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Observation 1

1/18/17 11:10am-12:35pm Math

1. Did the lesson unfold as you (or your CE) had planned? If not, what
changed and why? If yes, what was the #1 aspect of the lesson that went
well? Cite specifics from your Frontline video to affirm your response.

The lesson, for the most part, did unfold as I had planned. There were a few
things that I did not plan for. Some of the concepts were lost on the kids. I
had to change the way that they did things halfway through the lesson (at
first I told them to only compare the expressions by looking at them, but the
group that I had could not understand how to do that, so I told them, once I
realized, that they could check their work.) I did get through the whole lesson
which surprised me with the group of low kids that I have for math.

2. Did the students learn what you had established as the essential
understanding(s) of the lesson? How do you know? Refer to any data or
students' work on the video that helped you to determine the students'
progress.

The students did learn what I had established which was to compare two
expressions. They could do this at the end, they just needed a little help with
checking their work. I know that they were able to do this through the exit
ticket that I gave them at the end. More than half of the students passed the
exit ticket which was WONDERFUL! That almost never happens.

3. Briefly describe (include evidence from your Frontline video ) the


extent of your students engagement during the lesson. If you were not
satisfied with the level of student engagement, what could you have done
differently to improve the engagement of the students? Refer to any
classroom management changes/strategies that could have improved the
engagement of the students.

I believe that the students were engaged almost the entire time. There are
always those transitions and lulls that kids try and use as opportunities to
talk, but this is something that I am trying to work on. When they work in
partners, with three of us in the room, they tend to stay engaged and on
task. I also love that whenever I tell them to turn and talk, everyone is
actually talking about the math question that I posed which is amazing. If
they answered it correctly, I tended to come back with another question to
extend their thinking (e.g. I would ask them to talk about how much bigger
one expression was than another, and if they could give me the right answer,
I would probe more with How do you know that?

4. At what point during your lesson did you realize the students
were/were not understanding your instruction? What did you do to
compensate? Cite specifics from your Frontline video.

There was a point when I was walking around to check the work they were
doing with a person next to them and realized they couldnt compare the two
expressions by only looking at them. I would probe and probe and it still
wouldnt click. To compensate, I told them that they could check their work.
Thinking about the assessment piece of the lesson, I knew that when they
take the test (in class and on the eogs) they will only have to tell how much
bigger one is than the other, or which one is bigger and they will have
multiple choice, so I made this accommodation knowing that it wouldnt
harm them in any way and the standard was still being met.

5. If you could teach this lesson again to the same group of students,
what changes would you make and why? Cite specifics from your Frontline
video with your answer.

I would show them how to check their work so that I would not have to
change that way of thinking in the middle of the lesson.

6. Based upon your reflections, and your post-conference with your


university supervisor/clinical educator, what have you learned about your
teaching strengths and weaknesses? What are some steps that you could
take before your next observation that could strengthen your teaching skills?

I have learned that I am good at utilizing technology, but I still need to work
on some behavior management. Transitions are a time that I have not gotten
down yet and I am working on ways to help that. In order to fix this, I have
already started talking to my CE. I will then try different tactics to see what
works and what didnt. If something eventually works, I am going to stick
with that.
2/1/17, 8:35am-10:15am, ELA- Reading and Writing:

Observation #: 2

1. Did the lesson unfold as you (or your CE) had planned? If not, what changed and why? If yes,
what was the #1 aspect of the lesson that went well? Cite specifics from your Frontline video to affirm
your response.

The lesson unfolded almost exactly as I thought that it would (which actually surprised me). The kids were
participating more than they do other times. I believe that this happened because they love fantasy! The
other thing was that the lesson took the exact amount of time that I expected it to which almost never
happens. I was extremely glad that I got observed on this lesson! The only thing that I didnt expect was
when the small group left the room. This group leaving has been sporadic lately, so I am still getting used
to when they will be in class and what day they wont be for ELA.

2. Did the students learn what you had established as the essential understanding(s) of the lesson?
How do you know? Refer to any data or students' work on the video that helped you to determine the
students' progress.

