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Kindergarten Planning

Assignment The 4
Frames

Child Development EDUC 88


Summited by: Shannon Gray
Summited to: Cheryl Herder
Date: October 10, 2016

Belonging and Contributing (Kindergarten Program


pg. 14)
Description: This frame encompasses childrens learning and development
with respect to:
Their sense of connectedness to others;
Their relationships with others, and their contributions as part of a
group, a community, and The natural world;
Their understanding of relationships and community, and of the ways
in which people contribute to the world around them.
The learning encompassed by this frame also relates to the childs early
development of the attributes and attitudes that inform citizenship, through
his or her sense of personal connectedness to various communities.

A School of Fish
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(Kindergarten Frames)

Instructions:
1. Kindergarten students are given various colours of card stock and are
asked to trace a fish with a pencil. JK and SK students will vary in their
ability to do this task and will be asked to help each other.
2. Students will then cut out their fish (again, some adult support and
guidance may be required if cutting skills are not developed yet for
younger 4s)
3. Once the fish are cut out, students can decorate their fish with
markers, crayons and/or tissue paper.
4. Groups of students can work on cutting out the letters for the board.
Others can work on putting up the tissue paper and border for the
bulletin board.
5. We could kept this bulletin up all year as a reminder of how our
classroom community will swim together. It also shows how unique
each person (fish) in our classroom is.

Belonging and Contributing links to expectations


Overall Expectation (Kindergarten Program Pg. 138)
26. Develop an appreciation of the multiple perspectives encountered within
groups, and of ways in which they themselves can contribute to groups and
to group well-being
Specific Expectations (Kindergarten Program Pg. 139)
26.1 Understand that everyone belongs to a group/community (e.g., a family,
a class, a religious community), and that people can belong to more than one
group/community at a time
26.2 Understand that different groups/communities may have different ways
of being and working together
26.3 Describe, both verbally and non-verbally, ways in which they contribute
to the various groups to which they belong
Explanation
This activity fosters the idea that everyone in the class is different and
unique by giving them only instructions and materials to create their own
fish. All the childrens fish will different but will come together in the end to
create a sea of fish or a community of people. The children will see and
realize that they all bring a different aspect into the classroom. Every child
represent a single class of the larger school community and represent a
family in that school community.
Demonstrating Literacy and Mathematics Behaviours.
Overall Expectation (Kindergarten Program pg. 229)
17. Describe, sort, classify, build, and compare two-dimensional shapes and
three-dimensional figures, and describe the location and movement of
objects through investigation
Specific Expectations (Kindergarten Program pg. 230-234)
17.1 Explore, sort, and compare the attributes (e.g., reflective symmetry)
and the properties (e.g., number of faces) of traditional and non-traditional
two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional figures (e.g., when sorting
and comparing a variety of triangles: notice similarities in number of sides,
differences in side lengths, sizes of angles, sizes of the triangles themselves;
see smaller triangles in a larger triangle)
17.2 Communicate an understanding of basic spatial relationships (e/g/, use
terms such as above/below, in/out, forward/backward- use
visualization, perspective, and movements [flips/reflections,
slides/translations, and turns/rotations]) in their conversations and play, in
their predictions and visualizations, and during transitions and routines
Explanation:
As the students create their fish they will have an opportunity to compare
and sort the attributes of each others fish (size, colour, etc.) They will need
to use spatial relations to arrange the fish on the bulletin board in a way that
makes it look like a sea of fish and to make sure everyones fish can fit on
the board.
Self-Regulation and Well-Being (Kindergarten
Program pg. 15)
Description: This frame encompasses childrens learning and development
with respect to:

Their own thinking and feelings, and their recognition of and respect
for differences in the thinking and feelings of others;
Regulating their emotions, adapting to distractions, and assessing
consequences of actions in a way that enables them to engage in
learning;
Their physical and mental health and wellness.
In connection with this frame, it is important for educators to consider:

The interrelatedness of childrens self-awareness, sense of self, and


ability to self-regulate;
The role of the learning environment in helping children to be calm,
focused, and alert so they are better able to learn.
What children learn in connection with this frame allows them to focus, to
learn, to respect themselves and others, and to promote well-being in
themselves and others.
Breathing Square
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(Kindergarten Frames)

Instructions:
1. Kindergarten students will be provided with a square piece of paper
that is pre-folded into 4 separated labelled sections. Two sections will
be labelled hold in for 4 and the other two will be labelled breathe out
for 4.
2. The explanation of the breathing squares will be discussed with the
students. The students will know that the squares they create will be
available at all times to help when they are feeling overwhelmed,
frustrated or just need time to calm themselves down. They children
will follow the direction of the 4 squares. They will start with hold in for
4 seconds and then go to breathe out for 4 seconds. They will rotate
through the four squares as many times they need to help them calm
down.
3. Students will have many different materials to make the breathing
squares their own. They can decorate them with stickers, markers,
crayons and/or paint.
4. The breathing squares will need to be left out to dry.

Self-Regulation and Well-Being links to expectations


Overall Expectation (Kindergarten Program Pg. 157)
2. Demonstrate independence, self-regulation, and a willingness to take
responsibility in learning and other endeavours
Specific Expectations (Kindergarten Program Pg. 159-162)
2.1 Demonstrate self-reliance and a sense of responsibility (e.g., make
choices and decisions on their own; take care of personal belongings; know
when to seek assistance; know how to get materials they need)
2.2 Demonstrate a willingness to try new experiences (e.g., experiment with
new materials/tools; try out activities in a different learning area; select and
persist with things that are challenging; experiment with writing) and to
adapt to new situations (e.g., having visitors in the classroom, having a
different educator occasionally, going on a field trip, riding the school bus)
2.4 Demonstrate self-control (e.g., be aware of and label their own emotions;
accept help to calm down; calm themselves down after being upset) and
adapt behaviour to different contexts within the school environment (e.g.,
follow routines and rules in the classroom, gym, library, playground)
2.5 Develop empathy for others, and acknowledge and respond to each
others feelings (e.g., tell an adult when another child is hurt/sick/upset; have
an imaginary conversation with a tree or an insect; role-play emotions with
dolls and puppets)
Explanation
During the process of creating their own breathing squares, the students will
learn that its okay to need assistance calming down and that this tool with
allow them to try out different strategies to find out what will help self-
regulate. The breathing square will be an available tool for the students to
use whenever they are needing assistance. The children can use their
breathing squares when they are feeling any certain emotion. This tool will
help the students learn about the other childrens emotions and how to
acknowledge and respond to them. They will discover that everyone deals
with their emotions differently and will be able to assist other children when
they are experiences different emotions.
Belonging and Contributing.
Overall Expectation (Kindergarten Program pg. 126)
1. Communicate with others in a variety of ways, for a variety of purposes,
and in a variety of contexts
Specific Expectations (Kindergarten Program pg. 126)
1.2 Listen and respond to others, both verbally and non-verbally (e.g., using
the arts, using signs, using gestures and body language), for a variety of
purposes (e.g., to exchange ideas, express feelings, offer opinions) and in a
variety of contexts (e.g., after read-alouds and shared reading or writing
experiences; while solving a class math problem; in imaginary or exploratory
play; in the learning areas; while engaged in games and outdoor play; while
making scientific observations of plants and animals outdoors)
Explanation:
The students create their own breathing square that will be available at all
times for them to use. They will be able to see and understand when other
children are having difficulty controlling their emotions. They can help
support their peers regulate their emotions by talking to them, listening to
them, giving them space and using non-verbal communication such as hugs
and eye contact. They will need to use different types of communication to
help themselves and other students to regulate their emotions.

