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Table of Contents

America the Beautiful . . . . 1

America (My Country Tis of Thee) . . . . 2

Battle Hymn of the Republic . . . . 3

Caisson Song . . . . 4

Camptown Races . . . . 5

Clementine . . . . 6

Crawdad Song . . . . 7

Down by the Riverside . . . . 8

Erie Canal . . . . 9

Goober Peas . . . . 10

Home on the Range . . . . 11

Marines Hymn . . . . 12

Oh Susanna . . . . 13

Old Dan Tucker . . . . 14

Polly Wolly Doodle . . . . 15

Shenandoah . . . . 16

Star-Spangled Banner . . . . 17

When Johnny Comes Marching Home . . . . 18

When the Saints . . . . 19

Youre a Grand Old Flag . . . . 20


America the Beautiful
Music by Samuel A. Ward
Words by Katherine Lee Bates

Katherine Lee Bates wrote the lyrics to "America the Beautiful" as a poem in 1893. The words were most popularly sung to the tune
of Samuel A. Wards Materna. This combination resulted in the song as we know it today. At various times in the more than 100
years that have elapsed since the song was published, there have been efforts to give "America the Beautiful" legal status either as a
national hymn or as a national anthem equal to, or in place of, "The Star-Spangled Banner." "America the Beautiful" continues to be
held in high esteem by a large number of Americans and is one of Americas most popular patriotic songs.
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O beau - ti - ful for spa - cious skies, for am - ber waves of
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grain, for pur - ple moun - tain maj - es - ties a - bove the fruit - ed

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plain! A - mer - i - ca, A - mer - i - ca, God shed his grace on
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thee, and crown thy good with broth - er - hood from sea to shi - ning sea!

2. O beautiful for pilgrim feet,


whose stern impassioned stress,
a thoroughfare for freedom beat across the wilderness!
America, America! God mend thine evry flaw,
confirm thy soul in self-control, thy liberty in law.

3. O beautiful for heroes proved


in liberating strife,
Who more than self their country loved, And mercy more than life!
America! America! May God thy gold refine
Till all success be nobleness, And ev'ry gain devine!

4. O beautiful for patriot dream,


that sees beyond the years,
thine alabaster cities gleam, undimmed by human tears!
America, America! God shed His grace on thee, and
crown thy good with brotherhood from sea to shining sea.
1
America
Music - British National Anthem
Words by Rev. Samuel Francis Smith

Also known as My Country, Tis of Thee, this song served as one of the unofficial national anthems before the adoption of The
Star-Spangled Banner nearly 100 years later. The melody is the same as that of the national anthem of the United Kingdoms, God
Save the Queen. Samuel Francis Smith wrote the new lyrics in 1831. The song was first performed on July 4, 1831 by a childrens
choir in Boston under the direction of Lowell Mason.

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1.My coun - try, 'tis of thee, Sweet land of lib - er - ty.

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Of thee I sing: Land where my fa - thers died! Land of the

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Pil - grims' pride, From ev - 'ry moun - tain side, Let free - dom ring!

2. My native country thee, Land of the noble free, Thy name I love;
I love the rocks and rills, Thy woods and templed hills;
My heart with rapture thrills, Like that above.

3. Our fathers' God to Thee, Author of liberty, To Thee we sing;


Long may our land be bright, With freedom's holy light;
Protect us by Thy might, Great God, our King!

2
Battle Hymn of the Republic
Music by John William Steffe
Words by Julie Warde Howe

The melody of "Battle Hymn of the Republic" was originally another song, titled John Browns Body, which was written by John William Steffe. Julia
Ward Howe wrote new lyrics to the tune and published them in 1862. The religious text reflects on the judgement wrongdoers may face at the end of
time. Since it was first published, it has become an extremely popular and well-known American patriotic song.
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Mine eyes have seen the glo ry of the com ing of the Lord; he is
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tram pling out the vin - tage where the grapes of wrath are stored; he has
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loosed the fate - ful light - ning of his ter - ri - ble swift sword; his

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truth is march - ing on. Glo - ry, glo - ry hal - le - lu - jah!

