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An Evaluation of the Preparing New Educators (PNE) Program

by
Marc J. Summa

An Applied Dissertation Submitted to the


Fischler Graduate School of Education and Human Services in
Fulfillment of the Requirements for the
Degree of Doctor of Education

Nova Southeastern University


2007
Approval Page

This applied dissertation is submitted by Marc J. Summa under the direction of the

persons listed below. It is submitted to the Fischler School of Education and Human

Services and approved in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor

of Education at Nova Southeastern University.

_______________________________________ ____________________

Phyllis Tucker-Wicks, EdD Date


Committee Chair

_______________________________________ ____________________

Cathern Wildey, EdD Date


Committee Member

_______________________________________ ____________________

Maryellen Maher, PhD Date


Executive Dean of Research and Evaluation

ii
Acknowledgments

Looking back on the journey I have taken in this doctoral process, there are so

many people who have provided guidance, support and feedback.

I would like to especially thank my wife, Amanda. You are my heart and my

soul. You fuel my passion to always work hard and are the inspiration behind my love

for life. To my parents, Daniel and Frances, who have given me not only the gift of life,

but instilled in me the determination necessary to achieve my goals. You never accepted

anything but my very best, set the highest of expectations and truly believed in me.

I have always felt that the only way to succeed in life is to surround oneself with

the greatest of friends, colleagues and environment possible to become worldly in ones

profession. My cohort provided so much personally and professionally throughout the

doctoral journey thank you Six Appeal. My professors had the highest respect for my

openness, creativity and opinions, and provided me with the most thought-provoking

insight into the educational profession. Of course none of this could have happened

without the guidance of my advisor, Phyllis Tucker-Wicks, EdD. Your wisdom and drive

is a model for us all to follow.

Finally, I want to thank my children, Madelyn and Daniel, for whom this

doctorate is dedicated because you are the reason I pushed myself to the limit, spent

weekends away from home, and worked intensely on my assignments. I hope that

someday, when you read this dissertation, you feel pride in knowing that your father

became a doctor for the betterment of the education profession and to make a difference

in the life of children.

iii
Abstract

An Evaluation of the Preparing New Educators (PNE) Program. Summa, Marc 2007:
Applied Dissertation. Nova Southeastern University, Fischler School of Education and
Human Services. Beginning Teachers/Mentoring/High School Teachers

This applied dissertation was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of the Preparing New
Educators (PNE) program at the researchers worksite and to provide recommendations
for an induction program designed for new members of the teaching profession. This
study evaluated the researchers school districts PNE program and its effectiveness for
new teachers at the researchers worksite. This study also provided insight into the
programs available within the researchers school district that can assist in the induction
of new teachers as well as the progression of new teachers throughout the first years of
the profession.

The PNE program was a collegial-coaching and induction program designed to help
educators new to the researchers school district. The primary purpose of the program
was to ensure that teachers had the opportunity and support necessary to develop into
highly effective educators. The problem was that the PNE program was designed to assist
new teachers with preparing lessons and acclimating to the classroom environment, but
the program was not achieving its goals. The program also was intended to provide each
new teacher with an experienced teacher for support with guidance, procedural
information, and teaching skills. The criteria and benchmarks used in this program came
from the heavily researched Florida Performance Measurement System (FPMS) and the
Florida Department of Educations Accomplished Practices for Educators of the Twenty-
First Century. The program was flexible so that the varying developmental needs of new
educators would be accommodated. All educators new to the district entered into the PNE
program.

Teachers in the PNE program had to successfully complete six observations; each
observation was measured by a performance instrument. These performance instruments
consisted of six domains, considered by the researchers school district to be a
measurement of a qualified, professional educator. Additionally, each new teacher was
assigned a PNE team, consisting of an administrator and two certified faculty members.
These team members were resources for new teachers throughout their participation in
the PNE program.

This project evaluation enabled the researcher to provide guidelines for a more effective
PNE program for the researchers worksite. It was the intent of this evaluation to increase
the effectiveness of the PNE program, using resources already available at the
researchers school district.

iv
Table of Contents
Chapter 1: Introduction ....................................................................................................... 2
Organizational Setting .................................................................................................... 2
Statement of the Problem ............................................................................................... 2
Purpose of the Study ...................................................................................................... 3
Background and Significance of the Problem ................................................................ 4
Research Questions ........................................................................................................ 4
Definition of Terms ........................................................................................................ 7
Chapter 2: Review of the Related Literature ..................................................................... 10
Literature Review Summary ........................................................................................ 10
Chapter 3: Methodology.................................................................................................... 17
Research Design ........................................................................................................... 17
Participants ................................................................................................................... 17
Instruments ................................................................................................................... 18
Procedures .................................................................................................................... 18
Treatment Program ....................................................................................................... 19
Chapter 4: Results ............................................................................................................. 21
Introduction .................................................................................................................. 21
Analysisof Data ............................................................................................................ 25
Chapter 5: Discussion........................................................................................................ 27
Introduction to Dissertation .......................................................................................... 27
Implications of Findings............................................................................................... 28
Limitations ................................................................................................................... 30
Outcomes ...................................................................................................................... 31
Summary ...................................................................................................................... 32
Recommendations ........................................................................................................ 32
References ......................................................................................................................... 33
Appendices ........................................................................................................................ 36
A Program Theory Diagram ..................................................................................... 37
B Data Collection Instrument ................................................................................... 39
C Teambuilding Workshop Agenda (Sample) ......................................................... 43
D Teambuilding Evaluation Form (Sample) ............................................................ 45
E Collegial Buzz Group Topics ............................................................................... 49
F LEADSPNE Survey .............................................................................................. 53
G LEADSPNE Administrators Guide .................................................................... 66
H LEADSPNE Scoring Key .................................................................................... 70
I LEADSPNE Calculation Worksheet ..................................................................... 83
J LEADSPNE Feedback Summary Sheet ................................................................ 93
K References: LEADSPNE Reading List ................................................................ 95
Tables ................................................................................................................................ 98
1 Teacher Number and Percentage of the Rate of Participation in the LEADSPNE
Survey Process .............................................................................................................. 99
2 Participants Responses to the Individual Professional Development Plan Survey
..................................................................................................................................... 101
3 Participants Responses to New Teacher Induction Program Teambuilding
Workshop .................................................................................................................... 103

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4 Results of the LEADSPNE Survey Using the LEADSPNE Feedback Summary
Worksheet.................................................................................................................... 105

vi
2

Chapter 1: Introduction

Organizational Setting

As the ninth largest school district in the nation, the researchers school district

prided itself on the belief that it would provide the best education in the nation. The

researchers worksite was a high school surrounded by an upper-middle class, vastly

expanding learning community in the southeast section of the school district. Most of the

1,800 students enrolled in college-level and advanced-placement courses in mathematics,

science, social studies, English, and foreign languages offered at the school. According to

the 2004-2005 Florida Department of Education School Accountability Report, the

researchers worksite was one of only three A graded high schools in the school

district.

In 2006, population growth in the surrounding neighborhoods caused student

enrollment at the researchers worksite to exceed 2,000requiring the hiring of

additional teachers, many of whom were new to the teaching profession or lacked the

requisite formal teacher education. The increased student population and influx of

inexperienced teachers challenged the school administrators and teachers.

The researchers role at the worksite was as a social studies teacher and an

administrator in-training. Additionally, the researcher was a member of the graduation

committee, volunteering regularly to assist new teachers to become acclimated to the

school and the education profession.

Statement of the Problem

The problem existing in the researchers school district was that the induction

process for new teachers had not been successful, despite district administrators
3

concerted efforts to develop an effective Preparing New Educators (PNE) program

(School District of Hillsborough County, 2005). In the 2003-2004 school year

7 out of 12 new teachers (58.4%) did not complete the PNE program. There was only a

slight improvement during the 2004-2005 school year, when 14 out of 25 (56%) of the

districts new teachers failed to complete the program.

The researchers school district allowed new teachers to participate in the

program until they completed all PNE components and domains. Administrators at the

researchers worksite expected PNE participants to complete the program within two

consecutive school years.

Participants in this study included new teachers at the researchers worksite for

the following school years: (1) 2004-2005, (2) 2005-2006, and (3) 2006-2007.

Participants in this study were asked to complete surveys that allowed them to reflect on

their experiences and make recommendations for the PNE program. The researcher

tabulated, analyzed, and used the statistical data from several instruments (see

Appendices) in order to evaluate the PNE program.

