheet)
up aluminium shoe grooves in vertical legs exterior wall waterproofing system
moulding. Concrete of alum. shoe moulding 11 Prefinished with watercourse
pavers on protective 13 Prefinished alum. aluminium sections drainage layer over
pad over flashing composite panel and mounting 13 41 mm (1 5/8 inch)
1 2 Butt glazed system. Prefinished 12 Continuous backer insulated glass in
aluminium curtain wall alum. sills above and rod and sealant curtain wall framing
mullion below, with back 13 33 mm (1 5/16 inch) with four-sided butt
2 4 10 3 Base assembly frames, trims, etc. insulated glass panel glazing
3 components of in prefinished alum. 14 Glass fibre
prefinished aluminium 15.11 curtain-wall system reinforced concrete
curtain wall system Concrete Punched panel soffit
4 610 mm square x Opening Detail 15.12 15 Continuous drip
51 mm thick (24 inch 1:10 Window Head and reveal
5 square x 2 inch thick) 1 10 mm (5/8 inch) Sill Detail
concrete pavers on white oak timber 1:20
pedestal system veneer 1 19 mm (3/4 inch)
11 5 83 x 241 mm (3 1/4 2 10 mm (5/8 inch) ACX plywood window
x 9 1/2 inch) recess in fire-treated plywood sill with plastic
top of concrete wall backer laminate top surface
12 along column 3 152 x 508 mm (6 x and back edge
6 Reinforced concrete 20 inch) galvanized 2 38 x 762 mm (1 1/2
6 7 slab and beams steel studs at 406 mm x 30 inch) galvanized
7 Suspended glass (16 inch) on centre. floor deck
fibre reinforced Stud framing secured 3 203 mm (8 inch)
8 13 concrete soffit panel to 19 mm (3/4 inch) masonry block walls
8 13 mm (1/2 inch) furring system 4 64 mm (2 1/2 inch)
tempered glass guard 4 64 x 51mm (2 1/2 x spray foam insulation
rail system 2 inch) two-component 5 16 mm (5/8 inch)
9 25 mm (1 inch) spray foam gypsum board over
insulated spandrel polyurethane insulation 16 mm (5/8 inch)
9 glass in corner panel applied to exterior non-combustible
11
10 Prefinished concrete wall plywood on 92 mm
aluminium flashing 5 38 mm (1 1/2 inch) (3 5/8 inch) steel studs
strip on terrace side treated, non- at 406 mm (16 inch)
12 of rail system combustible wood on centre
11 105 x 64 mm (4 1/8 blocking, secured to 6 Reinforced concrete
x 2 1/2 inch) aluminium concrete wall and to exterior wall
shoe moulding bottom track of 152 7 Bentonite water
screwed down at 305 mm (6 inch) stud plug strip
mm (12 inch) on centre system 8 Layered drainage
to 114 x 16 mm (4 1/2 x 6 Recessed enclosure course strips over
5/8 inch) galvanized box for sun shade unit back of weep strip
steel plate anchor 7 White oak trims, 9 Weep strip (CVS010

69
16 1
UN Studio / KUG

MUMUTH Haus fr Musik und


Musiktheater, Graz, Austria

Client
University of Music and Performing
Arts Graz (KUG)

Structural Engineers
Arup, Cecil Balmond, Volker Schmid,
Charles Walker, Francis Archer

Ben van Berkel, the architect of this


concert hall constructed for the
University of Music and Performing
Arts Graz, has said that it was his
desire to make a building that was as
much about music as possible. His
original concept of a building in the
form of a spring that expresses the
forces and tensions of music
remains in the finished structure.
Within the free-flowing space of the
foyer is a giant spiralling constructive
element that connects the entrance to
the auditorium and music rooms
above. Around this structure all the
other elements revolve. Light from the
skylights above is filtered through dark
wood lamellae to further accentuate
the drama of the forms. The seemingly
liquid spiral is a massive concrete
construction. A technical tour de
1 The translucent wrap around the reflective steel evoke surface. The moir
force, it required very high precision in bowed mesh facade performance space are the spectacle and effect of the outer
its construction. To achieve the creates a barrier expressions of musical atmosphere of mesh further enhances
between the street and movement. performance. the spacial fluidity.
finishes desired, self-compacting the interior that is both 3 The spiral stair that 4 The carefully
concrete was pumped up from below fragile and resilient. connects the second designed lighting and
2 The ribbon-like and third floors: the glazing details suggest
into the formwork instead of being internal forms that rich red and the movement in every
poured from above, as is the usual
2 3
method.
The foyer leads to a multipurpose
auditorium, which can seat up to 6500
people. This space can adapt its form
and acoustics for many different types
of performance, from solo instruments
or dance to a full orchestra.
Throughout the building a repetitive
pattern is applied in a variety of ways
to the facades. This creates both a
rhythmic flowing movement that
echoes the structures found in music
and a varied acoustic surface. The
outer layer of the facade is a
gossamer mesh of steel.
4

70
16.01 16.02
First Floor Plan Second Floor Plan
1:500 1:500
3 1 Foyer 1 Rehearsal room for
4 2 Main hall and stage theatre
3 Backstage 2 Dressing room
3 4 Costume storage 3 Dressing room
5 Tailoring room 4 Professors rooms
3 6 First-aid room 5 Backstage gallery
4 6 Fly gallery
5
3

1 6
2
2
A A A A A A A A

0 5 10m

1
0 15 30ft

16.03
Section AA
1:200
1 Foyer
2 Dressing room
3 Stair
2
2

71
16 UN Studio MUMUTH Haus fr Musik und Graz, Austria
Musiktheater

16.04
Sectional Wall Detail
1:10
1 121 mm (4 3/4 inch)
diameter inserted
round galvanized rod
suspended by eye
2 3
bolts at top, middle
and base fixations
2 Ventilated facade
panel consisting of
powder-coated metal
plate and 100 mm (3/8
inch) mineral wool
3 Concrete wall
4 5 7 4 Steel structure
fixing mesh facade to
the concrete wall
5 Ventilation system,
34 swivel jet nozzles
6 100 mm (3/8 inch)
vertical facade
insulation
6 7 Acoustical wall
composed of 1 x 2
metre (36 1/4 x 78 3/4
inch) concave and
convex acoustical
panels bent in one
direction with an arch
rise of 11 mm (7/16
inch) each. 3 concave
panels added to 3
convex panels result in
a c.6 metre (c.236
inch) waved wall with
200 mm (7 7/8 inch)
8 deepness (amplitude).
One panel is built out
of three bonded layers;
each 16 mm (5/8 inch)
flame resistant MDF
8 Mineral rock wool
fixed, disjoined by a
9 non-combustible
acoustic mat
9 Movable platform,
stage floor of three
11 10 wooden layers, with
topping of Oregon pine
10 Subconstruction of
stage floor
11 Facade fixture
12 Precast concrete
segment bedded in
concrete
13 60 mm (2 13/36 inch)
screed, resin-coated
PE foil
14 30 mm (1 3/16 inch)
TDPS 35 / 30 mm (1
3/8 / 1 3/16 inch) impact
sound insulation
15 80 mm (3 3/20 inch)
1 foam insulation,
moisture barrier
16 In-situ concrete
finished by brush
stroke

12

13

14

16 15

72
2

6 5 7

8 10

16.05 6 Mesh facade,


Sectional Wall Roof stainless steel net type
Detail OMEGA 1520 with
1:10 roles / screws hidden
1 121 mm (4 3/4 inch) in cover strip
diameter inserted 7 Concrete wall
round galvanized rod, 8 Ventilated facade
suspended by eye panel consisting of
bolts at top, middle powder-coated metal
and base fixations plate and 100 mm (3/8
2 Roof parapet with inch) mineral wool
hidden rain drain 9 Acoustical
3 Horizontal roof broadband compact
insulation with slope absorber laid out along
4 Facade fixture the edges of the hall
5 Steel structure 10 Vertical facade
fixing mesh facade to insulation
the concrete wall

73
74
Residential
Buildings
1732

75
17 1
AFF Architekten

ichtelberg Mountain Hut


F
Saxony, Germany

Client
Private client

Architects
AFF Architeckten (Martin Frhlich,
Sven Frhlich)

Project Team
Sven Frhlich (lead architect and
construction management), Ulrike Dix,
Torsten Lockl, Thomas Weisheit

Structural Engineer
Ingenieurbro BauArt, Peter Klaus

This utilitarian mountain refuge is high


up on Fichtelberg, a mountain in
Saxony, replacing an earlier hut that
stood on the site. The architects say
that it grew out of a desire to return to
a more basic way of life, to make a
connection with the elemental forces
that used to shape our lives but now
do not. Protruding from the mountain
like a boulder, this is a building that
gives the appearance of having been
pulled out of the ground.
The interior is a raw shelter. There
are no comforts here only the
1 The stark white front 2 The interiors of the chairs and a table 4 At the rear of the
essentials for sheltering in the facade of the hut two sleeping areas are fabricated from hut, a line of windows
mountains are provided. The walls and emerges from the raw, and the folded reclaimed wood, gives views to the
ground as if it were a geometry of the provides a space for garden and to the
ceilings are formed from concrete, part of nature. Framed rock-like roofs is those staying at the forest beyond.
presented without any further finish. against the forest, it is reflected on the ceiling. hut to socialize. The
both severe and 3 The dining area, walls bear impressions
Within the building, the new walls welcoming. furnished with recycled of the original hut.
have been cast against the walls of
2 3
the previous structure. They display
the indentations and patterns of the
timber structures they have replaced
like an impression left by a boot in the
snow. This record of the past as an
ephemeral mould is evocative in this
place of temporary residence. The
floorboards are made of locally felled
spruce, and other fittings are recycled.
The simple spaces, with their basic
domestic forms, suggest a special
type of habitation. This shelter, built in
the harsh environment of the
mountain, recalls the old typology of
the hut in a vibrant new form. It
teaches us what it means to build and 4
live in a simple way.

76
17.01
Plan
1:100
1 Sleeping area
2 Dining area
3 Living room
4 Kitchen
5 Bathroom
6 Store
7 Entrance
8 Store

1 3 2 1

A A A A
6 7 4 5 8

0 5m

0 15ft

17.02
Section AA
1:100
1 Store
2 Bathroom
3 Kitchen
4 Entrance
5 Store

1 2 3 4 5

77
17 AFF Architekten Fichtelberg Mountain Hut Saxony, Germany

6
3

11 15
13

14
2
8

7 10
12

17.03
Section
1:20
1 Concrete
2 Wood floor
3 Double-glazed
window unit
4 Ceiling
5 Formwork
impression of windows
from previous structure
6 Window opening
mechanism
7 Subbase
8 Store
9 Skylight
10 Drain
11 Window sill
12 External steps
13 Built-in bed
14 Stack of wood
15 Embankment

78
9

16

3
5

15
11
13

14
2 8

10
12

17.04
Section
1:20
1 Concrete
2 Wood floor
3 Double-glazed
window unit
4 Ceiling
5 Formwork
impression of windows
from previous structure
6 Window-opening
mechanism
7 Subbase
8 Store
9 Skylight
10 Drain
11 Window sill
12 External steps
13 Built-in bed
14 Stack of wood
15 Embankment
16 Ladder

79
18 1
BAKarquitectos

Casa de Hormign
Mar Azul, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Client
Mara Victoria Besonas, Guillermo de
Almeida

Project Team
Mara Victoria Besonas, Guillermo de
Almeida, Luciano Kruk

Structural Engineer
Luciano Kruk

Positioned on a densely wooded,


sloping site near to the sea, this
single-storey house was designed
to make a minimal impact on the
environment. The small budget and
the desire to build a structure that
required little subsequent
maintenance also informed the plans.
The form of the building is an
elongated box, the rear wall of which
is folded into a prismatic groove.
Rooted on a small plateau, the land
slopes away under the house, giving it
the appearance of a rock formation.
One corner of the box is buried into
the hill, and the opposite one projects 1 The house is located runs the length of the impression of solidity the trees that surround
in a dense wooded house behind the and permanence. the house.
out above the ground. landscape; it echoes concrete mullions. 4 The interior walls 5 The folded wall
The external and internal walls carry the random cadence of 3 Emerging from the have the same rough suggests an object
the tree trunks with its site, and in close board-marked finish as extruded from the
strong horizontal board marks that pattern of vertical proximity to mature the exterior. Simple ground by the forces of
suggest geological strata. Principally concrete walls. trees, the concrete timber furniture echoes nature.
2 A linear glass wall walls give an both the formwork and
used as summer house, its solid
concrete construction ensures a 2 4
stable internal environment. The roof
has a deep covering of pine needles,
which is constantly replenished by the
surrounding trees.
Across the front of the house a
rhythmic pattern of short walls, set at
right angles to the facade, mimics the
trunks of the surrounding trees.
Behind these walls, the glass reflects
both the real forest and these
concrete reproductions. A small
terrace constructed from finished
wood boards connects the forest with
the house through its scale and
material. 3 5

80
18.01
Plan
1:100
1 Bedroom
2 Bathroom
3 Kitchen
4 Dining area
5 Living area
B C
18.02
Section AA
1:100
1 Kitchen
2 Bedroom
B C
18.03
Section BB
1:100
1 Kitchen
2 Dining area
1 1 5 3 Terrace
A A A A
18.04
Section CC
1:100
1 Living area

2 3 4
B C

0 5m B C

0 15ft

1 2 2

1 2

81
18 BAKarquitectos Casa de Hormign Mar Azul, Buenos Aires, Argentina

1
2

18.05 18.06 18.07 18.08


Table Section and Wall Section Wall and Foundation Wall Section
Plan 1:10 Section 1:10
1:20 1 Concrete 1:10 1 Concrete
1 Concrete 2 Steel reinforcement 1 Concrete 2 Steel reinforcement
2 Steel reinforcement 2 Steel reinforcement

82
1

1
2
2

2 1

83
19 1
Dosmasuno Arquitectos

102 Dwellings in Carabanchel


Madrid, Spain

Client
EMVS (Empresa Municipal de la
Vivienda y Suelo de Madrid)

Project Team
Ignacio Borrego, Nstor Montenegro
and Lina Toro (Dosmasuno
Arquitectos)

Structural Engineer
Jos Luis de Mguel

Consulting Engineers
GRUPO JG

Main Contractor
BEGAR

This project has been built using


industrialized technology similar to
that used in automobile production. It
introduces an important innovation
into the construction process by
fabricating the formwork from
aluminium. This makes the individual
formwork parts much lighter and
enables workers to safely manipulate
1 The apartments are 2 The extra bedroom service cores. The 4 Light is modulated
them without additional cranes. arranged in two blocks spaces push out from bright monochrome on the south east
This Project for 102 apartments in set at right angles. the building to create a palette applied to all facade through the use
Cantilevered additional highly articulated the surfaces ensures of metallic screens.
Carabanchel consists of 52 one- accommodation units cuboid surface. that the structures
bedroom dwellings, 35 two-bedroom are applied to the 3 Connecting sharp forms are
basic unit. walkways link the emphasized in the
dwellings and 15 three-bedroom apartments to the strong sunlight.
dwellings. Each apartment is based
on a single concrete cast unit. Using 2 3

the precision aluminium formwork


over and over again, the common
one-bedroom type of apartment can
be constructed very rapidly. The unit is
cast to include all the facades, the
dividing walls, partitions and even
wardrobes. It also incorporates
thermal insulation and all the services.
The one-bedroom unit can be
extended with the addition of light
steel cantilevered bedroom parts to
make the two- and three-bed
apartments. The building uses two
types of walls throughout; external
walls that are 240 mm (9 1/2 inches
thick made up of 100 mm (4 inches) of 4
concrete either side of an insulation
core, and 100 mm (4 inch) solid
internal walls. All of these walls are
structural. The building is constructed
sequentially from the first unit to the
last, each unit built off the previous.
The system allows for the construction
of a single unit in one day.

84
B

0.01
2nd Floor Plan
1
1:1000
B 1 Bedroom
2 Living room
3 Bathroom
2 4 Balcony
3 5 Stair
6 Lift
A A A A
4
0.02
Ground Floor Plan
1:1000
1 Bedroom
6 2 Living room
5 3 Bathroom
4 Stair
5 Lift

0.03
Basement Floor Plan
1:1000
1 Store
2 Parking
3 Stair
4 Lift

A A A A

3 5 4
1
2

0.04
Section BB
1:500
3
0.05
Section AA
1:500

A A A A
2

B 4
1

B
0 10 20m

0 30 60ft

85
19 Dosmasuno Arquitectos 102 Dwellings in Carabanchel Madrid, Spain

19.06
Modular Room Plan
1:5
1 Galvanized steel
2 Concrete block
1
3 Glass wool
insulation
4 Plasterboard
3 5 Aluminium sheet
6 Steel structure
7 Lacquered
aluminium jamb

5 6

86
19.07 19.08
Detail Lintel Section Detail Sill Section
1:5 1:5
11 1 Galvanized steel 1 Concrete block
2 Concrete block 2 Plasterboard
1 3 Plasterboard 3 Glass wool
15
4 Glass wool insulation
insulation 4 Steel IPE 160 beam
5 Steel UPN 160 5 Blind channel
channel 6 Double glazing
6 Extruded 4 / 6 / 3 + 3 mm (2/10 /
polystyrene 400 mm 3/10 / 1/10 + 1/10 inch)
(1 ft 3 7/10 inch) 7 Window frame
16 4 3 2 14 7 Blind lacquered aluminium
8 Blind channel with thermal break
9 Folded sheet metal 8 Concrete and
lintel forged steel decking
10 Double glazing 9 Aluminium sheet
4 / 6 / 3 + 3 mm (2/10 / 10 Painted skirting
3/10 / 1/10 + 1/10 inch) board
6
11 Aluminium coping
12 Window frame
lacquered aluminium
with thermal break
13 Concrete and
forged steel decking
14 Concrete
5 13 15 Macael marble
crushed gravel
16 Aluminium sheet

5 7

7 10

3 2 1

9 11
9 4 8

8 10
3

87
20 1
EASTERN Design Office

MON Factory/House
Kyoto, Japan

Client
Morita MON factory

Project Team
EASTERN Design Office

Structural Engineer
HOJO Structure Research Institute

Main Contractor
Kotobuki Kensetsu

Situated in the Gojo area of Kyoto,


this building is both a home and a
workshop. It is occupied by a
traditional Japanese business that
applies family crests (mon) onto
clothing. The design of these crests,
which are usually round in form,
was the inspiration behind the 26
circular openings that pierce the
structures walls.
The site is typical of Kyoto long,
thin and facing directly onto a narrow
busy street. With the exception of the
entrance to the shop area, the building
is raised up three metres (ten feet)
along its entire length, and the area
underneath is let out for parking. The
1 The concrete skin is 2 Along the long side views of the world
upper element is composed of three marked with a cross of the building there is outside the quiet
interior parts separated by two pattern formed of an access road. The contemplative interior.
circular openings. building is raised to 4 Domestic spaces
exterior courts. The first part is the These refer to the provide shaded parking look out over an internal
workshop, the next is the living space round family badges space beneath. courtyard, which acts
that the occupants 3 From within, the as a filter between
and the last is a sleeping area. This apply onto clothing. round windows frame work and home.
rhythm establishes patterns of solid
2 3
and void, light and dark, work and
living, connection and separation. The
circular openings project beams of
light into the circulation spaces deep
within the interior. As garments arrive
to be marked, and completed work is
collected, the building casts its
patterns onto users.
The front facade is formed from two
overlapping walls that mimic the
method and direction in which a
Kimono is crossed. As you enter you
slip between walls into the warm
embrace of the building.

88
20.01
1 5 10 11 First Floor Plan
1:200
9 1 Hall
2 Workroom
3 Terrace
A A A A 4 Living area
2 3 4 6 7 8 5 Kitchen
6 Terrace
7 Bedroom
8 Closet
9 WC
10 Dressing room
11 Bathroom

11 20.02
Ground Floor Plan
1:200
1 Shop
1 4 2 House entrance
3 Shop entrance
A A A A 4 Parking
3

0 5 10m

0 15 30ft

20.03
Section AA
1:200
1 2 3 4 5 1 Workroom
2 Terrace
3 Kitchen
4 Terrace
5 Bedroom
6 Shop
6 7 7 Parking

20.04
Axonometric
Not to Scale

89
20 EASTERN Design Office MON Factory/House Kyoto, Japan

2 3

20.05 20.06
Section Detail Window Detail
1:50 1:5
4 6 1 Coping 1 Concrete
1 2 Concrete 2 Glass
3 Waterproof 3 Aluminium window
membrane / insulation frame
4 Insulation 4 Insulation
7 5 Void
6 Plasterboard
7 Mastic

2 3

90
1
6
13

7 4 5

3 11

10 8

12

20.07 20.08
Section Detail Roof Detail
1:50 1:10
1 Coping 1 Concrete upstand
2 Window beam
3 Stair 2 Waterproof
4 Workroom membrane
5 Kitchen 3 Insulation
6 Upstand beam 4 Trowel finished
7 Hall (upper part) concrete
8 Parking 5 Flashing
9 Sign 6 Aluminium sash
10 Glass door 7 Glass
11 Plasterboard
1 12 Floor surface
13 Waterproof
membrane / insulation

2
3 4

5
6

91
21 1
Ensamble Studio &
Antn Garca-Abril

The Truffle
Costa de Morte, Spain

Client
Private client

Project Team
Ensamble Studio (Ricardo Sanz,
Javier Cuesta)

Structural Engineer
Ensamble Studio

Main Contractor
Materia Inorgnica

When we first see this building it


appears not to be man-made; rather
we might think that it is a piece of
nature. In some ways this is true,
because nature played a large part in
the making of this space.
The construction of this project is a
story that is both poetic and
pragmatic. It commenced with digging
a hole. As the earth was removed, it
was built up around the hole to make
a wall. This earth wall was retained by
temporary formwork, and once the
wall was the required height the
interior was filled with a smaller
1 One sliced end of 2 The cave-like interior to make a smooth
volume of hay bales. Concrete was the rock is fitted with displays the precise surface. Into this
then poured between and over the a steel window. This impression of the facade an enigmatic
acts like a screen straw that had formed dark steel door is set.
straw and the earth. When the between two worlds: the void. 4 In the niche by the
concrete had set the earth was the static straw-cast 3 At the rear, another front window is a bed
interior and the sharp slice cuts that affords incredible
removed to expose a large monolithic dynamic sea beyond. through the rough form views of the sea.
stone, a reflection of the earth that
2 3
formed it.
The architects then made some
cuts into this stone to reveal the
interior form. The pressure of the
concrete had compressed the straw,
producing ribbed walls. Removing the
hay from the interior was the job of a
calf called Paulina. Over a year, she
ate her way through all 50 cubic
metres (1765 cubic feet) of hay,
emerging as an adult cow weighing
300 kilograms (660 pounds).
Overlooking the sea, this tiny
building is a place for contemplation.
It speaks quietly of natural forces and
the passage of time. 4

92
D B

21.01
Plan
6 1:100
1 Bed
D B 2 Bookshelf
3 Door
C C 5 C C 4 Seating
5 Washing / WC
6 Concrete
7 Window
4

A A A A
7 1

D B 3

D B
0 5m 21.02 21.03
Section AA Section BB
1:100 1:100
0 15ft 1 Concrete 1 Concrete
2 Interior 2 Interior
3 Window

21.04 21.05
Section CC Section DD
1:100 1:100
1 Concrete 1 Concrete
2 Interior 2 Interior
3 Skylight

1 1

3 2 2

1 1

2 2

93
21 Ensamble Studio & The Truffle Costa de Morte, Spain
Antn Garca-Abril

21.06 21.09
Bathroom Plan Door Section
1:20 1:20
1 Concrete 1 2 1 Concrete
2 Door 2 Door frame
3 Basin 3 Steel door
4 WC 4 Wood floor
5 Door
2
1

3
4

21.07
Bathroom Section
1:20
1 Concrete
1 2 Basin
2 4
3 Water heater
4 Cabinet
4 5 WC

31.08
Bathroom Section
1:20
1 Concrete
2 Basin
2 3 Water heater

3
1

94
21.10
Box Sill Section
1:20
1 Glazing
2 Window frame
3 Bed
4 Concrete
5 Castor

1
3

2
3

21.11
Box Sill Detail
1 1:2
1 Wood panel
2 Steel
3 Concrete
2 4 Castor
5 Wood floor

21.12
Skylight Detail
1:2
1 Concrete
2 Steel tubing
3 Glazing

4
5

95
22 1
Head Architektid

Villa Lokaator
Paldiski, Estonia

Client
Private client

Project Team
Indrek Peil, Siiri Vallner

Structural Engineer
Maari Idnurm, Juhan Idnurm EEB

Located near to the coast, this house


has the vigilant, defensive quality of a
gun emplacement. Using elements of
a redundant army barracks at its core,
this small residence deliberately
evokes the harsh, functional ascetic of
military facilities. A nearby Soviet-era
nuclear submarine training base
provided additional inspiration.
On top of the original structures
650 mm (25 12 inch) thick calcium
silicate brick walls, and facing out to
the sea, the architects have placed
two cantilevered concrete pavilions.
Each of these is accessed via its own
stair. At the side of the house at
ground level is a third projection,
which provides a motorcycle garage.
Towards the sea, the facade is almost
entirely glazed and opens onto a
1 The two upper presents a series of upper sleeping areas. of the sea through
broad terrace; on the street side the parts of the house look vertical louvre walls 4 There has been no large windows.
angled slit windows present a closed, out towards the sea that closes the interior attempt to disguise the
like giant eyes. Below, to the street. rough texture of the
defensive facade. a large terrace 3 An open-plan living walls that remain from
Light filters down into the open-plan extends out into the area is organized the original structure.
garden. around two light steel 5 From the sleeping
living space from the southeast-facing 2 The entrance front stairs, which access areas, there are views
dormer windows. This indirect sunlight
2 4
reflected off the concrete walls gives
the interior a luminous glow. The
house maintains a pleasant internal
environment whilst remaining very
energy efficient. The massive external
concrete walls ensure an effective
thermal mass, while a geothermal
pump provides underfloor heating in
the cast concrete floors.