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Glo - ry, glo - ry hal - le - lu - jah! Glo - ry, glo - ry hal - le -

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lu - jah! His truth is march - ing on!

2. I have seen him in the watch-fires of a hundred circling camps, 3. He has sounded forth the trumpet that shall never call retreat;
They have builded him an altar in the evening dews and damps, he is sifting out the hearts of men before his judgment seat.
I can read his righteous sentence by the dim and flaring lamps, Oh, be swift, my soul, to answer him, be jubilant, my feet!
His day is marching on. Our God is marching on.
3
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The Caisson Song Edmund L Gruber G7 C

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1.O - ver hill, o - ver dale, We have hit the dust - y trail, And those cais -sons go roll - ing a - long. "Coun - ter
2.To the front, day and night, Where the dough - boys dig and fight, And those cais -sons go roll - ing a - long. Our bar -

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march! Right - a - bout!" Hear those wag - on sol - dier shout, While those cais - sons go roll - ing a - long. For it's Hi! Hi!
rage will be there Fired on the rock - ets flare, Where those cais - sons go roll - ing a - long.

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Hee! In the Field Ar - til - ler - y, Call off your num - bers loud and strong! And wher - e'er we go, You will al - ways
One! Two! Three! Four!

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know That those cais - sons are roll - ing a - long.

"The Army Goes Rolling Along" was made the official song of the United States Army in 1956, yet its history goes back to March 1908 when
Brigadier General Edmund Louis "Snitz" Gruber wrote "The Caissons Go Rolling Along." Gruber came up with a tune that grew from his
experience in battle. After World War II, the U.S. Army conducted a nationwide song contest to find an official song. The Caissons Go Rolling
Along was eventually selected by commanders. However, the Army was unwilling to settle for the popular lyrics so it sent out a call for new
ones. Of the 140 sets of lyrics received, the screening committee selected phrases from which Dr. H. W. Arberg molded an official song.

Although most people sing the old words, the official first verse now reads:
March along, sing our song,
With the Army of the free
Count the brave, count the true,
Who have fought to victory
We're the Army and proud of our name
We're the Army and proudly proclaim
Refrain:
Then it's Hi! Hi! Hey!
The Army's on its way.
Count off the cadence loud and strong,
For where e'er we go,
You will always know
That The Army Goes Rolling Along.
4
Camptown Races Stephen Foster

Camptown Races" was written by preeminent American songwriter Stephen Foster, who first published the song in 1850. Camptown is
in Pennsylvania near Foster's hometown. The phrase "camp town" also refers loosely to the "towns" workers would set up around train
tracks to make it easier to hop trains to get from job to job and town to town. The lyrics talk about a group of workers in a camp town,
who bet on horses to try to make some money.
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The Camp town la dies sing their song, Doo dah, doo dah! The

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Camp town race tracks five miles long, Oh, doo dah day!

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See those hor - ses round the bend, Doo dah, doo dah!

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Guess that race will nev - er end, Oh, doo dah day!

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Goin to run all night, goin to run all day, I
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bet my mon - ey on a bob - tailed nag, some - bo - dy bet on the bay.