The students did learn what I wanted them to. I know this because I collected the homework they did
which was another chart like I modeled and the students all knew how to pull out the characters, setting,
and plot from a fantasy story. I also knew they learned what they needed to because they were able to fill
out the fantasy elements chart with the fantasy picture books correctly. As I walked around, I saw that the
students knew how to fill it out and they could correctly pick out the elements from the story.

3. Briefly describe (include evidence from your Frontline video) the extent of your students
engagement during the lesson. If you were not satisfied with the level of student engagement, what could
you have done differently to improve the engagement of the students? Refer to any classroom
management changes/strategies that could have improved the engagement of the students.

The students were more engaged than they usually are which was amazing! Normally I have one or two
students that participate, but during this lesson, almost every student raised their hand at one point and I
tried to get to all of them! There are a few students in the video that I ask to answer questions that do not
have their hand raised, but I dont do this often. This is because I know my students. I know which
students will be okay to answer without raising their hand and which ones wont. The students in the video
that dont ever have their hand raised are students that I know already know the content, but are not very
vocal and they dont speak up because they do not do well talking in front of others. Teaching students to
be okay with doing this would be the next step that I would take.

4. At what point during your lesson did you realize the students were/were not understanding your
instruction? What did you do to compensate? Cite specifics from your Frontline video.
I realized that they were understanding the content when walking around during the time that they were
reading the story. They were annotating where they could see the characters, setting, and plot and as I
walked around, they were also adding in where they could see the different elements of fantasy in the
story. They were also writing those down in their annotations.

5. If you could teach this lesson again to the same group of students, what changes would you
make and why? Cite specifics from your Frontline video with your answer.

If I could teach this lesson again, I think I would look for better fantasy books for students to read in the
groups at the end of the lesson. For this lesson, I had to use what my CE had and what was available at
the library (because I dont have the money for new books and many of the fantasy books were already
checked out). If I could do it again and I had the money for it, I would get some books that I felt worked
amazingly instead of just working well.

6. Based upon your reflections, and your post-conference with your university supervisor/clinical
educator, what have you learned about your teaching strengths and weaknesses? What are some steps
that you could take before your next observation that could strengthen your teaching skills? List specific
North Carolina Teacher Candidate Standards in your answer.

I have learned that I can do mini lessons better than I thought I could. Mini lessons were something that I
didnt fully understand until working with this fifth grade team, and I feel like this lesson really
encompassed the idea of mini lessons. Before my next observation, I can work on standard five of the NC
teaching standards and look at the data more and do some grouping of students prior to the lesson.
Instead of doing random grouping, I could use the assessments to guide my groups for the group work.

*Dr. Palermo asked me a question about pre-assessment with the fantasy unit. I have been talking with
my CE about this and this is something that they, as a team, do by asking students So what do you know
about ____? Students usually respond verbally and that tells them if they need to eliminate anything they
were going to teach. She said that they dont really do written pre-assessments because they dont have
time for them. I was wondering what kind of pre-assessment is being looked for? In my lesson the day
before (first day of fantasy), I know that I did ask the question What do you already know about fantasy?
in the lesson where I introduced fantasy. I was able to see what kids already knew and knew how to pace
my lesson accordingly.
2/15/17, 1:50pm-2:50pm, Science

Observation #: 3

1. Did the lesson unfold as you (or your CE) had planned? If not, what changed and why? If yes,
what was the #1 aspect of the lesson that went well? Cite specifics from your Frontline video to affirm
your response.

The lesson unfolded almost exactly as I thought that it would! This was probably one of my favorite
lessons that I have ever done! All of the technology worked, the students were engaged, and they were
answering questions correctly! The #1 aspect of my lesson (to me) was the final activity that I had them
do. They each got a piece of paper that had a QR code linked to a video about El Nio. They were to
watch the video and answer questions about the video. Not only was this engaging, but it also tied in ELA
with the lesson by making kids think about the source of the video and the audience. I loved this part of
the lesson.

2. Did the students learn what you had established as the essential understanding(s) of the lesson?
How do you know? Refer to any data or students' work on the video that helped you to determine the
students' progress.

