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Kendra Luckey

Supervised Teaching
ED 459
Application of Knowledge Unit Plan

500 Festival & Indianapolis 500 Unit Plan


Theme: Curriculum designed to foster an understanding and develop an appreciation of the

Indianapolis 500 and the 500 festival.

First Gear: Getting Up to Speed

Standards:
English/Language Arts
4.RN.2.1 Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what a text says explicitly
and when drawing inferences from the text.

4.RN.2.2 Determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details;
summarize the text.

4.RN.2.3 Explain the relationships between events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a


historical, scientific, or technical text, based on specific information in the text.
4.RN.3.1 Apply knowledge of text features to locate information and gain meaning from a
text (e.g., charts, tables, graphs, headings, subheadings, font/format)
4.W.1 Write routinely over a variety of time frames and for a range of discipline-specific
tasks, purposes, and audiences; apply reading standards to support reflection and
response to literature and nonfiction texts.
4.W.5 Conduct short research on a topic.
Identify a specific question to address (e.g., What is the history of the Indy
500?).
Use organizational features of print and digital sources to efficiently to locate
further information.
Determine the reliability of the sources.
Summarize and organize information in their own words, giving credit to the
source.
Present the research information, choosing from a variety of formats.
4.SL.3.1 Summarize major ideas and supportive evidence from text read aloud or
information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually,
quantitatively, and orally.
Social Studies:
Kendra Luckey
Supervised Teaching
ED 459
Application of Knowledge Unit Plan

4.1.17 Construct a brief narrative about an event in Indiana history using primary and
secondary sources.
Day 1:

Objective: Assessing the students knowledge of the Indianapolis 500 and the 500 Festival.

1. Are You an Indianapolis 500 Expert?

Materials: Copies of the Are You an Indianapolis 500 Expert assessment?

a. Prior to any discussions or instruction, administer the pre-test to assess students

Indianapolis 500 and 500 Festival knowledge. Collect students papers and revisit

this assessment at the end of the unit.


2. What Do You Know? Activity

Materials: KWL Chart (Draw a KWL chart on chart paper prior to the lesson.)

a. Explain to the students that KWL chart (What You Know, What You Wonder,

What You Learned) will be used to assist the teacher and students with their

understanding of the Indianapolis 500 and to list information the class wants to

learn.

KWL
K W L

What You Know What You Wonder What You Learned

b. To introduce the unit of study, pose the question, What do you know about the

Indianapolis 500? As a class, work on the KWL chart. Begin with What You

Know. List the information the students share about the 500 and the events.
Kendra Luckey
Supervised Teaching
ED 459
Application of Knowledge Unit Plan

Students may provide information about the Mini-Marathon, the parade, the track,

racecars, etc. Pose the question, What are you wondering about the Indianapolis

500? Record students questions under the W section of the chart. The What

You Learned? is completed as the information is learned or at the end of the unit.

Day 2:

Objective: Building the students schema of the Indianapolis 500 and the 500 Festival.

1. Video Activity
a. To introduce the Indianapolis 500 and its history, show the 11-minute video,

History of the Indy 500, which highlights race activities and 500 Festival events.

Discuss the video. Ask if anyone has any additional questions to add to the

Wondering section of the KWL chart.


2. Building Indianapolis 500 Schema Activity

Materials:

Gearing Up for Indy Student Informational Text


Building Indianapolis 500 Schema Sheet
a. To comprehend a complex informational text, students will engage in a close

reading of the Student Informational Text. A close reading enables students to

develop a deeper understanding of text through text-dependent questions.


b. Students will use the Student Informational Text to answer the questions on the

Building Indianapolis 500 Schema sheet. The questions may be posed as a whole

class discussion, think-pair-share, group work or an independent activity.

Second Gear: Researching the History

Standards:
Kendra Luckey
Supervised Teaching
ED 459
Application of Knowledge Unit Plan

English/Language Arts:

4.RN.2.3 Explain the relationships between events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a

historical, scientific, or technical text, based on specific information in the text.