2. The longtail filly and the big black horse, Doo-dah, doo-dah! 3. Old muley cow came on the track, Doo-dah, doo-dah!
They fly the track and they all cut across, Oh, doo-dah day! The bob-tail flung her over his back, Oh doo-dah day.
The Blind horse stuck in a big mud hole, Doo-dah, doo-dah! Then fly along like a rail road car, Doo-dah, doo-dah!
Can't touch bottom with a ten foot pool, Oh doo-dah day. Running a race with a shooting star, Oh doo-dah day.
Chorus Chorus
5
Clementine
"Oh My Darling, Clementine" is a popular American Western folk ballad. Its origins, however, lie in an 1863 tune by H.S. Thompson called
"Down By the River Liv'd a Maiden." Like "Clementine," the song is a mock-serious ode to the narrator's deceased lover, who drowned after
she stubbed her toe and fell in the river. Like many American folk songs, it has underwent countless changes through the years.
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In a cav - ern, in a can - yon, ex - ca - vat - ing for a mine, dwelt a

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min - er, for - ty - nin - er and his daugh - ter Clem - en - tine. Oh, my

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dar - ling, oh, my dar - ling, oh, my dar - ling Clem - en - tine! You are

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lost and gone for - ev - er, dread - ful sor - ry, Clem - en - tine!

2. Light she was, and like a fairy,


and her shoes were number nine,
herring boxes without topses,
sandals were for Clementine.
Chorus

3. Drove she ducklings to the water


every morning just at nine
hit her foot against a splinter,
fell into the foaming brine.
Chorus

6
Crawdad Song
The Crawdad Song is a folksong originating in the southern United States. It was first published in a collection of songs in 1917 by
Cecil Sharp, though the original author remains unknown. The song was used for a 'play party' in the early years of the southern
United States. Play party songs are commonly simple melodies with improvised words in responses to the experiences of life. Many
folksongs have their origin in the play party tradition.
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1.You get a line and I'll get a pole, Hon - ey. You get a line and I'll get a pole,
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Babe. You get a line and I'll get a pole, We'll go down to the craw - dad hole, Hon - ey,
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Babe, Mine. 2.Yon - der comes a man with a sack on his back, Hon ey. Yon - der comes a man with a
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sack on his back, Babe. Yon - der comes a man with a sack on his back, Tot - in' all the craw - dads he can pack,
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Hon ey, Babe, Mine. 3.What - cha gon - na do when the lake runs dry, Hon ey.
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What - cha gon - na do when the lake runs dry, Babe. What - cha gon - na do when the lake runs dry,
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Sit on the bank and watch the craw -dads die, Hon ey, Babe, Mine.
7
Down by the Riverside
"Down by the Riverside" is an African-American spiritual song. Its roots date back to before the American Civil War and the composer
remains unknown. The song has alternatively been known as Aint Gonna Study War No More and Gonna Lay Down My Burden.
The song depicts the image of pacifism, the belief that violence is to be avoided at all costs. Because of this, it has been often used as
an anti-war song, especially during the Vietnam war.
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I'm gon - na lay down my bur - den down by the riv - er - side down by the
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riv - er - side down by the riv - er - side. I'm gon - na lay down my bur - den
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Down by the riv - er - side Stu - hu - dy war no more. I ain't gon - na
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stu - dy war no more I ain't gon - na stu - dy war no more Stu - hu - dy
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war no more I ain't gon - na stu - dy war no more I ain't gon - na
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stu - dy war no more. Stu - hu - dy war no more.

2. I'm gonna lay down my sword and shield


Down by the riverside
Down by the riverside
Down by the riverside
I'm gonna lay down my sword and shield
Down by the riverside
Stu-hu-dy war no more
Chorus 8
Erie Canal Thomas Allan
Erie Canal was written in 1905 by Thomas S. Allen. The song is a nostalgic remembrance. Initially, boats on the Erie Canal were
pulled by horses or mules walking along the bank. In the early 1900s, boats with steam powered engines began to replace the
animals pulling the barges. This drastically increased the speed of the canal. The song memorializes the years from 1825 to 1880
when the mule barges made fast cities along its banks, and transformed New York into the Empire State. The song refers to travelers
who would typically ride on top of the boats. The low bridges would require them to get down out of the way to allow safe passage
under a bridge. Em Am Em B7 Em