The data collected over the three school years showed that 80% of new teachers

completing the survey felt they were not adequately supported, and 75% felt that they

needed more assistance in planning. Also, 35% of the surveyed new teachers felt that

morale was low amongst new teachers at the researchers worksite. Given these data, the

researcher identified a strong need to evaluate the effectiveness of the PNE program at

the worksite.

Purpose of the Study

The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the PNE program.

For over 10 years the PNE program had been used in the researchers school district, but
4

no formal program evaluation had been conducted. The domains which new educators

had to pass included the following: (1) presentation of subject matter; (2) management

of student conduct; (3) instructional organization and development; (4) communication

(verbal and nonverbal); (5) instructional planning; and (6) testing (student preparation,

administration, and feedback). Each domain had specific subcategories that were

observed during the PNE evaluation process.

Background and Significance of the Problem

The primary purpose of the PNE program was to ensure that new teachers had the

opportunity and support necessary to develop into highly effective educators. PNE was

designed to assist new teachers in preparing lessons and acclimating to the classroom

environment. The program was also intended to provide each new teacher with an

experienced teacher to support the novice with guidance, procedural information, and

technical teaching skills. PNE was intended to be a collegial-coaching and induction

program.

The criteria and benchmarks in the program came from the state governments

heavily researched Florida Performance Measurement System (FPMS) and the guidance

provided in the Florida Department of Educations Accomplished Practices for Educators

of the Twenty-First Century. The PNE program was intended to be flexible so that

varying developmental needs of new educators could be accommodated. Educators were

observed at least once by their administrator, who used a FPM Screening/Summative

Instrument. All PNE participants were assigned to a support team and, more important,

an experienced teacher early in the year. The mentors role was to coach, support,

encourage, and guide the new teacher through a successful experience during the new
5

teachers first year or for the length of the new teachers participation in the PNE

program.

Research had shown that peer teachers acting as mentors had an impact on new

teachers in ways that were superior to training alone. The real-life classroom presented

questions that only real-life experiences could answer. Mentors helped provide those

answers by (1) giving practical, concrete advice; (2) posing important questions to

prompt reflection; (3) modeling teaching techniques in the classroom; (4) observing and

offering feedback; and (5) suggesting potential alternative solutions to different

problems. Mentors experience helped novice teachers balance professional development

with their day-to-day responsibilities (Moir, 2003). The amount of time that each PNE

participant took to complete the program depended primarily on the participants

teaching proficiency. At the end of the school year, trained auditors visited each of the

district schools to audit participant portfolios for program compliance.

Research Questions

The following research questions formed the structure of this research study:

1. How can the PNE program be effectively evaluated?

2. What specific interventions can be offered as an alternative to the program

that will lead to a change in the way the researchers worksite and the district

present this program?

3. What are the major concerns of teachers and staff regarding the PNE

program?

4. What other teacher-orientation programs currently exist at the high-school

level elsewhere in the state or in other states?


6

5. How should the PNE program be customized to better meet the needs of each

school in the researchers school district?


7

Definition of Terms

504 Plans of the Exceptional Student Accommodations program refers to Section

504 of the Americans with Disabilities Act, which is a federal statute requiring that

students with disabilities have access to public education programs. Students who are

eligible include those served in Special Education programs under the Individuals With

Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and those with other disabilities substantially limiting

a major life function (Kentucky Department of Education, 2006).

ESE, or Exception Student Education, is the title used to describe special-

education services and programs for disabled or gifted students. All students may need

assistance with instruction and assessment from time to time. Accommodations are

simply adjustments in the way students are taught or the way they are expected to

demonstrate learning. For students with disabilities, providing accommodations must be

more deliberate. Students with disabilities require accommodations that will help those

students to work around the limitations resulting from the disabilities. Without the

accommodations, students with disabilities may not be able to learn important concepts

and skills (Accommodations and Modifications for Students With Disabilities Project,

2004).

ESOL is a state-funded instructional program for eligible English Language

Learners (ELLs) in grades K-12. Title III, a federally funded program, provides eligible

Local Education Agencies (LEAs) sub grants to provide supplemental services for ELLs.

Both ESOL and Title III hold students accountable for progress in English language

proficiency and require evidence of attainment to the exit level. The ESOL program is

transitioning from a discrete skills curriculum to a standards-based curriculum

emphasizing language proficiency. The programs overarching standard is that students


8

will use English to communicate and demonstrate academic, social, and cultural

understanding. To reach this standard, it is critical that instructional approaches, both in

ESOL and general-education classes, accommodate the needs of the linguistically- and

culturally-diverse student and parent populations. To the extent practicable, it is

appropriate to use the language spoken in the students homes as a means of facilitating

instruction for English language learners and communication with their parents (Barker,

2005).

FPMS is a measurement tool consisting of six domains designed to define areas of

concern for educators in the Florida Public School System. The FPMS is also used by

school administrators to evaluate performance improvements and deficiencies and to

document them for annual reviews and performance-pay opportunities.

IEP, or the Individual Education Plan, is set by the Admissions, Review, and

Dismissal (ARD) Committee, which sets short- and long-term goals. As with all

educational goals, they must be measurable, observable, and obtainable within the

timeframe set (Attention Deficit Disorder Association, Southern Region, 1997).

LEADSPNE (Leadership Survey for Preparing New Educators) is a measurement

tool developed by the researcher. LEADSPNE is designed to help improve the

performance of instructional personnel at the researchers worksite by focusing on the

needs of the new educator, thus providing feedback to the administrators of the PNE

program.

Mentoring occurs anytime someone seeks to learn from someone else who had

experience in the topic for learning. Preservice, novice, or experienced teachers can have

mentors.
9

PD refers to professional development for teachers to help them learn new roles

and teaching strategies that will improve student achievement. Educators have access to

an expanding body of knowledge about their content area, teaching techniques, and

meaningful, engaged learning for students. This increased flow of informationalong

with the current focus on educational standards that emphasize in-depth learning

experiences and problem-solving abilities in mathematics, science, social studies, and

other disciplineshas made it imperative for teachers to be prepared to implement

change in the classroom (Cook, 1997).

PNE is a program designed to assist new teachers with preparing lessons and

acclimating to the classroom environment. The program was also intended to provide

each new teacher with a mentor to support new teachers with guidance, procedural

information, and technical teaching skills. The primary purpose of the program is to

ensure that teachers have the opportunity and support necessary to develop into highly

effective educators.
10

Chapter 2: Review of the Related Literature

Literature Review Summary

The PNE program attempted to provide an outline for school districts to use in

order to prepare all new educators to meet the challenges of the teaching profession. A

study conducted by Andrew in 1990 found that graduates of 5-year (teacher) programs

had higher entry and retention rates than graduates of 4-year programs. Graduates of the

5-year program were more likely to enter and stay in teaching and to take on leadership

roles (Floden and Wilson, 2003).

Additionally, experiences with coaching, facilitating groups, and other

collaborative models was an important indicator of likely success as a mentor. Successful

mentors had keen observational skills, excellent communication skills, and of course,

patience, enthusiasm, and a love of all kinds of learning (Moir 2003). They also mastered

their content area and spent time in preparing for any assessments.

If we dismiss the opportunity to create life-long educators, an enormous toll will

be taken on the education system. New teachers must constantly be recruited in order to

fill in the gaps when teachers leave the system, exacting a financial burden. But far worse

is the educational cost of teacher attrition. Every teacher who leaves after only a few

years takes vital classroom experience. With each departing teacher was a missed

opportunity to establish lasting relationships between teachers and students, teachers and

parents, and among teaching professionals (Moir, 2003).

It is important, therefore, that when we create life-long professional educators and

provide unlimited professional-development opportunities, the more effective our

mentoring programs will be in our schools. Key to ensuring that teachers, principals, and
11

other educators have the knowledge and skills to meet the challenges of todays

classrooms is ensuring that they have access to sustained, intensive professional

development (Neville and Robinson, 2003).

Excellent teachers have, at one time or another, been influenced by instructors

who fanned the flames of their students educational passion. Excellent teachers also

credited their mentors who encouraged them to continue in the profession. Excellent

teachers allow their passion to shape them in their profession (Zarra, 2003).

Teachers entering the profession with an academic background in education

nevertheless find it challenging to translate their education courses into effective teaching

practice. An instructional gap, whether from insufficient training or lack of true

preparation, must become the focus of a new teachers professional-development plan. It

appears that teacher-education students may learn to think differently about the subject

matter they teach as a result of participating in teacher education programs (Floden and

Wilson, 2003).