96
B

22.01 22.02
Mezzanine Plan Ground Floor Plan
1:200 1:200
1 Bedroom 1 Garage
B 2 Bathroom 2 Entrance
3 Flat roof 3 Bathroom / sauna
4 Skylight 4 Services
5 Bedroom
6 Kitchen
7 Living area
8 Terrace

1 1 2

4
3

B
8

A A A A
7 6

3
5
4
1 2
B

22.03 22.04
B Section AA Section BB
1:200 1:200
1 Bedroom 1 Bedroom
2 Living area 2 Bedroom
3 Kitchen 3 Living area

0 5 10m

0 15 30ft

1 1 1

2
2 3 3

97
22 Head Architektid Villa Lokaator Paldiski, Estonia

22.05
1 Vertical Section of
4
Small Window
1:20
2 5 1 Parapet cap steel
sheet
2 In-situ concrete
3 60 x 60 mm (2 1/3 x
6 2 1/3 inch) treated
timber
7 4 Two layers of
bituminous roof
membrane
5 200 mm (8 inch)
3 and 300 mm (11 4/5
inch) insulation
6 Vapour barrier
7 200 mm (7 7/8 inch)
concrete slab
8 Double-glazed
window
9 70 mm (2 3/4 inch)
concrete floor with
8 mineral surface
hardener
10 Underfloor
geothermal heating
system
11 100 mm (4 inch)
insulation
12 100 mm (4 inch)
concrete slab
13 Waterproofing
14 Sand
15 Existing limestone
foundation

9
10

11
12
13
14

15

98
1
2
3

5 6 7

2
3
1

7 6
1
2

8 3

6
5
7

10

11
22.06 board 5 100 mm (4 inch)
Vertical Section of 14 Existing limestone concrete
Big Window foundation 6 150 mm (5 9/10 inch)
1:20 15 70 mm (2 4/5 inch) insulation
1 Stair to mezzanine concrete floor with 7 150 mm (5 9/10 inch)
15 16 2 70 mm (2 4/5 inch) mineral surface concrete
12 13 concrete floor with hardener
17 mineral surface 16 Underfloor 22.08
hardener geothermal heating Vertical Section of
18 3 Underfloor system Cantilever
19 14 geothermal heating 17 100 mm (4 inch) 1:10
system insulation 1 70 mm (2 4/5 inch)
4 180 mm (7 1/10 inch) 18 100 mm (4 inch) concrete floor with
concrete slab concrete slab mineral surface
20 5 150 mm (5 9/10 inch) 19 Waterproofing hardener
21 insulation 20 Sand 2 Underfloor
6 100 mm (4 inch) 21 Existing limestone geothermal heating
concrete slab foundation system
7 100 x 50 x 3.5 mm 3 180 mm (7 1/10 inch)
(4 x 2 x 1/10 inch) 22.07 concrete slab
U-shaped steel section Horizontal Section of 4 150 mm (5 9/10 inch)
8 I-post with rusted Cantilever insulation
surface 1:20 5 100 mm (4 inch)
9 Glass facade: 1 150 x 150 mm (5 concrete slab
Schco FW50+ 9/10 x 5 9/10 inch) 6 100 x 50 x 3.5 mm
window with double I-shaped steel (4 x 2 x 1/10 inch)
glazing 2 50 x 70 x 4.5 mm (2 U-shaped steel section
10 Above dashed line: x 2 4/5 x 3/16 inch) 7 60 x 60 mm (2 2/5 x
existing brick wall T-shaped steel profile 2 2/5 inch) steel angle
11 Below dashed line: 3 Glass facade: bar
existing limestone wall Schlco FW50+ 8 Glass facade:
12 Exterior window sill: window with double Schlco FW50+
0.8 mm (1/32 inch) glazing window with double
stainless-steel sheet 4 100 x 30 x 3.5 mm glazing
13 30 x 150 mm (1 1/5 (4 x 1 1/5 x 1/10 inch)
x 5 9/10 inch) larch U-shaped steel

99
23 1
id-ea Architects

Alam Family Residence


Jakarta, Indonesia

Client
Alam Family

Project Team
Elsye Alam

Structural Engineer
Arsitek dan Rekan Sehati

Main Contractor
Arsitek dan Rekan Sehati

A rhythmic pattern of slots perforates


the concrete screen that forms the
front of this house. This filter serves a
number of functions. It shades the
interior, allows privacy and provides
security for occupants. In addition, it
projects an ever-varying arrangement
of light into the house while also
animating the buildings exterior with
evidence of the activities inside.
The house is arranged in an
E-shaped plan. Two courts between
three wedge-shaped wings bring air
and light deep into the interior. Around
these courts, extensive vertical
glazing, along with skylights, makes
artificial lighting unnecessary except
at night. The pure white palette used
on the walls and floors further
develops the sense of a house built
from light and reflections as much as 1 The front facade of 2 In the stairwell, the seamlessly with the
from solid materials. the house is pierced by white surfaces reflect internal spaces around
a diagonal pattern of light through the it. The relationships
The open plan-interior is designed slots. This transitional house. Glimpses of the between the spaces
to encourage family interaction and a screen filters the exterior are evident suggest a pattern of
interior and exterior through the screen. habitation rooted in
shared family lifestyle. The wall that light and creates an 3 The roofed inner communication and
encloses the house and the ability to active elevation. courtyard blends sharing.
open up the glazed walls allow
2 3
exterior spaces to be used as living
areas. At the top of the house there is
a multi-level roofscape, providing
expansive views and a number of
recreational spaces parts of these
are covered by grass. Amid the
interiors bright, milky coolness, a
dramatic red prayer area is the
symbolic heart of the house.

100
D C D C D C

11 12 13 2 3 2 3 4 6
5
D C D C D C
4
A A 1 7 A A
10 5 8

1
10 9 10 11
14 9 8 7 6 7 8

B B 1 3 5 13 9 10 B
12 B

2
4 11 12 10
16
D C D C D C 0 5 10m
14 13 14 15
15 6 17 16
15 0 15 30ft

D C D C D C

23.01 8 Bathroom
Ground Floor Plan 9 Balcony
1:500 10 Dining area below
1 Foyer 11 Guest bathroom
4 5 2 Shoe closet 12 Guest bedroom
3 Aquarium 13 Master bedroom
4 Pantry 14 Reading room
5 Dining area 15 Walk-in closet
3 3 4 6 Kitchen 16 Master bathroom
7 Powder room
8 Living room 0.03
1 2 1 2 9 Prayer room Second Floor Plan
10 Inner courtyard 1:500
11 Master bedroom 1 Gallery below
12 Walk-in closet 2 Bedroom
AA BB 13 Master bathroom 3 Reading area
14 Gallery 4 Walk-in closet
15 Car port 5 Bathroom
16 Storage 6 Open to below
17 Bathroom 7 Balcony
8 Open to courtyard
23.02 below
First Floor Plan 9 Roof deck
11 12 1:500 10 Roof garden
1 Gallery below 11 Mechanical roof
2 Family room 12 Skylight
3 Home theatre 13 Service
4 Open to below 14 Laundry
5 Courtyard below 15 Maids room
6 Pantry
7 Bedroom

7 8 9 10

23.04 23.05
Section AA Section BB
1:500 1:500
1 Gallery 1 Dining area
2 Inner courtyard 2 Shoe closet
1 2 3 4 5 6 3 Hallway 3 Hallway
4 Balcony 4 Master bedroom
5 Roof deck

CC

23.06 23.07
Section CC Section DD
1:200 1:200
1 Master bedroom 1 Master bedroom
2 Inner courtyard 2 Main stairs
3 Living room 3 Foyer
9
4 Dining area 4 Shoe closet
10 5 Pantry 5 Garage
6 Kitchen 6 Family room
7 Home theatre 7 Guest bedroom
8 Bedroom 8 Reading room
9 Guest bedroom 9 Reading room
10 Master bathroom 10 Services
11 Walk-in closet
12 Laundry
6 7 8

1 3 4 5

101
DD
23 id-ea Architects Alam Family Residence Jakarta, Indonesia

23.10
Roof Section
1:10
9 1 26 mm (1 inch)
8 10 composite wood
3 decking
2 42 mm (1 7/10 inch)
composite wood joists
1 2 4 2 with ballast in gaps
3 170 mm (6 7/10 inch)
1 rigid EPS insulation
5 4 Hot-melt rubberized
bitumen sheet
5 225 mm (8 9/10 inch)
4 5 reinforced concrete
slab
6 20 mm (4/5 inch)
6 honed natural stone
1 7 20 mm (4/5 inch)
bed of mortar
2 8 Lightweight
concrete block
3 9 Coarse mortar base
7 and plaster finish
1 10 20 mm (4/5 inch)
7 6 6 11 reveal
2 7 11 Tube steel

23.11
8 Stairs Section
1:10
12
9 1 Stairs beyond
10 13 2 Reinforced
concrete bottom
3 Fluorescent light
8 11
pocket
4 Brick
2 4 5 5 Coarse mortar base
9 and plaster finish
6 26 mm (1 inch)
3 composite wood
decking
7 42 mm (1 7/10 inch)
composite wood joists
23.08 23.09 1 with ballast in gaps
Second Floor Terrace Second Floor Terrace 6 8 Reinforced
Ceiling Section Section 7 concrete slab
1:10 1:10 9 Solid wood handrail
1 15 mm (3/5 inch) 1 Suspended 8 10 Reinforced
terrazzo gypsum-board ceiling concrete top
2 45 mm (1 4/5 inch) 2 Wood block
bed of mortar with 3 Concrete beam
cushion of sand 4 Curtain pocket
3 Reinforced 5 Fixed glazing
concrete slab 6 Vertical structural
4 Lightweight glass fin
9
concrete block 7 Operable window
5 Coarse mortar base with anodized
and plaster finish aluminium frame
6 20 mm (4/5 inch 8 15 mm (3/5 inch) 10
reveal parquet
7 Tube steel 9 40 mm (1 3/5 inch)
8 Wood block screed
9 Suspended 10 Concrete curb
gypsum-board ceiling topping
11 Reinforced
concrete slab
12 15 mm (3/5 inch)
terrazzo
13 45 mm (1 4/5 inch)
bed of mortar with
cushion of sand
4 5

102
1

23.12
Skylight and Roof
2 Deck Section
1:10
3 1 18 mm (7/10 inch)
tempered glass
2 Line of opening
beyond
3 Reinforced
concrete
4 Metal gutter
5 26 mm (1 inch)
composite wood
decking
6 42 mm (1 7/10 inch)
composite wood joists
with ballast in gaps
7 170 mm (6 7/10 inch)
rigid EPS insulation
8 Hot-melt rubberized
bitumen sheet
9 225 mm (8 9/10 inch)
reinforced concrete
slab

5
6

4 9

23.13
Skylight Section
1:10
1 Coarse mortar
1 base and plaster finish
2 Brick
2 3 Concrete beam
4 Aluminium panel
5 Reinforced
concrete slab
4 6 18 mm (7/10 inch)
tempered glass
7 Cement plaster
3 gutter
8 5 x 10 mm (1/5 x 2/5
inch) steel C profile
9 10 x 20 mm (2/5 x
5 4/5 inch) structural steel
beam
6

7
8

103
24 1
Joseph N. Biondo

House Equanimity
Northampton, Pennsylvania, USA

Client
Private client

Project Team
Joseph Balsamo, Sierra Krause,
Patrick Ruggiero

Structural Engineer
E.D. Pons Associates

Main Contractor
Joseph N. Biondo

This house in Northampton,


Pennsylvania the birthplace of
American Portland cement is
constructed of concrete in homage to
the history of the region. The area has
many industrial ruins that tell the story
of the industry. The working aesthetic
of this past is reflected in the strong
functionality of House Equanimity.
Like the surrounding relics, this
structure is rooted in its landscape.
It rejects the scale and forms of the
nearby housing, choosing instead to
take many of its references from the
topography and nature of the area.
The concrete base slab, which is
1 Constructed on an two could have been 3 The open court at of overlapping wood,
deliberately crude in its finish, elegant, balanced formed at the same each end of the main concrete and plaster
emerges from the sloping ground as platform that appears time. living area provides panels. Visible through
to slide out from the 2 Large parts of the undercover seating. the large panes of
if it were a natural feature or part of a ground, the house is facade fall away to 4 The double-height glass, the surrounding
pre-existing ruin. It is a permanent responsive to the open the structure living area is framed trees imbue the space
landscape, giving an to the surrounding with a carefully with the gentle spirit
feature of great substance. On and impression that the garden. animated arrangement of nature.
around this platform are arranged
2 3
carefully detailed boxes, clad in
fibrous cement panels, which contain
the domestic spaces. The materiality
of the surfaces suggests that they will
accommodate future patinas. They
invite your touch, and each material
meets another in a satisfying manner
that speaks of care and
understanding. The double-height
living space opens onto a generous
terrace. From within the views are
controlled and carefully framed.

104
A A

4 3 1 2 1
B B A A B B
5 A 4 3 2 1 A
1

A A

0 5 10m 24.01 24.02


Ground Floor Plan First Floor Plan
1:500 1:500
0 15 30ft 1 Courtyard 1 Bedroom
2 Kitchen 2 Bathroom
3 Dining area 3 Open to below
4 Living area 4 Deck
5 Deck
6 Car port

24.03 24.04
Section AA Section BB
1:200 1:200
1 Living area 1 Courtyard
2 Basement 2 Kitchen
3 Dining area
4 Living area
5 Deck
6 Bedroom
7 Bathroom
8 Basement

6 7 6

5 4 3 2 1

105
24 Joseph N. Biondo House Equanimity Northampton, Pennsylvania, USA

2 12 10

14 11 1
1 2
2 7

10 9
4
4
5
5 3
3
6 6
7
7
11
13
2 12 2

8 8

2 1
9
4
8
5
6
7

15

7 12

3
4
5

6 10 11

15

7
1 9

14
13

106
24.05 24.08
Deep Eaves Section Sliding Glass Wall
1:10 Section
1 Wood blocking 1:10
2 Lead-coated 1 Wood sliding-glass
copper flashing system 14
3 Engineered timber 2 Wood blocking
beam 3 Lead-coated
4 11 mm (7/16 inch) copper flashing
cement board 4 203 mm (8 inch)
5 19 mm (3/4 inch) reinforced structural
wood firring and air concrete
space 5 51 mm (2 inch)
6 Air and vapour sealed concrete
barrier topping
7 16 mm (5/8 inch) 6 51 mm (2 inch) rigid
plywood insulation 7 11
15
8 Wood fixed window 7 Engineered timber
8
9 305 mm (12 inch) beam
TJI roof joist 8 11 mm (7/16 inch)
13
10 Waterproof cement board 12
membrane 9 19 mm (3/4 inch)
11 22 mm (7/8 inch) wood firring and air 7 9
corrugated metal roof space
12 10 mm (3/8 inch) 10 Air and vapour 10
veneer plywood barrier
(stained) 11 16 mm (5/8 inch) 16
13 Insect fabric plywood
14 Neoprene flute infill 12 Thermal Batt
insulation 3
24.06 13 16 mm (5/8 inch) 8
Typical Eaves Section gypsum wall board
1:10 14 Wood-fixed window
1 Wood blocking 15 356 mm (14 inch)
2 Lead-coated TJI floor joist
copper flashing 16 Insect fabric
3 Engineered timber
beam
1
4 11 mm (7/16 inch)
cement board
5 19 mm (3/4 inch)
wood firring and air
space
6 Air and vapour
barrier
7 16 mm (5/8 inch)
plywood
8 Wood fixed window
9 Waterproof
membrane
10 22 mm (7/8 inch)
corrugated metal roof
11 Insect fabric
12 Neoprene flute infill

24.07
Low Roof and
Deep Sill Section
1:10
1 Wood blocking
2 Lead-coated
copper flashing
3 Engineered timber
beam
4 11 mm (7/16 inch)
cement board
5 19 mm (3/4 inch)
wood firring and air 1
space
6 Air and vapour
barrier
7 16mm (5/8 inch)
plywood
7
8 Thermal Batt
5
insulation
9 16 mm (5/8 inch) 2
6 3
10 356 mm (14 inch)
TJI floor joist
11 305 mm (12 inch)
TJI roof joist
12 51 x 152 mm (2 x 6 4
inch) wood stud
framing
13 Exposed reinforced
concrete wall
14 Wood roof joist
15 Insect fabric

107
25 1
Mount Fuji Architects Studio

Rainy / Sunny House


Tokyo, Japan

Client
Private client

Project Team
Masahiro Harada, Mao Harada

Structural Engineer
Jun Sato

Main Contractor
Sun Walk Construction

The concept behind this project was


to build a house that appeared to be
part of the terrain, to have been in
place for a long time, and to have
many years still ahead of it. Built in a
dense residential area of Tokyo, the
structure is positioned diagonally on
its rectangular site, creating triangular
open spaces on either side. To the
north at the front there is a parking
space; on the south side there is a
secluded courtyard garden.
Concrete has been chosen to
realize this terrain, but the architects
wanted to increase the durability of
the material as the climate in Japan
has been becoming almost
subtropical in recent years. They came
up with the idea of casting the exterior
walls against a staggered board
shuttering, which creates a 1 The street facade 2 The wood interiors environment.
shows the strongly have a rich quality that 3 The fully glazed wall
weatherboard surface. This allows the ridged textural quality suggests warmth and to the living area
walls to quickly shed water. of the walls. The comfort. Using the allows natural light to
buildings general form same parquet blocks enter the house,
The boards used were larchwood recalls vernacular on floors, walls and illuminating both the
ply, as the architects wanted a strong structures but does ceilings creates a upper and lower floors.
not copy directly. luxurious, enveloping
wood-grain pattern on the finished
concrete. This ridged surface gives 2 3
the house an ever-changing
appearance. On clear days, the sun
casts strong shadows on the uneven
surface. On cloudy days, the concrete
absorbs the humidity and turns the
ridges into dark horizontal cracks,
while on rainy days necklaces of water
droplets form across the walls.
In contrast to the hard exterior, the
floors, walls and ceiling inside are
covered with wooden parquet blocks
arranged in a herringbone pattern.
This gives the house a hand-crafted
domestic warmth.

108
25.01
First Floor Plan
1:100
1 WC
2 Wardrobe
5 3 Study
4 Terrace
5 Stair

25.02
Ground Floor Plan
1:100
1 WC

A
2 Bedroom
3 Kitchen

A
4 Living area
5 Store
6 Bathroom
1 7 Entrance
8 Tree
9 Car-parking space
3 10 Cupboard

25.03
Section AA
2 1:100
1 Bedroom
2 Kitchen

A
0 5m 3 Living area
4 Wardrobe
5 Study

A
4
0 15ft

5 6 8 9

7
A

4
1
10

3 2

8
A

4 5

1 2 3

109
25 Mount Fuji Architects Studio Rainy / Sunny House Tokyo, Japan

1 2

3
2

25.04 25.05
Formwork Wall Section Detail
Construction 1:5
Not to Scale 1 Trowelled mortar
1 Larchwood ply 2 Waterproofing
2 Concrete membrane coating
3 Strengthening bars 3 Trowelled concrete
4 Tie rod ends 4 Larchwood
moulded concrete
5 Herringbone with
Osmo finish

110
1 1

2 1 2

3
3

4 4 4

1 2 5 6 5 5

3
6
7

6
4

25.06 3 75 x 75 x 6 mm (3 x 25.07 3 32 x 16 mm (1 3/10 25.08 3 32 x 16 mm (1 3/10 25.09 3 32 x 16 mm (1 3/10


Study: Catwalk 3 x 1/5 x inch) steel Study: Catwalk x 7/10 inch) steel flat Study: Catwalk x 7/10 inch) steel flat Study: Catwalk x 7/10 inch) steel flat
Section Detail 1 angle Section Detail 2 bar Section Detail 3 bar Section Detail 4 bar
1:5 4 Luan-wood 1:5 4 Rounding steel 1:5 4 Rounding steel 1:5 4 Rounding steel
1 16 mm (3/5 inch) moulded concrete 1 40 x 55 mm (1 3/5 x 5 16 mm (3/5 inch) 1 40 x 55 mm (1 3/5 x 5 Herringbone with 1 40 x 55 mm (1 3/5 x 5 Herringbone with
steel plate, adiabatic 2 1/5 inch) oak with steel plate, adiabatic 2 1/5 inch oak with Osmo finish 2 1/5 inch oak with Osmo finish
paint Osmo finish paint Osmo finish 6 16 mm (3/5 inch) Osmo finish 6 Lauan-wood
2 Herringbone with 2 32 x 19 mm (1 3/10 6 Lauan-wood 2 32 x 19 mm (1 3/10 steel plate, adiabatic 2 32 x 19 mm (1 3/10 moulded concrete
Osmo finish x 7/10 inch) steel flat moulded concrete x 7/10 inch) steel flat paint x 7/10 inch) steel flat
bar bar 7 Lauan-wood bar
moulded concrete

25.10 25.11
Fixed Window 1 Sliding Door Detail
Section Detail 1:5
1:5 1 5 mm (1/5 inch) float
1 Herringbone with 2 2 glass
Osmo finish 2 25 x 16 mm (1 x
3
2 27 x 27 x 3 mm (1 x 7/10 inch) steel flat bar
1 x 1/10 inch) 3 190 x 19 mm (7 1/2
4 4 6
aluminium angle x 7/10 inch)steel flat bar
1 3 5 mm (1/5 inch) float 5 5 4 21 x 8 mm (4/5 x
glass 3/10 inch) steel flat bar
4 Herringbone with 5 2.3 mm (1/10 inch)
2 Osmo finish steel plate
5 25 x 16 mm (1 x 6 15 x 2 mm (3/5 x 1/5
7/10 inch) steel flat bar inch) stainless-steel
6 25 x 16 mm (1 x flat bar
7/10 inch) steel flat bar 7 5 mm (1/5 inch) float
7 190 x 19 mm (7 1/2 7 7 8 glass
3 x 7/10 inch) steel flat 8 Window screen
bar 9 Herringbone with
8 Australian cypress Osmo finish
herringbone 10 35 x 4 mm (1 2/5 x
9 Mortar 1/5 inch) stainless-steel
10 400 x 100 x 16 mm flat bar
(15 3/4 x 3 15/16 x 3/5 5 5 11 Australian cypress
inch) steel flat bar herringbone
11 FRP waterproofing 12 21 x 8 mm (4/5 x
12 Mortar 3/10 inch) stainless-
steel flat bar
13 190 x 9 mm (7 1/2 x
2/5 inch) stainless steel
flat bar
4 5 6 8 9 10 13 14 24 x 2 mm (9/10 x
1/10 inch) stainless-
11 11 12
7 steel flat bar
14
15 FRP waterproofing
11 16 Mortar
10 15
9 12 16

111
26 1
Paul Bretz Architectes

House F
Rameldange, Luxembourg

Client
Mr and Mrs F.