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I've got an old mule, and her name is Sal, Fif - teen miles on the Er - ie Can - al. She's a good ol' work - er and a
bet - er look 'round for a job old gal, Fif - teen years on the Er - ie Can - al. You bet your life I would - n't
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good ol' pal, Fif - teen miles on the Er - ie can - al We've hauled some bar - ges in our day,
part with Sal, Fif - teen years on the Er - ie can - al. Gid - up there gal we've passed that lock,

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filled with lum - ber coal and hay, And we know ev' - ry inch of the way from Al - ban - y to Buf fa - lo
We'll make Rome 'fore six o' - clock, So one more trip and then we'll go. Right back home to Buf - fa - lo

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Oh Low bridge ev' - ry - bod - y down. Low bridge 'cause we're com - in' to a town and you'll al - ways know your neigh-bor you'll
Oh Low bridge ev' - ry - bod - y down. Low bridge I've the fin - est mule in town Once a man name Mike Mc - Gin - ty, Tried
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al - ways know your pal If you ev - er nav - i - ga - ted on the Er - ie Can - al. We'd Er - ie Can - al.
to take my Sal, Now he's way down at the bot - tom of the

9
Goober Peas A. E. Blackmar
"Goober Peas" is a traditional folk song originating in the Southern United States. It was popular with Confederate soldiers during the American
Civil War, and is still sung frequently in the South to this day. The lyrics of "Goober Peas" are a description of daily life during the last few
years of the Civil War for Southerners. After being cut off from the rail lines and their farmland, they had little to eat aside from boiled peanuts
(or "goober peas") which often served as an emergency ration. Peanuts were also known as pindars and goobers. The publication date on the
earliest sheet music is 1866, published by A. E. Blackmar in New Orleans. Blackmar humorously lists A. Pindar as the lyricist and P. Nutt as the
composer.
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1.Sit - ting by the road - side on a sum - mer's day. Chat ting with my mess mates
2.Just be - fore the bat - tle, the Gen' - ral hears a row. He says, "The Yanks are com - ing, I
3.Now my song has last - ed al - most long e - nough. The sub - ject's in - ter - est - ing, but

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pass - ing time a - way. Ly - ing in the shad - ows un - der - neath the trees.
hear their ri - fles now!" He looks down th road - way, what d'you think he sees? The
rhymes are might - y rough. When this war is o ver, And free from rags and fleas. We'll

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Good - ness how de - li - cious, eat - ing goob - er peas! Peas! Peas! Peas! Peas!
Ten - ess - ee mi - li - tia, eat - ing goob - er peas!
kiss our wives and sweet hearts And gob - ble goob er peas!

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Eat - ing goo - ber peas! Good - ness, how de - li - cious, eat - ing goob - er peas!
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Good - ness, how de - li - cious, eat - ing goob - er peas!

10
Home on the Range
Words by Brewster M. Higley

"Home on the Range" is a classic western song, sometimes called the "unofficial anthem" of the American West. The lyrics were written by Dr.
Brewster M. Higley of Smith County, Kansas in a poem entitled "My Western Home" in the early 1870s. In 1947, it became the state song of the
American state of Kansas. Soon after Franklin D. Roosevelt was first elected president, he declared "Home on the Range" his favorite song.
Because of this presidential endorsement, it was picked up by many entertainers, and frequently played on the radio, until it became immensely
popular worldwide. Members of the Western Writers of America chose it as one of the Top 100 Western songs of all time.

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1.O give me a home where the buf - fa - lo roam, Where the deer and the an - te - lope play. Where

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sel - dom is heard a dis - cour - ag - ing word, And the skies are not cloud - y all day.

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Home, home on the range. Where the deer and the an - te - lope play. Where

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sel - dom is heard a dis - cour - ag - ing word, And the skies are not cloud - y all day.

