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Other Monthly Expenditures

Table 5.10 presents the amount of spending the study participants pay for each of the
categories monthly. Majority of the study participants are less likely to spend above the first
range on electricity, water, rent, and miscellaneous. More than half of them (54.74%) spend
from P 3,751 to P 7,500 on food (Table 5.10).

Three-fourths of the study participants were reported to be spending less than P 76 on


rent (Table 5.10). It is worth noting that the minimal expenditure on shelter can be attributed
to Pabahay projects, namely the SM village and the Greendale village, of the government, in
which a number of study participants were the primary beneficiaries. The study participant
living there stated that they are not subjected to any form of payment ever since their
movement on the late of 2016, however they further elaborated that they are expecting to be
charged sometime late in 2017.

Table 5.10 Distribution of Study Participants by Monthly Expenditures on Electricity,


Water, Rent, Food, and Miscellaneous When Classified by Sex
Expenditure Categories Male Female All
n=9 n=86 N=95
No. % No. % No. %
Electricity
below P 326 5 55.56 52 60.47 57 60.00
P 326 650 3 33.33 16 18.60 19 20.00
P 651 975 0 0.00 10 11.63 10 10.53
more than P 975 1 11.11 8 9.30 9 9.47
Water
below P 1,126 9 100.00 84 97.67 93 97.89
P 1,126 2,250 0 0.00 1 1.16 1 1.05
P 2,251 3,375 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0
More than P 3,375 0 0.00 1 1.16 1 1.05
Rent
below P 76 8 88.89 64 74.42 72 75.79
P 76 150 0 0.00 3 3.49 3 3.16
P 151 225 1 11.11 7 8.14 8 8.42
more than P 225 0 0.00 12 13.95 12 12.63
Food
below P 3,751 2 22.22 7 8.14 9 9.47
P 3,751 7,500 4 44.44 48 55.81 52 54.74
P 7,501 11,250 3 33.33 26 30.23 29 30.53
more than P 11,250 0 0.00 5 5.81 5 5.26
Miscellaneous
less than P 1,001 9 100.00 82 95.35 91 95.79
P 1,001 2,000 0 0.00 2 2.33 2 2.11
P 2,001 3,000 0 0.00 1 1.16 1 1.05
more than P 3,000 0 0.00 1 1.16 1 1.05
Electricity (mean) 389.44 399.76 398.78
Water (mean) 255.56 353.38 344.12
Rent (mean) 22.22 58.72 55.26
Food (mean) 6333.33 6978.37 6917.26
Miscellaneous (mean) 11.11 187.67 170.95
Perception on Expenditure and Budget Allocation Patterns of the Respondents

Expenditure Patterns

As stated on table 5.11, all study participants reported an increase in income due to
cash grant in the past half year. Among the 95 study participants, 50.53% has their income
increased by 26-50%. Slightly less than a third (32.63%) had an increase in income by 25%
or less, and 15.79% stated an income increase of more than 50%.

Due to cash grant, majority of the study participants reported an increase in


expenditure towards food, clothing, healthcare, and education. However, majority of them
also exhibited no allocation adjustment as a result of cash grant on expenditures such as
shelter, electricity and water, savings, and leisure (Table 5.11).

Table 5.11 Distribution of Study Participants by Changes in Income during the last 12
months due to cash grant and Household Perception on Expenditure
Adjustment from Cash Grants When Classified by Sex When Classified by
Sex
Male Female All
n=9 n=86 N=95
No. % No. % No. %
Has Income Increase?
Yes 9 100.00 86 100.00 95 100.00
No 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00
If yes, by how much?
less than 26% 5 55.56 26 30.23 31 32.63
26% - 50% 3 33.33 45 52.33 48 50.53
51% - 75% 1 11.11 9 10.47 10 10.53
above 75% 0 0.00 6 6.98 5 5.26
Food
Increase 9 100.00 78 90.70 87 91.58
Decrease 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00
Same 0 0.00 8 9.30 8 8.42
Clothing
Increase 6 6.67 75 87.21 81 85.26
Decrease 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00
Same 3 3.33 11 12.79 14 14.74
Shelter
Increase 2 22.22 16 18.60 18 18.95
Decrease 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00
Same 7 77.78 70 81.41 77 81.05
Healthcare
Increase 3 33.33 48 55.81 51 53.68
Decrease 0 0.00 2 2.33 2 2.11
Same 6 66.67 36 42.86 42 44.21
Elec. & water
Increase 4 44.44 32 37.21 36 37.89
Decrease 0 0.00 2 2.33 2 2.11
Same 5 55.56 52 60.47 57 60.00
Education
Increase 6 66.67 64 74.42 70 73.68
Decrease 1 11.11 2 2.33 3 3.16
Same 2 22.22 20 23.26 22 23.16
Savings
Increase 3 33.33 26 30.23 29 30.53
Decrease 0 0.00 3 3.49 3 3.16
Same 6 66.67 57 66.28 63 66.32
Leisure
Increase 4 44.44 26 30.23 30 31.58
Decrease 0 0.00 1 1.16 1 1.05
Same 5 55.56 59 68.60 64 67.37