Project Team
Paul Bretz, Petra Schmitt

Structural Engineer
InCA, Ingnieurs Conseils Associs
S..r.l.

Main Contractor
Socimmo Construction S.A.

Built on a narrow, sloping site, this


family house in a village on the
outskirts of Luxembourg is organized
around three immense walls that
emerge from the hillside. Other than
these concrete walls, all other
divisions of space are made with light
plasterboard or glazing. The flexible
open-plan living areas are arranged
over a number of half levels and
double-height spaces. This allows the
patterns of possible habitation to be
both open and closed.
At the rear of the house a large
terrace with a pool serves as a
summer open-air living room.
1 The street elevation 2 The rear terrace the garden is located leads to the garden The opening on the
From the glazed front facade, set showing the garage looking towards the on the right side. The and upper terrace. right leads to the
behind open balconies, there are entrance the main kitchen. Cantilevered dining area is situated 5 The main living area kitchen.
entrance is on the left. above is one of the behind glazing at the looking towards the
views across the valley. The strong, Large recessed bedroom suites. end of the pool area. fire place, which acts
linear, orthogonal forms of the building balconies are located 3 A view of the pool 4 The terrace with as a partition dividing
on the upper floors. from the exterior stair. pool looking towards the living room and the
establish a dialogue of contrasts with A second access to the garden. The stair dining room beyond.
the natural forms of the landscape.
2 4
Through the use of high levels of
insulation, with double-skinned
concrete walls and triple-glazed
windows, the house achieves a very
good rating for energy use. The
concrete spine walls further aid this
through their high thermal mass.
The solidity of the polished concrete
is contrasted with the fragile and
ductile qualities of the light that
penetrates and permeates the
domestic spaces of this house.

3 5

112
A A 26.01
First Floor Plan
1:200
1 Entrance
10 2 Foyer
3 WC
4 Balcony
A A 5 Guest bedroom
6 Study
7 Living area
12 8 Dining area
9 Kitchen
9 10 Terrace
11 Swimming pool
12 Garden storage

26.02
Second Floor Plan
1:200
1 Balcony
2 Library
11 3 Storage
4 Bedroom
5 Bathroom
10 6 Master bathroom
7 Master bedroom
8 Dressing area
9 Terrace
10 Garden
7

8 9

10
7

3 5
3
6

2
26.03
5 2 4 Section AA
1:200
1 Garden storage
1
2 Master bedroom
A A 3 Dressing area
4 Master bathroom
4 1 5 Kitchen
6 Laundry room
7 Wine cellar
8 Bathroom
9 Bedroom
A A 10 Balcony
0 5m 11 Study
12 Guest bedroom
13 Garage
0 15ft

2 3 4

8 9 10

1 5

11 12

7 13

113
26 Paul Bretz Architectes House F Rameldange, Luxembourg

26.04
1 Vertical Section of 1 1
Courtyard Southside
1:20
1 Alwitra MAK
4 3 parapet capping 3 3
2 Fair-faced concrete 2
4 5 2 4
5 2 wall 5
6 3 Emergency
overflow 6
7 6
4 Slag
5 Building protection 7 7
8
mats
6 Waterproofing
9 7 200 mm (7 9/10 inch) 8 13 8
10 thermal insulation 9
8 Vapour barrier
12 11 9 200 mm (7 9/10 inch) 9 10 11
concrete slab 10
13 10 100 x 100 x 8 mm 12
(3 9/10 x 3 9/10 x 3/10
inch) welding plate
11 Curtain rail 11
12 10 mm (2/5 inch)
interior plaster 12
13 Schco FW50+
facade system
14 20 mm (4/5 inch)
natural stone
15 60 mm (2 2/5 inch)
screed with underfloor
13 heating
16 70 mm (2 4/5 inch) 2 10 11 12
14 thermal / impact sound 12
15 insulation
17 28 mm (1 1/10 inch) 14 15
16 13
IPE wood deck 16
18 140 mm (5 1/2 inch)
9 wooden beam
19 100 mm (3 9/10 inch) 17
Foamglas insulation 2 13
12 11 20 50 mm (2 inch) 18
interior insulation
13 21 Concrete wall 19
20
21

14 22
23
21 15
13
22 16
14
23 17
15 18
20
16
19
9

12 11
26.05 thermal / impact sound 26.06 interior plaster
13 Vertical Section of insulation Vertical Section of 9 20 mm (4/5 inch)
1
North Facade First 18 Vapour barrier North Facade Second natural stone slab
Floor Dining Room 19 200 mm (7 9/10 inch) Floor Bedroom 20 60 mm (2 2/5 inch)
1:20 concrete floor slab 1:20 screed with underfloor
1 Alwitra MAK 20 40 mm (1 3/5 inch) 1 Alwitra MAK heating
parapet capping perimeter insulation parapet capping 21 70 mm (2 4/5 inch)
2 Fair-faced concrete 21 28 mm (1 1/10 inch) 2 225 mm (8 9/10 inch) thermal / impact sound
wall IPE wood deck fair-faced concrete insulation
3 Slag 22 40 mm (1 3/5 inch wall 22 40 mm (1 3/5 inch)
4 Building protection IPE substructure) 3 Slag insulation
mats 23 80 mm (3 1/10 inch) 4 Building protection 23 10 mm (2/5 inch)
5 Waterproofing lava stone mats exterior plaster
6 200 mm (7 9/10 inch) 5 Waterproofing
thermal insulation 6 200 mm (7 9/10 inch)
7 Vapour barrier thermal insulation
8 200 mm (7 9/10 inch) 7 Vapour barrier
concrete slab 8 200 mm (7 9/10 inch)
13 9 15 mm (4/5 inch) concrete slab
interior plaster 9 100 x 100 x 8 mm
17 10 100 mm (3 9/10 (3 9/10 x 3 9/10 x 3/10
inch) core insulation inch) welding plate
11 160 mm (6 3/10 inch) 10 Curtain rail
18 concrete wall 11 10 mm (2/5 inch)
5 12 15 mm (3/5 inch) interior plaster
19 interior plaster 12 Schco FW50+
13 100 x 100 x 8 mm facade system
8 (3 9/10 x 3 9/10 x 3/10 13 60 mm (2 2/5 inch)
9 inch) welding plate core insulation
14 Schco FW50+ 14 Window sill exterior:
facade system sheet metal aluminium
20 15 20 mm (4/5 inch) 15 Window sill interior:
natural stone slab natural stone
12 16 60 mm (2 2/5 inch) 16 Mortar
21 screed with underfloor 17 200 mm (7 9/10 inch)
heating concrete wall
17 70 mm (2 4/5 inch) 18 15 mm (3/5 inch)

114
26.08
1 Vertical Section of 1
South Facade
1:20
3 1 Alwitra MAK 2
parapet capping 3
2 2 225 mm (8 9/10 inch)
4 5 fair-faced concrete
wall 4
5
3 Slag
6 4 Building protection 6
mats
7
5 Waterproofing 7
6 200 mm (7 9/10 inch)
8 thermal insulation
12 11 8
7 Vapour barrier 13 10
8 190 mm (7 1/2 inch)
9 concrete slab 15 14 9
9 20 mm (4/5 inch)
interior plaster 16
10 Lighting
10 11 Venetian blinds
12 110 mm (4 3/10 inch)
insulation
13 100 x 100 x 8 mm
(3 9/10 x 3 9/10 x 3/10
inch) welding plate
14 Curtain rail
15 10 mm (2/5 inch)
interior plaster
2 16 Schco FW50+
facade system
17 20 mm (4/5 inch)
natural stone slab
3 18 60 mm (2 2/5 inch) 16 26
screed with underfloor
heating 17 21 22
4 5 19 70 mm (2 4/5 inch) 18
thermal / impact sound 23
insulation 19 24
6
20 200 mm (7 9/10 inch) 25
7 concrete slab 20 12 8
21 Tension cord for 13 11
10
Venetian blinds
8 22 30 mm (1 1/5 inch) 15 14 9
natural stone 16
9 23 100 mm (3 9/10 inch)
screed
24 Drainage mat
11 25 Waterproofing
26 500 x 720 mm (19
7/10 x 28 3/10 inch)
concrete parapet
27 160 mm (6 3/10 inch)
concrete slab
28 60 mm (2 2/5 inch)
insulation
29 40 mm (1 3/5 inch)
insulation
30 Door rail 26
31 Sliding glass door
with expanded metal 16
cladding 21
22
32 Steel angle
26.07 33 60 mm (2 2/5 inch)
Vertical Section of 23
screed with surface 24
Roof Connection sealing 25
Fair-faced Concrete 34 20 mm (4/5 inch) 28
Wall 27 8
insulation 13
1:20 35 Waterproofing 10
1 Alwitra MAK 29 15
36 150 mm (5 9/10 inch)
parapet capping concrete floor slab 30 9
2 225 mm (8 9/10 inch) 37 Trench drain
fair-faced concrete 38 100 x 70 mm (3 9/10
wall 31
x 2 8/10 inch) natural
3 Slag stone paving
4 Building protection 39 50 mm (2 inch)
mats mortar bed
5 Waterproofing 40 200 mm (7 9/10 inch)
6 200 mm (7 9/10 inch) concrete floor slab
thermal insulation
7 Vapour barrier
8 200 mm (7 9/10 inch)
concrete slab
9 15 mm (3/5 inch)
interior plaster
10 100 mm (3 9/10
inch) core insulation
11 550 mm (9 7/10 inch)
fair-faced concrete 31 38
wall 33
34 35 32
37 39
36
40

115
27 1
Peter Stutchbury Architecture

Springwater
Seaforth, Sydney, Australia

Client
Private client

Project Team
Peter Stutchbury, James Stockwell

Structural Engineer
Professor Max Irvine

Main Contractor
Watpow Constructions Pty Ltd

This house is positioned on a wooded,


west-facing site on the coast of
Sydney Harbour. Despite its solid
materiality, it is a delicate structure
that acts primarily as an absence
enclosure. Designed to interact with
the natural conditions of the area, the
house does not impose itself as
closed space; rather it is developed as
a series of simple framed areas open
to the landscape. The architects
conceived the house as a reliable
camp a place where you can rest
amongst nature.
In plan, the building reaches out like
fingers across the site towards the
sea. Within its concrete frame, the
1 The living areas of remain in their raw 3 On the upper level, 4 Transparency and
building has a simple skin that can be the house extend out state. beneath the deep permeability allow the
adjusted to control the environment. across the layered 2 The main stair slices eaves, a pool runs house to be integrated
platforms, an through the house alongside the house, with its surroundings.
The house does not seek to dominate arrangement that within a canyon-like its infinity edge Each space is visually
its surroundings, but to exist in subtly melds the cut that recalls the merging into the connected to those
interior and exterior. local topography. landscape. that surround it.
balance with them. Ceiling heights are The basic materials
carefully shifted according to their
2 3
relationship with the adjacent
landscape. The platforms that extend
out from the house offer multiple
possible areas for occupation.
Throughout, the materials of the
house are presented in their raw state.
Galvanized steel frames are bolted
directly to the structure, while polished
timber is set in contrast against
cast-in-situ concrete.
This is a house in which nature is
always present. The transition
between the interior and the exterior is
fragile; it is a place of both permanent
and transitory atmospheres.
4

116
B C

1
B C

6 4 3

5
A A A A

27.01 27.02
Upper Floor Plan Middle Floor Plan
1:500 1:500 11 10 9
1 Roof 1 Concrete deck
2 Lap pool 2 Living area
3 Outdoor bathroom 3 Dining area
4 Bedroom 4 Kitchen
5 En-suite bathroom 5 Laundry
6 Concrete deck 6 Pantry 5
7 Plant room 1 2 3 4 7 8
8 Service 6
9 Courtyard
10 Void to gallery A A A A
11 Timber deck
below

27.03
Lower Floor Plan
1:500 0 5 10m
1 Timber deck 1 2
2 Gallery
3 Wardrobe 0 15 30ft
9 6 3
4 En-suite bathroom
5 Services 7 4 5
6 Outdoor kitchen
7 Paved terrace B C
8 Recreation room 8
9 Water feature

A A A A

B C

27.04
Section AA
1:200
1 Bathroom 1
2 Stair
3 Concrete deck

2
27.05 27.06
Section BB Section CC
1:200 1:200
1 Pool 1 Pool
2 Bedroom 2 Bedroom
3 Bathroom 3 Stair
4 Dining area 4 Living area 3
5 Study / recreation
room
6 Terrace
7 Gallery

1 2 3 1 2 3

4 4

7 6 5

117
27 Peter Stutchbury Architecture Springwater Seaforth, Sydney, Australia

27.07
Concrete Roof Detail
1:10
1 Open stainless-
steel spout (dotted line
denotes cast-in with
splayed top)
2 Full flexible ADDIS
epoxy membrane
2 3 Hanging track
recessed in top wall
4 Concrete roof slab
with Caltite additive
1 5 20 x 20 mm (4/5
x 4/5 inch) rebate
4 4 6 Glass
7 Wood frame
5

27.08
Roof Detail
1:10
1 Hanging track
recessed in top wall
2 Full flexible ADDIS
epoxy membrane
2 2 3 Concrete roof slab
with Caltite additive
4 Fixed glass
5 Typical glazing
3 3 detail: Sikaflex into 20
x 60 mm (4/5 x 2 2/5
inch) precast slots to
wall col and 50 x 6 mm
5
(2 x 2/10 inch) soffit infill
4 bronze plate
6 Fall sill
6
1

27.09
Footing Detail
1:10
1 Concrete slab with
Caltite additive
2 Henderson bottom
roller guide and brass
track block
3 Precast concrete
sills to concrete floor
thresholds
4 5 mm (1/5 inch)
Sikaflex joint

3 2
4

118
2

1 4 7

6
3 5

10

27.10 27.11 4 75 x 6 mm (3 x
Facade Glazing Detail Facade Detail 1/5 inch) intermediate
1:10 1:10 stiffeners with cleats at
1 Typical glazing to 1 75 x 75 mm (3 x ends into recesses in
GL detail: Sikaflex into 3 inch) galvanized EA concrete
10 x 30 mm (2/5 x 1 1/5 integral to frame 5 100 x 70 mm
inch) precast slots to 2 5 x 30 mm (1/5 x 1 (3 9/10 x 2 4/5 inch)
wall and col seal at 1/5 inch) cast-in cast lighting rebate
base and bring flashing slot 6 Mini orb laid in
earth up to glass 3 10 mm (2/5 inch) single lengths with
1 2 Bagged blockwork galvanized fin plates galvanized finish
wall beyond 20 x 20 on grid lines slot into 7 50 mm (2 inch)
mm (4/5 x 4/5 inch) 10 mm (2/5 inch) galvanized angle
rebate to head cast-in sleeves with integral to frame
3 Concrete slab with three countersunk 10 8 25 mm (1 inch)
Caltite additive mm (2/5 inch) aluminum tongue-and-groove
3 head fixings boards, vertical
window slides on the
outside
9 Timber treated for
protection seal to all
sides of window
10 Shaped turpentine
sill fix through plastic
2 packers

119
28 1 The entrance facade
rises up out of the
Pezo von Ellrichshausen landscape like an
emerald jewel. The
entrance cuts into the
FOSC House sharply formed wall,
San Pedro, Chile drawing you deep into
the building.
2 The surfaces of the
Client walls record the history
of their construction.
Claudio and Simonetta Rossi The green pigment and
the layered strata
depict two different
Project Team sorts of time.
Mauricio Pezo, Sofia von 3 Large windows open
up the interior to the
Ellrichshausen landscape.
4 Internal walls are
made from the same
Structural Engineer boards as those used
German Aguilera to form the walls.
5 Simple wooden
furniture is built in,
Main Contractor providing storage and
sleeping areas within
Ricardo Ballesta the compact plan.

A six-sided crystalline tower, this


compact, three-storey concrete house
is positioned on a hilltop in San Pedro,
Chile. Built on the highest part of the
site, it dominates the landscape and
offers an expansive view. The house is
buried into the hill and entered on its
middle level, which provides the living
areas; the bedrooms are on the upper
floor and the lower floor. The five
bedrooms, three bathrooms, living
room and studio are arranged in
a tight plan, which circles around a
central vertical void containing a
simple folded-steel stair. Internal walls 1
are constructed from wood and
2 4
suggest future flexibility for the
internal arrangements.
The external walls are constructed
as two independent cast-in-place
walls an inner structural one and an
outer protective skin. Both of the walls
were cast at the same time in wood
formwork, with an insulation layer
between them. The exterior concrete
skin is coloured green using a
water-repellent copper oxide wash.
Windows are set flush with the outer
skin and positioned in the walls
according to both the arrangement of
the rooms and the best views of the
surrounding landscape.
The inspiration for the copper oxide
stain on the exterior walls came from
the clients observation of staining on 3 5
the pedestals of monuments in the
local square.

120
28.01
Roof Plan
1:200
1 Roof
2 Skylight

1
2 28.02
Upper Floor Plan 28.05
1:200 Section A-A
1 Bedroom 1:200
2 Bathroom 1 Living area
3 Stair 4 4 2 Bedroom
4 Study 3 Living area
4 Bedroom

28.03
Middle Floor Plan 28.06
1:200 3 Section B-B
1 Kitchen 1:200
2 Living area 1 Bedroom
3 Dining area 2 Stair
4 Entrance hall 3 Kitchen
5 Stair 4 Utility
1 2
6 Utility room 5 Bathroom
2

1 28.04 28.07
Lower Floor Plan Section C-C
1 1:200 1:200
3 1 Living area 1 Living area
2 Bedroom 2 Stair
3 Bathroom 3 Living area
4 Stair 4 Kitchen
4 5 Bedroom

1 5 2 5
2 28.08
Section D-D
1:200
1 Living area
2 Bathroom
3 Living area
3 2 4 4 Kitchen
5 Bedroom
6 Bathroom

1 2

1
3

4
2

5 2 5
A B

3 2 4

D D A B D D
3
1 2
C C 1 C C

2 A 2 B

5 6
A B

3 4

0 5m
1 2
0 15ft

121
28 Pezo von Ellrichshausen FOSC House San Pedro, Chile

28.09 28.10
Exploded Axonometric
Axonometric Not to Scale
Not to Scale
1 Bedroom
2 Bathroom
3 Living area
4 Kitchen
5 Utility room
6 Study

6
2

1
2

122
123
29 1
Shubin + Donaldson Architects

Toro Canyon Residence


Santa Barbara, USA

Client
John Mike and Marcia Cohen

Project Team
John Mike Cohen, Robin Donaldson,
Greg Griffin, Sheida Owrang, Karl
Hamilton

Structural Engineer
Taylor & Syfan Consulting

Main Contractor
Paul Franz Construction

Set among oak and eucalyptus trees


in the Toro Canyon near Santa
Barbara, this house has the rawness
of nature in its materiality and form.
The sharp grey concrete walls set
against the yellow soil give the
building the character of a Donald
Judd sculpture. The site is positioned
along the canyon axis, and there are
dramatic views of the ocean and
islands in the distance.
Approached along a tree-lined
drive, the house at first gives the
appearance of being composed of
three parallel wedge-shaped cast-
1 The house slides out glass-roofed entrance over the pool. Throughout, the
concrete volumes. These are a carport like a rock formation hall defines the 4 The interior living boundaries between
and service volume to the north; a from the desert, its transition between the area opens up towards interior and exterior are
three sliced wedge public and private the framed landscape. carefully shifted
public living volume to the south west; forms pierced with areas of the house. Above, a pale wood through the plane of
and a sleeping volume to the south deep openings. 3 A terrace flows ceiling reduces the the concrete skin.
2 In the canyon void around and between weight of the large
east. The carport intersects with the between the wings, a the volumes, and floats enclosing walls.
living volume and is offset to reveal a
2 3
glass entry pavilion that separates the
two other volumes. This transparent
part also divides the public and
private spaces. Throughout, the
hardness of the concrete is contrasted
with mahogany doors and windows
and eucalyptus ceilings.
Beneath the upper volumes, there is
a lower level containing guest rooms
and an exercise space.