2. How often at night, when the heavens are bright


With the light from the glittering stars
Have I stood there amazed and asked as I gazed,
If their glory exceeds that of ours.
Chorus

11
The Marines Hymn
The "Marines' Hymn" is the official hymn of the United States Marine Corps, introduced by the first Director of USMC Band, Francesco
Maria Scala. It is the oldest official song in the United States Armed Forces. The author of the lyrics is unknown. The "Marines' Hymn" is
typically sung at the position of attention as a gesture of respect. "The Halls of Montezuma" refers to the Battle of Chapultepec in
September of 1847 during the Mexican-American War, where a force of Marines stormed Chapultepec Castle. "To the shores of Tripoli"
refers to the Tripolitanian War, and specifically the Battle of Derne in 1805.
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From the halls of Mon - te - zu - ma to the shores of Tri - po - li; we
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fight our coun - trys bat - tles in the air, on land and sea. First to

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fight for right and free - dom, and to keep our hon - or clean; we are

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proud to claim the ti - tle of U - ni - ted States Ma - rines.

2. Our flag unfurled to ev'ry breeze, From dawn to setting sun


We have fought in ev'ry clime and place, Where we could take a gun.
In the snow of far off Northern lands, And in sunny tropic scenes;
They will find us always on the job, The United States Marines.

3. Here's health to you and to our Corps, Which we are proud to serve,
In many a strife we've fought for life, And never lost our nerve.
If the Army and the Navy, Ever look on Heaven's scenes;
They will find the streets are guarded, By United States Marines.

12
Oh, Susanna Stephen Foster
Oh! Susanna made its debut in a Pittsburgh ice cream parlor. After its publication, it quickly became known as an "unofficial
theme of the Forty-Niners," with new lyrics about traveling to California with a "wash pan on my knee" (a wash pan was used to find
gold). Within a couple years, gold seekers from every state were singing the song as they headed west to California. The California
Gold Rush was one of the most epic events in American history. Roughly 100,000 people raced to the West Coast after the discovery
of gold in the California foothills in January 1848. These profit-seeking pioneers quickly quadrupled the population of the territory,
speeding its admission into the Union as the nations 31st state.
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I came from Al - a - ba - ma with my ban - jo on my knee, Im
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goin to Lou - si - an - a, my true love for to see. It rained all night the day I left, the
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wea - ther it was dry, the sun so hot I froze to death, Su -

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san - na dont you cry. Oh Su - san - na, oh dont you cry for me, for Ive

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come from Al - a - ba - ma with my ban - jo on my knee.

2. I had a dream the other night, when everything was still;


I thought I saw Susanna dear, a-coming down the hill;
the buckwheat cake was in her mouth, the tear was in her eye,
says I, Im coming from the south, Susanna dont you cry!
Chorus

13
Old Dan Tucker Daniel D. Emmett

The origins of Old Dan Tucker are unknown. The tune may have been a folk song, and the words are often credited to songwriter and
performer Dan Emmett. The Virginia Minstrels popularized "Old Dan Tucker" in 1843 and it quickly became a hit. Today it is a bluegrass and
country music standard. The first sheet music edition of "Old Dan Tucker," published in 1843, is a song of bragging and nonsense.

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1.Come to town the oth - er night, I heard the noise and saw the fight, The watch - man was a - run - nin round, Said

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Old Dan Tuck - er's come to town. Get out the way for Old Dan Tuck - er He's too late to get his sup - per,

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Sup - per's o - ver, and break - fast's cook - in', Old Dan Tuck - er stands there look - in'.

2. Old Dan Tucker was a funny man, He washed his face in a fry-ing pan,
He combed his hair with a wagon wheel, And died with a toothache in his heel.
Chorus

3. Old Dan Tucker's still in town, Swingin' the ladies all around.
First to the right, and then to the left, And then to the one that you love best.
Chorus

14
Polly Wolly Doodle
"Polly Wolly Doodle" was first published in a Harvard student songbook in 1880. Although the songwriter is unknown, it is often thought that
Daniel Decatur "Dan" Emmett was the author. He was an American songwriter and entertainer. Emmett wrote Dixie and is also credited with
the song Turkey in the Straw. Polly Wolly Doodle has its origins as a slave song in the south. Polly Wolly Doodle is mostly likely a nonsense
saying without hidden meaning.