According to the Vermont Early Childhood Work Group (2001), the quality of

childrens experiences depends largely on the knowledge, experience, and skills of the

people who work with them. Everyone who works with young children and their

families needs a basic understanding of child development and early education. As

professional interest and demands of the field change, it is important to expand

knowledge and skills. To provide children with the best, it is important that we strive for

the best in ourselves, personally and professionally.

According to Adela Solis, PhD (2004), a severe and persistent national shortage

of teachers has greatly compromised the quality of teaching in todays schools. This

shortage has become especially troublesome at a time when students face an ever-
12

growing demand to master challenging standards. Many students are being taught by

teachers who have not been certified or who are teaching subjects outside their expertise.

As a result, we are seeing the federal government and professional organizations address

the problems and spearhead ways to improve teacher quality.

The most relevant source for a definition of teacher quality comes from federal

law, which focused on credentials and content expertise. The No Child Left Behind Act

required a highly qualified teacher in every school classroom by the end of 2005. The

Act authorized a number of programs to recruit, certify, and place teachers in high-

need schoolsprimarily through alternative routes to certification initiatives (Solis,

2004).

In an attempt to comply with the law and obtain quality versus quantity, how are

potential college students and education majors, reacting to the recruitment effort? What

is being done to entice college-aged students or even professionals in other fields to the

education profession? Additionally, how is the federal government going to ensure that

teacher quality is being obtained and retained?

There is no doubt that high-quality teaching has been influenced by the lack of

teachers and by the presence of teachers who are teaching outside their field. In all

classrooms, teacher inexperience and lack of accurate pedagogical knowledge make it

difficult for students to receive sound instruction. An additional threat to quality is the

inability to retain new teachers once they are recruited, trained, and placed in schools.

Solis (2004) found that the increasing numbers of teachers who came into the field

through alternative certification programs exacerbated the retention problem. So how

does the federal government propose to integrate a successful recruitment and training

program into the education profession? What alternative resources can be tapped to
13

further the development of educational excellence among new classroom teachers?

In Texas, the Intercultural Development Research Association (IDRA) provides

several alternative certification projects that are funded by the Transition to Teaching

program of the U.S. Department of Education. The mentoring of and support for teacher

candidates of the IDRA projects supplements the new teacher services already provided

by the school district. The districts new teacher support and mentoring program is

coordinated through the professional development department. Its services are geared

toward all first-year teachers, whether they are certified through a traditional certification

program, emergency certification, or alternative certification.

Key features of this program include the following: pairing of a novice teacher

with a veteran teacher, having a teacher buddy, creating a new teacher support group,

and building a grade-level or content-area team (Solis, 2004). This support system is

crucial to the success of the new teacher and the development of excellence in quality.

It should be used at all levels, in all school districts, throughout the nation. This IDRA

project serves as a model for educational effectiveness and should be embraced and

promoted at the local, state, and federal level.

Mentors prepare new teachers in ways that no amount of training can. The real-

life classroom presents questions that only real-life experiences can answer. Mentors help

provide those answers by giving practical, concrete advice; posing important questions to

prompt reflection; modeling teaching techniques in the classroom; observing and offering

feedback; and suggesting another point of view at a time when it is easy to lose all

perspective. Moir found (2003) that mentors help novice teachers balance professional

development with day-to-day details.


14

A successful induction and mentoring program can help ensure that after the first

year, a novice teacher has acquired requisite skills, confidence, and motivation. A new

teacher observed:

My advisor kind of walked me through the year. She is always there to


listen to my ideas, my reflections. I never felt that I was alone, even when
she isnt in the room, because I knew that I had daily access to a person
who would listen and respond to my ideas. I trusted her to give me honest
feedback on how successfully a strategy workedshe met whatever needs
I had (p. 3).

Understanding the changes and transitions in adults lives enables adult educators to

anticipate learning needs that arise at various life points, understand how life events

facilitate or inhibit learning in a particular situation, prepare adults for life changes,

capitalize on teaching moments to accelerate learning, and plan learning experiences

that are more meaningful (Knowles, Holton & Swanson, 2005). A new teachers

experiences in and out of the classroom, with the assistance of an effective mentor, will

remain with the new educator.

Research reaffirmed that another way in which the PNE program could be an

effective tool for developing excellent teachers was by using reflective practice, which

encouraged teachers to learn from experiences and collaborate more efficiently with

colleagues. In the teacher-education community, many advocated reflective practice and

adopted this paradigm in preparing teachers.

Administrators and experienced teachers must take ownership for mentoring

beginning teachers so they are prepared for the complexities of everyday teaching and

decision making. Collaborative reflection can positively affect professional growth and

development by leading participants to a greater sense of self-awareness. Research


15

reaffirmed that by becoming independent and reflective thinkers, beginning teachers were

able to cooperate, contribute, and grow professionally.

The role of the mentor during reflective dialogue is not only to provide answers

but to help beginning teachers develop their own answers and pose questions. Mentors

can use many strategies to help beginning teachers organize their thoughts and make

sense of classroom events. Reflection on teaching often starts in the university and ends

in the school to which the new teacher is assigned.

The literature repeatedly stated that with encouragement, beginning teachers can

incorporate what they learned in their teacher-preparation programs into the real-world

experiences of their classroom. A beginning teacher can share verbal reflections with a

mentor whose experience and support can help during the first year. By engaging in

reflective practice, beginning teachers can reflect not only on technical aspects but also

on the social and moral issues of teaching (Pedro, 2006).

Research and practice reaffirmed that supporting new teachers in their first years

of teaching was where the focus should be if we want teaching quality and retention.

Studies showed that well-designed mentoring programs lowered the attrition rates of new

teachers. Experience with mentoring in the classroom demonstrated that this type of new

teacher support can promote quality in the new teachers instruction: New teachers were

more motivated to make teaching a life-long career.

Mentoring in teaching was especially important for new teachers during their

induction year (induction is the process of joining a profession; in education it is typically

the first year of teaching). According to Barry Sweeney (2001), Mentoring during

induction is a complex and developmental process which mentors use to support and

guide their protg through the necessary early career transitions which are part of
16

learning how to be an effective, reflective educator and career-long learner (Solis,

2004).

After reviewing the literature, the researcher identified that the PNE program

could be improved in order to make the program more effective. The researcher identified

that there was no clear explanation of what the purpose for the PNE program was or how

the program was designed to assist in new teachers professional growth and

development. For an organizations professional-development program to succeed, the

following program criteria must be articulated. (1) purpose, (2) benefits, and (3)

drawbacks. Once these criteria are established, identifying how shall we get there

becomes extremely important. Only then can the organization determine whether the

value of the development program is successful (Bethower and Smalley, 1998).


17

Chapter 3: Methodology

Research Design

This was a quasi-experimental methodology. In order to evaluate the

effectiveness of the current PNE program and provide an intervention to be followed at

the researchers worksite, there are several steps that are taken. First, the formative

committee is formed. The formative committee consisted of the researcher, several

teachers (one from each department) and one administrator. The formative committee

met prior to the evaluation process to discuss the plan of how to conduct the evaluation

and to suggest any changes or additions to the timeline. The summative evaluation

committee consisted of the researcher, several teachers not participating in the formative

committee (one from each department), and one administrator. The summative

committee met to discuss which of the measurement tools would be used in the

evaluation of the program. Additionally, the summative committee met at the conclusion

of the evaluation and used the LEADSPNE data collection instruments, as well as a

FPMS form to provide statistical evidence for the researchers final recommendations.

The summative evaluation and subsequent intervention had a preliminary outline

developed and submitted for approval by the administration at the researchers worksite.

Participants

The design of the evaluation is a quasi-experimental design with non-

randomization of the treatment group and control group due to the fact that the specific

guidelines of the Preparing New Educators program prohibit any new educators from

being excluded from the program. However, the researchers worksite had a system

already in place of after-school committees that each faculty member are a part of and are
18

an active participant. One such committee is specifically designed for new teachers

called collegial buzz group and this was the foundation for the treatment group. Once

administrative approval is provided, the collegial buzz group consisted of twenty

members among the forty new teachers at the researchers worksite and are randomly

selected alphabetically by last name, selecting the first person to be assigned to the

treatment group and the second person to be assigned to the control group, and so on after

to ensure an even numerical distribution. The remaining twenty new teachers formed

another committee known as Wolves 101.