Demonstrating Literacy and Mathematics


Behaviours (Kindergarten Program pg. 15)
Description: This frame encompasses childrens learning and development
with respect to:

Communicating thoughts and feelings through gestures, physical


movements, words, symbols, and representations, as well as through
the use of a variety of materials;
Literacy behaviours, evident in the various ways they use language,
images, and materials to express and think critically about ideas and
emotions, as they listen and speak, view and represent, and begin to
read and write;
Mathematics behaviours, evident in the various ways they use
concepts of number and pattern during play and inquiry; access,
manage, create, and evaluate information; and experience an
emergent understanding of mathematical relationships, concepts,
skills, and processes;
An active engagement in learning and a developing love of learning,
which can instil the habit of learning for life.
What children learn in connection with this frame develops their capacity to
think critically, to understand and respect many different perspectives, and
to process various kinds of information.
Name Puzzle
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Mathematics Behaviours (Kindergarten Frames)

Instructions:
1. Kindergarten students will be given the same amount of craft sticks per
number of letters there are in their first name, for example Shannon
would get 7 sticks.
2. The sticks will have the letters dotted on them to allow for the children
to trace each letter of their name on the craft stick.
3. They then will be able to put their puzzle together so it spells their
name. The students will then be asked to draw a picture on all the
sticks of something that they love. For example in the picture above
Jonathan drew a picture of cars because he loves them.
4. After the sticks are finished the students can mess up their own or
others up and try to solve the puzzle. Students can also switch puzzles
with their peers.
Demonstrate Literacy and Mathematics Behaviours links to
expectations
Overall Expectation (Kindergarten Program Pg. 216)
15. Demonstrate an understanding of numbers, using concrete materials to
explore and investigate counting, quantity, and number relationships
Specific Expectations (Kindergarten Program Pg. 217-219)
15.1 Investigate (e.g., using a number line, a hundreds carpet, a board game
with numbered squares) the idea that a numbers position in the counting
sequence determines its magnitude (e.g., the quantity is greater when
counting forward and less when counting backward)
15.2 Investigate some concepts of quantity and equality through identifying
and comparing sets with more, fewer, or the same number of objects (e.g.,
find out which of two cups contains more or fewer beans [i.e., the concept of
one-to-one correspondence]; investigate the ideas of more, less, or the
same, using concrete materials such as counters or five and ten frames;
recognize that the last number counted represents the number of objects in
the set [i.e., the concept of cardinality])
15.4 Demonstrate an understanding of the counting concepts of stable order
(i.e., the concept that the counting sequence is always the same 1 is
followed by 2, 2 by 3, and so on) and of order irrelevance (i.e., the concept
that the number of objects in a set will be the same regardless of which
object is used to begin the counting)
Explanation
During the process of creating their own name puzzle the children will learn
how to write letters, and spell their name. When using this puzzles they will
learn about how many letters are in their name and other students names.
The puzzle allows for the students to compare the amount of letters in each
of their names and they get a visual of how long their name is compared to
students. They will learn who has the longest name and the shortest in the
class for example Victoria and Tia.

Problem Solving and Innovating


Overall Expectation (Kindergarten Program pg. 265)
4. Demonstrate an ability to use problem-solving skills in a variety of
contexts, including social contexts
Specific Expectations (Kindergarten Program pg. 265)
4.1 Use a variety of strategies to solve problems, including problems arising
in social situations (e.g., trial and error, checking and guessing, cross
checking looking ahead and back to find material to add or remove)
Explanation:
As the students construct the name puzzles they will have an opportunity to
use problem solving when trying to put back their own puzzle and other
students. They will have to use trial and error to find how to solve other
students puzzles.