124
B B 29.01
Lower Floor Plan
1:500
1 Bathroom
2 Bedroom
3 Hall
4 Patio
B 1 B 2
5 Snack kitchen
6 Spa above
7 Pool equipment
8 Plant room
9 Pool above
3 10 Storage
A A 11 Reflecting pool
above

29.02
Upper Floor Plan
4 5 1:500
1 14
A 8 A 1 Equipment
2 Trash
2 6 7 13 3 Car port
4 WC
5 Vestibule
5 4 6 Studio
9 10 11 12
7 Hall
10 3 8 Laundry
1 9 Family
2 15 16 10 Gallery
11 11 Entry hall
1 12 Hall
C C C C 13 Office
14 WC
2 19 18 15 Closet
16 Master bathroom
17 Deck
6 20 18 Master bedroom
8 7
19 Dining room
20 Living room

B 9 A B17 A

0 5 10m
B A B A
0 15 30ft

29.03 29.04
Section AA Section BB
1:500 1:500
1 Office 1 Deck
1 2 3 4 2 Hall 2 Living room
3 Closet 3 Dining
4 Master bedroom 4 Kitchen
5 6 7 8 5 Bedroom 5 Family
6 Bedroom 6 Studio
7 Exercise room 7 Car port
8 Pool equipment 8 Trash

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

29.05
Section CC
1:200
1 Dining
2 Gallery
3 Entry / reflecting
pool
4 Master bedroom
5 Patio
1 2 3 4 5 6 Exercise room
7 Patio

6 7

125
29 Shubin + Donaldson Architects Toro Canyon Residence Santa Barbara, USA

2 1

2
3 3

4 4

5 5

29.06 29.07
Door Head Detail Jamb at Casement to
1:5 Concrete Wall Detail
1 Concrete 1:5
2 Drip 1 Concrete
3 Waterproof 2 Insulation
membrane 3 Waterproof
4 Wood door frame membrane
5 Double glazing 4 Wood door frame
5 Double glazing

1
4

2
3 3

6 6

2
7 7 8

5 5 5

29.08 5 Double glazing 29.09


Head at Sliding Door 6 Door runner Sill at Swing Door to
to Concrete Wall 7 Sliding door frame Concrete Floor Detail
1:5 8 Fixed door frame 1:5
1 Concrete 1 Concrete
2 Drip 2 Insulation
3 Waterproof 3 Plywood substrate
membrane 4 Stainless-steel L
4 Wood door frame section
5 Swing door

126
7
6

1 1 5

3
8
4

2 5 4
4

6 2

29.10 29.11 29.12


Glass Entry Beam to Roof Eaves at Down Roof Rake
Concrete Wall Detail Slope Detail Detail
1:5 1:5 1:5
1 Concrete 1 Concrete 1 Concrete
2 Insulation 2 Insulation 2 insulation
3 38 x 203 mm (1 1/2 3 Wood beam 3 Wood beam
x 8 inch) tempered 4 Steel fixing 4 Steel fixing
laminated glass beam 5 Wood nailer 5 Corrugated metal
4 10 mm on 10 mm 6 Plywood sheathing roofing
(3/8 on 3/8 inch) 7 Corrugated metal 6 Plywood sheathing
tempered laminated roofing 7 Wood nailer
glass 8 Stainless-steel 8 Roof rafter
5 Silicone flashing 9 Stainless-steel
6 (3/8 inch) neoprene flashing
5

9
4
8

127
30 1 1 The tall structure,
with its sinuous,
TNA rhythmic facade, is
a dominant presence
on the city street.
Colour Concrete House The corner openings
Yokohama, Japan alternate between
open and closed
around the building.
Client 2 Glass is used for
the internal walls.
Private client In contrast to the
monolithic exterior,
the interior appears
Project Team fragile and delicate.
Makoto Takei, Chie Nabeshima 3 From the kitchen
and dining area, broad
views of the street
Structural Engineer and city can be seen
through the large
Akira Suzuki corner windows.
4 Rising above the
roofs of surrounding
Main Contractor buildings, the
Matsumoto Corporation combined study and
bedroom on the third
floor has a small
As is typical in Japanese cities, the private balcony.
site for this house is very small and
very narrow at only 46 square metres
(495 square feet). It also faces onto a
busy main road in Yokohama. The
clients wanted to replace an existing
two-storey house with a taller
structure that better suited its
surroundings. The new building is
designed for a family of five individuals
across three generations.
Although the site is not big, it is
located in a commercial area where
buildings can be as high as 31 metres
(102 feet). The architects decided to
set the house one-and-a-half metres
(59 inches) back from the road, but
otherwise make the most of the
available height and width. The result
is a five-storey house in which each
floor is allocated to a member of the
family. Reinforced concrete was
chosen for the construction. To make
2 3
the facade appear softer and
smoother, a light green pigment was
added. This colour hides the joints
between individual pours of concrete.
Great care has been given to the
positioning of the windows. As other
buildings closely surround the house,
the windows were cut out from the
corners of each alternate floor.
This arrangement maximizes the
structures openness and ensures a
unique character in a busy urban
location.

128
B
30.01 30.02 30.03 30.04 30.05
Fourth Floor Plan Third Floor Plan Second Floor Plan First Floor Plan Ground Floor Plan
1:100 1:100 1:100 1:100 1:100
1 Stair 1 Stair 1 Stair 1 Stair 1 Stair
2 Study / bedroom 2 Study / bedroom 2 Bathroom 2 Kitchen 2 WC
B 3 Lift 3 Lift 3 Lift 3 Lift
1 4 Balcony 4 WC 4 Dining room 4 Closet
5 Bedroom 5 Entrance
6 Living room

A A A A
0 5m

0 15ft

2 4
30.06 30.07
A A A A Section AA Section BB
1:100 1:100
1 Study / bedroom 1 Study / bedroom
2 Study / bedroom 2 Study / bedroom
with balcony 3 Bathroom
3 Bathroom 4 Kitchen
4 WC 5 Closet
5 Bedroom 6 Stair
6 Kitchen
3
7 Dining area
8 Closet
9 Room
1

1 1
2 4
A A A A

2 2
3

3 4 5 3

A A 2 4 A A
6

6 7 4
3 5

8 9 5
B
A A 4 6 A A

B
129
30 TNA Colour Concrete House Yokohama, Japan

30.08
Balcony Plan
1:20
1 18 mm (7/10 inch)
solid wood flooring
(rocky pine), 180 mm
(7 1/10 inch) wide,
12 mm (1/2 inch) wood
boards, 20 mm (4/5
inch) spray urethane
1 8 10 foam insulation
2 12.5 mm (1/2 inch)
plasterboard
3 Pitted cheesecloth
acrylic emulsion paint
finish
4 20 mm (4/5 inch)
9 urethane foam 5
insulation
5 Movable shelf
11
support
6 195 mm (7 7/10 inch)
exposed coloured
concrete
3 7 7 Steel window frame
2 8 Steel window
5 4
support
6 9 Double glazing
10 19 mm (7/10 inch) 4
ulin-wood deck, with
6 mm (1/5 inch) shadow
gap boarding
11 20 mm (4/5 inch)
diameter laundry pipe,
FB bending

30.09
Balcony Section
1:20
1 18 mm (7/10 inch)
14 solid wood flooring
1 (rocky pine), 180 mm
2 (7 1/10 inch) wide
2 20 mm (4/5 inch) 1 2
4 urethane foam
insulation 3
5 3 12 mm (1/2 inch)
11
wood boards
4 195 mm (7 7/10 inch)
exposed coloured
17 concrete
5 15 mm (3/5 inch)
placing insulation 11
6 Flat rail
16 7 Steel window frame
8 Double glazing
9 Mortar
10 Steel window
support
11 Caulking
12 19 mm (7/10 inch)
10 ulin wood deck,
96 mm (3 8/10 inch)
wide, with 6 mm (1/5 6
8 inch) shadow gap
boarding 7
13 Waterproof rising
14 195 mm (7 7/10 inch)
exposed coloured
concrete
15 12.5 mm (1/2 inch)
plasterboard
16 20 mm (4/5 inch)
diameter laundry pipe
17 FB bending 8

9
14
8

7
1 6 12
3
9 13
2
10

5
15 2

130
2

13 1 7
3

14

5
6

9 3

10 8

11
12 1 2

30.10 30.11 30.12


Window Section Wall Plan Wall Plan
1:10 1:20 1:10
1 Wood window 1 30 mm (1 1/5 inch) 1 Wood window
frame (western flash panel insulator, frame (western
hemlock) lined side hemlock)
2 Steel window frame 2 20 mm (4/5 inch) 2 Steel window frame
3 1.5 mm (1/10 inch) urethane foam 3 Double glazing
steel plate insulation 4 12.5 mm (1/2 inch)
4 Double glazing 3 15 mm (3/5 inch) plasterboard
5 Curtain flat rail placing insulation 5 Pitted cheesecloth 7
6 12.5 mm (1/2 inch) 4 15 mm (3/5 inch) acrylic emulsion
plasterboard urethane foam paint finishing
7 Pitted cheesecloth insulation 6 20 mm (4/5 inch)
acrylic emulsion paint 5 Steel flash door urethane foam 5
finishing 6 Glass wool fill-up insulation
8 20 mm (4/5 inch) 7 100 mm (3 9/10 inch) 7 195 mm (7 7/10 inch)
urethane foam trowelled exposed exposed coloured 6
insulation concrete concrete
9 18 mm (7/10 inch) 8 195 mm (7 7/10 inch) 8 18 mm (7/10 inch)
solid wood flooring exposed coloured solid wood flooring 8
(rocky pine), 130 mm concrete (rocky pine), 130 mm 4
(5 1/2 inch) wide 9 12.5 mm (1/2 inch) (5 1/2 inch) wide,
10 15 mm (3/5 inch) plasterboard 12 mm (1/2 inch) wood
placing insulation 10 Pitted cheesecloth boards, 20 mm (4/5
11 195 mm (7 7/10 inch) acrylic emulsion paint inch) urethane foam
exposed coloured finishing insulation 6
concrete 11 5 mm (1/5 inch) and
10 mm (2/5 inch)
plasterboard
12 45 x 40 mm (1 4/5
x 1 3/5 inch) metal
support for
plasterboard
13 Technical
compartment
14 Mailbox

131
31 1
Torafu Architects

House in Kohoku
Yokohama, Japan

Client
Private client

Project Team
Koichi Suzuno, Shinya Kamuro

Structural Engineer
MID Architectural Structure Laboratory

Main Contractor
Yamasho

The clients for this project wanted to


demolish their existing two-storied
house as their children had left home,
and to replace it with a smaller house
that would be filled with natural light.
This was problematic as houses
already surrounded the L-shaped site,
with a particularly tall house on the
south side. The only solution that
could fulfill the brief while also dealing
with the potential problem of being
overlooked was to bring light in from
the top.
The house is therefore composed
of four funnel-like roofs that are each
glazed on the top. These roof lights
are positioned to bring the maximum
1 The house opens interior catches both the house has an air of calm and cosy
light into the house while avoiding the directly onto the light and shadow, permanence and of a domestic life.
gaze of the neighbours. The materials garden. Its pyramid communicating the natural connection
roofs are angled to passing of time and with its environment.
used are standard as is common in bring in light at the prevailing external 4 The scale and
Japan, the roofs and the walls are different seasons and conditions. materiality of the
times of day. 3 Amongst its interior suggest a
made only of 150 mm (5 910 inch) thick 2 The white-painted suburban neighbours, place well suited to a
reinforced concrete.
The entire upper part was cast as a 2 3

single pour, hence there are no joints


and in turn no weaknesses. There are
no columns inside the house the
external form is an exact reflection of
the internal form. The single-storey
interior has been softly divided into
four areas according to the shape of
the roofs. In the area with the highest
ceiling, a mezzanine floor has been
added as an office space. The exterior
of the building is left in exposed
concrete, while the interior is painted
white to reflect the light and to make
the shadows more visible. Space has
been maximized by constructing 4
much of the furniture from MDF this
has been left in its raw condition to
reflect the spirit of the building.

132
A

1
7 A

1 2
6 2

B B 3 4 B B
4 3
A

8 A
31.01 31.02
Ground Floor Plan First Floor Plan
1:200 1:200
1 Dressing room 1 Studio / office
2 Bedroom space 2 Bedroom space
3 Living and dining 3 Kitchen
A space 4 Living space
4 Kitchen
5 Entrance lobby
0 5 10m 6 Bathroom
7 Garden
8 Entrance from
0 15 30ft street

2 4 1 2 3

31.03 31.04
Section AA Section BB
1:200 1:200
1 Studio / office 1 Front door
2 Bathroom 2 Kitchen
3 Living and dining 3 Living and dining
space space
4 Garden

133
31 Torafu Architects House in Kohoku Yokohama, Japan

3 1

11

6
6

4 5
10

13
8

11

14 12 12

134
31.05
Detail Section
1:50
1 Aluminium tilt sash
skylight
2 Exposed watertight
concrete roof with
water-repellent-paint
finish
3 Emulsion on 12.5
mm (1/2 inch)
plasterboard wall with
30 mm (1 1/5 inch)
urethane insulation
spray finish
4 1200 mm (47 1/5
inch) high fence
5 Planting: climbing
rose
6 Aluminium tilt sash
7 12 mm (1/2 inch)
MDF floor with white
wax finish, urethane
clear paint
8 12 mm (1/2 inch)
MDF floor with white
wax finish, urethane
clear paint, and electric
floor-heating panel
below
9 Hanging stirrup bolt
to suspended ceiling
10 MDF island table
with white wax finish,
urethane clear paint
and 10 mm (2/5 inch)
artificial marble top
11 300 mm (11 4/5
inch) raft foundation
12 Deep pile
foundations
13 Terrace of
interlocking blocks
14 Existing retaining
wall

135
32 1
Wood / Marsh

Merricks House
Mornington Peninsula, Victoria,
Australia

Client
Joseph Gersh

Project Team
Roger Wood, Randal Marsh, David
Goss, Matthew Borg

Structural Engineer
John Gardner & Associates

Main Contractor
DC Construction

Approached along a long winding


drive through an established vineyard,
Merricks House overlooks the
Mornington Peninsula. The brief was
to build a large, flexible family home of
a high quality and with a sense of
solidity, constructed from materials
that would age well and require
minimal upkeep. Through the centre of
the house, a pair of curved walls
constructed from rammed earth a
material that is essentially a primitive
form of concrete form the spine of
the building. Large south-facing
windows provide views across the
1 The entrance is 2 A dark pool across flow from one to display the owners
landscape to the ocean. The structural between the two the centre of the house another without the art collection.
engineer was involved early in the parallel arcs of the reflects the sky and constraint of doors. 5 As the central
spine walls. The house cools the environment. Views of the corridor passes
design process to ensure the appears comfortable The strong shadows surrounding landscape through the house,
seamless integration of services, and established in its define and accentuate are always present. the ceiling compresses
raw coastal the forms. 4 The curved corridors the space in a gentle
openings and frameless glazing. environment. 3 Main living spaces provide space to swelling arc.
There are six bedrooms to
2 4
accommodate the large family, with a
range of spaces that can be enjoyed
in differing weather conditions. Mainly
used as a holiday and weekend
residence, the bedrooms are
positioned in three wings, accessed
through discreet openings in the
central corridor. This layout allows
autonomy between visitors and also
ensures that the house does not
appear empty when it is not fully
occupied.
A basement cellar provides storage
for wine, including that produced on
the propertys vineyard. The building
makes particular use of mass to store 3 5
energy and modulate the environment.
Materials with low embodied energy
ratings have been used throughout. All
of the spaces are cross-ventilated,
and each building volume can be
heated and cooled independently. As
the house is not connected to mains
water, all rainwater is harvested for
use, while sewage is treated on site.

136
E
D
C
B
32.01
Plan
E 1:500
D 1 Garage
C 2 Store
B 3 Entry
21 4 Bedroom
24
5 Bathroom
6 En suite
7 Laundry
A 8 Corridor
14 14 9 Kitchen
4 10 Dining area
22 17 11 Lounge
2 24 22 A 12 Living area
11
6 13 Study
18 14 Terrace
23
15 Powder room
1 9 16 Basement stair
10 17 Robe
A 18 Pool
7 4 6 4 19 Spa
19 14
A 20 Pond
15 21 Pool equipment
B 3 8 22 Pool terrace
12 13 23 Courtyard
E 24 Garden wall
16
4 5 4 20
D
14
B C

0 5 10m E

0 15 30ft D
C

32.02
Section AA
1:500
1 1 Corridor

32.03
Section BB
1:500
1 Corridor

32.04
Section CC
1:500
1 Corridor
3 2 1 4 2 Kitchen
3 Lounge
4 Living area

32.05
Section DD
1:500
1 Corridor
2 Study
3 Wine cellar

1 2
32.06
Section EE
3 1:500
1 Corridor

137
32 Wood / Marsh Merricks House Mornington Peninsula, Victoria, Australia

32.07
Entry Door Window 4
5
Plan
1:10
1 Solid timber door
2 Full-height timber 5
frame 3
3 Selected glazing 6
4 Recessed glazing 7
channel
5 Rammed-earth wall

32.08 2
Window Plan 8
1:10
1 Rammed-earth wall
2 Recessed glazing
channel
3 Edge of slab 1
4 9
4 Line of ceiling over
5 Angle below
6 Selected glazing
7 13 mm (1/2 inch)
plasterboard 1
8 Recessed glazing
channel
9 Shiplap cladding

1
32.09
Window Section at
2 Pool Edge
1:10
1 Rammed-earth wall
2 Structural slab
3 3 Concrete screed
4 Selected glazing
5 Recessed glazing
channel
6 Concrete window
ledge / sill
7 Pool terrace
8 Pool waterline
9 Selected pool tiles

3 4

32.10
Pool Edge Section
5 1:10
1 Paving slab
6 2 Sawcut to slab
3 Concrete pool shell
4 Pool waterline

8
7

138
32.11 32.13
Recessed Blind Lintel Section
Section 1:10
1:10 1 Timber battened
1 Recessed blind ceiling
2 Folded aluminium 2 Hopleys truss roof
sheet conceal fixed to structure.
reveal 3 13 mm (1/2 inch)
3 Drip groove plasterboard
4 Recessed side suspended ceiling with
glazing channel shadow gap to earth
5 Selected glazing wall junction
6 Rammed-earth wall 4 Rammed earth
5 Concrete beam
32.12 6 Steel plate to
Window Sill Section underside of lintel
1:10
1 Rammed-earth wall 32.14
2 Structural slab Window Head
3 Concrete screed Section
4 Selected glazing 1:10
5 Recessed glazing 1 A/C equipment
channel screed to 2 Drip groove
window sill 3 Glazing channel
6 Finished floor level 4 Selected glazing
7 Concrete blockwork 5 Rammed-earth wall
6 Timber ceiling

3 4 5 4
2

1
3

4 5

4 5

6
3 6

2 1

7
5

2 3 6

139
140
Commercial
and Public
Buildings
3342

141
33 1
Barbosa & Guimares

Vodafone Building
Porto, Portugal

Client
Vodafone

Project Team
Jos Antnio Barbosa and Pedro
Lopes Guimares
Ana Campante, Ana Carvalho, Ana
Mota, Daniela Teixeira, Eunice Lopes,
Filipe Secca, Henrique Dias, Hugo
Abreu, Nuno Felgar, Jos Marques,
Miguel Pimenta, Pablo Rebelo, Paula
Fonseca, Paulo Lima, Raul Andrade,
Sara Caruso

Structural Engineer
Afaconsult / Carlos Quinaz

Main Contractor
Teixeira Duarte

This building for the mobile telephone


company Vodafone adopts a dynamic
form that communicates linear, flowing
movement to its facades. The effect of
a surface in motion is obtained in part
through the qualities concrete has as
a plastic material. The ability of
1 The folded concrete 2 The rear of the 3 Within the building
concrete to be both structure and facade wraps the building has the the walls are bright
surface allows the building to place building like an origami same language of white; both artificial
model. Between the articulated forms. At and natural light are
the majority of its support in its skin, bands of linear wall, ground level sculpted manipulated to create
augmented by two stairways and diamond-shaped lights illuminate the dramatic effects.
windows expose the basement.
three central columns. This open interior.
arrangement allows maximum
flexibility in the internal plan. 2 3
The fractured geometry of the main
facade faces out onto a busy avenue.
The alignment is a response to the
adjacent buildings to the east and
west. The shell structure on the north
and south elevations is constructed of
white self-compacting concrete. This
concrete was cast entirely in-situ
using marine plywood formwork. The
outer window frames are stainless
steel and aluminium, while the interior
frames are stainless steel and wood.
The building has eight floors; five
are above ground and three below.
On the ground floor, in addition to the
auditorium, office and cafeteria, there
is a large retail store. The four upper
floors contain open-plan offices; on
the third floor and the roof there are
open terraces. Two of the three
basement floors are for car parking
while the other is occupied by
technical areas and training rooms.
At the rear, there is a south-facing
courtyard garden that can be
accessed via the auditorium and
cafeteria; here a few mature trees
have been preserved.

142
A A

A A
2

1 2 1 4
B B B B

3 2 3

3 4 5

6 A 5 A

A A

0 5 10m

0 15 30ft

2 2

2 2

2 2 1
7
2 2

5 8 1 3 3

4 4

6 5

33.01 33.02 33.03 3.04


Ground Floor Plan Second Floor Plan Section AA Section BB
1:500 1:500 1:500 1:500
1 Megastore 1 Office 1 Lift 1 Lift
2 Offices access 2 WC 2 Office 2 Office
3 Cafeteria 3 Stair 3 Megastore 3 Megastore
4 Auditorium 4 Lift 4 Training rooms 4 Technical areas
5 WC 5 Garden 5 WC 5 Car parking
6 Garden 6 Car parking
7 Garden
8 Stair

143
33 Barbosa & Guimares Vodafone Building Porto, Portugal

33.05
Construction Section
1:50
1 White concrete
2 Concrete curb
3 Adjustment /
19 settlement
20 4 Concrete lintel
21
5 Concrete wall
27 6 Brick wall
31 7 Plastering
31 32 8 Prefabricated boiler
9 PVC piping
11 10 Bituminous layer
18 28 33 11 Geotextile
29 30 12 Outside windows
13 Grabs
14 Metal structure
15 Plasterboard
35 16 Outside door
34
26 17 Projected gypsum
28 1 8 Wire-mesh
reinforcement screed
36
1 9 Metal sheet
20 Ip wood structure
21 Ip slatted wood
12 22 Calcium sulphate
13 module
23 Technical floor
14 24 Wood shavings
module
25 Carpet
28
26 False cooled ceiling
37 27 White concrete
paving
28 Thermal insulation
26 29 Bituminous paint
30 Shape layer
15 31 Concrete wall
44
14 32 Grid
23 33 Geberit drain
25 34 Acoustic layer
23 24 45 35 Grid
10 36 Air gap
28 47 46 37 Concrete
3 38 Concrete ceiling
39 Light concrete slab
40 Wire-mesh
reinforcement
41 PVC layer
15 42 Delta drain
43 Earth
16 44 100 x 10 mm (3 9/10
15 x 2/5 inch) Cor-ten steel
2 1 48 27 45 Polyester layer
10 18 46 Drainage layer
11 3
47 Bituminous paint
3 3 49 48 Marble
38 49 Structural slab
22 6
5 8
17 5 17 5
7 23 8
18
10

9 9
39 40 42
41

9 43 9

144
33.06 33.08
Skylight Section Skylight Section
10 1:5 Detail
6 1 Concrete slab 1:5
2 Earth 1 Concrete slab
3 Grass 2 Earth
4 White concrete 3 Grass
5 4-4-12-6 mm 4 White concrete
(1/5-1/5-1/2-3/10 inch) 5 4-4-12-6 mm
glass (1/5-1/5-1/2-3/10 inch)
6 Steel bracket to glass
paint 6 Steel bracket to
4 7 Metal bushing paint
8 15 x 15 mm (6/10 x 7 Metal bushing
6/10 inch) tubular steel 8 15 x 15 mm (6/10 x
to paint 6/10 inch) tubular steel
9 Plasterboard to paint
10 Structural silicone 9 Plasterboard
5 10 Structural silicone
33.07
Outdoor Window
Section
1:10
1 White concrete
2 Insulation
3 Rubber seal
4 Glass support
9 5 Interim profile
6 Silicone mastic
7 Withdrawal
8 8 Steel bar
7 9 Tremo layer
10 Aluminium profile
3 11 Interior glass joint
12 Double glazing
13 Glass board
2 14 LED ruler
15 Grabs
16 Air gap
17 Plasterboard
18 Thermal and
acoustic insulation
1 19 Steel structure

6
10

3 4
8
2
6

5 9

12

5
11109
4 8
14
13 7 6
17 7
15

18

16 19 3 1

145
34 1
Becker Architekten

Hydroelectric Power Station


Kempten, Germany

Client
Allguer berlandwerk GmbH (AW),
Kempten

Project Team
Michael Becker, Bernhard Kast,
Franz G. Schroeck

Structural Engineers
RMD Consult, Konstruktionsgruppe
Bauen

Main Contractor
Xaver Lutzenberger Co.