4.RN.3.1 Apply knowledge of text features to locate information and gain meaning from a

text (e.g., charts, tables, graphs, headings, subheadings, font/format).

4.SL.3.1 Summarize major ideas and supportive evidence from text read aloud or

information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually,

quantitatively, and orally.

Social Studies:

4.1.15 Create and interpret timelines that show relationships among people, events, and

movements in the history of Indiana.

4.1.17 Construct a brief narrative about an event in Indiana history using primary and

secondary sources.

Day 3:

Objective: Understanding the purpose of a timeline and being able to organize events in

chronological order.

1. Uncovering the History Activity

Materials:
Kendra Luckey
Supervised Teaching
ED 459
Application of Knowledge Unit Plan

History of the Indy 500 video


Timeline Research sheet for each student
Resource materials
a. Discuss the purpose of a timeline is to organize events in chronological order.

Throughout the history of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, many significant

events have occurred. Students use secondary source materials to search and

report significant events. To begin the research, watch the History of the Indy 500

video again. To guide their research, students use the Timeline Research sheet to

record significant dates as reported in the video. Students may explore brochure,

booklets, magazines, newspapers, and the Internet for additional research

information.
2. Video Activity: The First 100 Years-A Timeline of Drivers
a. Show The First 100 Years-A Timeline of Drivers video. The video highlights

legendary and current drivers in a timeline format to help students visualize a

timeline.

Third Gear: Understanding the Numbers

Standards:

Mathematics:

4.NS.2: Compare two whole numbers up to 1,000,000 using >, =, and < symbols.
Kendra Luckey
Supervised Teaching
ED 459
Application of Knowledge Unit Plan

4.NS.7: Compare two decimals to hundredths by reasoning about their size based on the

same whole. Record the results of comparisons with the symbols >, =, or <, and

justify the conclusions (e.g., by using a visual model).

4.C.1: Add and subtract multi-digit whole numbers fluently using a standard algorithmic

approach.

4.C.2: Multiply a whole number of up to four digits by a one-digit whole number and

multiply two two-digit numbers, using strategies based on place value and the

properties of operations. Describe the strategy and explain the reasoning.

4.AT.1: Solve real-world problems involving addition and subtraction of multi-digit whole

numbers (e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown

number to represent the problem).

4.AT.2: Recognize and apply the relationships between addition and multiplication,

between subtraction and division, and the inverse relationship between

multiplication and division to solve real-world and other mathematical problems.

4.M.3: Use the four operations (addition, subtraction, multiplication and division) to

solve real-world problems involving distances, intervals of time, volumes, masses

of objects, and money. Include addition and subtraction problems involving

simple fractions and problems that require expressing measurements given in a

larger unit in terms of a smaller unit.

4.M.4: Apply the area and perimeter formulas for rectangles to solve real-world problems

and other mathematical problems. Recognize area as additive and find the area of

complex shapes composed of rectangles by decomposing them into non-


Kendra Luckey
Supervised Teaching
ED 459
Application of Knowledge Unit Plan

overlapping rectangles and adding the areas of the non-overlapping parts; apply

this technique to solve real-world problems and other mathematical problems.

Day 4:

Objective: Students can apply math skills to real-world activities at the Indianapolis 500.

1. Video Activity: Numbers, Numbers, Numbers


a. Show the video, Numbers, Numbers, Numbers. Group the students into teams

discuss the video. Ask each team to create a list of ways math is used at the

Indianapolis 500 and related events. Teams shared their lists to create a class list.
2. Numbers, Numbers, Numbers of Indy Activity
Materials:
Copies of the Numbers, Numbers, Numbers of Indy worksheet
Calculators (optional)
a. With a partner, complete the math activity sheet about the Indy 500 and its events.

Discuss the information and answers when all students are finished. Calculators

are optional for checking answers.

Day 5:

Objective: Students can apply math skills to real-world activities at the Indianapolis 500 Festival.

1. Video Activity: Numbers, Numbers, Numbers of the 500 Festival Parade worksheet
a. Watch the Numbers, Numbers, Numbers of the 500 Festival video to provide

students with 500 Festival background information.