Instruments

In order to effectively evaluate the Preparing New Educators program, the

researcher used mean scores, standard deviation, standard error, t-scores and z-scores to

determine confidence level, validity and reliability of the treatment provided to research

participants in Table 3 of this applied dissertation. Additionally, the statistical data are

collected by using the surveys and evaluations provided in the appendices section of this

dissertation.

Procedures

Each new teacher at the researchers worksite is invited to participate in pre-

service trainings conducted by the Program Evaluation Committee for a non-specified

amount of time, prior to the scheduled pre-planning dates, where the New Educators

Induction program took place. They are introduced to their PNE team members, the

Program Evaluation Committee, and the administrative staff at the researchers worksite.

After their orientation to the building and questions are answered, the two groups are

formed, without prior knowledge of the participants. When pre-planning began, the
19

collegial buzz treatment group met several times throughout the pre-planning schedule to

discuss the PNE program in detail, including the evaluation process and the specifics of

the domains that determined successful completion of the program. Additionally, an in-

depth question and answer session concluded each meeting. The Wolves 101 control

group met only once during pre-planning to receive a brief overview of the program and

its evaluation process. On the first day of school, the collegial buzz treatment group met

to discuss any problems or concerns participants had with the first day of school and any

problems they detected.

Treatment Program

The outline for each collegial buzz group meetings can be found in Appendix E

and addressed fifteen areas which research shows are the most important areas for new

teachers to focus their attention to meet the requirements of the PNE program as well as

become highly qualified professional educators. Several of the topics of the collegial

buzz group meetings included; curriculum development, classroom management, moral

and ethical development, diversity training and integrating technology into the classroom.

Throughout the school year, the collegial buzz treatment group met twice a

month, set for a specific day such that all members are available to meet, for after-school

in-service trainings on each of the domains of the PNE program provided by veteran

teachers or staff development personnel from the researchers school district. At the end

of each nine week session, the PNE team and administrative staff met with each collegial

buzz group member to discuss professional development, curriculum concerns and

classroom management techniques. The Wolves 101 group met once a month on un-

specified days for limited PNE discussion groups. Throughout the school year, the
20

standard Preparing New Educators domains are used to observe and evaluate all of the

new teachers performance. At the end of the school year, the Program Evaluation

Committee conducted the LEADSPNE data collection survey forms, as well as an

unofficial FPMS evaluation to test the results of the intervention programs effectiveness.
21

Chapter 4: Results

Introduction

This chapter is organized in terms of the five specified research questions

proposed by the researcher in Chapter 2 of this dissertation. The research questions

providing the research conducted are as follows:

1. How can the PNE program be effectively evaluated?

2. What specific interventions can be offered as an alternative to the

program that will lead to a change in the way the school and the

county present this program?

3. What are the major concerns of teachers and staff regarding the PNE

program?

4. What other PNE programs currently exist in the high school setting?

5. How should the PNE program fit the needs of the school?

The purpose of the research study is to evaluate the effectiveness of the Preparing

New Educators program. This type of research study could uncover much of which had

been the questioning behind the education profession are teachers being successfully

prepared for the rigors of teaching and are they being monitored for their progress (or

lack there of)?

Data are collected from self-administered surveys, developed by the researcher, to

high school teachers in a paper form, specifically designed to examine the Preparing New

Educators program. The data collected are analyzed by the Individualized Professional

Development Survey, LEADSPNE Scoring Key, LEADSPNE Calculation Worksheet,

LEADSPNE Feedback Summary and an unofficial FPMS form.


22

A description of the applied dissertation study sample was presented in Chapter 1

and is followed by statistical data relating to the research questions. The research study

consisted of 40 new high school teachers at a site-based school in a large school district

in the southeast. For the purpose of this applied dissertation study, participants are

recruited using a convenience sampling methodology. Of the 40 new high school

teachers, 20 are randomly selected to participate in the Collegial Buzz Group treatment

group. Table 1 on page 93 of this applied dissertation presents the teacher number (for

anonymity purposes) and response rate of surveys provided to new teachers who

participated in the IPDP, LEADSPNE, and New Teacher Workshop process.

Once the statistics are gathered, the summative committee used each of the

instruments and provided the results which are defined throughout this chapter.

Meanwhile, the formative committee discussed the various research questions originally

formulated at the beginning of the study and assessed the state of the program after the

study is conducted. Additionally, the formative committee reviewed how the evaluation

is conducted and suggested that the timeline to conduct the study is effective. The data

are measured by determining the mean, standard deviation, standard error, z-score and t-

score of responses provided by participants in each of the surveys provided throughout

the research study process.

Research question 1 is: How can the PNE program be effectively evaluated? In

order to effectively evaluate the PNE program, the researcher used the Individual

Professional Development Plan Survey (Appendix B) to determine the initial needs of

participants in the study. Table 2 on page 95 of this applied dissertation presents the

results of the Individual Professional Development Plan Survey. A response of Yes


23

equaled three quality points, Yes, But Needs Work equaled two quality points, and

No equaled one quality point.

As a result of the Individual Professional Development Plan Survey, participants

characterized their needs to be in the areas of professional development, but not limited

to; understanding educational and performance goals, current skill knowledge of school

leadership, activities to focus on learning gaps, research on effective methods of teaching,

school/district policies and procedures, time allocation and financial stipends for training,

and the evaluation process of student performance.

Research question 2 is: What specific interventions can be offered as an

alternative to the program that will lead to a change in the way the school and the county

presents this program? The answer to this question in chapter 5 and can be found, in part,

through the information provided in Appendices C and E. Appendix D is used by the

researcher to evaluate Appendix C and the results of the evaluation are found in Table 3

on page 97 which concluded that there is a 99 percent confidence level of the results of

the evaluation. The t-score is calculated by using the formula t = 10z + 50, where as the

variable z is obtained by taking the participants score (X) and subtracting the mean score

() divided by the standard error (s.e.) in the formula z = X - / s.e.

Additionally, participants in the New Teacher Induction Program Teambuilding

Workshop had commented that prior to the workshop their understanding of the domains

of the PNE program is not explained in the detail that the researcher provided.

Additionally, the participants stated that they are thankful that the researcher provided an

opportunity to learn the process involved in the completion of the PNE program.

Research question 3 is: What are the major concerns of teachers and staff

regarding the PNE program? Compiled statistical data using Appendix H as a scoring
24

key and is reflected in the calculation worksheet (Appendix I). As a result of the survey,

the participants identified several areas/behaviors that the leader(s) of the PNE program

are incomplete in providing and the area/behavior in parentheses include, but are not

limited to; mentioned that corrective and effective feedback are important (curriculum

development), told everyone that a syllabus was required, but should be completed during

pre-planning time (time management), stated that providing a safe, caring and nurturing

environment was the goal of the school district (classroom management), expressed the

importance of having morals and values as an educator (moral and ethical development),

explained that an educator should expect to have parent-teacher conferences when

necessary (parent communication), stated that there are times when the school practices

specific drills to familiarize yourself (the teacher) with the plans (general policies and

procedures), stated that the 21st century will need to include advanced technology in the

classrooms (integrating technology), and briefly stated that there are six (6) domains in

the PNE program (PNE domains introduction). All of these areas/behaviors had an

average response of less that 2.50 from participants and are specifically identified by

participants as deficiencies in the PNE program process.

Research question 4 is: What other PNE programs currently exist in the high

school setting? After much observation of the participants in the PNE program within

their individual classrooms and during collegial buzz group meetings, as well as the

research conducted on school-wide programs, it is concluded that no other program

existed in the high school setting to prepare new educators for the rigors of the education

profession. However, several recommendations are provided in chapter 5 on how to

effectively prepare new educators for the fifteen identified areas of needs of teachers for
25

growth within the profession. Appendix E provides an outline of the fifteen identified

areas. Appendix K provides a reading resource list for the identified areas of need.

Finally, research question 5 is: How should the PNE program fit the needs of the

school? After providing participants with literary resources, an after-school workshop,

an after-school training session, discussion forums, and the LEADSPNE survey

(Appendix F), the several areas of need as expressed in Table 4 on page 99 of this applied

dissertation which are defined previously in this chapter. Statistically, the treatment

group responded to the surveys, provided in Appendices B and F, with the subsequent

results, identified previously in this chapter, which are tallied using the overall averages

for the responses to Appendix B and the LEADSPNE Administrators Guide (Appendix

G), the LEADSPNE Scoring Key (Appendix H), the LEADSPNE Calculation Worksheet

(Appendix I) and the LEADSPNE Feedback Summary Worksheet (Appendix J).

