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TENNIS UNIT PLAN

Unit: Tennis Date: 4/17-4/28 Standard:1, 2, 3, 4 & 5

Lesson Focus: Ball Handling Grade: 9th Technology Used: Cardio machines

Sequence: 1 of 7 Facility/Equipment: Tennis rackets (1 per student) and balls (1 per student or 1 every 2 students)

Lesson Intro (What will you say to get the students attention, communicate the lesson objectives, and motivate students to achieve them?):
Good morning! We are going to start our tennis unit today. If the weather is nice enough on certain days we will try to go outside as much as we can. At the end of
this unit we will be having an online quiz so make sure you pay attention and if you have any questions about the rules or anything please talk to me and I can help
you.

Learning Objectives Assessment


Each objective should include: a) Performance (the knowledge or ability For each objective include your procedure for determining whether
the learner will gain as a result of this lesson), b) Conditions (under which the objectives have been met:
learner will perform, and c) Criterion (the level of performance considered
acceptable):
1) Students will be able to properly execute a forehand, backhand, and 1) Informal Observation with Checklist (See Below)
serve over the net 85% of the time. 2) Personal Fitness/Nutrition Log (See Below)
2) Students will explain and exhibit tactical decisions in a game situation. 3) Online Quiz (Formal Summative)
3) Students are able to calculate and monitor their target heart rate 4) Pre-assessment
through the use of heart rate monitors and/or physical activity logs. 5) Rubric
4) Students design and implement a personal fitness program based on the
information obtained from fitness assessments and in accordance with
particular fitness training principles.
5) Students participate successfully in a cooperative learning environment
in a variety of physical activity settings.

Safety considerations and/or modifications for special needs students:


Hold on to your racquet, watch where you are going before you run and chase down your ball, if you hit your ball over the fence go get it and come right back,
dont jump over the net,
Learning Activities
Time Formation Activity Transitions; Comments
Day 1
10 min. Dressing Out

Warm-Up: Racket control

Introduction: Work on the Forehand (shake hands with the racquet, kiss bicep)
Cues: shift weight, flat head racquet, kiss bicep

10 min. Dressing out

Day 2
10 min. Dressing Out

Warm-up: Volley (forehand) with a partner

Review Forehand
Introduce Backhand-use 2 hands (against the fence, with partner, volley)

10 min. Dressing Out

Day 3
10 min. Dressing Out

Warm-up: Volley (forehand & backhand) with a partner

Review Forehand & Backhand


Serving:
1) Start in R court and serve diagonally
2) Alternate R & L court after each serve
3) Players change sides of court after odd # of games

10 min. Dressing Out

Day 4
10 min. Dressing Out

Warm-Up:
Short Court-drop hit until someone messes up
Talk about scoring (Love=0, 15=1, 30=2, 40=3, Game=4, Deuce=40-40, Advantage=point
after deuce, & you have to win by 2 points)
10 min. Dressing Out

Day 5
10 min. Dressing Out
Closure (What will you say and do to help students recall the lesson objectives and recognize what theyve learned? How will you meet one or more of the
following goals: review, accountability, cool-down, recognition, interpersonal communication, future plans?):
Great job today! We are going to continue to work on our tennis unit next time and learn different kinds of strokes (or ways to hit the ball). Remember to pay
attention on the rules and the different cues I am telling you because there will be an online quiz at the end of this unit. So, if you dont understand something and
have questions talk to me ahead of time.

Reflective Comments (to be completed after the lesson):


TENNIS SKILLS
Grade 9

1. Ball Handling (Wrist Action): Controls the ball on the racket for 20 bounces in a row, is able to alternate forehand-backhand while bouncing the ball
2. Forehand: Contacts the ball in the middle of the racket, pushes it forward, and follows through
3. Backhand: Steps forward with the same side foot, uses two hands, pushes, and follows through
4. Serve: Contacts ball at optimal height, reaches racket back, snaps the wrist, and follows through
5. Accuracy: Able to serve and return the ball over the net, in bounds, 80% of the time
6. Game Knowledge: Knows the names of the different lines on the court, the rules, and the scoring of the game

Period__________________

Name 1 2 3 4 5 6
Tennis Skills Rubric

Task Mastery Advancing Developing Beginning


4 3 2 1
Shot Execution: Forehand Always at the ready position. Normally at the ready Some attempt at the ready No attempt at the ready
Proper grip is utilized while position. Proper grip is position. Shot is sometimes position. Shot is not taken
completing appropriate shots utilized to attempt the shot. taken outside of the body outside of the body. Grip on
from the forehand side. Ball is Shot is taken from the proper using the proper grip. the racquet is incorrect.
regularly hit in play. side of the body.