2. Numbers, Numbers, Numbers of the 500 Festival Parade Activity
Materials:
Copies of the Numbers, Numbers, Numbers, Numbers of the 500 Festival Parade

worksheet
Calculators (optional)

Students use math skills to determine answers to problems related to the 500 Festival.

Day 6:
Kendra Luckey
Supervised Teaching
ED 459
Application of Knowledge Unit Plan

Objective: Students calculate answers to problems related to a day at the track.

1. Qualification Math Activity

Materials:

Copies of the Qualifications Math worksheet


Calculators (optional)
2. Indy by the Numbers Activity

Materials:

Copies of Indy by the Numbers worksheet

Students use statistics from the Indianapolis 500 to solve math problems.

Fourth Gear: Celebrating the Event

Standards:

English/Language Arts:

4.W.1 Write routinely over a variety of time frames and for a range of discipline-specific
tasks, purposes, and audiences; apply reading standards to support reflection and
response to literature and nonfiction texts.
4.W.3.2 Write informative compositions on a variety of topics that:
Provide an introductory paragraph with a clear main idea.
Provide supporting paragraphs with topic and summary sentences.
Provide facts, specific details, and examples from various sources and texts to support
ideas and extend explanations.
Connect ideas using words and phrases.
Include text features (e.g., formatting, pictures, graphics) and multimedia when useful
to aid comprehension.
Kendra Luckey
Supervised Teaching
ED 459
Application of Knowledge Unit Plan

Use language and vocabulary appropriate for audience and topic.


Provide a concluding statement or section.
Visual Art:
4.6.3 Identify and use a variety of symbols and subject matter that clearly communicate
ideas.
Day 7:
Objective: Students will know about the 500 festival and the float planning.
1. Festival Theme Activity
Materials:
Copies of the 500 Festival writing prompt
Explain to students each year the 500 Festival and the Indianapolis Motor Speedway
announce a theme for the month of Mays events. In the past themes, have includes
Lights, Camera, Traction; Accelerate Your Senses; and Art in Motion.
Ask students to imagine that they are part of the committee to choose a theme for this
years event. Give each student a copy of the 500 Festival writing prompt. Each student
persuades the committee to select his or her theme.

Day 8:
Objective: Students will know about planning and the construction of the floats at the 500
Festival.
I WonderActivity
Pose the following questions to learn how much your students know about the 500 Festival and
the float planning and construction.
1. I Wonder
How many years has the 500 Festival Parade been staged? (The first parade
was held in 1957.)
Where is, the parade held? (On the street of downtown Indianapolis)
On what day is the parade staged? (The Saturday of Memorial Day weekend)
How long is the parade route? (2 miles)
Who serves as the Honorary Grand Marshals? (The 33 qualified drivers of the
Indy 500)
Kendra Luckey
Supervised Teaching
ED 459
Application of Knowledge Unit Plan

Approximately how many people line the streets for the parade? (More than
300,000 people)
What is the maximum length and width for a float? (Length-60 feet and width
20 feet)
At what rate of speed do the parade units travel? (2.5 mph)
Often the people ride on the floats. What is the minimum age of a person who
may ride the float/ (10 years of age)?
What are some of the safety requirements for the floats? (No sharp of pointed
edges on the float may be exposed. Each float must have a fire extinguisher.
Handholders are required for people standing on the float. Emergency towing
units are placed along the parade route. No articles may be thrown into the
crowd from the float.)
Video Activity: Floats:
View the video, Floats. Discuss with the students the organization, time, and materials needed to
plan and construct the floats.
Fifth Gear: Shaping Up for the Race
Standards:
Health & Wellness:
4.1.1 Explain the connection between behaviors and personal health.
4.7.1 Describe positive health behaviors.