Many influences provided the


inspiration for this power stations
appearance, each of them carefully
melded into a single, dynamic
structure. Essentially a reinforced-
concrete tunnel 100 metres (328 feet)
long by 23 metres (75 feet) wide, its
sculpted form, inspired by the motion
of the river and local rock formations,
twists and flows in homage to the
forces it seeks to utilize.
Providing power for 3000 homes,
it replaces a previous power station
from the 1950s. The form of its
1 The fluid forms of contrasting orthogonal walls are strengthened
external shell creates a harmonious the power stations backdrop to the with ribs. The effect is
dialogue between a group of adjacent structure recall the organic water tunnel. reminiscent of a
action of water erosion 3 The surface of the cathedral.
nineteenth-century industrial on river rocks. upper parts has a 5 The board-marked
buildings, the hills beyond and the 2 The historic rough grit texture that lower areas are
buildings adjacent to catches the light. supported by rhythmic
river itself. This skin, mounted on the facility provide a 4 Within the tunnel the cast arches.
sliding bearings to compensate for
2 4
movement, is constructed from pale
spray-coated concrete; the soft
surface and the exposed, fine-gravel
aggregate within exude a soft
luminosity. In contrast, the interior is
constructed from raw board-marked
concrete reinforced with lateral ribs
this more basic language is well suited
to the generation process.
Water is channelled into a holding
basin, then downwards through the
turbines, and finally back into the
River Iller. Conserving the rivers
ecology and contributing to the local
area were important to the evolution
of the design. The power station 3 5
incorporates a fish ladder to aid
migration, a cycle path, and measures
to minimize noise. At night it is
dramatically lit.

146
B

15 6

8
4 5 11

12
A A 7 A A
10

3
2 13

14
1 16

0 5 10m B

0 15 30ft

34.01
Plan
1:500
1 Congestion
defence bar
2 Protective flaps
3 Military crown
4 Computer cleaning
4 5 Cable bar
6 Former weaving
2 house
12 7 Incoming water
9 3 8 Dam boards
9 Gallery
11 10 Machine room
5
11 Generators
12 Transformer room
1 6
10 13 Dam boards
8 9 14 Exiting water
15 River wall
13 16 Fish ladder
7

34.02 34.03
Section AA Section BB
1:500 1:500
1 Incoming water 1 Former weaving
2 Crane rail house
3 Gallery 2 Crane rail
4 Machine room 3 Gallery
5 Generators 4 Machine room
6 Turbines 5 Generators
7 Suction hose 6 Turbines
8 Filter rakes 7 Suction hose
1
9 Dam boards 8 Fish ladder
10 Cable cellar
11 Transformer room
12 River wall
13 Water exit

2
3
5

6 6

8
7 7

147
34 Becker Architekten Hydroelectric Power Station Kempten, Germany

34.04 34.05
CAD Model Section
Not to Scale 1:200
1 Right water inlet
8 2 Incoming spur
3 Maintenance
4 Bearings
5 Cover
6 Hydraulic press
7 7 Ribs
8 Ridge lighting

5 4

1 2

148
34.06 34.07
Vertical Section of 1 Vertical Section of
Ridge Detail Gap Building Element
1:10 Number 5: Roof
1 8 mm (3/10 inch) Ridge and Roof Point
diameter lightning 1:10
protection V2A roof 1 Two-part
ridge 2 polyurethane spray,
2 8 mm (3/10 inch) BASF Co. or
lightning protection 3 comparable with
V2A stainless steel gravel scattered on
3 Two-part surface
polyurethane spray, 2 10 mm (2/5 inch)
BASF Co. or stainless-steel panel
comparable with 3 5 mm (1/5 inch)
1 gravel scattered on stainless-steel panel
surface 4 150 x 5 mm (5 9/10
2 4 Thread rod x 1/5 inch) stainless-
3 5 40 mm (1 3/5 inch) steel panel
galvanized steel tube 7 5 6 5 150 x 25 mm (5 9/10
6 Galvanized pipe x 1 inch) stainless-
clip steel plate; 4 pieces
7 50 mm (2 inch) gap 6 100 x 16 mm (3 9/10
along roof ridge x 16 mm (3/5 inch) core
4 8 Suspension via dowel, Pfeifer Co.
thread rod 7 Lightweight
9 Galvanized pipe concrete LC 30/33
5 clip around luminaire
7 6 10 90 mm (3 1/2 inch)
Zumtobel Tubilux
8
9

10

34.09
Vertical Section of
Steel Shelf Locking /
1 1 Rail 1
1:10
4
1 Two-part
5 polyurethane spray,
BASF Co. or
comparable with
gravel scattered on
2 surface
6 2 200 x 200 mm
(7 9/10 x 7 9/10 inch)
steel shelf with 16 mm
3
2 (3/5 inch) blind hole

34.10
Vertical Section
of Steel Shelf for
Removable Units
1:10
1 Pfeiffer Co. 42 x
4.5 mm (1 13/20 x 1/6
inch) flat bar tie rod for
generators; 30 x 3.5
mm (1 2/10 x 1/10 inch)
flat bar tie rod for
transformer
2 100 mm (3 9/10 inch)
inner insulation,
3 Foamglas Co.
7
3 Two part
polyurethane-spray,
BASF Co. or
34.08 stainless-steel frame comparable with
1 gravel scattered on
Section of Lip 4 Elastic dividing strip
Turbine / Transformer 5 Round cord surface
Detail 6 Concrete C30/37
1:10 7 Inner insulation,
1 Two-part Foamglas Co.
polyurethane spray,
BASF Co. or 2
comparable with
gravel scattered on
surface
2 10 x 100 mm (4/10 x
3 9/10 inch) ESZ
bearing
3 5 mm (1/5 inch)

149
35 1 2
Bennetts Associates

Mint Hotel Tower of London


City of London, UK

Client
Mint Hotel Group

Project Team
Bennets Associates (Architects);
Gleeds (Project Manager); Jones Lang
LaSalle (Cost Consultant); Bennetts
Associates / Woods Bagot (Interior
Design); AECOM (Acoustic Consultant
& M&E Engineer); DP9 (Town Planning
Consultant); In Your Stride (Accessibility
Consultant); Frost Landscape
Construction (Living Wall Contractor)

Structural Engineer
Buro Happold

Main Contractor
Laing ORourke

Located on a tight urban site near


Tower Bridge in the City of London,
this hotel has been carefully inserted
into the medieval street pattern. The
hotel replaces a 1960s building that
failed to connect to the dense
contextual fabric. The new
development seeks to address this by 1 The confined island 2 The materials used environment. covers the bar area
site does not allow the reflect those found in 4 Giant concrete and allows views of the
building out to the original street line entire building to be buildings adjacent to columns and deep courtyard and green
and by populating the ground level viewed from any point. the site. beams support the wall above.
The scale and metre of 3 The green wall hotel over the entrance
with a variety of public uses. the building is brings a welcome area.
Although this is very much a city measured to its natural element to the 5 The glazed roof with
surroundings. intense urban its delicate lattice
building, nature has been brought
deep into the hotel. The courtyard 3 4
incorporates the largest green wall in
Europe, rising up from the ground
floor to the eleventh-floor terrace. This
space provides welcome calm in the
turbulent city.
There are 583 bedrooms in the
hotel, along with meeting rooms,
conference facilities, three bars and
an award-winning restaurant. The
main bulk of the building is scaled to
adjacent buildings. At the roof level,
the SkyLounge is treated as a discrete
lighter element that hovers above the
adjacent roofs, allowing spectacular
views over Londons skyline.
Throughout the project, a clear,
5
strong and disciplined material
language lends the hotel a powerful
image. This is particularly evident in
the powerful concrete columns and
beams of the entrance canopy.

150
A A

A A
2 4 2
2 2
2 2 5

2
1
4 1
3
5 6
B B B B

5
3

7 3

6
3
7 10
4 8
5

5
B B B B
2 7
3 4

A 2 A
1 1

0 10 20m
A A
0 30 60ft
35.01 35.02 35.03 35.04 35.05 35.06
First Floor Plan Ground Floor Plan SkyLounge Floor Typical Floor Plan 28 Section AA Section BB
1:1000 1:1000 Plan 1:1000 1:1000 1:1000
1 Break-out space 1 Car drop area 1:1000 1 Bedroom 1 SkyLounge 1 SkyLounge
2 Meeting room 2 Entrance 1 SkyLounge 2 Bathroom 2 Bedroom 2 Bedroom
3 Conference space 3 Car park entrance 2 Lift 3 Lift 3 Break-out space 3 Lounge bar
4 Lift 4 Bar 3 Bar 4 Stair 4 Car drop area 4 Reception / foyer
5 WC 5 Foyer 4 Courtyard 5 Courtyard 5 Restaurant 5 Car park
6 Restaurant 5 Terrace 6 Car park
7 Lift 6 WC 7 Reception / foyer
8 Lounge bar
9 WC
10 Reception desk

1 1

2 2

3
3
5 7 4 4
6 5

151
35 Bennetts Associates Mint Hotel Tower of London City of London, UK

13
12
3 5
11
4

10
9

35.07 fixed behind stone by 3 mm (1/10 inch) 8 89 mm (3 1/2 inch) inch) marine ply. Edges 12 15 mm (3/5 inch)
Horizontal Section panels galvanized steel angle thick prefabricated of ply full sealed with Gyproc Sound Bloc
Wall Detail 3 60 mm (2 2/5 inch) top and bottom Panablock walls EPDM with Tyvec board, fully silicone
1:20 Kooltherm thermal 6 180 mm (7 1/10 comprising rigid vapour barrier over sealed
1 Natural stone (Jura, insulation boards with inch) prefabricated insulation with 18 mm 10 50 x 12 mm (2 x 1/2 13 Powerlon Vapour
cross cut, bed 11), vapour barrier, bonded structural concrete (7/10 inch) moisture- inch) marine ply Barrier
panels bonded / to back of twin-wall system resistant MDF bonded battens fixed to
pinned to prefabricated cladding between rooms with both sides, fixed to backboard overlapped
prefabricated cladding panel. All joints foil nominal 3 mm (1/10 structural frame on with EPDM and fully
panel. Thickness: 40 taped inch) spray-plaster three sides with sealed around edges
mm (1 3/5 inch) to 140 4 Backing rod and finish on both sides proprietary channel 11 100 mm (3 9/10
mm (5 1/2 inch) mastic seal 7 12.5 mm (1/2 inch) system inch) Rocksilk
2 Vertical silver- 5 90 mm (3 1/2 inch) plasterboard internal 9 VM zinc clip-on RainScreen slab
anodized facade thick firestop / lining fixed to panels on 25 mm (1 insulation fitted
drainage channel with acoustic insulation at proprietary framing inch) carrier system between ply and
removable cover panel slab level, contained behind fixed to 12 mm (1/2 Sound Bloc

35.08 thick Kooltherm


Horizontal Section thermal insulation
Wall / Window Detail boards with vapour
1:20 barrier, bonded to
1 18 mm (7/10 inch) back of prefabricated
pre-finished MDF cladding panel. All
window board fixed to joints foil taped
softwood battens 7 Cavity closer and
9 behind sound barrier
2 12.5 mm (1/2 inch) 8 3 mm (1/10 inch)
plasterboard lining full-height galvanized
forming internal steel angle
window head / jambs 9 180 mm (7 1/10
to fixed proprietary inch) prefabricated
framing behind structural concrete
3 Coloured precast twin-wall system
1 2 concrete spandrel as between rooms with
part of prefabricated nominal 3 mm (1/10
cladding panel with inch) spray-plaster
8 formed gutter to top finish on both sides
7 side and compression 10 Coloured precast
seals between concrete vertical fin as
6 prefabricated frames part of prefabricated
4 PPC black cladding panel
aluminium bar with
mastic seal on both
5 sides
4
5 Prefabricated
Kawneer AA100 fully
sealed system with
integral opening vent,
full-height low-
emissivity double SSG
3 glazing unit comprising
9.5 mm (2/5 inch)
10 laminated inner and 3
mm (1/5 inch)
heat-soaked outer with
black warm edge
spacers
6 60 mm (2 2/5 inch)

152
35.09
Vertical Wall / Floor
Section Detail
1:5
11 10 1 18 mm (7/10 inch)
pre-finished MDF
window board fixed to
softwood battens
behind
2 Floor finish: carpet
on top of acoustic
underlay and latex
leveller
3 180 mm (7 1/10
inch) concrete floor
slab (50 mm [2 inch]
prefabricated slab with
130 mm [5 1/10 inch]
1 structural topping),
3 mm (1/10 inch)
nominal spray plaster
to ceiling
4 12.5 mm (1/2 inch)
plasterboard lining
forming internal
13 window head / jambs
6 to fixed proprietary
framing behind
5 Prefabricated
cladding panel
2 5 structural support.
Fixing resin anchored
to concrete slab
6 100 mm (3 9/10
inch) high extruded
3 15 8 conduit skirting
7 Prefabricated
cladding panel
structural restraint
fixed to cast-in Halfen
channel
8 Coloured precast
concrete spandrel as
part of prefabricated
cladding panel with
14 formed gutter to top
side and compression
seals between
prefabricated frames
7 9 9 PPC black
aluminium bar with
mastic seal on both
sides
10 Natural stone (Jura,
cross cut, bed 11),
4 panels bonded /
pinned to
prefabricated cladding
panel. Thickness:
40 mm (1 3/5 inch) to
140 mm (5 1/2 inch)
11 Vertical silver-
anodized facade
drainage channel with
removable cover panel
12 fixed behind stone
panels
12 Prefabricated
Kawneer AA100 fully
sealed system with
integral opening vent,
full-height low-
emissivity double SSG
glazing unit comprising
9.5 mm (2/5 inch)
laminated inner and
6 mm (1/5 inch)
heat-soaked outer with
black warm-edge
spacers
13 60 mm (2 2/5 inch)
thick Kooltherm
thermal insulation
boards with vapour
barrier, bonded to
back of prefabricated
cladding panel. All
joints foil taped
14 Compressive joint /
mastic seal
15 90 mm (3 1/2 inch)
thick firestop /
acoustic insulation at
slab level, contained
by 3 mm (1/10 inch)
galvanized steel angle
top and bottom

153
36 1
Claus en Kaan Architecten

Crematorium Heimolen
Sint-Niklaas, Belgium

Client
Intercommunale Westlede
Sint-Niklaas, Belgium

Project Team
Kees Kaan, Vincent Panhuysen,
Hannes Ochmann, Luuk Stoltenborg,
Yaron Tam, Hagar Zur

Structural Engineer
Pieters Bouwtechniek

Main Contractor
Roegiers 2

The brief for this project called for a


reception building and crematorium
to be located within an existing
cemetery. The two parts of the
programme are separated into two
discrete structures for environmental
and practical reasons. A common
language links the two buildings, as
it was considered important to the
bereaved families for the ceremony
to have at least a symbolic connection
with the cremation. The reception
building is situated in the southwest
of the cemetery, with the smaller
crematorium in the northeast.
Between the two is a small lake.
The horizontal and linear reception
building has a large overhanging roof 1 At the front of the 2 The facade of the 3 The cast concrete 4 Within the reception
(100 x 40 metres, 328 x 131 feet) that reception building a crematorium block is panels are recessed in building, cast concrete
large sheltered area is composed of a grid of steps. As the sun benches provide a
extends beyond the walls to form a sliced into the corner. 306 square concrete moves across their place for rest and
generous canopy. Beneath this shelter It provides a space for panels. They are either surface, shadows reflection. Illumination
families and friends to solid, or have glass enhance the is provided by top
mourners can gather and funeral gather before and after centres of three monumental quality of lights.
corteges can arrive. The invisible ceremonies. different sizes. the structure.
structural support for the canopy
3 4
gives it a quality of easy elegance.
Within is an austere anteroom that
looks out across the lake. From here
mourners can move to one of the two
chapels, simple non-religious spaces
in which the services take place. In the
main space, which can hold up to 280
people, the mourners are invited to
contemplate a wall of marble. There
are no windows; light enters via a row
of large circular roof lights.
The crematorium is a nine metre
(29 12 foot) high block; its walls are
formed from square, cream-coloured
concrete panels. These have a coffer
pattern of reducing recessed squares,
in the centre of which many have
small glass windows of various sizes.
The steel furnaces inside are
accessible to the public and are
presented as a dignified mechanism
for the process of cremation.

154
36.01
Site Plan
1:10000
1 Crematorium
2 Reception building
C 1
36.02
Reception Building
Ground Floor Plan
1:500
1 Cafeteria
2 Kitchen supply C 2
room
3 Kitchen
4 Hall personnel
5 Guests hall
6 Dividable dining
room
7 Guidance
8 Entrance hall 11
9 Family room
10 Auditorium B
11 Car port
12 Entrance
13 Entrance area
9 1 2 3 4 5 6
B
8 7
A A A A
10 10

9 B

9
4 5

12
1 2 3

8
12

3 4
6 6 6 7

2 1

13
36.03 36.04 36.05
Crematorium Ground Crematorium Section Crematorium Section
Floor Plan AA BB
1:500 1:500 1:500
1 Family room 1 Family room 1 WC
2 Undertaker 2 Expedition 2 Expedition
3 4 5 3 WC 3 Car port 3 Furnaces
2 4 Cooling 4 Double-height 4 Filter room
5 Guidance family room
6 Transformers / gas 5 Filter room
7 Car port
8 Expedition
9 Furnaces
1

0 5 10m 36.06
Reception Building
Section CC
0 15 30ft C 1:500
1 Entrance area
2 Entrance hall
3 Auditorium

1 2 3

155
36 Claus en Kaan Architecten Crematorium Heimolen Sint-Niklaas, Belgium

1 1

36.07 36.08
Crematorium Detail, Crematorium Detail,
Plan Sections
1:10 1:10
1 Precast concrete 1 Precast concrete
panel panel
2 Glass

156
1

4 2 3 2
1 2 3 4

5 9
6
8

7
7
6
5 8

10

11

36.09 36.10
Reception Building Reception Building
Detail, Section Detail, Section
1:10 1:10
1 Glass 1 Brick
2 Concrete 2 Rockwool insulation
3 Rockwool insulation 3 Concrete
4 3 mm (1/10 inch) 4 Plasterboard
muffled folded steel 5 Insulation
plate 6 Paving slab
5 Grill 7 Raised floor
6 Insulation support
7 Steel deck 8 Insulation
8 Screed 9 Drip tray
9 Parquet floor
10 Concrete slab
11 Foundations

157
37 1
Heikkinen-Komonen Architects

Hmeenlinna Provincial Archive


Hmeenlinna, Finland

Client
Senate Properties

Project Team
Mikko Heikkinen and Markku
Komonen, Markku Puumala

Structural Engineer
Contria Oy

Main Contractor
Peab Oy

Despite its remote location 100


kilometres (60 miles) north of Helsinki,
the city of Hmeenlinna has a rich
history and a large archive of
documents that record events dating
back to the sixteenth century.
A building that contains the
collective history of a place and its
people can never be just a store. It
must also be a place that holds
significance for the city. The striking
design seeks to make the archive
itself the focus of the architectural
composition. The building contains
three parts: the treasury where the
documents are stored; offices and
1 The graphic facade the brown service importance of words in 5 The graphic images
workshops for staff; and an area for hangs above the glass block behind give a defining the meaning are also present on the
the public to come and view the lower storey like a civic quality to the of things. interior of the archive.
curtain. The letters building, appropriate 4 The cladding of the
contents of the archive. give glimpses of the to its function. rear block is linear,
The lower storey is a transparent treasures within. 3 The letters form a giving the surface the
2 The solidity of the pattern across the appearance of wood
box containing, in island-like areas, archive block and of surface that recall the marquetry.
study rooms, an auditorium, a library,
2 4
a cafeteria and an exhibition space.
Above is an enclosed three-storey
concrete box. Its surface is covered
inside and out with typographic
patterns designed by the artist Aimo
Katajamki. The letters used are taken
from documents in the collection. This
heavy treasure chest floats effortlessly,
in defiance of its obvious weight. The
offices and workshops at the rear are
covered with brown aluminum plates.
Between the two parts there is a
top-lit canyon.

3 5

158
A

37.01
Upper Floor Plan
1:500
A 1 Archive
2 Offices

37.02
Ground Floor Plan
1:500
1 Lobby
4 5 3 2 Information desk
6 5 3 Exhibition space
4 Library
5 Desks for
1 researchers
6 Lecture hall
7 Microfilms
8 Workshops
7 2

8
A

0 5 10m

0 15 30ft
37.03
Section AA
1:500
1 Archive
2 Office
3 Library

2 1

2 1

2 1

159
37 Heikkinen-Komonen Architects Hmeenlinna Provincial Archive Hmeenlinna, Finland

37.04
Concept Diagram
Not to Scale
1 Offices
2 Void
3 Archive
4 Public spaces

160
1

2
5

1 2 3
4

7 6

37.05 37.06
Vertical Wall Section Horizontal Wall
1:20 Section
1 Plastic-covered 1:20
sheet metal 1 90 mm (3 1/2 inch)
2 Bitumen roofing felt concrete outer shell
3 Expanded-clay 2 180 mm (3 1/2 inch)
aggregate insulation insulation
4 Expanded 3 200 mm (7 9/10 inch)
polystyrene insulation load-bearing inner
5 180 mm (7 1/10 inch) concrete shell
insulation 4 In-situ concrete
6 90 mm (3 1/2 inch) 5 Corner element
concrete outer shell
7 200 mm (7 9/10 inch)
load-bearing inner
concrete shell)

161
38 1
Hohensinn Architektur

Hotel am Domplatz
Linz, Austria

Client
Stiftung St. Severin, Linz

Project Management
Erich Ganster (Hotel), Helmut Lanz
(Houses 36 and 38), Karlheinz Boiger
(Design)

Project Team
Pair Dicke, Thomas Klietmann, Ognjen
Persoglio, Klemens Mitheis, Mario
Mayrl, Franz Jelisitz

Structural Engineer
Peter Pawel, Praher & Schuster ZT
GmbH

Main Contractor
Hohensinn Architektur

Since the completion of the neo-


Gothic cathedral in Linz in 1924, the
surrounding area had never been
developed as intended. It had been
proposed to remove the buildings
around the cathedral to create a park
setting. This did not happen and the
area was left unresolved.
A new plan for the square has
1 The hotel is sited the cathedral has a bathrooms increase the rooms. The
resulted in the construction of a hotel parallel to the staggered rhythm of the penetration of light buildings circulation is
and the revitalization of two existing cathedral, establishing syncopated openings. into the space. Outside arranged around this
a new boundary for the The glazing reflects the cathedral is a dramatic space.
Baroque buildings on the southwest urban space around. intricate Gothic detail. constant presence.
side. The square has been Beneath the paving is 3 The rooms are bright 4 A bright atrium rises
a large car park. and generous; the through the building,
reconceived as space of possibilities; 2 The facade facing glazed walls of the linking the reception to
the paving pattern is laid so as not to
2 4
allow any directional influence to
emerge. Beneath is a large
underground car park.
The two historic houses have been
restored to their original condition and
now contain long-stay apartments and
a restaurant. The clear intention of the
new hotel is to be a confident element
in the composition of the Domplatz,
and this is evident in its rigorous
orthogonal concrete frame. The large
openings give the structure a
transparency that contrasts with the
solidity of its context.
The hotel is composed of two
perforated concrete blocks folded, 3
with a simple cranked articulation,
around a long funnel-like atrium. The
internal room circulation is accessed
from the top-lit atrium, negating the
need for internal corridors. Guest
rooms are bright and spacious, with
full-height glass walls that give views
of the cathedral and immediate
surroundings.