Shot Execution: Backhand Always at the ready position. Normally at the ready Some attempt at the ready Not attempt at the ready
Proper grip is utilized while position. Proper grip is position. Shot is sometimes position. Shot is not taken
completing appropriate shots utilized to attempt the shot. taken outside of the body outside of the body. Grip on
from the backhand side. Ball Shot is taken from the proper using the proper grip. the racquet is incorrect.
is regularly hit in play. side of the body.

Serving Service is from the baseline. Service is from the baseline. Service is from the baseline. Service is from the wrong
Punch serve form is used. Ball Punch serve form is used. Ball An attempt at the punch serve area. No attempt is made at
is regularly contacted well and is normally contacted well and is made. Ball is improperly the punch serve form. Ball
normally lands in the proper sometimes lands in the proper contacted high or low and does not go to correct service
service box. service box. rarely lands in the proper box area.
service box.

Rules & Scoring Rules are followed and used Rules are mostly followed. Rules are sometimes Rules are not followed. Score
to the players advantage. Score is called most of the followed. Score is not called, is not known or kept. Cannot
Score is always called before time and is usually known. but may be known. Can answer questions regarding
the serve. Answers all Can answer questions sometimes answer questions rules of play. Must rely on
questions. regarding the rules of play. regarding rules of play. others for help.

Etiquette Consistently recognizes good Usually recognizes good play Sometimes recognizes good Rarely talks and interacts with
play by others. Works well by others. Works with partner play by others. May work partner or opponents. Does
with partner and others and and shows cooperation and with partner to cover court. not work as a team player
shows strong evidence of teamwork. Calls shots Sometimes dominates.
cooperation and fair play. honestly.

Score __________/20
Tennis Quiz

Name ________________________________________________________________ Date____________________________

Question 1 (1 point)
The term used when both players have scored their third point, and the score is tied 40-40.
A. Let
B. Fault
C. Set
D. Deuce

Question 2 (1 point)
You must always begin serving from the ________ side of the center line behind the baseline.
A. Left
B. Right

Question 3 (1 point)
The server serves a complete game before their opponent starts to serve.
A. True
B. False

Questions 4 (1 point)
You may serve overhand or underhand in the game of tennis.
A. True
B. False

Question 5 (1 point)
If a player reaches over the net to make a play, or hits the net with their racquet a _________ would be called.
A. Side-out
B. Fault
C. Timeout
D. Goof

Question 6 (1 point)
The sequence of scoring in tennis is love, 15, 30, 40, game.
A. True
B. False

Question 7 (1 point)
During a tennis game, points may be scored by:
A. The serving team
B. The receiving team
C. Both the serving and receiving team

Question 8 (1 point)
The term love which in tennis means zero, is thought to have evolved from the French word Loeuf which means _______.
A. Egg
B. Tied
C. Good Try
D. You Lose

Question 9 (1 point)
How many opportunities do you get to make a serve?
A. 1
B. 2
C. 3
D. 4

Question 10 (1 point)
A tennis ball that lands on a line would be called _________.
A. Out
B. Replay
C. Fault
D. In

Extra Credit: Name a professional tennis player.

________________________________________________________________________________
Tennis Quiz (Answer Key)
9th Grade PE Tennis Unit Quiz

Question 1 (1 point)
The term used when both players have scored their third point, and the score is tied 40-40.
____ A. Let
____ B. Fault
____ C. Set
__X_ D. Deuce

Question 2 (1 point)
You must always begin serving from the _______ side of the center line behind the baseline.
____ A. Left
__X_ B. Right

Question 3 (1 point)
The server serves a complete game before the opponent starts to serve.
__X_ A. True
____ B. False

Question 4 (1 point)
You may serve overhand or underhand in the game of tennis.
__X_ A. True
____ B. False

Question 5 (1 point)
If a player reaches over the net to make a play, or hits a net with their racquet a ________ would be called.
____ A. Side-out
__X_ B. Fault
____ C. Timeout
____ D. Goof

Question 6 (1 point)
The sequence of scoring in tennis is love, 15, 30, 40, game.
__X_ A. True
____ B. False

Question 7 (1 point)
During a tennis game, points may be scored by:
____ A. The serving team
____ B. The receiving team
__X_ C. Both the serving and receiving team
Question 8 (1 point)
The term love in tennis means zero, is thought to have evolved from the French word Loeuf, which means _________.
__X_ A. Egg
____ B. Tied
____ C. Good Try
____ D. You Lose

Question 9 (1 point)
How many opportunities do you get to make a serve?
____ A. 1
__X_ B. 2
____ C. 3
____ D.