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1.Oh, I went down South to see my Sal, Sing Pol - ly wol - ly doo - dle all the day; My
2.Oh, my Sal - ly is a maid - en fair, Sing Pol - ly wol - ly doo - dle all the day; With
3.Be - hind the barn, down on my knees, Sing Pol - ly wol - ly doo - dle all the day; I
4.He sneezed so hard with whoop - ing cough, Sing Pol - ly wol - ly doo - dle all the day; He

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Sal - ly is a spunk - y gal, Sing Pol - ly wol - ly doo - dle all the day. Fare thee
curl - y eyes and laugh - ing hair, Sing Pol - ly wol - ly doo - dle all the day.
thought I heard a chick - en sneeze, Sing Pol - ly wol - ly doo - dle all the day.
sneezed his head and tail right off, Sing Pol - ly wol - ly doo - dle all the day.

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well, fare thee well, fare thee well, my fair - y fay, For I'm

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going to Loui - si - an - a for to see my Su - zy - an - na, Sing Pol - ly wol - ly doo - dle all the day.

15
Shenandoah
Shenandoah is an American folk song of unknown origin. Until the nineteenth century, only adventurers who sought
their fortunes as trappers and traders of fur ventured as far west as the Missouri River. Most of these men were loners who
became friendly with, and sometimes married, Native Americans. The lyrics tell the story of a trader who fell in love with
the daughter of an Algonquian leader, Shenandoah. American sailors heading down the Mississippi River picked up the
song and made it a sea shanty that they sang while hauling in the anchor.
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Oh Shen-an - do' I long to see you And hear your rol - ling

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riv - er, Oh Shen - an - do' I long to see you, 'way

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we're bound a - way, a - cross the wide Mis - sou - ri

2. I long to see, your smiling valley


And hear your rolling river
I long to see, your smiling valley
'way, we're bound away
Across the wide, Missouri

3. 'Tis seven long years, since last I see you


Away, you rolling river
'Tis seven long years, since last I see you
Away, we're bound away
Across the wide, Missouri

16
Star-Spangled Banner Words by Francis Scott Key
"The Star-Spangled Banner" is the national anthem of the United States of America. The lyrics come from "Defense of Fort McHenry," a poem written
on September 13, 1814 by Francis Scott Key. Key witnessed the bombardment of Fort McHenry by British ships of the Royal Navy in Baltimore
Harbor during the Battle of Fort McHenry in the War of 1812. Key was inspired by the large American flag, the Star-Spangled Banner, flying above
the fort during the American victory. The poem was set to the tune of a popular British song written by John Stafford Smith. This combination resulted
in the song as we know it today and was titled "The Star-Spangled Banner;" it soon became a well-known American patriotic song. Although the poem
has four stanzas, only the first is commonly sung today. "The Star-Spangled Banner" was made the national anthem by a congressional resolution on

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March 3, 1931, which was signed by President Herbert Hoover.
A B7 E

### 3
& 4
#
1.Oh, say can you see by the dawns ear - ly light what so
A E A
5
### .
&
J
F #m
proud - ly we hailed at the twi - lights last gleam - ing. Whose broad
A B7 E
9
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&
#
stripes and bright stars through the per - li - ous fight oer the
A E A
13
### .
&
J
ram - parts we watched were so gal - lant - ly stream - ing. And the
A E
17
###
&
rock - ets red glare, the bombs burst - ing in air, gave
A E F #m B7 E
21
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&
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proof thru the night that our flag was still there. Oh,
A D Bm
25
###
&
say does that star - span - gled ban - ner yet
E A E A
28
### .
& . J J .
wave oer the land of the free and the home of the brave.
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When Johnny Comes Marching Home
Patrick Gilmore

"When Johnny Comes Marching Home" was immensely popular and was sung by both the North and South during the
American Civil War. The song appealed to families on both sides of the Mason-Dixon line by offering hope that their sons
and brothers and fathers would return safely from the combat. Patrick Gilmore, a famous bandleader before the war,
served during wartime as bandmaster for the 22nd New York Regiment. Gilmore wrote this song under the name Louis
Lambert. The melody was similar to several well known Irish folksongs.