Budget Allocation Patterns

Table 5.12 summarizes the distribution of study participants according to the ranking
of their priority on allocation of resources on the event that the cash grant increases. They
were asked to rank items food, clothing, shelter, recreation, savings, luxury, education,
electricity and water, and healthcare, according to the prioritization on incrementing the
allocated resources suppose if the cash grant increases. Shades are applied to the table to
expedite the analyzation of the tabulated data. As the number of observation increases, its
intensity also increases (e.g. a darker shade on Rank 1-clothing means that many participants
will prioritize on spending more on clothing in the event of cash grant increases).

Food was considered as the number one priority for most of the participant (81.05%)
in resource allocation should the cash grant increases, followed by education on second then
clothing on third which garnered 48.42% and 28.42% respectively on their respective
positions. The least prioritized commodity according to many study participants (62.11%) is
luxury on ninth, followed by recreation on eighth (52.63%). This means that the expenditures
on food is the most likely to go up first if the cash grant increase, while luxuries are least
likely to be prioritized (Table 5.12).
Table 5.12 Distribution of Study Participants by Ranking of Priority in Allocation Expenditure Should the Cash Grant Increase When
Classified by Sex
Male (n=9)
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
No. % No. % No. % No. % No. % No. % No. % No. % No. %
Food 8 88.89 1 11.11 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00
Clothing 0 0.00 2 22.22 4 44.44 0 0.00 1 11.11 1 11.11 0 0.00 0 0.00 1 11.11
Shelter 0 0.00 1 11.11 0 0.00 1 11.11 2 22.22 2 22.22 2 22.22 1 11.11 0 0.00
Recreation 0 0.00 0 0.00 1 11.11 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 6 66.67 2 2.22
Savings 0 0.00 1 11.11 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 1 11.11 5 55.56 1 11.11 1 11.11
Luxury 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 1 11.11 2 22.22 1 11.11 5 55.56
Education 1 11.11 1 11.11 3 33.33 2 22.22 1 11.11 1 11.11 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00
Electric and water 0 0.00 3 33.33 0 0.00 4 44.44 1 11.11 1 11.11 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00
Healthcare 0 0.00 0 0.00 1 11.11 2 22.22 4 44.44 2 22.22 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00
Female (n=86)
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
No. % No. % No. % No. % No. % No. % No. % No. % No. %
Food 69 80.23 9 10.47 4 4.65 2 2.33 2 2.33 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00
Clothing 1 1.16 11 12.79 23 26.74 12 13.95 19 22.09 14 16.29 4 4.65 2 2.33 0 0.00
Shelter 1 1.16 4 4.65 9 10.47 10 11.63 21 24.42 25 29.07 12 13.95 2 2.33 2 2.33
Recreation 0 0.00 0 0.00 1 1.16 0 0.00 1 1.16 5 5.81 11 12.79 44 51.16 24 27.91
Savings 2 2.33 3 3.49 3 3.49 6 6.98 11 12.79 17 19.77 32 37.21 7 8.14 5 5.81
d
Luxury 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 1 1.16 7 8.14 24 27.91 54 62.79
Education 9 10.47 45 52.33 14 16.28 10 11.63 5 5.81 2 2.33 1 1.16 0 0.00 0 0.00
Electric and water 0 0.00 4 4.65 12 13.95 15 17.44 15 17.44 17 19.77 17 19.77 4 4.65 2 2.33
Healthcare 3 3.49 11 12.79 21 24.42 31 36.05 10 11.63 6 6.98 2 2.33 1 1.16 1 1.16
All (N=95)
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
No. % No. % No. % No. % No. % No. % No. % No. % No. %
Food 77 81.05 10 10.53 4 4.21 2 2.11 2 2.11 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00
Clothing 1 1.05 13 13.68 27 28.42 12 12.63 20 21.05 15 15.79 4 4.21 2 2.11 1 1.05
Shelter 1 1.05 5 5.26 9 9.47 11 11.58 23 24.21 27 28.42 14 14.74 3 3.16 2 2.11
Recreation 0 0.00 0 0.00 2 2.11 0 0.00 1 1.05 5 5.26 11 11.58 50 52.63 26 27.37
Savings 2 2.11 4 4.21 3 3.16 6 6.32 11 11.58 18 18.95 37 38.95 8 8.42 6 6.32
Luxury 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 2 2.11 9 9.47 25 26.32 59 62.11
Education 10 10.53 46 48.42 17 17.89 12 12.63 6 6.32 3 3.16 1 1.05 0 0.00 0 0.00
Electric and water 0 0.00 7 7.37 12 12.63 18 20.00 16 16.84 18 18.95 17 17.89 4 4.21 2 2.11
Healthcare 3 3.16 11 11.58 22 23.16 33 34.74 14 14.74 8 8.42 2 2.11 1 1.05 1 1.05
76.00%-100.00%, 51.00%-75.99%, 26.00%-50.99%, 13.00%-25.99%, 6.00%-12.99%, 3.00%-5.99%, 0.01%-2.99%, 0.00%
Feedback on Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program (4Ps) by the Respondents