Question 10 (1 point)
A tennis ball that lands on the line would be called _________.
____ A. Out
____ B. Replay
____ C. Fault
__X_ D. In
Tennis Handout
Early History: Tennis had its beginning in Greece before the Christian Era when it was a game similar to handball, in that the ball was batted against the wall with
the palm of the hand.
During the Middle Ages, tennis became popular in France and England where it was known as the Sport of Kings. A wandering minstrel introduced the
original game to the court. No racquets were used, only the open hand. Then a glove was worn and eventually cords were wrapped around the glove. In order to get
a longer reach, an elongated glove, or paddle, was used. Finally, the idea of a racquet evolved from a combination of the paddle and cords. The early tennis balls
were of leather, stuffed with hair, and these were first batted back and forth across a mound of earth.

Origin of Tennis Terms: The game may have received its named from a command frequently heard in France during the game. The command in English means
take it! Play! in French it is Tenez. When hearing the word Tenez during the game, English-speaking people thought the game itself was Tenez. Similarly,
the term love, which in tennis scoring means zero, is thought to have evolved from the French Loeuf, or egg, which resembles a zero.

Modern History: Major Walter Wingfield, a British Army Officer, revived Tennis in 1873 and placed it outdoors. An American tourist in Bermuda, Mary
Outerbridge, saw the game there and introduced it to the U.S. in 1874. Its name then was Court Tennis and was played generally at homes and private clubs. Its
popularity spread rapidly and by 1881 the U.S. Lawn Tennis Association was formed. In 1900 International competition began with the Davis Cup matches for
men. Also today the Wightman Cup matches are played between women of the United States and England.

Equipment: A racquet which is a comfortable weight and size, tennis balls, shoes with rubber soles, and comfortable clothes. Traditionally tennis was played in all
white clothing. A visor or billed cap to keep the sun out of ones eyes is helpful to many people.

Basics of the Game


The basic idea is to hit the ball in the opponents court in such a way that the opponent cannot return it, or hits it back in a way that allows you to put it
away on your next shot.
The choice of a court or serve is determined by a toss commonly made by spinning the racquet, while one player calls for a distinguishing mark to be
facing up. The winner receives the choice to serve or receive, or choice of either end of the court.
The server serves a complete game before his opponent starts to serve. The server always starts serving from the right side of the center line behind the
baseline. He serves diagonally into the opponents right service court, receiving two serves or chances to place ball in designated area. After serving from the right,
the server then switches and begins serving from the left side of the center line behind the baseline. Therefore, he serves diagonally into the opponents left service
court. There, he receives the same number of chances for services.
If one of the serves (either the first or second) hits the net and lands in the proper service area, the serve is considered a let, and the player is permitted to
serve over. If the let occurs on the first ball served, he still is entitled to two more serves. However, if the let occurs on the second serve, the player is entitled to
one service. Outside interference, either from another player from a nearby court or his ball, results in a let and the point is played over. If the receiver is not ready
(in ready position), a let may be called. If the receiver makes an attempt to hit the ball, the player cannot claim a let.

Ready Position: A player must never be caught flat-footed in order to move quickly in various directions to return the ball. The ready position is with knees bent
slightly, body weight slightly forward, feet comfortably spread. The player must always remember to keep the body position to the side of the ball so that he can
swing freely.

Forehand: The forehand is probably the most frequently used in tennis. It is intended to be used for returning balls that are hit in front or to the right of a right-
handed player. The left foot and shoulder, and the side of the body is toward the net in stroking the ball. As the ball approaches, the racquet swings backwards and
the elbow is kept close to the body. As the swing starts forward, the weight is transferred to the front foot. The ball should be hit at about the position of the hip. As
the weight continues to transfer through the swing, the racquet should follow-through by bringing the racquet up by the opposite shoulder at the end of the stroke.
Backhand: The backhand is used to return balls which hit the court on the side of the body opposite of where the racquet is held. This stroke is similar to the
forehand in that the opposite foot steps forward with the side of the body facing the net. On the backswing, the weight is transferred to the back foot. When the
forward swing begins to take place, the racquet comes around in a wide arc at about hip level and meets the ball just about opposite the forward foot.
Serve: A right-handed server assumes a position as near to the center mark as possible when serving to the right service court and about two to three feet from it
when serving from the left service court. For a left-handed server, the opposite is correct.
The forward foot should be a few inches behind the baseline when serving. The body is sideways to the net, the feet comfortably spread, and the forward
shoulder pointing in the direction the ball is to be served. The ball is thrown high enough into the air at an arms length in front of the body so the arm will be fully
extended at the moment of impact of the racquet and ball. The weight is shifted to the back leg when the ball is thrown in the air; the racquet swings back and the
arm is bent to bring the racquet behind the head. As the ball drops, weight shifts to the front leg as the racquet is brought down and across the outside of the ball.