Analysis of Data

The researcher found that participants expressed an overwhelming need for

direction and guidance throughout their Preparing New Educators experience. As a result

of the average score being 2.83, whereas the LEADSPNE development team anticipated

the outcome to be closer to the average of 3.13. The statistical evidence concluded that

there are several areas that the researcher believed were cause for concern; therefore the

researcher will provide recommendations in chapter 5 of the changes needed to the PNE

program. This determination can be proven in the statistical and verbal evidence

provided by the participants in the collegial buzz treatment group.

The commentary provided by several of the participants included their displeasure

with the overall PNE process, including the lack of any induction process to the PNE
26

program, as well as a deficient mentorship program. Each participant voiced an opinion

in regards to the PNE program in the comment section of the collegial buzz treatment

group evaluation form, Appendix D, and was described previously in this chapter.
27

Chapter 5: Discussion

Introduction to Dissertation

The purpose of the applied dissertation was to evaluate the Preparing New

Educators program and determine if, in its current state, it was effective in truly preparing

a new teacher for all aspects of the education profession. After surveying prior and

current PNE participants and determining that 80% of new teachers felt they were non-

supported, 75% of new teachers felt that more assistance was needed in instructional

planning, and 35% of new teachers felt that morale was low; the writer was able to focus

on these specific areas to assist in the evaluation of the PNE program. This evaluation

process provided the writer with a great deal of insight into the overall effectiveness of

the program, as well as a strong understanding of the specific needs of the participants in

the program.

The subjects for this study were 40 new teachers from an upper-middle class

neighborhood high school in a large school district in the southeast. Subjects for the

study were selected from a convenience sample and the 20 participants in the treatment

group were randomly selected from the sample group.

There were three instruments used in the research project. The Individual

Professional Development Plan survey form was used to compile data on the needs of the

participants in the study. Secondly, the New Teacher Induction Program Workshop

evaluation form was used to indicate the effectiveness of a workshop designed to

promote teamwork amongst members of the PNE program teams. Finally, the

LEADSPNE survey was administered to the study participants to measure the specific
28

needs in the fifteen areas identified by the researcher as statistically significant for

effective educational growth and development amongst new teachers.

Implications of Findings

According to Neville and Robinson (2003), the key to ensuring that teachers,

principals, and other educators have the knowledge and skills they need to meet the

challenges of todays classrooms is ensuring that they have access to sustained, intensive

professional development. In order to develop a highly effective, truly motivated,

professional educator, there must be a system in place that will organize the Preparing

New Educators program into a well-defined, relevant, applicable and effective process.

After careful observation, experimentation and evaluation, it had been determined that

the deficiencies of the PNE program include; a lack of an induction process that

introduces the PNE program for the new teachers entering the profession, inconsistency

in providing training opportunities for the new teachers throughout the process,

insufficient mentoring assistance throughout the program, and an inadequate evaluation

and feedback forum provided for new teachers to correct their deficiencies to improve in

their need for professional development.

Additionally, the following conclusions materialized from the results of the study.

The PNE program can be effectively evaluated using statistical data compiled by the

researcher using mean scores which indicated the average level of responses of the

participants and compared those scores with anticipated outcomes; standard deviation

which is defined as a probability distribution, random variable, or population or multiset

of values used as a measure of the spread of its values; standard error which is defined as

the standard deviation of the difference between the measured or estimated values and the
29

true values; t-scores (or standardized scores) measured the conversion (transformation) of

raw individual scores into a standard form, where the conversion was made without

knowledge of the population's mean and standard deviation; and the z-scores determined

a 99 percent confidence level of the treatment provided to research participants. There

are several interventions that can be offered as an alternative to the current program that

exists in the school and district that can change the effectiveness of the program. One of

the suggested changes, entitled the New PNE Program, can be found in Appendix E of

this applied dissertation which defines the fifteen areas of need for new teachers.

Additionally, Appendix E provides the corresponding staff development training

opportunities offered as part of the office of staff developments professional

development training program. The writer recommends that these programs be used

throughout the PNE program process as a major tool for the progression of participants in

their professional development.

As defined in chapter 4, the major concerns of the PNE participants, as well as the

teachers and staff who have completed the PNE program include, but are not limited to;

the belief that the teachers involved in the program are not receiving the guidance,

mentorship, or training needed to grow professionally in education, the time that was

involved in preparing for classes versus the time involved for professional growth was

lacking throughout the school year, and that there was a lack of an induction process that

defines and exemplifies the fifteen areas identified by the writer. Currently there are no

programs that exist in the high school setting that can assist teachers in their professional

growth and development. It is recommended that the PNE program be designed to

develop one-time new teachers into long-term educational professionals through the

effective usage of the PNE program. The PNE program should not be streamlined
30

throughout the writers school district. Each school should have the ability to tailor the

design of the PNE program to fit the needs of the school. It is recommended that through

surveying the new teachers on their professional development needs, as well as utilizing

the districts office of staff development to provide specific trainings, the effectiveness of

the PNE program would be reflected in the results of the teachers ability to provide a

safe, efficient, and desirable environment for students to grow academically.

Limitations

This program evaluation and intervention set an attrition rate of 25% percent.

Provided that this rate is not exceeded, the results of the evaluation and subsequent

intervention are determined to be valid. Additionally, many variables affected the

outcomes in this evaluation process. The first variable is the inability to control the

number of participants in the study that are of the same race, color, creed, ethnicity,

gender, sexual orientation, religion or educational experience. Secondly, the amount of

or level of the students in which the new teachers are assigned to teach cannot be

controlled due to the types of courses offered at the researchers worksite. For example,

a senior English teacher may have been assigned only twenty students to his/her honors

class, while a freshmen American Government teacher may have had as many as thirty-

five regular level students. Thirdly, the level of education that each new teacher had will

vary between required bachelors degrees and masters degrees, as well as concentration

areas. Also, because of the extreme teacher shortage in the state, many new teachers had

alternative certification in areas that are not related to education, yet are still allowed to

teach regular education students provided they agree to take part in both the PNE

program and the researchers school districts Alternative Certification Program. There
31

are equal numbers in each group. Limitations also altered the results of the evaluation.

One such limitation is the amount of available time and space for collegial buzz group

and Wolves 101 meetings. Additionally, availability of the support personnel for

collegial buzz group meetings is limited due to inability to require teachers to remain

after-school due to contractual guidelines and stipulations.

Outcomes

It is the goal of this program evaluation and intervention to provide a strong,

positive and successful induction process for new teachers entering the profession. The

effectiveness of the Preparing New Educators program is vital to the future

accomplishments of our education system and the students, parents, stakeholders and

communities the school district serves.

The teaching profession had historically expected initiates to perform as

competently (and independently) as veterans. Understandably, new teachers often feel a

tremendous pressure to get everything going at once! Remember that running all of your

different programs, especially if youre in a self-contained classroom or working with a

number of different preparations, demands familiarity with the content and management

of each program, the development and preparation of materials and the establishment of

the learning skills necessary to function successfully in each class. All of these take time.

Ask more experienced teachers for reality checks or suggestions for pacing, prioritizing

and implementing that will work for you (Bluestein, 2007). Dr. Bluestein provided

tremendous advice to those just entering the education profession look for guidance

from those who have been there before. Build a support system by identifying one or

several members of your staff with whom you feel capable of developing a close working
32

relationship. Approach people with a blend of confidence and openness. You may be new

and willing to grow, but you are also a very capable person and you belong there as much

as anyone (2007).

Summary

The writer believes that all new educators to the school district, through proper

training and education, will embrace the envisioned PNE program wholeheartedly due to

intrinsic qualities that are correlated to the desire to attain employment in the education

profession. Additionally, the writer knows that there have been no recent efforts made to

examine the PNE program and assess its effectiveness. Therefore, any members of the

school district willing to take on this daunting task are supported by all levels of the

school district staff. Finally, any person who enters education and believes that there is

no room for improvement is not an experienced educator. In other words, teachers do not

enter into the education field for money, fame, or power. Teachers go into the education

profession to watch children grow into responsible young men and women and for that

person to have a direct effect on that growth process.