Physical Education:
4.3.1 Identify and demonstrate the physical, mental, social, and emotional benefits of
participation in health-related physical fitness activities.
4.4.3 Describe exercises/activities that will improve each component of health-related
physical fitness.
Day 9:
Objective: Students investigate if Race Car Drivers are athletes.
1. Are Race Car Drivers Athlete? Activity
Materials:
Post-it note for each student
Kendra Luckey
Supervised Teaching
ED 459
Application of Knowledge Unit Plan

Yes/No chart
Give each student a Post-it note. Pose the following question to students. Ask each
student to respond on the post-it note with yes or no and to write a sentence that
supports his or her opinion. On the chalkboard or a poster board, create two columns, one
column for YES and one column for NO. Instruct students to place their post-it notes
under the corresponding column. Discuss the students responses.
2. Seat Stimulations Activity
Materials:
Several pillows
Textbooks
Timer
Sit in a position similar to a race car driver. Place pillows at a 30-degree angle behind the
students back. Have the student hold two textbooks at arms length to represent the effort
needed to control an Indy car at speed. Set a timer for two minutes and hold the position.
Discuss what it would be like to sit in a race car for two hours.

Day 10:
Objective: Students investigate if Race Car Drivers are athletes.
Video Activity: Fit to Win!
Prior to watching this video, discuss with students the following key points.
Both drivers and crew members work out 4-6 days a week. Like other professional sports, some
teams even employ a certified strength and conditioning coach who travels with the teams.
The drivers use many muscles, but a lot of their training involves neck exercises. Over the course
of a race, a drivers neck has a lot of force on it, which cause fatigue. When a driver becomes
tired, it is more difficult to make quick decisions. The drivers must sustain fitness over the course
of a race.
For each pit crew, a limited number of team members may cross over the wall to work on the car.
Each crew member has different job, but they all must be very quick. A special training program
is designed for each crew member. Flexibility is more important for pit crew members than for
the drivers. Special exercise programs are designed with flexibility, strength, balance, and
cardiovascular activities. Some of the exercises include bent over row, push-ups, bicep curl, and
abdominal crunch. In addition, drivers must sleep six to eight hours each night, eat healthy food,
and drink lots of water.
Kendra Luckey
Supervised Teaching
ED 459
Application of Knowledge Unit Plan

Show the Fit to Win! Video.


Follow-Up Activity:
Ask students if any of them would like to change their response to Are race car drivers
athletes? Discuss with the students the importance of being physically fit to be both physically
and mentally prepared for the Indianapolis 500.

Sixth Gear: Racing to the Checkered Flag


Standards:
English/Language Arts
4.W.1 Write routinely over a variety of time frames and for a range of discipline-specific
tasks, purposes, and audiences; apply reading standards to support reflection and
response to literature and nonfiction texts.

4.W.3.2 Write informative compositions on a variety of topics that:


Provide an introductory paragraph with a clear main idea.
Provide supporting paragraphs with topic and summary sentences.
Provide facts, specific details, and examples from various sources and texts to support
ideas and extend explanations.
Connect ideas using words and phrases.
Include text features (e.g., formatting, pictures, graphics) and multimedia when useful
to aid comprehension.
Use language and vocabulary appropriate for audience and topic.
Provide a concluding statement or section.
4.W.3.3 Write narrative compositions in a variety of forms that:
Establish an introduction, with a context to allow the reader to imagine the world of
the event or experience.
Organize events that unfold naturally, using meaningful paragraphing and transitional
words and phrases.
Use dialogue and descriptive details to develop events and reveal characters
personalities, feelings, and responses to situations.
Employ vocabulary with sufficient sensory (sight, sound, smell, touch, taste) details
to give clear pictures of ideas and events.
Provide an ending that follows the narrated experiences or events.
Kendra Luckey
Supervised Teaching
ED 459
Application of Knowledge Unit Plan