162
A A

A A

38.01
Site Plan
1:5000

4 6

5 5
1

2 4

6 3 3

2
3
2
A A
1

A A

38.02 0 5 10m 38.03


Ground Floor Plan Upper Floor Plan
1:500 1:500
1 Lounge 0 15 30ft 1 Bedroom
2 Lifts 2 Bathroom
3 WC 3 Stair
4 Reception 4 Lift
5 Restaurant 5 Atrium
6 Stair 6 Suite
7 Kitchen

38.04
Section AA
1:500
1 Stair
2 Lift
3 Balcony with
bedroom access 2 1
4 Car park 3

163
38 Hohensinn Architektur Hotel am Domplatz Linz, Austria

38.05
Attic Section
1:10

Roof Construction
1 1 5 mm (1/5 inch)
2 gravel
3
2 0.5 mm (1/10
inch) protective
4 fleece
3 0.2 mm (1/50 inch)
5 PVC insulation
4 On average 8 mm
(3/10 inch) EPS
6 insulation
5 12 mm (1/2 inch)
EPS W25 insulation
7 6 0.01 mm (1/100 inch)
vapour barrier
7 25 mm (1 inch) STB
blanket
8 Concrete slab
9 180.5 mm (7 3/10
inch) suspended
8 ceiling with skim
coating
10 Blind
11 Glass
12 Window frame
13 Insulation

Floor 00
4 10 mm (2/5 inch)
1
wood parquet floor
15 70 mm (2 4/5 inch)
heating screed
16 Foil
17 30 mm (1 1/5 inch)
9 10 TDPS
18 70 mm (2 4/5 inch)
packing
19 250 mm (9 4/5 inch)
concrete slab
20 Concrete slab
11
Square Construction
1 420 x 420 x 140
2
mm (16 1/2 x 16 1/2 x 5
1/2 inch) concrete
paving
22 40 mm (1 3/5 inch)
gravel bed
12 23 200 mm (7 9/10 inch)
Mech. support 0 / 32
24 200 300 mm (7
9/10 11 4/5 inch) Case
Frost

13

14
15
20 21
16
17

18

22
19
23
24

164
38.06
Bedroom Section
1:10
1 Wood parquet floor
2 Sealing
3 70 mm (2 4/5 inch)
2 1 heated screed
3 4 Foil
5 30 mm (1 1/5 inch)
4 TDPS
5 6 Packing
7 250 mm (9 4/5 inch)
6
concrete slab
8 Insulation
9 Suspended ceiling
10 Blind
1
1 Glass
7

9 10

11

165
39 1
PleskowRael Architecture

Santa Monica Boulevard Transit


Parkway Wall
Los Angeles, USA

Client 2
City of Los Angeles

Project Team
Tony Pleskow, David Kim

Structural Engineer
Bureau of Engineering, City of
Los Angeles

Main Contractor
Excel Paving Corporation

Seeking to redefine a busy urban


area characterized by its transport
infrastructure, this project was
designed to accommodate the
changes in level between two sections
of highway and their surroundings.
The retaining wall structure is
composed of six independent
freestanding concrete walls of
different heights that are placed along
a very narrow footprint. These six
walls slide past each other in a shifting
configuration of layered planes.
Between the planes are ramps and
stairs that connect the levels.
1 Seen from above, 2 Layered plates, like 3 Between the walls, 5 The intense
Formed from dark sand-coloured the road makes a the scales of a giant broad stairways Californian sunshine
concrete, the stratified walls make brutal slice through the snake, create a connect the levels. describes every edge
area. The new retaining fractured pattern of 4 The upper parts of with sharp shadows.
reference to the active seismology of walls seek to reconnect shadows across the the walls feature
the area. Along the length of the two neighbourhoods surfaces of the horizontal observation
that the infrastructure retaining walls. slots.
assembly, the walls form an arched has separated.
cliff, resembling a giant slice of the
3 4
earth that has been forced up by
geological forces. The plane of each
wall is patterned with relief panels of
tilted planes, which appear like the
stratified layers of a rock face. The
edges of the panels catch the
sunlight, casting shadows along their
margins. At night, spotlights and the
headlights of passing vehicles
illuminate and animate the walls. Earth
mounds, combined with confident
planting, soften the edges. This
engineering structure both surprises
and delights, achieving a successful
piece of urban placemaking.
5

166
39.01 39.02
Wall Plan Ramp Plan
1:2000 1:500
1 Concrete wall
2 Ramp 1

39.03
Stair Plan
1:500
1 Concrete wall
2 Stair

1

2 2

0 20 40m 39.04 39.05 39.06


Ramp Section Stair Section Wall Section
1:500 1:500 1:500
0 60 120ft 1 Concrete wall 1 Concrete wall 1 Concrete wall
2 Ramp 2 Ramp

2
1

1 2

167
39 PleskowRael Architecture Santa Monica Boulevard Transit Los Angeles, USA
Parkway Wall

39.07 39.08
Ramp Section Bus Stop Section
1:20 1:20
1 Pedestrian light 1 Concrete wall
pole 2 Concrete expansion
2 Concrete guard rail joint
3 38 mm (1 1/2 inch) 3 Light fitting
steel pipe handrail 4 Steel bench
4 Concrete expansion support
joint 5 Concrete bench
5 Concrete ramp 6 Drain
6 Concrete wall
7 Ramped earth
8 Void

4 5

5
6 4

7 8 8

168
1

169
40 1
Rafael de La-Hoz Arquitectos

Torres de Hrcules
Los Barrios, Cdiz, Spain

Client
Valcruz

Architect
Rafael de La-Hoz Castanys

Project Team
Jess Romn, Peter Germann,
Markus Lassan, Alex Cafcalas, Ulrik
Weinert, Ivn Ucrs, ngel Roln,
Margarita Snchez, Nicolas Andr,
Ivonne de Souza, Paola Merani

Quantity Surveyor
Rafael Vegas

Structural Engineer
Inepro S.L. and NB 35

Electrical Engineer
IG Ingeniera y Gestin and rculo
Ingenerios

Main Contractor
Construcciones Snchez
Domnguez-Sando

These two slender white office towers,


linked by a glazed block, rise from a
1 Cast in a ring around 3 Looking across one openness and light.
shallow pool at their base to a height each storey of the of the glazed linking 4 At the top of each
of 126 metres (413 feet). Dominating concrete facade is the bridges, the landscape tower is an open roof
motto Non Plus Ultra. spreads out on either terrace, surrounded by
the surrounding landscape, they are 2 The two slender side. The absence of the continuation of the
the tallest structures in Andalusia. towers are linked by handrails or glazing towers structural
delicate glazed bridges bars accentuates the screen wall.
The structural outer screen of each on each storey. impression of
tower is a pierced white concrete wall
2 3
400 mm (15 34 inch) thick. In addition
to providing the main support for the
floor slabs in combination with the
service core, the wall also act as a
solar screen and provides thermal
mass. Each storey was cast in-situ
using a self-climbing, curved
formwork panel system. The pure
white concrete finish was achieved
after many tests to obtain the desired
colour and texture. A naturally
ventilated glazing wall is placed inside
this exterior wall.
In homage to the original Pillars of
Hercules that, according to legend,
stood nearby, giant filigree letterforms 4
around the towers spell out the Latin
motto Non Plus Ultra. This has a
double meaning: either nothing
beyond or perfection. The letters
were cast in special formwork made
from expanded polystyrene. This
fast-track construction method
allowed lower floors to be finished
while construction continued above.
Each of the twenty floors has a gross
area of 900 square metres (9,687
square feet).

170
A

40.01 40.02 40.03 40.04


Typical Floor Plan Section AA Section BB Section CC
1:1000 1:1000 1:1000 1:1000
A 1 Office 1 Office 1 Stair 1 Bridge
2 Stair 2 Lift 2 Lift 2 Lobby
3 Lift 3 Sky lobby 3 Roof terrace 3 Pool
4 WC 4 Roof terrace
5 Bridge 5 Lobby
1

2
B B 4 B B
3
3

C C 5 C C

3
3
4
2

A 0 10 20m

0 30 60ft

3
4
1
3
1 2
1

5
2
3

171
40 Rafael de La-Hoz Arquitectos Torres de Hrcules Los Barrios, Cdiz
Spain

40.05
Concrete Facade
Layout
1:500

172
40.06
Wall Detail
1:10
1 Concrete slab
2 Slope of cellular
concrete (slope = one
per cent)
3 20 mm (3/4 inch)
cement mortar bed
4 Bituminous primer
5 Double asphalt
layer
6 Geotextile
7 Fixing material
8 Paving
9 Plinth of
stainless-steel plate
10 Extra-clear 10 mm
(2/5 inch) laminated
glass railing, height
1100 mm (43 3/10 inch)
11 400 mm (15 3/4
inch) white concrete
beam
12 Stainless platen
stiffener
13 U-profile galvanized
steel to hold glass
railing
14 L-profile painted
galvanized steel
15 Raised floor
16 Floor support

10 12

15
14 13

11 9

8
7 6
5 4 16
3 2

173
41 1
Scott Brownrigg

Bodleian Book Storage Facility


South Marston, Swindon, UK

Client
Bodleian Library

Project Team
Richard McCarthy (Project Director);
Kelly Foster (Project Architect);
Stephanie Kom (Architect)

Structural Engineer
Peter Brett Associates

Main Contractor
Mace

This building has been built to solve


the problems caused by an ever-
increasing collection of books. The
Bodleian Library is one of the largest
in the world by number of books, and
its collections are currently expanding
at the rate of 5000 books every week.
A very simple utilitarian building has
here been made special through the
use of high quality materials and
attention to detail. The 11,700 square
metre (126,000 square foot) facility
provides a long-term solution for the 1 The wooden panels are set into a 4 The unrestricted
entrance facade has galvanized steel frame. open spaces of the
storage in optimum conditions of up the appearance of 3 The incised graphic interior provide a
to eight million volumes on 246 pages in a book, pattern that covers the working environment
pressed between the service facade is ideally suited to the
kilometres (153 miles) of shelving. The concrete covers. intended to represent preservation of the
facility has been designed to have a 2 The concrete- the many volumes collection.
insulated sandwich within.
life of 100 years. The modular design
will also allow the building to be 2 3
extended in the future.
Internally the building is divided into
four sealed sections. Each of these 12
metre (39 foot) high sections is
independently fire rated and isolated
from the other three. Their walls are
constructed from prefabricated
insulated concrete sandwich panels.
These panels give the building a high
thermal mass, which in turn helps to
regulate temperature and humidity.
Alongside the east facade of the
archive areas, a single-storey area
provides offices, storage, data and
IT support and staff spaces. The
exterior is clad in the same insulated
concrete panels as the storage 4
chamber. The surface of these panels
features a cast-in graphic pattern
representing the millions of books
within. A wall of timber cladding marks
the entrance facade.

174
A

41.01
Ground Floor
1:1000
A 1 Book storage
2 Entrance
3 Meeting room
4 WC
B B 1 B B 5 Office
6 Book sorting
7 Loading bay

7

6
1

4 3

2
A

41.02
A Section AA
1:1000
1 Book storage
0 10 20m
41.03
Section BB
0 30 60ft
1:500
1 Book storage
2 Book sorting
3 Loading bay

1 2 3

175
41 Scott Brownrigg Bodleian Book Storage Facility South Marston, Swindon, UK

41.04
Facade Pattern
1:50
Surface pattern is a
repeating panel of
dimensions 3025 mm
(119 in) high x 1480 mm
(58 in) wide. Setout
point is the base
centreline of each
panel with a 250 mm
(9 3/4) horizontal space
between the centre
joint and pattern and
also between pattern
repeats. Recess is a
20 mm wide x 20 mm
deep (3/4 x 3/4 in) alcove.

176
41.05 41.07
Head Window
1:20 1:10
1 1 Coping 1 Concrete
2 Concrete 2 Insulation
3 Concrete 3 Concrete
4 Structural frame 4 Steel support
6 5 Profiled metal 5 Glazing
decking 6 Pivot mechanism
5 6 Insulation

41.06
Foot
1:20 1 2 3
1 Rainwater down
pipe
2 Fixing for down
pipe
3 Concrete
2 3 4 4 Concrete
5 Concrete slab
6 Insulation
7 Sand blinding
8 Hardfill

1 3 4

177
42 1
SPASM Design Architects

Aon Insurance Headquarters


Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

Client
AON Corp.

Project Team
Sangeeta Merchant, Maithali Joshi,
Sanjay Parab, Sanjeev Panjabi

Structural Engineer
Pendharkar Associates Ltd

Main Contractor
Holtan (East Africa) Ltd

This building, designed as the


headquarters of an insurance
company, is located on the coast
of Tanzania in East Africa. It is
surrounded by a rich and fragrant
1 The entrance 2 The thick external 3 A water pool in the 4 The roof is
landscape of acacias, frangipanis facade is marked with walls have a defensive courtyard helps to supported on elegant
and areca palms. Protection of the a simple punched fortress-like quality, provide a cool steel columns allowing
opening. The and create a calm environment. The the glass wall below to
company archives necessitated the seemingly independent oasis within. Tall spaces are defined by wrap the around the
construction of three shutter-formed roof floats above, its vertical slot openings floor-to-ceiling glazing building.
sharp edge outlined allow glimpses of the sheltered beneath a
concrete cabinets. These structures against the sky. interior. deep soffit.
form the main enclosure, and views of
the garden are framed between them. 2 3
Under deep eaves the upper storey
is entirely glazed and encircles the
structure, detaching the solid podium
from the roof. Distant views across the
surrounding trees connect the building
to the landscape. The modulated light
is reflected into the interior working
spaces. Through the openings at this
level, fresh cool breezes penetrate the
building and reduce the energy loads.
Outside the meeting rooms are
shallow pools of water that provide 4

delicate reflections and gentle sounds.


The roof that overhangs the building
all around is a shallow pyramid that is
preserved at its edge as a blade-like
free-floating plane. A contemporary
interpretation of indigenous thatch
roofs, it shelters the building from the
heavy tropical rains that are common
in the area.
This is a building that affords its
occupants an acute awareness of the
changing environment around it,
creating a wonderful place in which
to work.

178
B B

12
0 5 10m

6
B B 0 15 30ft
7 2
7 3
4
9 10
10
8
5 11
5 9
8
A A A A
11 4

2 6 7 1
3
13 B B
1

B B

42.01 6 Large archive 42.02 4 Managing 9 Personal assistant


Ground Floor Plan 7 Executive area First Floor Plan directors office 10 Kitchen area
1:500 8 WC 1:500 5 Entertainment 11 WC
1 Main entrance 9 Kitchen area 1 Finance managers lounge
2 Waiting area 10 Staff area office 6 General managers
3 Double-height 11 Body of water 2 Finance office
space 12 AC plant department 7 Double-height
4 Reception desk 13 Store 3 Boardroom space
5 Meeting room 8 Waiting area

43.03
Section AA
1:200
1 Reception foyer
2 Waiting area
3 Meeting area
4 Entertainment
2 4 6
lounge
5 Store
6 Terrace
7 Body of water

44.04
5 1 3 Section BB
1:200
1 Double-height
7 reception foyer
2 Reception
3 Staff area
4 Large archive
5 General
managerss office
behind
6 Waiting area
7 Personal assistant
8 Boardroom

5 6 7 8

1 2 3 4

179
42 SPASM Design Architects Aon Insurance Headquarters Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

12

13

15
14

14 16 17

11

180
42.05 9 48 mm x 48 mm
Wall and Glazing (1 9/10 x 1 9/10 inch)
Section timber square member
1:20 fixed on the edge of
1 Mild steel L- angle the reinforced concrete
fixed onto the sill finished in clear
reinforced concrete epoxy matt polish
peripheral beam. The 10 Fair-faced concrete
wooden frames for the windowsill with a slope
glazing system will be to the outside
fixed on the underside 11 Nutec fibre cement
2 150 mm x 50 mm sheet 12 mm (1/2 inch)
(5 9/10 x 2 inch) top thick suspended
timber frame fixed to ceiling to the
the soffit of mild steel undersoffit of the first
L-angle with a GI or floor terrace (external)
equivalent flashing 12 Insulation under
3 48 mm x 150 mm the metal corrugated
(1 9/10 x 5 9/10 inch) sheet roof
vertical and top timber 13 Corrugated iron
frames (Afzelia / metal sheet laid and
1 Mkongo wood), to hold fixed on Z-purlins
12 mm (1/2 inch) fixed spaced at 1200 mm
glass (3 ft 11 2/10 inch) c/c
4 Vertical and with ridge and hip
horizontal timber stiles capping. SAFLOK-
of size 60 mm x 100 mm dark green colour
2 3 (2 4/10 x 3 9/10 inch) sheets
11 to the doors. Double 14 100 mm x 100 mm
rebated. Finish in clear (4 x 4 inch) waterproof
epoxy polish. To have membrane flashing /
a 10 mm thick flat strip aluminium flashing
beading on the inside 15 Mild steel metal
to hold the glass panel L-angle finished in
5 Clear laminated anti-rust hammered
glass panel 10 mm oil paint
(4/10 inch) thick for the 16 20 mm (8/10 inch)
doors / window thick, 600 mm (1 ft 11
shutters, held within a 6/10 inch) wide superior
60 mm thick timber grade marine plywood
frame on all sides sheet fixed onto the
6 150 mm x 35 mm underside of roof edge
(5 9/10 x 1 4/10 inch) of eaves
4 timber frame at the 17 Seasoned
bottom of the glazing hardwood brandering,
5 fixed onto the bottom finished in waterproof
rough ground paint, treated for
7 Rough ground with termite / borer
a GI flashing for the 18 Fair-faced concrete
bottom frame 23 mm wall
20 thick x 135 mm (9/10 x 19 Clear glass
5 3/10 inch). To be fixed 20 White wear-and-
onto the fair-faced wash paint
concrete sill. Finished 21 Polyurethane clear
in waterproof, varnish (matt)
termite- and borer
resistant paint
8 Tongue-and-groove
19 19 wooden boards 12 mm
(1/2 inch) thick (Afzelia /
Mkongo) finished in
clear epoxy matt polish
21 21

3
8 9
10 6 7

18

181
182
Educational
Buildings
4349

183
43 1
Aebi and Vincent

Schulheim Rossfeld Renovation


and Extension
Bern, Switzerland

Client
Stiftung Rossfeld, Schulungs und
Wohnheime, Bern

Project Team
Bernhard Aebi / Pascal Vincent

Structural Engineer
Weber & Broenimann AG, Bern

This renovation and extension of a


boarding school for disabled children
near Bern, Switzerland, has involved a
careful restoration of the original
1960s buildings clarity of form along
with the addition of a new pavilion.
The aim of the project was to increase
the amount of space available for
teaching and to make this space more
flexible. The building is E shaped, and
small classrooms are arranged along
a spine corridor with service spaces
in the three wings. Throughout the
building a simple austere palette of
materials has been utilized.
The building makes clever use of
its basement areas, which are flanked
1 The rhythmic vertical the column pattern use of natural light and
by open-stepped terraces that allow concrete fins that and the trees that bright reflective
light deep within. The lower walls line the buildings surround the site. surfaces.
perimeter shade the 3 A broad corridor 5 The classrooms have
are constructed from multiple thin floor-to-ceiling glazing runs along the spine of floor-to-ceiling glazing,
columns of fair-faced concrete. behind. the building. allowing views out
2 There is a clear 4 Interior circulation across the grounds.
Concrete fins in front of the floor-to- relationship between spaces made excellent
ceiling windows allow variable light
2 4
conditions and modulate the
transparency of the building.
The position of the new building
emphasizes the axial alignment of the
complex and additionally creates an
architectural tension with the bell
tower of the adjacent church.

3 5

184
A A A

8
6 9 9 6 6 1 1 1 1 3 2 2 2

8
A 7 A A
2 11 9 2 11 9 6
12 5 9 10 7 7 1 2 2
12
2 6
2
5 1
6 11
5 1
10
7
9 6 4 4 5 1 1 2 3 3 2 2 2
7 10

11 5
7
12 8 1 9 2 2 1 2 2
6
5 11
6 1
5 1 B B
B B
7
1

5
4 4 4 4 2 1 3 3 2 2 2 2
A A A
11 11
2 1 12 4 3 4 12 9 2 4 4 5 2

A A A

0 10 20m

0 30 60ft
43.01 43.02 43.03 43.04 43.05
Basement Ground Floor First Floor Section AA Section BB
1:1000 1:1000 1:1000 1:500 1:500
1 Office 1 Office 1 Office 1 Office 1 Classroom
2 Room 2 Room 2 Room 2 Room 2 Office
3 Kitchen 3 Kitchen 3 Kitchen / living 3 Kitchen / Living 3 Technical room
4 Therapy room 4 Therapy room room room 4 Corridor
5 Cleaning room 5 Classroom 4 Logopedics 4 Therapy room
6 Storage 6 Storage 5 Therapeutic bath 5 Storage
7 Technical room 7 Multipurpose 6 Shower 6 Corridor
8 Workshop Room 7 WC
9 WC 8 Entrance 8 Corridor
10 Corridor 9 WC 9 Lift
11 Lift 10 Corridor 10 Stair
12 Stair 11 Lift 11 Terrace
12 Stair

7 6 2 2 6 2 2 6 2

2 6 3 2 6 3 2 6 1

3 6 4 2 4 2

2 4 1

185
43 Aebi and Vincent Schulheim Rossfeld Renovation Bern, Switzerland
and Extension

43.06
Porch Connecting
Wing
1:20
1 Lino 5 mm (2 inch)
2 Underlay 70 mm
(27 1/2 inch)
3 Concrete 200 mm
(7 9/10 inch)
4 Insulation 100 mm
(3 9/10 inch)
5 Oiled Siberian larch
115 x 26 mm (451/5 x
101/5 inches)
6 Battens
7 Protective foil 1.3
mm (1/2 inch)
8 Plastic foil 1.8 mm
(7/10 inch)
9 PUR insulation
(aluminium-laminated)
100 mm (39 3/10 inch)
10 Vapour barrier 3.5
mm (1 2/5 inch)
11 Concrete between
180-240 mm (70 4/5
- 87 3/10 inches) 1%
slope + 20 mm (7 9/10
inch) deflection
12 Acoustic plaster
perforated ceiling
13 Drainage pipe 90
mm (35 2/5 inch) + 40
mm (15 4/5 inch)
13
insulation 0.5% slope

186
43.07
Concrete Detail
Section
1:20
1 Concrete slats
400 x 100 mm (39
3/10 x 1571/2 inches) 4
2 Concrete 5
3 Insulation
4 Extensive green 6
roof
5 Protective layer
6 Insulation
7 Window
8 Awning / sunscreen 2 3 2
9 Convector
10 Insulation

1
7
5

6 8
7
8 8
10

11
9
12

1
2
9
3
10
4

187
44 1
Atelier Bow-Wow

Four Boxes Gallery


Skive, Denmark

Client
Krabbesholm Hjskole

Project Team
Yoshiharu Tsukamoto, Momoyo
Kaijima, Takahiko Kurabayashi (Atelier
Bow-Wow), Naho Maki, Kazuaki
Horikake (University of Tsukuba
Kaijima Lab.)