Volley: A volley is hitting a ball on the fly before it bounces. It is primarily used by the net or in a forecourt position. The swing is also shortened to be hit in front
of the body with a locked wrist.
Etiquette or Game Courtesies
Rules for good sportsmanship:
1) Never lose your temper
2) Be a good sport at all times
3) Accept officials rules graciously
4) Never question an opponents decision
5) Win or lose graciously
6) Return ball directly to the server after play
7) Never take unfair advantage of an opponent
8) Try for every point
9) Always shake hands after a tournament match
Glossary for Tennis Terms
Ace: An earned point, as distinguished by scoring on opponents error
Advantage: Score of a game after either side has won one point after deuce.
Alley: Strip of court between singles and doubles boundaries
Baseline: The back line at either end of the court, behind which the server stands
Deuce: A term used when both players have scored the third point, score is 40-40
Double: A slang expression derived from Double Fault meaning two successive faults by service
Foot-Fault: A ball served when the feet are no in the correct position established by the rules
Half-Court Line: The line dividing the service court into halves and separating the right and left service courts
Half-Volley: A stroke made by hitting the ball just as it rises from the ground after its first bounce
Let: A term used when the ball hits the net on the service and falls into the service area. It is then played over again without penalty.
Match: Contest play. Usually two out of three sets wins the match.
Service Line: The line, 21 feet from the net, that bounds the back of the service court
Set: A scoring term applied to the player who first wins six games providing there is a two game advantage
Smash: A ball fit forward and down from the highest point possible over the head
Sideline: The line at either side of the court that marks the outside edge of the playing surface.
Volley: Stroke made by hitting the ball before it has touched the ground
Basic Rules of Tennis
Tennis is played by either two players (singles) or four players (doubles) on a regular court, 78 ft. long and 36 ft. wide, divided by a net 3 ft. high in the middle,
and 3 ft. high at the net post. Singles is played on the narrow part of the court and is marked by the alley on either side.

Scoring:
Either the server or receiver can win a point on each serve. If you have no points your score is love, one point is called 15, two points is called 30, three points is
called 40, and if you have won the fourth point it is called game, and you have won. The term deuce refers to if the score is 40-all, not 30-all. In order for a
player to win the game after the score becomes 40-all, he must win two successive points. If the server wins one point after deuce, it is called advantage-in or
ad-in and to win he must win the next point. If the receiver wins the next point after deuce, it is called advantage-out or ad-out and if she wins the next point,
she wins.
Players change sides after every odd-numbered game of each set. This equalizes sun, wind, shade, background, etc. A set is won by the player or side that
has won six games. A match consists of the best of two out of three sets.

Serve Rules:
1) If you fault (break a rule) on the first serve, you get one more serve. If you fault on the second serve, it is called a double fault. You lose the point and
then must serve from the other side.
2) Server must have both feet behind the baseline, and feet must remain in place until after the ball is contacted.
3) Ball must be tossed into the air and hit; overhead is most powerful, but ball may be contacted underhand or sideways.
4) Game begins with the ball being served from the right side of the servers court into diagonally opposite service court
5) Ball may not hit your partner
6) Ball may not hit outside of the service court lines, but ball on a line is good
7) Ball may not hit a permanent fixture (such as net post, fence, etc.) before it touches the ground
8) Ball may be tossed, caught, and tossed again, but if any attempt to hit is made it is a fault.
9) Ball which hits the net and lands in proper court is a let serve. Server gets to serve it again

Receiving Rules:
1) Receiver may stand anywhere
2) Receiver must be ready; if she is not and does not make any attempt to return, a let is called and the serve is made again
3) If receiver attempts to hit a serve she is considered ready
4) Ball must bounce only once on the court before returning
5) After the serve, a ball that hits the net and goes over is good

During play---you lose a point if:


1) Ball bounces twice
2) You fail to return the ball
3) You touch the net with your body, racquet, or clothing
4) You reach over the net to hit a ball. You may contact the ball on your side and follow-through across the net as long as you dont touch it
5) You let a ball touch you or your clothing