Problem Solving and Innovating (Kindergarten


Program pg. 15)
Description: This frame encompasses childrens learning and development
with respect to:
Exploring the world through natural curiosity, in ways that engage the
mind, the senses, and the body;
Making meaning of their world by asking questions, testing theories,
solving problems, and engaging in creative and analytical thinking;
The innovative ways of thinking about and doing things that arise
naturally with an active curiosity, and applying those ideas in
relationships with others, with materials, and with the environment.
The learning encompassed by this frame supports collaborative problem
solving and bringing innovative ideas to relationships with others.
In connection with this frame, it is important for educators to consider the
importance of problem solving in all contexts not only in the context of
mathematics so that children will develop the habit of applying creative,
analytical, and critical thinking skills in all aspects of their lives.
What children learn in connection with all four frames lays the foundation for
developing traits and attitudes they will need to become active, contributing,
responsible citizens and healthy, engaged individuals who take responsibility
for their own and others well-being.
Apple Jenga
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(Kindergarten Frames)

Instructions:
1. Kindergarten students will paired up together, one Jk and one Sk. Each
pair will receive a baggie full of the same materials. The baggies will
contain 12 flat blocks, 30 cube blocks and 1 apple.
2. Students will then need to take their baggies and empty the content on
the floor
3. Then using all the materials from the baggies the children will need to
create the tallest tower with their partner that will support their apple
4. Once the towers are built students will use a ruler to measure how tall
the tower is
5. Pairs can continue to build the tower to see if they can make it taller

Problem Solving and Innovating links to expectations


Overall Expectation (Kindergarten Program Pg. 265)
13. Use the processes and skills of an inquiry stance (i.e., questioning,
planning, predicting, observing, and communicating)
Specific Expectations (Kindergarten Program Pg. 280-284)
13.1 State problems and pose questions in different contexts and for
different reasons (e.g., before, during, and after inquiries)
13.2 Make predictions and observations before and during investigations
13.3 Select and use materials to carry out their own explorations
13.4 Communicate results and findings from individual and group
investigations (e.g., explain and/or show how they made their structure;
state simple conclusions from an experiment; record ideas using pictures,
numbers, and labels)
Explanation
During the process of exploring and experiencing apple jenga the students
will learn how to use trial and error to accomplish their end task. The
students will need to understand what the activity is asking them to do and
communicate with their partner about the problems they could face. They
will be able to make predictions about the towers they are creating and if its
going to be able to hold the apple. At the end of this activity children will be
able to converse with each other about the towers they created. They can
explain how they built the tower by drawing a picture, recording ides and
state simple conclusions from the experiment.
Demonstrating Literacy and Mathematics Behaviours.
Overall Expectation (Kindergarten Program pg. 182)
1. Communicate with others in a variety of ways, for a variety of purposes, and in a
variety of contexts

Specific Expectations (Kindergarten Program pg. 185-191)


1.2 Listen and respond to others, both verbally and non-verbally (e.g., using
the arts, using signs, using gestures and body language), for a variety of
purposes (e.g., to exchange ideas, express feelings, offer opinions) and in a
variety of contexts (e.g., after read-alouds and shared reading or writing
experiences; while solving a class math problem; in imaginary or exploratory
play; in the learning areas; while engaged in games and outdoor play; while
making scientific observations of plants and animals outdoors)
1.5 Use language (verbal and non-verbal communication) in various contexts
to connect new experiences with what they already know (e.g., contribute
ideas during shared or interactive writing; contribute to conversations in
learning areas; respond to educator prompts)
1.6 Use language (verbal and non-verbal communication) to communicate
their thinking, to reflect, and to solve problems
1.8 Ask questions for a variety of purposes (e.g., for direction, for assistance,
to innovate on an idea, to obtain information, for clarification, for help in
understanding something, out of curiosity about something, to make
meaning of a new situation) and in different contexts (e.g., during
discussions and conversations with peers and adults; before, during, and
after read-aloud and shared reading experiences; while exploring the
schoolyard or local park; in small groups, in learning areas)
Explanation:
As the students construct their towers to support the apple they will have an
opportunity to communicate with their partner by using verbal and non-
verbal communication. They will be able to think back to previous times they
built with blocks and used what they learned to create a solid structure for
the apple to sit on. They will be able to ask questions and work together with
their partner to solve the problem.
References

Pinterest (n.d) Retrieved from https://www.pinterest.com/

The Kindergarten Program (2016) Ministry of Education www.edu.gov.on.ca