The students did learn what I wanted them to. I know this based on their responses to my questions. I
love my science class because they are usually able to think critically about things and they did an
amazing job with El Nio and La Nia. They were able to connect the different weather occurrences that
come with these natural phenomenons and apply them to the effects that would happen around the world.
It was really cool to see the engagement and understanding when they were able to make connections to
real world examples (like rice growing in Asia, and alpacas living in South America).

3. Briefly describe (include evidence from your Frontline video) the extent of your students
engagement during the lesson. If you were not satisfied with the level of student engagement, what could
you have done differently to improve the engagement of the students? Refer to any classroom
management changes/strategies that could have improved the engagement of the students.

Like in my last comment, my students were actively engaged. This science class seems to always be on
top of things, and they always want to learn more. I have one student who wants to explain and answer
everything (he often teaches the class for me). I dont think that the engagement could have been any
better. The kids did a phenomenal job, and I believe I had plenty of transitions (notes, videos,
demonstration, and group work) to keep them engaged for the entirety of the lesson.

4. At what point during your lesson did you realize the students were/were not understanding your
instruction? What did you do to compensate? Cite specifics from your Frontline video.
I realized that they were understanding the content when discussing the demonstration that I did. I probed
them with questions as to what they would think happen based on the change in ocean temperature and
the prior knowledge they had from my previous lessons. They were finally understanding how the air
temperature, space of water molecules, air pressure, condensation, and precipitation came together in El
Nio and La Nia. It was their responses that clued me in to how well they understood the content.

5. If you could teach this lesson again to the same group of students, what changes would you
make and why? Cite specifics from your Frontline video with your answer.

If I could teach this lesson again, I would make on big change. Instead of using Italian dressing in the
demonstration, I would simply use only vegetable oil. I believe that my kids could see the thin layer of oil
floating on the top, but it would have been helpful if it were a little more bold and prevelant. That is the
one thing that I would change.

6. Based upon your reflections, and your post-conference with your university supervisor/clinical
educator, what have you learned about your teaching strengths and weaknesses? What are some steps
that you could take before your next observation that could strengthen your teaching skills? List specific
North Carolina Teacher Candidate Standards in your answer.

I have learned that I create an environment for students that is welcoming and that uses a variety of
instructional methods. I have also learned that I can implement technology into my lessons better than I
thought I could. These are a few things from the teaching standards that I have learned I do well at. I have
grown so much and my university supervisor has told me that I am progressing well. I am more confident
in my teaching and instruction and I believe that is a great improvement.

*Dr. Palermo asked me a question about the demonstration in the activity. This was answered in question
5 of my reflection.
2/27/17, 9:00am-10:15am, ELA: Reading

Observation #: 4

1. Did the lesson unfold as you (or your CE) had planned? If not, what changed and why? If yes,
what was the #1 aspect of the lesson that went well? Cite specifics from your Frontline video to affirm
your response.

The lesson unfolded almost exactly as I thought that it would! The students were engaged, participating,
and they seemed to understand tone and mood better than I thought they would! It played out better than
I thought because there were more students than usual ready to answer questions. In the video you can
see the number of students that have their hands raised for each question. This is more than I usually get
on a Monday which was great!

2. Did the students learn what you had established as the essential understanding(s) of the lesson?
How do you know? Refer to any data or students' work on the video that helped you to determine the
students' progress.

The students did learn what I wanted them to. I know this based on their responses to the questions that
came with the music videos as well as their prior knowledge on tone and mood. They seemed to know
more about figurative language and tone and mood than I expected which helped them really understand
what to do when we watched the videos. They knew that mood is how they feel and tone is how the
author feels. It was even better when they all had different moods towards the songs.

3. Briefly describe (include evidence from your Frontline video) the extent of your students
engagement during the lesson. If you were not satisfied with the level of student engagement, what could
you have done differently to improve the engagement of the students? Refer to any classroom
management changes/strategies that could have improved the engagement of the students.