Recommendations

The following recommendations for future research include: a study conducted at

various site-based schools in the writers school district with a larger heterogeneous

student and faculty population conducive to a district-wide initiative to examine and

possibly alter the current Preparing New Educators program. A more comprehensive

study without time constraints or limitations as to participants within the study should

prove valuable to the writers school-district, an examination of induction processes and

mentoring practices for new teachers being conducted nationwide and the implementation
33

of such practices to be included in the various Preparing New Educators programs, or the

like, in school districts throughout the country. It is the responsibility of the school

district, administration, and educators to utilize current, as well as future educational

resources to improve the teaching profession. By doing so, the general public will view

the teaching profession as one in which the level of respect, as well as the level of

salaries, will reach those of other professions.

References

Accommodations and Modifications for Students with Disabilities Project (2004).


Teaching Resources for Florida ESE. Florida State University. Retrieved on
September 11, 2006 from http://www.cpt.fsu.edu/ese/cs/legal/who.html
34

Attention Deficit Disorder Association Southern Region (1997). Developing an IEP.


Retrieved on September 8, 2006 from http://www.adda-sr.org/iep.htm

Barker, E. (2005). Georgia Department of Education: ESOL Program. Retrieved on


September 11, 2006 from http://www.glc.k12.ga.us/pandp/esol/homepg.htm

Bethower, D. & Smalley, K. (1998). Performance-based instruction: Linking training to


business results. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Bluestein, J. (2007). Great Expectations: Good News for Beginning Teachers. Retrieved
on May 22, 2007 from http://www.janebluestein.com/articles/great_exps.html

Cook, C. (1997). Critical Issue: Evaluating Professional Growth and Development.


Retrieved on September 8, 2006 from
http://www.ncrel.org/sdrs/areas/issues/educatrs/profdevl/pd500.htm

Floden, R.E., & Wilson, S.M. (2003). Creating Effective Teachers: Concise Answers for
Hard Questions. An Addendum to the Report Teacher Preparation Research:
Current Knowledge, Gaps, and Recommendations. Michigan: Education
Commission of States, American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education,
& ERIC Clearinghouse on Teaching and Teacher Education. (ERIC Document
Reproduction Service No. ED476366)

Joe E. Newsome High School Advisory Council (2004). School Improvement Goals for
2004 - 2005. Retrieved October 31, 2005 from
http://apps.sdhc.k12.fl.us/sdhc2/schoolsite/SIPPLANS/3171.pdf

Kentucky Department of Education (2006). Section 504 of the Americans Disabilities


Act. Retrieved September 8, 2006 from
http://www.education.ky.gov/KDE/Instructional+Resources/Student+and+Family
+Support/Exceptional+Children/Section+504.htm

Knowles, M., Holton, E., & Swanson, R. (2005). The adult learner (6th ed.). Houston:
Gulf Publishing.

Merriam-Webster (2006). Merriam-Webster OnLine Dictionary. Retrieved on October


20, 2006 from http://www.m-w.com/dictionary/excellence
35

Moir, E. (2003). Launching the Next Generation of Teachers through Quality Induction.
California: National Commission on Teaching and Americas Future. (ERIC
Document Reproduction Service No. ED479764)

Neville, K. & Robinson, C (2003). The Delivery, Financing, and Assessment


Professional Development in Education: Pre-Service Preparation and In-Service
Training. Ishington D.C.: Institute of Education Services. (ERIC Document
Reproduction Service No. ED482979).

Pedro, J. (2006). Taking Reflection in the Real World of Teaching. Indianapolis, IN:
Kappa Delta Pi Record. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. EJ738071).

School District of Hillsborough County (2005). Office of Staff Development: Preparing


New Educators. Retrieved November 1, 2005, from
http://apps.sdhc.k12.fl.us/public/dept/staffdev/PNE

Solis, A. (2004). The Role of mentoring in Teacher Quality and Retention. San Antonio,
TX: Intercultural Development Research Association. (ERIC Document
Reproduction Service No. ED484937).

Vermont Early Childhood Work Group (2001). Planning Your Professional Growth:
Creating an Individualized Professional Development Plan for Early Care and
Education. Vermont: Professional Preparation and Development Committee of
the Vermont Early Childhood Work Group. (ERIC Document Reproduction
Service No. 455970).

Zarra, E. (2003). Taking It to the Next Level: Components of Excellence Secondary


Educators. Annual Meeting of the American Association of Colleges for Teacher
Education. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED472814).
36

Appendices
37

Appendix A

Program Theory Diagram

Program Theory Diagram

Causes of the Problem


- Lack of Time Available to Adequately Acclimate New Educators to the School
- Unwillingness/Inaccessibility of Support Staff for Mentoring/Coaching
- Hiring of New Educators isContinuous throughout the School Year
38

The Problem(s)
- Lack of Induction Program for New Educators
- Lack of Mentoring/Coaching Support Staff for New Educators
- Lack of Formal Pre-Service Training for New Educators

Solution Strategies and Interventions


- Develop an Induction Program for New Teachers during Pre-Planning
- Provide Continuous Mentoring/Coaching Throughout PNE Program
- Provide Effective Feedback through Weekly/Monthly/Yearly Performance
Measurement Evaluations

Evaluate the Effectiveness of Intervention


1. Formative
- Defining the Program Problem
2. Summative
- Quasi-Experimental Design
- Randomization within Program Intervention
39

Appendix B

Data Collection Instrument


40

Joe E. Ne wsome High School


Preparing New Educators Program
Individual Professional Development
Plan
Survey Form

Professional Development
Where Are You Now?

Instructions: Please fill out the following evaluative survey completely by


checking the box that corresponds to your feelings about Professional
Development. Beside each statement, check column a, b, or c to indicate the most
accurate response (a: Yes, b: Yes, But Needs Work, c: No).
Purpose of Evaluative Survey: This information provided on this
evaluative survey will be used for your own Individualized Professional
Development Plan mandated by the School District of Hillsborough County. The
purpose is to improve the instructional practices of the Newsome High School
Faculty and Staff.

Scoring Guide:
a. Yes b. Yes, But Needs Work c. No
a b c Statements About Our School

Step One: Designing Professional Development


Inclusive Process
1. We have included or informed all stakeholders about our PD and related school
improvements (example stakeholders: students, school staff, parents, principals,
district PD staff, district management, teachers union, community members)
2. Our stakeholders support our PD efforts.

School/District Educational Plan


3. Our school had clear, written educational goals (for student learning).
4. Our schools educational (student learning) goals support district and state goals.
5. Our schools curriculum is built around our schools educational goals.
6. Our teachers and other staff understand our schools educational goals and how our
curriculum supports them.
7. If our school had staff teams, the teams have clear performance goals that support
the schools goals.
8. Our individual staff members have performance goals that support the school/team
goals.

Professional Development Needs Assessment


9. Our school leadership and staff understand how well our students are doing against
educational goals.
41

10. Our school leadership and staff understand the underlying causes of gaps between
student performance and goals.
11. Our school leadership understands what teacher skills, knowledge, and
competencies/behaviors are needed to close gaps between student goals and actual
performance.
12. Our school leadership understands the actual current skill, knowledge, and
competency level of staff.

Professional Development Goals


13. Our school had professional development principles and specific goals/objectives.
14. Our schools teachers and other staff understand our professional development
principles/goals.
15. Our schools professional development goals are built on our schools educational
goals.

Professional Development Activities


16. In our school, teachers know how well each student is doing in terms of our school
goals and the students potential.
17. In our school, staff teams or the principal know(s) what student learning gaps are
common among our students: within each academic subject, within each grade, and
across the whole school.
18. We research PD activities in advance to ensure that they will help staff close
student learning gaps in our school.
19. We have a process for choosing professional development activities to focus on
student learning gaps in our school.
20. Our schools professional development activities actually help staff close student
learning gaps in our school.

Research to Support Professional Development


21. We clearly assign responsibility for researching PD best practices.
22. We use research produced by others (e.g., district, NSDC, ASCD) rather than doing
all of our PD research from scratch.
23. We assess the effectiveness of our own PD efforts using scientific research
methods where possible (action research).

Resources to Support Professional Development


24. Our schools leaders know how much money we receive from all sources.
25. Our schools leaders know how much we spend on each area of school operations.
26. We have prioritized school activities to achieve school goals, and we spend our money
on the highest priorities first.
27. In our school, we find affordable, capable expertise to organize and implement
effective professional development.
28. In our school, we find and use affordable facilities that support effective
professional development.

Evaluation (See Step Three: Evaluating and Improving Professional


42

Development below)
Share the PD Plan with School Community
29. Our schools parents, neighbors, and other stakeholders are informed about our PD
efforts.
30. We use a variety of media to inform stakeholders about PD efforts.
31. We share the results of PD efforts with our school community.