Structural Engineer
Fritz Nielsen & J. Juul Christensen A/S

Main Contractor
Dan-Element A/S

This gallery is located in northern


Denmark, on a former farm property
that has been converted into an art
school. Its directly adjacent to a port
area, which is characterized by its
silos and warehouse buildings. On the
campus, there is a diverse collection
of buildings both traditional and
modernist, and in addition there are
some art pavilions. In contrast with the
existing structures, the gallery is built
entirely of pre-cast concrete panels.
This gives it a primitive, raw
1 From the road the 2 The entrance to the 3 The buildings 4 The interior of the 5 Simple details and a
appearance that reflects the nearby gallery presents an courtyard is via a composition of walls gallery has been made limited material palette
industrial buildings. austere private facade. cut-away corner, the and openings as simple as possible. produce exemplary
The windows at the end wall also has a references the features The proportional exhibition spaces.
The concrete panels, which are of upper levels provide large window that of vernacular relationship between
different heights, enclose a three- clear illumination frames the view architecture at different the interior and exterior
throughout the gallery. scales. spaces is clearly
storey volume placed between two . evident.
equally sized exterior grass
2 4
courtyards. The front courtyard leads
into the large ground-floor exhibition
space; this space is lit by diffused light
from clerestory windows located
along the lateral walls. All of the
interior surfaces have been kept clear,
without openings or interruptions,
allowing for easy display, light control
and spatial flexibility.
Above the gallery there are two
additional spaces, one is a second
gallery and the other is a workshop.
These spaces are stacked on top of
the main gallery and are reached by a
side staircase. The courtyards can
also be used as additional exhibition 3 5
areas. The buildings users are mainly
students engaging in all forms of
artistic experimentation and creation,
so the finishes have been designed to
accommodate such activities. The
schools alumni funded the building,
and the wider local community also
uses it as a social space.

188
44.01
Second Floor Plan
1:200
1 Artists workspace

44.02
First Floor Plan
1:200
1 Gallery 2

44.03
Ground Floor Plan
1:200
1
1 Gallery 1
2 Courtyard gallery 1
3 Courtyard gallery 2
4 WC
5 Storage and
machine room
A A A A
44.04
Section
1:200

A A A A

4
2 1 3

A A A A

0 5 10m

0 15 30ft

189
44 Atelier Bow-Wow Four Boxes Gallery Skive, Denmark

4
3

2
1
6
5
7

10

12
11
13 4

14

44.05 6 9/10 inch) 44.06


Section Detail 8 Roll curtain Plan Detail
1:20 9 Aluminium and 1:10
1 Double-layered felt wood sash 1 Plasterboard
roofing 10 Plasterboard 13 mm 12.5 mm (1/2 inch),
2 Insulation 250 (1/2 inch), paint finish paint finish RAL9003
350 mm (9 8/1013 8/10 RAL9003 signal white signal white
inch) with slope 1:40 11 Aluminium plate 2 Plywood 12.5 mm
3 Precast concrete 1 mm (1/24 inch), paint (1/2 inch), firring strips
215 mm (8 1/2 inch) finish RAL9003 signal 22 mm (7/8 inch)
4 Wood louvres 34 white 3 Precast concrete
98 mm (1 3/10 x 3 9/10 12 MDF 28 mm (1 1/10 panel 180 mm (7 inch)
inch) at 133 mm (5 1/4 inch) 4 Concrete sandwich
inch), paint finish 13 Polish-finish panel 480 mm (1 ft 6
RAL9003 signal white concrete 70 mm (2 3/4 9/10 inch)
5 Plasterboard 13 mm inch)
(1/2 inch), paint finish 14 Precast concrete
RAL9003 signal white panel 215 mm (8 1/2
6 Plywood 15 mm inch)
(3/5 inch), firring strips
22 mm (7/8 inch)
7 Concrete sandwich
panel 480 mm (1 ft

190
44.07
Section Detail
1:10
1 Plasterboard 13 mm
(1/2 inch), paint finish
RAL9003 signal white
2 Plywood 15 mm
(3/5 inch), firring strips
22 mm (7/8 inch)
3 Concrete sandwich
panel 480 mm (1 ft 6
9/10 inch)
4 Roll curtain
5 Aluminium and
wood sash
6 Polish-finish
concrete 70 mm (2 3/4
inch)
7 Precast concrete
panel 150 mm (5 9/10
inch)
8 Insulation 350 mm
(1 ft 1 4/5 inch)
3 2 1 9 Pebbles 150 mm
(5 9/10 inch)

5 6

191
45 1
Diener & Diener

Music House for Instrumental


Practise and Choral Rehearsal,
Benedictine Einsiedeln Abbey

Client
Benedictine Einsiedeln Abbey

Structural Engineer
Conzett, Bronzini, Gartmann

Main Contractor
Butti Bauunternehmung AG Pfffikon

The music house forms part of the


small educational campus of the
Benedictine Einsiedeln Abbey. The
abbey was originally founded in 934
and made up from buildings from
many periods: notably it has some
magnificent baroque structures.
Music is central to the educational
philosophy here and the central
location of the music house is
indicative of this.
Built on the site of the previous
music building from the 1930s, the
new larger structure anticipates a
possible future extension of the
schoolrooms in the eastern wing.
On the ground floor a large hall is
designed to be a hub for the school,
a place for exhibitions, meetings and
1 The new music 2 The rehearsal space space for students to 5 The rehearsal space,
chance encounters. This space, which school is positioned in is illuminated by a prepare for their with its high angled
is glazed with sliding doors on both front of the baroque large glazed opening performances. ceiling, is designed to
buildings of the abbey, in the north wall of 4 At night the provide an excellent
sides, opens onto the student its simple orthogonal the building. transparency of the acoustic performance.
courtyard, an area that in the winter form both in harmony 3 The top-lit half central section of the
and in contrast with landing of the internal building reveals the
becomes a skating rink. the existing structures. stair provides a quiet activities within.
A top-lit stair gives access to the
2 3
upper floor. Bridging over the hall
below, there are ten practise rooms
and beyond this a space for
performance and rehearsal. A large
window in the north wall of this space
opens out on the landscape. A pale
muted material language of white
concrete combined with larch
windows subtly rhymes with and
echoes the baroque surroundings.

4 5

192
A A
0 5 10m

0 15 30ft

A A
45.01 45.02
2 1 1 Ground Floor First Floor
1:200 1:200
1 External stair 1 External stair
2 Storage room 2 Rehearsal space
3 Entrance hall 3 Classroom
4 Hall 4 Corridor
5 Lift 5 Lift
2 6 Stair 6 Stair
2

45.03
5 Long Section AA
5 1:200
1 Rehearsal space
2 Corridor
3 Stair
4 Store
6 5 Entrance hall
6 6 Hall
7 Store

A A

A A

1 2 3

4 5 6

193
45 Diener & Diener Music House for Instrumental Einsiedeln, Switzerland
Practise and Choral Rehearsal,
Benedictine Einsiedeln Abbey

45.04
Stair Section
1:20
1 Oak
2 Insulation and
heating
3 Concrete ceiling
4 Foam glass
insulation
5 Concrete facade
6 Concrete stairs
7 Railing
8 Granolithic
concrete screed
9 Underfloor heating
10 Insulation

6 2

5 4 3

9
10

194
45.05
Roof / Gutter / Wall
Section
1 1:20
1 Precast concrete
element
2 Copper
3 Foam glass
4 Rainwater gutter
5 Foam glass
insulation
6 Window
2 7 Shutters
8 Railing
9 Oak floor
10 Heating
11 Insulation
12 Concrete ceiling
13 Drainage
14 Wooden grid
15 Air supply
3

9 14
10 13
11

12

15

195
46 1 1 The strong
sculptural forms of the
HCP new buildings are
evolutions of forms
found in the original
Indian Institute of Management campus. The
Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India architecture uses the
strong sunlight and
shadows to animate
Client the spaces.
2 The campus is
Indian Institute of Management composed of
interlinked open space
and shady cloisters.
Project Team The residential blocks
Principal Designers: Bimal Patel, are positioned near to
the teaching spaces.
Jayant Gunjaria, Gajanan Upadhyay 3 Open stretches of
Core Design Team: Brijesh Bhatha, water provide a
cooling element in the
Niki Shah, Samarth Maradia landscape. The plant
Project Managers: Viplav Shah, Amar forms in the pools are
referenced in the steel
Thakkar, Mahendra Patel panels that fill the
openings in the
concrete frame.
Structural Engineer
VMS Engineering and Design Services
Pvt. Ltd.

Built alongside the seminal campus of


the Indian Institute of Management,
Ahmedabad (IIMA) by Louis Khan, the
new campus is adjacent to the old
campus but separated by a busy road.
The development of this new 39-acre
site provides a range of new teaching
and residential facilities.
There is no direct visual link
between the two parts; however, the
new part is directly connected to the
old by a wide passageway under the
road. This passage houses an
exhibition about Khans work at IIMA.
Emerging into the new campus we
find it to be both familiar but also
different. Rather than copy the distinct
brick forms of Kahns campus, the
architects have made a subtle
translation of the forms and motifs
into new materials. The principal new
material is crisp white concrete. As in
Khans campus there is a central axis
from which the teaching areas and
accommodation have been arranged.
All of Khans language of circular
openings, steps and chamfered
corners can be found in the new
campus. This referencing has been
achieved with a clear sense of respect
for the original campus.
The teaching spaces are designed
to address the needs of the education
programme at IIMA. Around the
campus the architecture provides 2 3
many opportunities for students and
lecturers to engage with one another.
In several locations there are giant
steel screens based on plant motifs.
These graphic elements create a new
super scale within the complex that
succinctly expresses the monumental
yet human character of the buildings.

196
B D

B D

A 9A 9 7 6 A A
11
C 8
15

5 4 1 2 13 14 13 14 13 14 13 14 13 14 13
11 10

3 3
12

1
A 9A 9 6 9 A9 A
4 5 5 5 5 5
11
15

13 13
8 7 2 3 10 12 10 12 10 12 10 12 10 12 10
C B D
5 5 14 14 14 14 14

C B D

0 10 20m 46.01 46.02 46.03 46.04 46.05 46.06


First Floor Plan Ground Floor Plan Section AA Section BB Section CC Section DD
1:1000 1:1000 1:1000 1:1000 1:1000 1:1000
0 30 60ft 1 Entrance foyer 1 Entrance plaza 1 Terrace 1 Corridor 1 Corridor 1 Corridor
(below) 2 Entrance foyer and 2 Lower terrace 2 Seminar room 2 Research scholars 2 Courtyard
2 Syndicate room exhibition space 3 WC 3 AHU room 3 Working space 3 Lower terrace
3 Store 3 Bookstore 4 Electrical room 4 Classroom 4 Terrace 4 Terrace
4 Meeting room 4 Room 5 Store 5 Terrace 5 Upper terrace
5 Research scholars 5 Store 6 Room 6 Upper terrace 6 Lower terrace
6 Pantry 6 Electrical room 7 Verandah
7 Verandah 7 Exhibition space
8 Corridor 8 Working space
9 WC 9 WC
10 Faculty room 10 Courtyard
11 Faculty lounge 11 Corridor
12 Balcony 12 Seminar room
13 Courtyard 13 Faculty room
14 Classroom 14 AHU room
15 Lift 15 Lift

1 1 1
2 2 2
1 4 7
3 3 3 3
3 3 4 5 5 5 5 6 6 4 3 3

6 5
5 5 4
4
6 3
1 4
1 2 1
2 3 1 3 2 1

197
46 HCP Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India

46.07 46.08
Sectional Detail Sectional Detail
Through Corridor Through Corridor
and Courtyard 1 and Courtyard 2
1:10 1:10
1 Exposed reinforced 1 Polished cement
cement concrete flooring
surface 2 Screed
2 Groove 10 x 10 mm 3 Reinforced
(3/10 x 3/10 inch) concrete slab
3 China mosaic 4 Plain cement
flooring laid in slope concrete ratio 1:4:8
1:100 5 Rubble soling
4 Average 115 mm 6 Compact sand
(4 1/2 inch) thick brick filling
bat concrete with 7 Natural ground
waterproofing 8 Courtyard flooring
5 Exposed reinforced
concrete slab
6 Drip mould
1 7 Rainwater drain of
40 mm (1 1/2 inch)
2 depth with rainwater
channel in the floor
corridor
8 Polished cement
flooring
3 9 Screed
10 Reinforced
concrete slab

8
7
9

10

3
8

4 2

6 6

198
46.09 46.10
Sectional Detail Sectional Detail
Showing Concealed Showing Concealed
1 Rainwater Pipe From Rainwater Pipe From
Terrace 1 Terrace 2
1:10 1:10
1 Openable polyvinyl 1 Concealed
chloride grilled cover rainwater pipe 110 mm
for the rainwater pipe (4 3/10 inch) diameter
2 Concealed 2 Exposed reinforced
rainwater pipe 110 mm cement concrete
(4 3/10 inch) diameter surface
3 2 3 3 Exposed reinforced 3 Polished stone
cement concrete flooring
surface 4 Screed
4 Groove 10 x 10 mm 5 Reinforced cement
(3/10 x 3/10 inch) concrete slab of grade
5 China mosaic M20, with 8 mm (3/10
flooring laid in slope inch) diameter TOR
1:100 steel reinforcement at
6 Average 115 mm 200 mm (7 9/10 inch)
(4 1/2 inch) thick brick center
bat concrete with 6 Plain cement
water proofing concrete of ratio 1:4:8
7 Exposed reinforced 7 Rubble soling
concrete slab 8 Compacted sand
8 Polished stone filling
flooring 9 Natural ground
9 Screed 10 Rough stone finish
10 Reinforced cement for plinth protection
4 concrete slab of grade
M20, with 8 mm (3/10
inch) diameter TOR
steel reinforcement at
200 mm (7 9/10 inch)
centre
5

2 1 3

7
4

8
7
9

3 2 10
8

10
4

199
47 1
Toyo Ito & Associates Architects

Tama Art University Library


Hachioji, Tokyo, Japan

Client
Tama Art University

Project Team
Toyo Ito, Takeo Higashi, Hideyuki
Nakayama, Yoshitaka Ihara

Associate Architect
Kajima Design

Structural Engineer
Sasaki Structural Consultants

Main Contractor
Kajima Corporation

This new library is located on the


campus of an art university in the
suburbs of Tokyo. Driven by the idea
of a cave, the building is formed from
a series of gently curved intersecting
walls placed at different angles in a
loose grid. Giant arches piece these
walls. The continuously curved and
arched walls articulate the space into
square and triangle areas.
The construction is of in-situ
concrete formed around flanged steel
plate cores that are augmented with
1 The librarys open permanence and building has a tight 4 The ground floor 5 The ground floor
steel reinforcing rods positioned on arched form creates a solidity. skin. entrance undercroft is contains sinuous
either side. In effect this is a steel lively rhythm. Planting 2 The arches are 3 On the side of the an important new display cases for the
around the building expanded and building that faces to social space for the display of graphic
building with a concrete skin. The and the continuation of contracted across the the main road the wall university. Soft materials.
concrete was cast into wooden the ground contours facade. With the glass is cut flat to the spherical seats invite
into the building pushed flush to the campus boundary. students to sit and
shuttering that was precisely made in establish a sense of concrete surface the talk.
a factory. This allowed the walls to be
2 4
as thin as 200 mm (7 910 inch). The
arches spans vary from 1.8 to 16
metres (6 to 52 12 ft). The external
concrete walls on the north and
west sides of the building are curved,
as is the glass that is fitted flush
within them.
The ground floor of the building has
a sloping floor that blends with the
external landscape; it is designed to
be like a promenade, a place where
students can walk through the
building from one side to the other. It
can also serve as a gallery or lecture
space. The main library space is on
the first floor; here 100,000 books are 3 5
on display, while another 100,000
books are stored behind the glass
walls. 60,000 additional books are
stored in the basement. The whole
building sits on 24 rubber buffers and
27 sliding bearings, which allow the
building to move up to 500 mm (19 12
inches) horizontally in an earthquake.

200
A A A

3
A A 5 A
2 1
13
1
11

1 12
8
2 7 10
2
9
5
4 3 3
A A A
4

3
A A A

0 10 20m

0 30 60ft
47.01 47.02 47.03 47.04
Basement Plan Ground Floor Plan First Floor and Section AA
1:1000 1:1000 Mezzanine Plan 1:500
1 Seismic isolation 1 Arcade gallery 1:1000 1 Open stack and
pit 2 Cafe 1 Open stack and reading
2 Machine room 3 North entrance reading 2 Text
3 Valuable book 4 South entrance 2 Information desk 3 Closed stacks
stack 5 New arrival 3 Closed stacks 4 Cafe
4 Compact magazines 5 Arcade gallery
5 Lift 6 Lounge 6 Machine room
7 Locker 7 Seismic isolation
8 Information desk pad
9 Office 8 Valuable book
10 WC stack
11 Lift
12 Stair
13 Multimedia

1
2 3

4 5

8
6

201
47 Toyo Ito & Associates Architects Tama Art University Library Hachioji, Tokyo, Japan

47.05 47.06
Axonometric Detail Section
Not to Scale 1:50
1 Roof slab 1 Asphalt prepared
2 Arch steel and roofing
concrete frame 2 Insulation 25 mm
3 Slab (1 inch)
4 Arch steel and 3 Concrete panel
concrete frame 45 mm (1 8/10 inch)
1 5 Slab 4 Drainage slope 1:40
5 Flange (column) :
FB 28 x 65 mm (1 1/10
x 2 6/10 inch)
6 Steel plate 9 x 167
x 320 mm (4/10 x 6 6/10
inch x 1 ft)
7 High tension bolt
8 Flange (beam) FB
22 x 65 mm (9/10 x 2
6/10 inch)
9 Web (bottom of
column)
10 Reinforcement
11 Air conditioning
outlet
1
2 Carpet tile 500 x
500 mm (1 ft 7 7/10 x 1
2 ft 7 7/10 inch) 10 mm
(4/10 inch) thick
13 Raised access floor
14 Insulation 20 mm
(8/10 inch)
15 Void slab 300 mm
(11 8/10 inch)
16 Ceiling exposed
concrete
17 Hydrophobizing
agent finish
18 Exposed concrete
19 Hydrophobizing
agent finish
20 Hole 50 mm (2 inch)
@ 300 x @ 450 mm (11
8/10 x @ 1 ft 5 7/10 inch)
separator pitch
3 21 Web (beam)
22 Flange (beam) FB
22 x 65 (9/10 x 2 6/10
inch)
23 Hole 150 mm (5 9/10
inch) (concrete
connection)
24 Web (column)
25 Flange (column) FB
28 x 6 mm (1 1/10 x 2/10
inch)
26 Wire fabric hanger
27 Wire fabric on both
sides D6 @ 100 x 100
mm (3 9/10 x 3 9/10
inch)
28 Web at bottom of
4 column PL-40
29 Reinforcement D6
@100 x 100 mm (3 9/10
x 3 9/10 inch)
30 Base plate 36 x 460
x 460 mm (1 4/10 x 1 ft
6 1/10 x 1 ft 6 1/10 inch)
31 Anchor bolt 4-M36
32 Float glass 15 mm
(6 2/10 inch)
33 Anti-scratching film
34 Exposed concrete
100 mm (3 9/10 inch)
35 Toughening agent
finish
36 Seismic isolator
37 Steel mullion

202
4
1
2
3

12
11
13
9 14
15
10
8 5 16 17

6
7

21

23
20 26

22 27 19 18
24
37

25
33

32

34 35

28
29

30
31

36 36

203
48 1
LAN Architecture

Childrens Toy Library


Bonneuil sur Marne, France

Client
Bonneuil sur Marne Local Authority

Project Team
LAN Architecture

Structural Engineer
Cabinet MTC

This childrens toy library in Bonneuil


sur Marne is located within a large
1960s social housing complex. It
provides valuable social space for
both local children and their parents.
Created on a very small budget (the
original brief was for an internal refit),
the project carefully reuses and
interprets an existing structure.
The original building has been
completely wrapped by a new skin
formed from board-marked concrete.
Within these green-tinted walls the
architects have conjured a place of
security where children can play, as
well as a social area for adults.
The precise folding of a new origami
membrane around the existing
structure has made a protective shell
for the buildings new functions to
1 The severe the surrounding trees. the project. and large windows
inhabit. This strategy of covering the articulated facade that 2 The windows are 3 The upper roof gives the play area
building has provided spaces that are the building presents set flush with the walls, terrace is covered by a a welcoming
to the street gives few which creates a tight wooden deck. When atmosphere.
generous and surprising. At ground hints about the interior. sinuous skin. An the doors are folded
level there is a double-height atrium The concrete wall ambiguous atmosphere back the interior and
surface has a fine of both lightness and exterior become one.
space and on the upper level an open texture like the bark of heaviness pervades 4 Use of strong colour
decked play area that is accessed
2 3
from the toy library. Externally the
elevations provide little suggestion of
scale; the structure is neither
monumental nor is it insignificant.
The architects have used a strong
language of form and materiality to
create a subtle interplay between the
secluded safety of the interior and the
strong monolithic exterior. This
confident building suggests respect
and commands attention.