My students were actively engaged in the lesson. The best example of this was during the video when
some of my students were singing along with the songs. This was exciting to see and told me that they
were completely engaged because the content was relevant to things that they enjoy!

4. At what point during your lesson did you realize the students were/were not understanding your
instruction? What did you do to compensate? Cite specifics from your Frontline video.

I realized that they were understanding the content when they could explain to me the mood and tone of
the different songs. They obviously understood the difference and could tell me what their feeling was
toward the song and what they authors feeling was. The kids felt sad, nothing, happy, and mad during the
song Mean, but they knew that the tone was angry, sad, and confident.
5. If you could teach this lesson again to the same group of students, what changes would you
make and why? Cite specifics from your Frontline video with your answer.

If I could teach this lesson again, I dont think that I would change anything. I loved each part of this
lesson!

6. Based upon your reflections, and your post-conference with your university supervisor/clinical
educator, what have you learned about your teaching strengths and weaknesses? What are some steps
that you could take before your next observation that could strengthen your teaching skills? List specific
North Carolina Teacher Candidate Standards in your answer.

I have learned that I differentiate well! I reviewed with the kids, used videos and visuals, and then went
into guided reading groups. It was amazing to talk with my university supervisor on how I have improved
in this category and how he stated that I look more comfortable in the classroom and with the kids. I
believe this to be true and think that differentiation is becoming one of my strengths the more and more I
teach!
3/6/17, 8:35am-9:30am, ELA: Reading

Observation #: 5

1. Did the lesson unfold as you (or your CE) had planned? If not, what changed and why? If yes,
what was the #1 aspect of the lesson that went well? Cite specifics from your Frontline video to affirm
your response.

The lesson unfolded almost exactly as I thought that it would. It was a weird day to be observed because
they were only doing review. It was two days before the D.C. trip, so the fifth grade team did not want
anything new being done in class. When going over the word of the day, students gave good synonyms
and antonyms. They also gave some great sentences. Once they started their theme packet, they did well
to do their work quietly! It was a good lesson!

2. Did the students learn what you had established as the essential understanding(s) of the lesson?
How do you know? Refer to any data or students' work on the video that helped you to determine the
students' progress.

The students were reviewing today, but I did grade their packets. Based on their performance, they
learned exactly what I wanted them to. Almost all of my students passed the packet and they all had a
good grasp on how to identify the theme of a passage.

3. Briefly describe (include evidence from your Frontline video) the extent of your students
engagement during the lesson. If you were not satisfied with the level of student engagement, what could
you have done differently to improve the engagement of the students? Refer to any classroom
management changes/strategies that could have improved the engagement of the students.

My students were actively engaged during the time that we went over the word of the day. After that, they
worked quietly at their desks. There was not much engagement since it was a day where they were doing
a lot of independent work.

4. At what point during your lesson did you realize the students were/were not understanding your
instruction? What did you do to compensate? Cite specifics from your Frontline video.

I realized that they were understanding the content when they could give me accurate synonyms,
antonyms, and sentences that included the word of the day. The word was penetrate and students were
giving synonyms like piercing, poking, going through, etc.

5. If you could teach this lesson again to the same group of students, what changes would you
make and why? Cite specifics from your Frontline video with your answer.
If I could teach this lesson again, I would definitely play a theme video with an activity before introducing
the packet. I would have loved to show some video clips (ex. Lion King) and ask what the themes were.
This would have shown the kids why it is important to know how to determine the theme and it would
have gotten them more engaged before completing the packet.

6. Based upon your reflections, and your post-conference with your university supervisor/clinical
educator, what have you learned about your teaching strengths and weaknesses? What are some steps
that you could take before your next observation that could strengthen your teaching skills? List specific
North Carolina Teacher Candidate Standards in your answer.

I have learned that I give good feedback to students when they are answering questions. I provide a good
environment for my students and really show them that I care about their learning. One of my
weaknesses is still hooking the class. I do a really good job 90% of the time, but when there is an activity
like this one, where they are only doing independent work, it is easy for me to forget that I still need to
hook them. After this observation, I now have a spot on all of my lesson plans to make sure that I have a
hook no matter what the lesson.