Table 5.13 classifies the study participants into whether or not they are satisfied with
the 4Ps and the reasons as to why they convey such opinions. Their reported reasons for
satisfaction are; 4Ps helps them a lot in general, it helps them in purchasing medicine and
clothes, it lighten their burden in sending their children to school, it provides them with
additional income, it gives them additional savings, and other reasons. Other reasons refer to
the following; 4Ps frees them from other financial obligations, it has a big effect on their
income, it enables them to purchase what they want, it provides cash for emergency, it makes
day-offs from jobs allowable, and that they were included as beneficiaries.

Out of 95 study participants, 93 of them, which constitute to 97.89% of the total


sample, said that they were satisfied with 4Ps and 2 (2.11%) projected a negative feedback.
The importance of the cash grant in general needs appeared to be the most popular reason as
41.94% of the 93 study participant who relayed satisfaction answered with this reason. Its
help on education came second followed by its ability to give additional income with 27.96%
and 19.35% respectively. On the other hand, both of the study participants who are
unsatisfied with 4Ps said that the cash grant that they received was not enough (Table 5.13).

Table 5.13 Distribution of Study Participants by Their Satisfactory Opinion and Reasons
for Satisfaction/dissatisfaction When Classified by Sex
Male (n=9) Female (n=86) All (N=95)
No. % No. % No. %
Are you satisfied?
Satisfied 9 100.00 84 97.67 93 97.89
Dissatisfied 0 0.00 2 2.33 2 2.11
Reason for satisfaction
Helps a lot
(general) 4 44.44 35 41.67 39 41.94
Helps to buy
medicine and 0 0.00 2 2.38 2 2.15
clothes
Helps in education
Provides 2 22.22 24 28.57 26 27.96
additional 2 22.22 16 19.05 18 19.35
income
Gives additional 0 0.00 2 2.38 2 2.15
savings
Other reasons 1 11.11 5 5.95 6 6.45
Reason for
dissatisfaction
Cash grant is 0 0.00 2 100.00 2 100.00
insufficient

Summary of Expenditures of the Respondents


Table 5.14 shows the summary of total monthly income, expenditure, and savings of
the study participants. Income is the study participants general monthly income from their
occupations plus the amount of cash the households receive as a result of the cash grant
program. Expenditure is the summation of their expenses on education and other
expenditures (food, water, shelter, electricity, and miscellaneous). Savings is just the income
minus the expenditures.

Almost half (49.47%) of the study participants earn less than P 7,586 monthly.
However, majority of them (64.21%) pay expenses that amount from P 7,586 to P 13,610 per
month. Forty-two point eleven percent (42.11%) of them incur cost every month while the
remaining 57.89% have the capability of saving money (Table 5.14).

Table 5.14 Distribution of Study Participants by Total Amount of Income, Expenditures,


and Savings When Classified by Sex
Male (n=9) Female (n=86) All (N=95)
No. % No. % No. %
Income
below P 7,586 4 44.44 43 50.00 47 49.47
P 7,586 13,610 4 44.44 28 32.56 32 33.68
P13,611 19635 1 11.11 10 11.63 11 11.58
P 19,636 25,660 0 0.00 5 5.81 5 5.26
above P 25,660 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00
Expenditures
below P 7,586 3 33.33 16 18.60 19 20.00
P 7,586 13,610 6 66.67 55 63.95 61 64.21
P13,611 19635 0 0.00 12 13.95 12 12.63
P 19,636 25,660 0 0.00 2 2.33 2 2.11
above P 25,660 0 0.00 1 1.16 1 1.05
Savings
below P -3,891 0 0.00 13 15.12 13 13.68
P -3,891 2,410 5 55.56 46 53.49 51 53.68
P 2,411 8,710 3 33.33 19 22.09 22 23.16
P 8,711 15,010 1 11.11 7 8.14 8 8.42
P 15,011 21,310 0 0.00 1 1.16 1 1.05
below P 0 1 11.11 39 45.35 40 42.11
P 0 and above 8 88.89 47 49.47 55 57.89
Income (mean) 8866.67 9084.54 9063.90
Expenditures (mean) 8492.89 10627.42 10425.20
Savings (mean) 2773.78 1011.77 1178.70
Minimum Values
Income P 7,000 P 2,100 P 2,100
Expenditures P 4,070 P 1,560 P 1,560
Savings P -1,940 P -9.940 P -9.940
Maximum Values
Income P 17,600 P 28,000 P 28,000
Expenditures P 11,600 P 28,565 P 28,565
Savings P 9,733 P 21,090 P 21,090