Step Two: Implementing Professional Development


32. We have an ongoing method for learning about and using best practices in
professional development.
33. All of our schools policies and practices help staff improve their own and student
performance.
34. All of our districts policies and practices help staff improve their own and student
performance.
35. Our staff had enough time, at the right times and in the right amounts, to do
professional development.
36. We have the financial resources, expertise, and facilities we need to implement
professional development year-round.
37. In our school(s), teachers accept that that they need to change and improve
continuously to meet changing student needs.
38. We have an ongoing process for changing professional development when needed.

Step Three: Evaluating and Improving Professional Development


39. We have clear, written measures for each of our schools goals.
40. We have identified the data we need for each measure and a method for gathering
the data.
41. We have an ongoing process for reporting progress against school goals during the
school year.
42. We have and use the technology we need to analyze evaluation data efficiently.
43. We have a leader(s) who helps us make improvements (in professional development
and other school operations) based on evaluation findings.
44. We have a forum for making changes in how we evaluate and improve both student
performance and staff development.
45. We use student and PD evaluation data in time to change student performance
before the end of the school year.

Step Four: Sharing Professional Development


46. We keep a record of major decisions about school professional development to guide
future decisions.
47. We keep our professional development implementation materials organized to use and
share with other schools.
43

Appendix C

Teambuilding Workshop Agenda (Sample)


44

Newsome High School


New T eacher Induction Program
Teambuilding Workshop Agenda
Day 1

8:00 8:30 * Refreshments (provided by SGA)

8:30 9:30 * Icebreaker Activity


* Newsome Wolves Match Game
* Welcome and Introductions
* Principal Rebecca Anderson
* PNE Program Leader Marc Summa
* PNE Team Members
* New Teachers

9:30 10:15 * Power-Point Presentation


* School Vision and Mission
* Purpose of PNE Program
* Support Staff -
Purpose/Goals/Objectives
* PNE Teams
* Questions and Answers

10:15 10:30 * Break

10:30 11:00 * Tootsie Pop Activity

11:00 11:15 * Debriefing/Discussion

11:15 12:15 * Teambuilding Activity #1


* Building Bridges between Old and New

12:15 12:30 * Debriefing/Discussion

Thank you for participating in todays


teambuilding workshop!
See you tomorrow!
Go Wolves!!!
45

Appendix D

Teambuilding Evaluation Form (Sample)


46

Newsome High School


New Teacher Induction Program
Teambuilding Workshop
Evaluation Form

Instructions: Please fill out the following evaluative survey completely by


circling the number that corresponds to your feelings about the PNE induction
workshop. Your feedback on the bottom of the page is greatly appreciated!
Purpose of Evaluative Survey: This information provided on this evaluative
survey will be used for the PNE induction program workshop to improve the
overall nature and climate of the Newsome High School educational
environment.
Question: Scale: (1 = low est to 5 = highest)

1. How knowledgeable are you about the 1 2

3 4
teaching profession prior to the workshop?

2 . How comfortable are you with the 1 2

3 4
subject or discipline you are designated to
teach?

3 . How trusting are you in going to your 1 2

3 4
peers for help prior to the workshop?

4 . How well is the message about the 1 2

3 4
workshop presented by the leader?

5
47

5. Rate your overall understanding of 1 2

3 4
the PNE program prior to the workshop.

6 . Rate your overall understanding of 1 2

3 4
the PNE program after the workshop.

7 . How confident are you going to a 1 2

3 4
peer for help after participating in the
workshop?

8 . How would you rate the effectiveness 1 2

3 4
of the leader of the workshop?

9 . How comfortable are you entering 1 2

3 4
the classroom now that the workshop
isover?

10 . How would you rate the overall 1 2

3 4
effectiveness of the workshop?
48

A dditional C omments:

________________________________

________________________________

________________________________

________________________________

________________________________

________________________________

____

Thank you for participating in the evaluative survey.


- The PNE Induction w orkshop staff
49

Appendix E

Collegial Buzz Group Topics

The New PNE Program


Collegial Buzz Group Topics Office of Staff Development
Training Programs
Curriculum Development Teacher Expectations and Student
Achievement/TESA

*This course will focus on how to ask


questions, give feedback and express
personal regard toward their students.
The course will focus on 15 interactions
between teachers and students.
Participants in the course will practice
each interaction in their own classroom
with another class participant.
Time Management, Multitasking,
and Syllabus Development
50

Classroom Management and Effective Classroom Management


Discipline
*This course presents the knowledge,
skills and strategies necessary to
implement successful management of a
K-12 classroom. The goal is to increase
the effectiveness of educators in creating
a classroom environment in which
learning and teaching can take place
University to Professional Transition to Teaching
Transition
*Participants will examine the various
theories and their application to the
teaching and learning process. They will
develop an understanding of the
developmental theories of intelligence,
language, personality, and socialization
and be able to synthesize this
information into decision-making to
apply the knowledge to instruction.
Moral and Ethical Development Professionalism - Code of Ethics

*To increase the level of awareness and


understanding of participants
concerning the Code of Ethics and
Principles of Professional Standards of
the education profession of the State of
Florida.
Parent Contact/Communication

Project CRISS I Project CRISS-Level 1 Training

*Project CRISS is based on the


principles of learning and demonstrates
how to use a variety of strategies to
enhance student understanding and
retention of content material.
Diversity Training

Interactive Notebook

Policy and Procedures


(school and district)
st
1 Day of School/Semester Teacher Induction and Renewal
51

*This workshop is based on the work of


Harry Wongs The First Day of
School and Linda Alberts
Cooperative Discipline. It is designed
to assist teachers with the classroom.
Integrating Technology Integrating Technology into Education

*This course will address integrating


technology into the curriculum.
School Involvement Coaching, and
Club Sponsorships
ESE/IEPs/504 Plans/ESOL Quality Individual Educational Plans

*To train participants in the essentials of


the IEP process, IEP documentation,
and all procedures related to completing
Individual Educational Plans for ESE
students. Additionally, participants will
complete IEP/funding forms on students.
Current District procedures will be
discussed for implementation by
participants, as well as, federal and state
law currently in place will be shared.
FPMS (performance pay)/ Effective Teaching Strategies
National Board Certification
*This course focuses on the six domains
of the Florida Performance
Measurement System (FPMS) and
provides the understanding that FPMS is
essential to new teachers. Additionally, it
will concentrate on the concerns
expressed by the members of the class. It
is highly recommended for new teachers
especially those who are unfamiliar with
FPMS.
PNE Domains Introduction
52
53

Appendix F

LEADSPNE Survey

LEAD
Leadership Survey for Preparing New Educators
A paper and pencil 360-degree measurement tool for assessing
leadership of the preparing new educators program

Survey to Access The School

Introduction
Thank you for participating in this survey/assessment of the preparing new educators
program. This survey/assessment will provide valuable information to the leadership
within the School District of Hillsborough County. Your answers provided will assist in
the development, instructional leadership and overall effectiveness of the preparing new
educators program. The primary goal of this program is to improve the instructional
personnel within the School District of Hillsborough County by focusing on the needs of
the new educator, therefore providing feedback to the leadership of the program.

The information recorded from this survey/assessment will be provided to the


supervisors of the preparing new educators program, the administration of the site-
based schools where the program is initiated, and the School District of Hillsborough
54

County. A 360-degree measurement tool allows the evaluator to look at three dimensions
(a survey across, up, and down), providing a statistically significant amount of
information which simplistic forms of surveys cannot attain. Unlike other measurement
instruments, this LEADSPNE is completely anonymous therefore you should answer
the survey as honest as possible. The survey/assessment is completely objective and
user-friendly. Additionally, there are no written responses on the survey/assessment. It
is noted by the author of the survey/assessment that written comments can distract the
respondent from answering the questions openly and freely.

INSTRUCTIONS

1. For each scale, circle the bullet that best reflects the School District of Hillsborough
Countys Preparing New Educators program leadership components.

Example:
The leader in the PNE program

Suggests Ways Directs


to Communicate . . . . . Ways to
Important Concepts Think

In this instance, the evaluator decided that the information that is being provided by the
leadership in the Preparing New Educators program is slightly more directive than
suggestive as far as self-conceptualization. If the evaluator felt that the information is
provided by the leadership had both directive and suggestive, then the evaluator would
have circled the middle bullet. It is important for the evaluator to answer each with a
first impression approach, rather than contemplate over the correct answer or the
answer that the person wants to hear.