Mathematics:
4.NS.1: Read and write whole numbers up to 1,000,000. Use words, models, standard
form and expanded form to represent and show equivalent forms of whole
numbers up to 1,000,000.
4.C.1: Add and subtract multi-digit whole numbers fluently using a standard algorithmic
approach
Science:
Science and Engineering Process Standards (SEPS)
SEPS.1 Posing questions (for science) and defining problems (for engineering)
SEPS.2 Developing and using models and tools
SEPS.3 Constructing and performing investigations
SEPS.4 Analyzing and interpreting data
SEPS.5 Using mathematics and computational thinking
SEPS.6 Constructing explanations (for science) and designing solutions (for engineering)
SEPS.7 Engaging in argument from evidence
SEPS.8 Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information
4.PS.1 Investigate transportation systems and devices that operate on or in land, water,
air and space and recognize the forces (lift, drag, friction, thrust and gravity) that
affect their motion.
4.PS.2 Investigate the relationship of the speed of an object to the energy of that object.
3-5.E.1 Identify a simple problem with the design of an object that reflects a need or a
want. Include criteria for success and constraints on materials, time, or cost.
3-5.E.2 Construct and compare multiple plausible solutions to a problem based on how
well each is likely to meet the criteria and constraints of the problem.
3-5.E.3 Construct and perform fair investigations in which variables are controlled and
failure points are considered to identify aspects of a model or prototype that can
be improved.
Social Studies:
4.4.8 Define profit* and describe how profit is an incentive for entrepreneurs
Visual Arts:
Kendra Luckey
Supervised Teaching
ED 459
Application of Knowledge Unit Plan

4.6.1 Create artwork that communicates personal ideas, experiences, or emotions.

Day 11:
Objective: Students understand the purpose of the flags used at the race.
1. Green to Checkered Activity
Materials:
Verizon IndyCar Series Flag Chart (found on the Student Information Text)
Copies of the Verizon IndyCar Series Flag Design Sheet
Discuss with the students the purpose of flags. Explain some flags are designed to be symbolic
such as the United States of America flag or the Indiana flag. Other flags are used as a form of
communication.
Instruction students to locate the Verizon IndyCar Series flag chart found in the Informational
Text. Discuss each flag and its meaning. Although the drivers have radio communication with
their teams and the Verizon IndyCar Series officials, it is not uncommon for the communication
equipment to encounter.

Day 12:
Objective: Students get a better understand of the money it takes to pursue racing.
1. Video Activity: Racing Careers & Jobs
Explain to student the racing industry offers many career opportunities. View the Racing
Careers & Jobs video.
2. Lets Go Racing Activity
Materials:
Budget sheet for each student
Make a transparency copy of the budge sheet
1 copy of Team Sponsor Cards sheet (Cut apart cards.)
1 copy of Event Cards sheet (Cut apart cards.)
Notebook paper
1 dice
Calculator (optional)
Students will work in teams as business partners to make budgetary decisions related to a race
team. The goal is to direct the race team without going in debt. Ultimate success is attained if the
team makes a profit.
Kendra Luckey
Supervised Teaching
ED 459
Application of Knowledge Unit Plan

Prior to the activity, review the following economics related vocabulary:


Balance-after adding or subtracting, the amount of money you have
Budget-a plan for the money you have to spend
Credit-the amount of money you receive
Debit-the amount of money you pay
Entrepreneur-a person who takes a risk to start a business
Profit-revenues from selling a good or services minus the cost of producing the good or service
1. Divide the students into six things. (Teams do not have to have an equal numbers of
members.) Explain to the teams that they are entrepreneurs who own a race team. They
work together to make financial decisions with a goal to qualify a car for the Indianapolis
500.
2. Give each team member a copy of the budget sheet. Each team member calculated debits
and credits on his sheet. Team members compare their answers for accuracy.
3. Assign each team a car number 1-6. Teams record the car number on the sheet.
4. Explain to students teams must secure sponsors to help with the cost of running a race
team. Sponsors pay money to the teams for the teams racing budget. Invite each team to
pick a sponsor card. The cards lists the name of the company and the amount of money
the company commit to the team. Each team records its sponsor name on the budget
sheet.
5. Display the budget sheet transparency. Explain debit, credit, and balance to the teams.
Direct students to record the sponsor money under credit. Record the balance.
6. The race team has bills to pay. Every team needs the following:
Engine= $10,000
Wheels and tires = $4,000 (set of 4)
Models using the budget sheet to calculated the expenses of the engine and wheels and
tires. Students may use notebook paper to calculate. Also, students may use calculators to
check their work.
7. As a team, they must make a decision about the chassis. They can either buy a new
chassis for $25,000 or a used chassis for $20,000. Every member of the team must agree.
Discuss the advantages and disadvantages. Record the amount on the budget sheet.
8. As a team, the entrepreneurs must decide to hire a veteran driver for $25,000 or a rookie
driver for $20,000. Record the amount on the budget sheet and determine the balance.
9. In business, events affect budgets. Teams learn events affect their budgets.
10. Teacher rolls the dice. The numbers that appears on the dice indicates that team that must
select an event card from the stack. One student reads the card, and the team must follow
the directions on the card. For the activity column, the key words to record are italicized
Kendra Luckey
Supervised Teaching
ED 459
Application of Knowledge Unit Plan