Em G

# 6 j j j j
& 8 j j
. .
When John - ny comes march - ing home a - gain, Hur - rah! Hur - rah! We'll

Em G B7

# j j j j
. .
5

&

give him a heart - y wel - come then, Hur - rah! Hur - rah! The
G D Em B7

9
# j j j j
&
J
men will cheer, the boys will shout, the lad - ies they will all turn out and we'll

Em D C B7 Em B7 Em

13
# . j
& . . . .

all be glad when John - ny comes march - ing home!

2. Get ready for the jubilee, Hurrah! Hurrah!


We'll give the hero three times three, Hurrah! Hurrah!
The laurel wreath is ready now,
To place upon his loyal brow,
And we'll all be glad when Johnny comes marching home.

3. Let love and friendship on that day, Hurrah! Hurrah!


Their choicest treasures then display, Hurrah! Hurrah!
And let each one perform some part,
To fill with joy the warrior's heart,
And we'll all be glad when Johnny comes marching home.
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When the Saints Go Marching In
Words by Katharine Purvis
Music by James Milton Black

When The Saints Go Marching In is a song that has penetrated many genres across the musical spectrum. The exact history of the song is not
known, but it is often credited to lyricist Katharine Purvis and musician James Milton Black in 1896. Traditionally this song has been used in many
funeral marches, especially in New Orleans, Louisiana. This popularity, as well as the well-known version released by jazz musician Louis
Armstrong released in the 1930s, helped the song soar in prominence within the pop music world and turned it into a jazz standard.
C

& 44 w w

Oh, when the saints go march - ing in,
G

& w
oh when the saints go march - ing in.
C F

& .
.
Oh, Lord, I want to be in that num - ber,

C G C

..
12

&
w
when the saints go march - ing in.

2. Oh when the sun refuse to shine.


Oh, when the sun refuse to shine.
Oh, Lord I want to be in that number,
when the sun refuse to shine.

3. Oh, when the stars have disappeared.


Oh, when the stars have disappeared.
Oh, Lord I want to be in that number,
when the stars have disappeared.

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You're A Grand Old Flag George M. Cohan

"You're a Grand Old Flag" was written by George M. Cohan for his 1906 stage musical George Washington, Jr. The song was introduced to
the public on opening night, February 6, 1906, in New York. It was the first song from a musical to sell over a million copies of sheet music.
The original lyric for the song came from an encounter Cohan had with a Civil War veteran who fought at Gettysburg. Cohan noticed the vet
held a carefully folded but ragged old flag. The vet turned to Cohan and said, "She's a grand old rag." Cohan thought it was a great line and
originally named his tune "You're a Grand Old Rag." Many groups and individuals objected to calling the flag a "rag," causing him to change
the lyrics and name of the song to Youre a Grand Old Flag.

D A

## 2
& 4 . j j j

You're a grand old flag, you're a high - fly - ing flag; And for - ev - er in peace may you wave; You're the

D A D

9
## j j j
& . j . j j j .

em - blem of the land I love, The home of the free and the brave. Ev - ery heart beats true un - der

B Em D A

19
## j
j j . # j
& n
#

. j
red, white and blue, Where there's nev - er a boast or brag; But should auld ac - quaint -ance be for -

G D A D

#
& #
28

j j j

got, Keep your eye on the grand old flag.

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