204
48.01 48.02
Ground Floor Plan First Floor Plan
1:200 1:200
1 Entrance 1 Rear
2 Storage room for 2 Playground
pushchairs 3 Terrace
3 Hall 4 Computer space
B A B A 4 Games space 5 Office
5 Corridor 6 Store
6 Store 7 Multi-purpose
7 WC room
8 WC


B A B A

7 6 5

7 5 6

8
8 1 4

B A B A

0 5m
B A B A
0 15ft

48.03 48.04
Section AA Section BB
1:200 1:200
1 Entrance 1 Terrace
2 Computer space 2 Playground
3 Corridor 3 Rear
1 2 3 4 Office 4 Multi-purpose
room
5 Games space
6 Corridor

4

1 2 3 4

5 6

205
48 LAN Architecture Childrens Toy Library Bonneuil sur Marne, France

3
4

1
5

4
2 6

48.05 48.06
Entrance Ramp Roof Detail
6 Detail 1:20
1:50 1 Zinc coping
1 Zinc coping 2 Glazing
5 2 Aluminium frame 3 Steel plate
3 Thermal and 4 Concrete
acoustic insulation: 5 False ceiling
13 mm (1/2 inch) 6 Glazing
plasterboard and rock
7 wool
7 4 Interior and exterior
laminated glass
5 Reinforced tinted
freestanding concrete
wall
6 Fixed plate glass
7 False ceiling
8 8 Decentred and
embedded high pintle
9 Steel door: folded
sheet joined on brace
crossbeams with
interior insulation
10 Ramp
9 11 Door frame
cladding in lacquered
aluminium
12 Gate hinge with
brake
13 Carpet

11

10
12
13

206
1
1
2
2
3

4 4

4 5

5
6
7 6
8

48.07 48.08
Wall and Floor Roof Detail
10 Section Detail 1:10
1:20 1 Zinc coping
1 Zinc coping 2 Steel profile
2 Self-compacting 3 Sealing membrane
11 reinforced dyed 4 Insulation
concrete structure 5 Gravel
3 Existing masonry 6 Concrete
4 Wood deck 7 Plaster
5 Battens
6 Waterproof film
7 Insulation
8 Sealing membrane
9 Insulation
10 Suspended ceiling
11 Two sheets
laminated glass 4 mm
(2/10 inch) with 16 mm
(6/10 inch) gap
12 12 Aluminium sheet
covering the perimeter
of the bay frame
13 Insulation
14 Waterproof film
15 Vapour barrier
16 Underfloor heating
13 17 Floating Screed
18 PVC Floor covering

18
14
17 16
15

207
49 1
Zaha Hadid Architects

Evelyn Grace Academy


London, England

Client
School trust: Ark Education
Government: DCSF

Project Team
Zaha Hadid, Patrick Schumacher
Lars Teichmann, Matthew Hardcastle

Structural Engineer
Arup

Main Contractor
Mace Plus

Winner of the Royal Institute of British


Architects Stirling Prize in 2011, this
secondary school set in a diverse
area in South London is the first
major building by Zaha Hadid in
England. Sponsored by a charitable
organization set up by hedge-fund
financiers, the school is designed to
provide a good education and give a
sense of pride to the pupils from a
deprived area.
The zigzag-shaped building is
squeezed onto a very tight urban site
within a residential area. The strong
sculptural forms of the exterior stand
1 Pupils have many fractured by slanted 3 The running track lighting are atypical of
out against adjacent rows of Victorian different types of fissures. communicates the those found in
houses. The main structure is built space available for 2 Sharp graphic forms ambition of the school traditional school
recreation and fabricated from steel to place sport at the buildings.
from in-situ concrete, with cladding of socializing. The are a signature of centre of its activities.
steel and glass. spectacular angled Hadids architecture; 4 The generously
facades that wrap they animate the proportioned interior
As the academy is administratively around the building are glazed elevations. spaces with dramatic
structured into four small schools, the
2 3
building is loosely divided into four
sections. These are augmented with
common spaces and facilities, such
as an art and technology block, music
and drama studios, sports facilities and
a canteen. There are large balcony
spaces where students from different
schools can meet up and relax, and
the big windows of each classroom
give an impression of openness.
To make the most of the limited
space while also creating a dramatic
effect, a 100 metre athletics track runs
under the bridge that connects the
two blocks where the main entrance is
located. This also emphasizes the 4
schools focus on sport, one of its
core subject areas.

208
C B

49.01
C B First Floor Plan
1:1000
1 All-weather pitch
2 Classroom
3 Common hall
4 Sports hall
5 100 metre sprint
track
6 Multi-use games
area
4 7 Staff room
6 8 Service area /
parking on ground
floor

2 2

A A 3 A A

2 7 8

1 5

C B

C B

0 10 20m

0 30 60ft

49.02
Longitudinal Section
AA
1:1000

49.03
Section Through
Bridge Link Showing
Sports Block
Elevation at Ground
Level
BB
1:1000

49.04
Short Section
Through Building
Showing Art Block
Elevation at
Ground Level
CC
1:1000

209
49 Zaha Hadid Architects Evelyn Grace Academy London, England

49.05 49.06
Section End Inclined Section End Inclined
Wall 3rd Floor Wall 1st Floor Soffit
Shadow Band 1:10
1:10 1 Screed topped and
1 Screed topped and floor finish
1 floor finish 2 Insulation
2 Insulation 3 Insulation
3 Insulation 4 Membrane
2 4 Breather membrane 5 Reinforced
5 Cementitious soffit concrete
panels 6 Pressed aluminium
6 Reinforced panels
concrete downstand 7 Aluminium
beam rainscreen panels on
7 Aluminium metal framing
rainscreen shadow
band

6 5

1 7

5 3

210
49.07 49.08
Section End Inclined Section 3rd Floor
Wall 3rd Floor Terrace Balustrade
Shadow Band at Ends
1:10 1:10
1 Screed topped and 1 Screed topped and
floor finish floor finish
2 Insulation 2 Insulation
3 Insulation 3 Pitch pocket
4 Reinforced 4 Membrane
concrete 5 Reinforced
5 Insulation concrete
1 5 7 6 Breather membrane 6 Pressed aluminium
7 Cementitious soffit panels
2 panels 7 PPC aluminium
8 Aluminium rainscreen planks on
3 rainscreen panels on metal framing
metal framing 8 PPC aluminium
coping with insulation
9 Guarding

4

7 10 1
4
2

6 5

211
212
Directory of
Details

213
Directory of Details

Walls

01.07 BNKR Arquitectura 21.07 Ensamble Studio & Antn 42.06 SPASM Design Architects
03.06 C F Mller Architects Garca-Abril 43.06 Aebi and Vincent
03.07 C F Mller Architects 21.08 Ensamble Studio & Antn 43.07 Aebi and Vincent
03.11 C F Mller Architects Garca-Abril 44.05 Atelier Bow-Wow
03.12 C F Mller Architects 21.09 Ensamble Studio & Antn 44.06 Atelier Bow-Wow
04.08 Caruso St John Garca-Abril 44.07 Atelier Bow-Wow
04.09 Caruso St John 22.05 Head Architektid 45.04 Diener & Diener
04.10 Caruso St John 23.08 id-ea Architects 45.05 Diener & Diener
04.11 Caruso St John 24.05 Joseph N. Biondo 46.07 HCP
05.06 David Chipperfield 25.04 Mount Fuji Architects Studio 46.09 HCP
05.07 David Chipperfield 25.05 Mount Fuji Architects Studio 46.10 HCP
06.06 Ellis Williams Architects 25.06 Mount Fuji Architects Studio 47.05 Toyo Ito & Associates
06.07 Ellis Williams Architects 25.07 Mount Fuji Architects Studio 47.06 Toyo Ito & Associates
08.07 HMC Architects 25.08 Mount Fuji Architects Studio 48.05 LAN
08.08 HMC Architects 25.09 Mount Fuji Architects Studio 48.07 LAN
08.09 HMC Architects 26.04 Paul Bretz Architectes 49.05 Zaha Hadid Architects
09.05 :mlzd 26.07 Paul Bretz Architectes 49.06 Zaha Hadid Architects
10.07 Nuno Ribeiro Lopes 26.08 Paul Bretz Architectes 49.07 Zaha Hadid Architects
10.08 Nuno Ribeiro Lopes 28.09 Pezo von Ellrichshausen 49.08 Zaha Hadid Architects
11.05 ODonnell + Tuomey 28.10 Pezo von Ellrichshausen
11.06 ODonnell + Tuomey 29.10 Shubin + Donaldson Architects
11.07 ODonnell + Tuomey 30.09 TNA
11.08 ODonnell + Tuomey 30.10 TNA
11.09 ODonnell + Tuomey 30.11 TNA
12.07 Pysall Ruge Architekten 31.05 Torafu Architects
12.08 Pysall Ruge Architekten 32.11 Wood / Marsh
12.09 Pysall Ruge Architekten 33.05 Barbossa & Guimares
13.03 Ryue Nishizawa 33.06 Barbossa & Guimares
14.05 Eduardo Souto de Moura 33.07 Barbossa & Guimares
14.07 Eduardo Souto de Moura 34.05 Becker Architekten
15.11 wHY Architecture 35.07 Bennetts Associates
15.12 wHY Architecture 35.08 Bennetts Associates
16.04 UN Studio 36.07 Claus en Kaan Architecten
17.03 AFF Architekten 36.08 Claus en Kaan Architecten
17.04 AFF Architekten 36.09 Claus en Kaan Architecten
18.06 BAKarquitectos 36.10 Claus en Kaan Architecten
18.07 BAKarquitectos 38.06 Hohensinn Architektur
18.08 BAKarquitectos 39.07 PleskowRael Architecture
19.06 Dosmasuno Arquitectos 39.08 PleskowRael Architecture
19.07 Dosmasuno Arquitectos 39.09 PleskowRael Architecture
19.08 Dosmasuno Arquitectos 40.05 Rafael de La-Hoz Arquitectos
20.05 EASTERN Design Office 40.06 Rafael de La-Hoz Arquitectos
20.07 EASTERN Design Office 41.04 Scott Brownrigg
21.06 Ensamble Studio & Antn 41.05 Scott Brownrigg
Garca-Abril 41.06 Scott Brownrigg

214
Floors Lintels Glazing junctions

02.08 Bernard Tschumi Architects 02.09 Bernard Tschumi Architects 02.10 Bernard Tschumi Architects 35.09 Bennetts Associates
03.10 C F Mller Architects 15.11 wHY Architecture 03.08 C F Mller Architects 36.09 Claus en Kaan Architecten
09.06 :mlzd 15.12 wHY Architecture 08.10 HMC Architects 38.05 Hohensinn Architektur
10.06 Nuno Ribeiro Lopes 19.07 Dosmasuno Arquitectos 08.11 HMC Architects 40.06 Rafael de La-Hoz Arquitectos
15.08 wHY Architecture 22.08 Head Architektid 10.06 Nuno Ribeiro Lopes 41.07 Scott Brownrigg
21.12 Ensamble Studio & Antn 38.05 Hohensinn Architektur 19.08 Dosmasuno Arquitectos 42.06 SPASM Design Architects
Garca-Abril 38.06 Hohensinn Architektur 20.06 EASTERN Design Office 42.07 SPASM Design Architects
21.13 Ensamble Studio & Antn 42.06 SPASM Design Architects 21.09 Ensamble Studio & Antn 43.06 Aebi and Vincent
Garca-Abril Garca-Abril 43.07 Aebi and Vincent
26.04 Paul Bretz Architectes 21.11 Ensamble Studio & Antn 44.05 Atelier Bow-Wow
26.08 Paul Bretz Architectes Garca-Abril 44.07 Atelier Bow-Wow
29.09 Shubin + Donaldson Architects 22.05 Head Architektid 45.05 Diener & Diener
31.05 Torafu Architects 22.06 Head Architektid 49.08 Zaha Hadid Architects
35.09 Bennetts Associates 23.09 id-ea Architects
36.10 Claus en Kaan Architecten 23.13 id-ea Architects
37.05 Heikkinen-Komonen Architects 24.05 Joseph N. Biondo
37.06 Heikkinen-Komonen Architects 24.06 Joseph N. Biondo
38.05 Hohensinn Architektur 24.07 Joseph N. Biondo
24.08 Joseph N. Biondo
Stairs 25.10 Mount Fuji Architects Studio
25.11 Mount Fuji Architects Studio
11.09 ODonnell + Tuomey 26.05 Paul Bretz Architectes
23.11 id-ea Architects 26.06 Paul Bretz Architectes
45.04 Diener & Diener 26.07 Paul Bretz Architectes
26.08 Paul Bretz Architectes
Screen 27.07 Peter Stutchbury Architecture
27.09 Peter Stutchbury Architecture
07.05 Foster + Partners 27.10 Peter Stutchbury Architecture
07.06 Foster + Partners 27.11 Peter Stutchbury Architecture
07.07 Foster + Partners 29.06 Shubin + Donaldson Architects
29.07 Shubin + Donaldson Architects
Table 29.08 Shubin + Donaldson Architects
30.10 TNA
18.05 BAKarquitectos 30.11 TNA
30.12 TNA
Pool 31.05 Torafu Architects
32.07 Wood / Marsh
32.10 Wood / Marsh 32.08 Wood / Marsh
32.09 Wood / Marsh
32.11 Wood / Marsh
32.14 Wood / Marsh
33.06 Barbossa & Guimares
33.07 Barbossa & Guimares
33.08 Barbossa & Guimares
35.08 Bennetts Associates

215
216
Directory of
Architects

217
Directory of Architects

Australia France Japan Luxembourg

Peter Stutchbury Architecture LAN Atelier Bow-Wow Paul Bretz Architectes


5/364 Barrenjoey Road 25 Rue dHauteville -79 Suga-cho Shinjuku-ku
8 6 Rue Adolphe
Newport, NSW 2106 75010 Paris Tokyo 160-0018 L-1116
info@peterstutchbury.com.au info@lan-paris.com info@bow-wow.jp info@paulbretz.com
T +61 2 9979 5030 T +33 1 43 70 00 60 T +81 3 3226 5336 T +352 451861
F +61 2 9979 5367 F +33 1 43 70 01 21 F +81 3 3226 5366 F +352 451862
www.peterstutchbury.com.au www.lan-paris.com www.bow-wow.jp www.paulbretz.com

Wood / Marsh Architecture Germany EASTERN Design Office Mexico


30 Beaconsfield Parade 12-202 Sumizome-cho Fukakusa
Port Melbourne, Victoria 3207 AFF Architekten Fushimi-ku BNKR Arquitectura
wm@woodmarsh.com.au Wedekindstrae 24 Kyoto 612-0052 World Trade Center Mexico
T +61 3 9676 2600 10243 Berlin eastern@sweet.ocn.ne.jp Montecito 38 8th Floor Office 1
F +61 3 9676 2811 berlin@aff-architekten.com T +81 75 642 9644 03810 Mexico City
www.woodmarsh.com.au T +49 30 275 92 92 0 F +81 75 642 9644 info@bunkerarquitectura.com
F +49 30 275 92 92 22 www.eastern.e-arc.jp T +52 55 9000 3988
Austria www.aff-architekten.com www.bunkerarquitectura.com
Mount Fuji Architects Studio
Hohensinn Architektur Becker Architekten Akasaka Heights 501, 9-5-26 Akasaka The Netherlands
Grieskai 80 A-8020 Graz Beethovenstrae 7 Minato-ku, Tokyo 107-0052
office@hohensinn-architektur.at D 87435 Kempten, Allgaeu fuji-s@rmail.plala.or.jp Claus en Kaan Architecten
T +43 316 811188 kontakt@becker-architekten.net T +81 3 3475 1800 Boompjes 55
F +43 316 811188 11 T +49 831 51220 00 F +81 3 3475 0180 3011 XB Rotterdam
www.hohensinn-architektur.at F +49 831 51220 01 www14.plala.or.jp/mfas info@ckr.nl
www.becker-architekten.net T +31 10 2060000
Chile Ryue Nishizawa F +31 10 2060001
Pysall Ruge Architekten 1-5-27 Tatsumi Koto-ku info@ckr.nl
Pezo von Ellrichshausen Architects Zossener Strae 56-58 Tokyo 135-0053 www.clausenkaan.com
Nonguen 776, Concepcion, Chile D-10961 Berlin office@ryuenishizawa.com
info@pezo.cl info@pysall.net T +81 3 5534 0117 UN Studio
T +56 41 2210281 T +49 30 69 81 08 0 F +81 3 5534 1757 PO Box 75381
www.pezo.cl F +49 30 69 81 08 11 www.ryuenishizawa.com 1070 AJ Amsterdam
www.pysall.net The Netherlands
Denmark TNA T +31 (0)20 570 20 40
India 3-16-3-3F Taishido Setagaya-ku F +31 (0)20 570 20 41
C.F. Mller Architects Tokyo 154-0004 info@unstudio.com
Europaplads 2, 11 HCP Design and Project mail@tna-arch.com www.unstudio.com
8000 Aarhus C Management T +81 3 3795 1901
cfmoller@cfmoller.com Paritosh, Usmanpura F +81 3 3795 1902
T +45 8730 5300 Ahmadabad 380 013 www.tna-arch.com
www.cfmoller.com hcpahd@hcp.co.in
T +91 79 27550875 Torafu Architects
Estonia F + 91 79 27552924 1-9-2-2F Koyama Shinagawa-ku
www.hcp.co.in Tokyo 142-0062
Head Architektid torafu@torafu.com
Kopli 25-605, 10412 Tallinn SPASM Design Architects T +81 3 5498 7156
indrek@peilmail.ee 310 Raheja Plaza, Shah Industrial F +81 3 5498 6156
T +372 6414070 Estate www.torafu.com
F +372 6414070 New Andheri Link Road, Andheri West
Mumbai 400053 Toyo Ito & Associates Architects
Finland spasm@spasmindia.com Fujiya Bldg.1-19-4 Shibuya
T +91 22 26735862 Shibuya-ku
Heikkinen-Komonen Architects F +91 22 26733287 Tokyo150-0002
Kristianinkatu 11-13 www.spasmindia.com T +81 3 3409 5822
00170 Helsinki F +81 3 3409 5969
ark@heikkinen-komonen.fi Ireland www.toyo-ito.co.jp
T +358 9 75102111
F +358 9 75102166 ODonnell + Tuomey
www.heikkinen-komonen.fi 20A Camden Row
Dublin 8
info@odonnell-tuomey.ie
T +353 1 475 2500
F +353 1 475 1479
www.odonnell-tuomey.ie

218
Portugal Switzerland UK USA

Barbosa & Guimares Arquitectos Aebi & Vincent Architekten Bennetts Associates Bernard Tschumi Architects
Rua Brito Capelo n.1023 Monbijoustrasse 61 1 Rawstorne Place 227 West 17th Street Second Floor
4450-077 Matosinhos CH-3007 Bern London EC1V 7NL New York, NY 10011
mail@barbosa-guimaraes.com info@aebi-vincent.ch mail@bennettsassociates.com nyc@tschumi.com
T +351 229 363 022 T +41 31 321 10 10 T +44 20 7520 3300 T +1 212 807 6340
www.barbosa-guimaraes.com F +41 31 321 10 11 F +44 20 7520 3333 F +1 212 242 3693
www.aebi-vincent.ch www.bennettsassociates.com www.tschumi.com
Nuno Ribeiro Lopes
Rua Circular Norte n1 Diener & Diener Caruso St John HMC Architects
Parque Industrial e Henric Petri-Strasse 22 1 Coate Street 633 W 5th Street Third Floor
Tecnolgico de vora CH-4010 Basel London E2 9AG Los Angeles, CA 90071-2005
7005-841 vora info@carusostjohn.com losangeles@hmcarchitects.com
nrl.arquitectos@gmail.com buero.basel@dienerdiener.ch T +44 20 7613 3161 T +1 213 542 8300
T: +351 266 744 473 F +44 20 7729 6188 F +1 213 542 8301
F: +351 266 757 609 T +41 61 270 41 41 www.carusostjohn.com www.hmcarchitects.com
www.nurilo.com F +41 61 270 41 00
www.dienerdiener.ch David Chipperfield Architects id-ea
Eduardo Souto de Moura 11 York Road 612 S. Flower Street #1104
Rua Do Aleixo N 53, 1A :mlzd Architekten London SE1 7NX Los Angeles, CA 90017
4150-043 Porto Mattenstrasse 81 info@davidchipperfield.co.uk elsyealam@id-ea.com
geral@soutomoura.pt CH-2503 Biel/Bienne T +44 20 7620 4800 T +1 213 4001318
T +351 22 6187547 office@mlzd.ch F +44 20 7620 4801 www.id-ea.com
F +351 22 6108092 T +41 32 323 04 72 www.davidchipperfield.com
F +41 32 325 51 22 Joseph N. Biondo
Spain www.mlzd.ch Ellis Williams Architects 1750 Spillman Drive Suite 200
151 Rosebery Avenue Bethlehem Pennsylvania 18015
Dosmasuno Arquitectos London EC1R 4AB jacmbiondo@verizon.net
Maudes 22, 2a info@ewa.co.uk T +1 610-865-2621
28003 Madrid T +44 20 7841 7200 F +1 610-865-3236
estudio@dosmasunoarquitectos.com F +44 20 7833 3850 www.josephnbiondo.com
T +34 91 533 96 36 www.ewa.co.uk
F +34 91 533 96 36 PleskowRael Architecture
www.dosmasunoarquitectos.com Foster + Partners 13432 Beach Avenue
Riverside Marina del Rey, CA 90292
Rafael De La-Hoz Arquitectos 22 Hester Road rael@pleskowrael.com
Paseo de la Castellana 82 2 A London SW11 4AN T +1 310 577 9300
28046 Madrid info@fosterandpartners.com F +1 310 577 9302
estudio@rafaeldelahoz.com T +44 20 7738 0455 www.pleskowrael.com
T +34 91 745 35 00 F +44 20 7738 1107
F +34 91 561 78 03 www.fosterandpartners.com Shubin + Donaldson Architects
www.rafaeldelahoz.com 403 E Montecito Street #2A
Scott Brownrigg Santa Barbara, CA 93101
Ensamble Studio 77 Endell Street info@sandarc.com
C/Mazarredo 10 London WC2H 9DZ T +1 805 966 2802
28005 Madrid enquiries@scottbrownrigg.com F +1 805 966 3002
administracion@ensamble.info T +44 20 7240 7766 www.shubinanddonaldson.com
T +34 915 410 848 F +44 20 7240 2454
www.ensamble.info www.scottbrownrigg.com wHY Architecture
9520 Jefferson Blvd. Studio C
Zaha Hadid Architects Culver City, CA 90232
10 Bowling Green Lane work@why-architecture.com
London EC1R 0BQ T +1 310 839 5106
T +44 20 7253 5147 F +1 310 839 5107
F +44 20 7251 8322 www.why-architecture.com
www.zaha-hadid.com

219
220
Index and Further
Information

221
Index

:mlzd 425 E Indonesia R


102 Dwellings in Carabanchel, EASTERN Design Office 8891 Alam Family Residence, Jakarta Rafael de La-Hoz Arquitectos 1703
Madrid, Spain 847 Eduardo Souto de Moura 625 1003 Rainy / Sunny House, Tokyo, Japan
Ellis Williams Architects 303 10811
A Ensamble Studio & Antn Garca-Abril J Ryue Nishizawa 5861
Acropolis Museum, Athens, Greece 925 Japan
1417 Estonia Colour Concrete House, Yokohama S
Aebi and Vincent 1847 Villa Lokaator, Paldiski 969 12831 Santa Monica Boulevard Transit
AFF Architekten 769 Evelyn Grace Academy, London, UK House in Kohoku, Yokohama 1325 Parkway Wall, Los Angeles, USA
Alam Family Residence, Jakarta, 20811 MON Factory / House, Kyoto 8891 1669
Indonesia 1003 Rainy / Sunny House, Tokyo 10811 Schulheim Rossfeld Renovation and
An Gaelras Irish Language and F Tama Art University Library, Hachioji, Extension, Bern, Switzerland 1847
Cultural Centre, Derry, Northern Fichtelberg Mountain Hut, Saxony, Tokyo 2003 Scott Brownrigg 1747
Ireland 502 Germany 769 Teshima Art Museum, Teshima, Shubin + Donaldson Architects 1247
Aon Insurance Headquarters, Dar es Finland Kagawa 5861 Spain
Salaam, Tanzania 17881 Hmeenlinna Provincial Archive, Joseph N. Biondo 1047 102 Dwellings in Carabanchel,
Argentina Hmeenlinna 15861 Madrid 847
Casa de Hormign, Mar Azul, FOSC House, San Pedro, Chile 1203 L Torres de Hrcules, Los Barrios,
Buenos Aires 803 Foster + Partners 347 LAN Architecture 2047 Cdiz 1703
Atelier Bow-Wow 18891 Four Boxes Gallery, Skive, Denmark Luxembourg The Truffle, Costa de Morte 925
Australia 18891 House F, Rameldange 11215 SPASM Design Architects 17881
Merricks House, Mornington France Springwater, Seaforth, Sydney,
Peninsular, Victoria 1369 Childrens Toy Library, Bonneuil sur M Australia 11619
Springwater, Seaforth, Sydney Marne 2047 Masdar Institute, Masdar, Abu Dhabi, Surez, Esteban and Sebastin see
11