to guide the students. After each team makes its calculations, the teachers rolls the dice
again. Continue with this format until all the cards are selected.
11. To end the activity, announce the checkered flag is waving. If a team went bankrupt, they
are not eligible for the final prize money as they were not able to make the race. For
finishing the race, every team receives $10,000. Roll the dice one more time. The
winning car number is the Indianapolis 500 champion and receives $50,000.
12. Discuss with students the financial decisions they made throughout the game. Ask them
to share what financial decisions they would change.
Day 13:
Objective: The students understand the Indy has evolved throughout the years.
1. Video Activity: Evolution of an Indy Car
a. Through the years, race cars have evolved. Not only are cars faster, but they are
safer. Show the video. Discuss reasons for designing new cars.
2. Alike or Different? Activity
Materials:
Copies of the Alike or Different worksheet
Distribute a copy of the Venn diagram to each student. Compare and contrast a race car
from 1911 to todays race car. After completing the chart, explain to the students that the
Indianapolis Motor Speedway Museum needs some help. Many tour groups are schedules
to visit the museum in May. The first display the tourist will see is a 1911 race car and a
race car for this years Indianapolis 500. Tourists are always asking how cars are similar
and different. Use the Venn diagram to write an informative essay to compare and
contrast cars of yesterday to cars of today for the display in the museum.
Day 14:
Objective: Students comprehend and understand that testing is a vital component to keeping
the sport safe.
1. Video Activity: Testing and Safety
a. View the video, Testing & Safety. Discuss the video. Ask the students to share
their observations about preparing a race car. List on the board what the crew
members did in the video to prepare the car for race day. Discuss that crew
members are constantly using scientific principles and mathematics to adjust the
car.
b. Explain in science it is important to focus on one variable at a time. In a science
experiment, scientists study one variable at a time to determine its impact on the
experiment. If too many changes are made at once, the cause and effect cannot be
determined. Thus, it is important to make one change at a time and test that
variable several times.
2. In the Drivers Seat Activity
Kendra Luckey
Supervised Teaching
ED 459
Application of Knowledge Unit Plan

Materials
Copies of In the Drivers Seat writing prompt
a. Brainstorm a list of words to describe what a driver would feel, hear, see, and smell as he
or she drives around the Indianapolis Motor Speedway at 220 miles per hour.
b. Give each student a copy of the writing prompt, In the Drivers Seat. Students write a
narrative about being a Verizon IndyCar Series Driver.
The Checkered Flag
Objective: Students applied what they have learned before attending the field trip and have a
better understand of the tours.
1. Video Activity: Indianapolis Motor Speedway Tour
The Indianapolis Motor Speedway is huge facility that span 1,025 acres. Share with students
the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Tour video. For students who will attend the IMS Study
Trip, the video highlights some of the sites they will visit.
2. Study Trip
The class visit the Indianapolis Motor Speedway where they participate in guided Study trip.
After students participate in the Study Trip, complete the final section (What You Learned?)
of the KWL chart.
The Victory Lap
Day 15:
Objective: The students have learned and succeed to grow in knowledge about the Indianapolis
500.
Are You an Indy 500 Expert? Post Assessment

Developed by 500 Festival & Indianapolis 500 Education Program