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RAINWATER HARVESTING

In spite of a healthy annual rainfall in the region, the


demand for water in Clackamas County is outweighing Five Good Reasons to Start Rainwater Catchment
the supply. Of particular concern to resource managers
and landowners, are depleted aquifers and dry wells. One 1. Augment water supplies for irrigation
solution to the water shortage is rainwater catchment -- 2. No need for water rights
also known as rainwater harvesting.
3. Reduce city water use and cost
Five Areas of the County Have Restricted Water Rights 4. Conserve groundwater
The Oregon Water Resources Department has identified 5. Improve water quality through mud management
five groundwater restricted areas in the county:
Damascus; Sandy/Boring; Gladtidings (south of Molalla);
Sherwood/Wilsonville and Mt. Angel. In these quantity
limited areas, landowners applying for new or additional Inches of Rainfall & Storage Tank Size Determine Volume Stored
water rights – whether for wells or collecting ponds – may The quantity of water that may be captured depends on
find it more difficult to get permits. A water catchment the local rainfall received, and the size of the tank installed.
system may be installed without additional water rights. 1 The harvesting systems are available in a wide variety
of sizes to service houses and farms, from 50 gallon rain
barrels to 309,000 gallon tanks. Tanks may be installed
above the ground, or underground. Lined ponds may also be
Houses and Farms May Harvest Rain to Save Water constructed after careful planning and permitting.
Rainwater harvesting allows landowners to augment
their water supplies by harvesting rain water from their A typical 2000 square foot house will have a roof rainwater
roofs, gutters or other artificial impervious surfaces and run-off of 56,000 gallons annually if located in Oregon City
catching them in storage barrels or tanks for later use. where the annual
rainfall averages
In addition to saving on annual water costs, rainwater 45 inches, or up
harvesting systems may reduce mud problems to 105,000 gallons
and improve water quality on nurseries, livestock annually if located
operations and even home gardens. in Welches with an
annual rainfall of 85
inches.

Table 1: Annual Rainfall Roof Yields


Roof Square 45 inches/year 60 inches/year 85 inches/year
Footage Oregon City Sandy Welches

1500 42,000 gallons 56,000 gallons 79,000 gallons


harvested harvested harvested
2000 56,000 gallons 74,000 gallons 105,000 gallons
harvested harvested harvested
2500 70,000 gallons 93,000 gallons 132,000 gallons
harvested harvested harvested
3000 84,000 gallons 112,000 gallons 159,000 gallons
1 ORS 537. 141(h). harvested harvested harvested

CONSERVATION DISTRICT
CL ACK A M A S COUN T Y SOIL A ND WAT ER
221 Molalla Ave. Suite 102
www.conser va tiondist ric t.org Oregon City, Oregon 97045
Good dirt. Clean water.
503.655.3144

Fact Sheet 803 June, 2010


The Clackamas County Soil and Water Conservation District (CCSWCD) prohibits discrimination in all of its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, sex, marital status, familial status, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information and political beliefs. CCSWCD is an equal opportunity provider and employer.
Cost to Buy a System Varies Three Quick Watering Facts
Clackamas County Soil and Water Conservation District
has worked with several landowners to establish water
1. An acre-foot of water is equal to 325,851 gallons
harvesting projects, and costs have varied depending on or approximately 27,000 gallons per 1” of water
objective and end use. District staff can offer assistance
to landowners with conservation planning including
applied to the surface. One acre is equal to 43,560
design help and technical resource referrals. Some used square feet
20,000 gallon tanks with a water distribution system
cost $ 10,000 - $ 12,000 in 2008.
2. One cubic foot of water contains 7.5 gallons
3. A 1000 square foot garden, requiring 1” water
Tank dimensions: 28 feet long by 8 feet high applied per week, uses approximately 600 gallons

Rainwater Harvesting Web sites & Resource Information


www.conservationdistrict.org
The Clackamas County Soil and Water Conservation District does not validate these Web
sites for accuracy:
“Texas Guide To Rainwater Harvesting”
http://www.twdb.state.tx.us/publications/reports/RainwaterHarvestingManual_3rdedition.pdf

American Rainwater Catchment Systems Association http://www.arcsa.org/

http://rainwater.sustainablesources.com

http://www.rainharvesting.com

Tickle Creek – A large Scale Rainwater Harvesting Project. http://www.pdxpurple.com


Installed at Tickle Creek Farm, Summer 2003. 20,000 gallon Tank.
Cost $8,500. Barn roof gutter, screens and piping. Cost $100. http://howtomakearainwaterbarrel.com/

Oregon Rainwater Harvesting Manual (Basic) http://www.cbs.state.or.us/bcd/pdf/3660.pdf

Oregon Water Conservation Manual http://www.cbs.state.or.us/bcd/pdf/0990.pdf

Statewide Alternate Method codes


http://www.bcd.oregon.gov/programs/plumbing/alt_methods.html

CONSERVATION DISTRICT
CL ACK A M A S COUN T Y SOIL A ND WAT ER
221 Molalla Ave. Suite 102 N
Oregon City, Oregon 97045
www.conser va tiondist ric t.org
03.655.3144
Good dirt. Clean water.

Fact Sheet 803 June, 2010


The Clackamas County Soil and Water Conservation District (CCSWCD) prohibits discrimination in all of its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, sex, marital status, familial status, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information and political beliefs. CCSWCD is an equal opportunity provider and employer.