When you have completed the survey, please place it in a sealed envelope and place it in
my mailbox at the school. If you are providing answers to the survey outside of the
school, please place it in a sealed envelope and give it to your schools administrator of
curriculum and it will be picked up by an authorized person.

Thank you for your time and honesty!

Marc J. Summa
Nova Southeastern University
Joe E. Newsome High School
55

LEADSP
*Please note: In ALL of the questions, the following statement precedes each item:
The leader in the PNE program
Curriculum
Development
Provided several . . . . . Spoke briefly on questioning
ways to ask strategies
effective questions
Mentioned that . . . . . Described how to provide
corrective and corrective and effective
effective feedback feedback
are important
Talked about . . . . . Gave examples and details
engaging students on how to engage students in
in class discussions the curriculum using
relevant materials
Practiced situations . . . . . Spoke about activities that
thorough role play / can be used in the classroom
interactions with
PNE program
participants
Time
Management,
Multitasking, and
Syllabus
Development
Described time . . . . . Provided specific examples
management as of time management skills
something you and techniques
should have as a
professional
56

educator
Exemplified . . . . . Stated that there are times
multitasking when multitasking
through extended isnecessary during the school
discussion on day
continuity and
withitness
Reminded the . . . . . Provided detailed examples
participants that and non-examples of
they should have a effective and informative
syllabus for the syllabi
students on the first
day
Told everyone that . . . . . Allowed for PNE program
a syllabus participants to practice
isrequired, but writing syllabi for their
should be courses
completed during
pre-planning time
Classroom
Management and
Discipline
Provided useful and . . . . . Explained that it is necessary
relevant classroom to control the students in the
management classroom in order to teach
strategies
Used examples and . . . . . Stated that the instructional
non-examples of personnel handbook had
when to discipline information about when a
students according student should be disciplined
to district
guidelines
Used examples and . . . . . Showed the PNE program
non-examples of participants what a referral
how to discipline sheet looks like and referred
students according to the instructional personnel
to district handbook for additional
guidelines information
Stated that . . . . . Practiced/shared examples of
providing a safe, how to create an
caring and environment conducive to
nurturing learning
environment is the
goal of the school
district
University to
Professional
57

Transition
Examined, in detail, . . . . . Provided a list of names of
the various theories the different theorists and
and their what they believed
applications to the
teaching process
Briefly explained . . . . . Allowed PNE program
that there are four participants to use the
components of knowledge gained from the
developmental theories to develop their own
theories; personal understanding of
intelligence, the connection between
language, intelligence, language,
personality, and personality, and socialization
socialization
Provided a forum . . . . . Explained that these theories
for PNE program are useful, but are not a
participants to necessary part of the every
synthesize the day activities during school
information on hours
developmental
theories and discuss
them with other
educators
Stated that these . . . . . Asked probing questions on
theories have a how the PNE program
correlation to the participants plan on using
decision-making these theories to enhance
process and can be their decision-making and
applied to apply the theories to
instructional knowledge and instruction
techniques
Moral and Ethical
Development
Expressed the . . . . . Discussed the details of the
importance of need for awareness and
having morals and understanding of the morals
values as an and values expected of a
educator professional educator
Discussed the . . . . . Stated that the state of
details of the Code Florida had a Code of Ethics
of Ethics and and Principles of
Principles of Professional Standards to
Professional follow as an educator
Standards in the
state of Florida
58

Allowed for PNE . . . . . Gave an example of how an


program educator can be disciplined
participants to role for using unethical behavior
play using
hypothetical
situations regarding
moral and ethical
decision-making
and discuss their
feelings on the
situation
Described the . . . . . Expressed that as educators
details of the we will face consequences
consequences that for our actions
an educator can
face if they are
questioned on their
moral and ethical
beliefs during
interactions with
students,
colleagues, or
community
members
Parent Contact
and
Communication
Described the . . . . . Stated that parent
various ways in communication is important
which educators
communicate with
parents at the site-
based school and at
the district level
Exemplified the use . . . . . Expressed that it is a good
of positive phone idea to contact parents for
calls, e-mails, notes good and bad behavior
home, etc. to
stimulate student
achievement within
a classroom
Explained that an . . . . . Discussed effective parent-
educator should teacher conferences using
expect to have role play and hypothetical
parent-teacher situations with PNE program
conferences when participants
necessary
59

Eluded to the fact . . . . . Specified the policies and


that an educator procedures involved in
should expect to hosting conference nights
host parents for and open house for parents
conference nights and the expectations of the
and open house educator during both
night
Project CRISS
Strategies
Stated that Project . . . . . Presented several reasons
CRISS strategies why the school district
are an important expects all teachers in the
part of the district, including new
instructional teachers, to be Project
process CRISS trained
Defined what . . . . . Showed statistical
Project CRISS information and data
means to the explaining, in detail, the
teaching profession effects Project CRISS
strategies have on student
achievement
Introduced the . . . . . Eluded to the fact that an
many strategies of educator can use Project
Project CRISS and CRISS as a resource for
how to implement instruction every day
them into every
classroom, every
day
Allowed for PNE . . . . . Put an example of a Project
program CRISS strategy up on an
participants to overhead to show how
actively use the Project CRISS can be
Project CRISS applied
strategies using all
areas of curriculum
and discuss their
advantages with
other PNE program
participants
Interactive
Notebook
Stated that students . . . . . Presented several reasons,
loose things all the along with provided
time and need to be statistical data, to explain
more responsible why students tend to loose
points and receive lower
grades due to poor
60

organizational skills
Introduced the . . . . . Expressed that an Interactive
Interactive Notebook allows students to
Notebook as a great get organized
organizational tool
and why all
educators can use it
as an easy and
functional form of
organization
Showed examples . . . . . Passed around an example of
of the Interactive an exemplary Interactive
Notebook, its many Notebook
uses, and how to
get students to set-
theirs-up, as well
as a how to for
teacher
organization using
the notebook
Allowed for each . . . . . Stated that the PNE program
PNE program participants can use this
participant and Interactive Notebook to
opportunity to organize their information
create their own from the LEADSPNE
Interactive program
Notebook using the
information from
the LEADSPNE
program
General Policies
and Procedures
(school and
district)
Passed out the . . . . . Distributed the school
school district district policy and procedure
policies and guidebook and went in-depth
procedures into several areas of great
guidebook and importance for new
recommended that educators to understand,
it be read at the highlight and tab
PNE program
participants leisure
Distributed the site- . . . . . Passed out the site-based
based schools schools policies and
policy and procedures guidebook and
procedure recommended that it be read
61

guidebook and at the PNE program


went in-depth into participants leisure
several areas of
great importance
for new educators
to understand,
highlight and tab,
as well as discuss
how it differs from
other schools in the
district
Defined, in detail, . . . . . Explained that the school
how the leadership administration disciplines
at the site-based students when necessary and
school handles that the school is safe for all
disciplinary who enter its grounds
problems and what
steps are taken to
maintain a safe,
caring and
nurturing
environment for all
students, faculty,
and staff members
Stated that there are . . . . . Described the details of the
times when the Crisis Management Plan, the
school practices Fire-Drill procedure, and
specific drills so other important procedures
familiarize yourself that are relevant to the
with the plans educational process
First Day of
School/Semester
Procedures
Introduced the PNE . . . . . Stated that Harry Wongs
program The First Day of School is
participants to the an excellent book and should
work of Harry be read by all new educators
Wongs The First in the profession
Day of School and
discussed excerpts
from the book that
are applicable to the
specific educational
setting (i.e.
Elementary, Middle
or High School)
62

Introduced the PNE . . . . . Stated that Linda Alberts


program Cooperative Discipline is
participants to the an excellent book and should
work of Linda be read by all new educators
Alberts in the profession
Cooperative
Discipline and
discussed excerpts
from the book that
are applicable to the
specific educational
setting (i.e.
Elementary, Middle
or High School
Allowed for PNE . . . . . Showed an example of one
program of Harry Wongs techniques
participants to role for professional educators
play using
hypothetical
situations using
Harry Wongs The
First Day of
School
Showed an example . . . . . Allowed for PNE program
of one of Linda participants to role play
Alberts beliefs for using hypothetical situations
professional using Linda Alberts
educators Cooperative Discipline
Integrating
Technology into
the Curriculum
Stated that the 21st . . . . . Detailed the statistical
Century will need evidence showing the need
to include advanced to integrate technology into
technology in the the curriculum at all levels of
classrooms education
Provided detailed . . . . . Expressed how important
examples of the using differentiated forms of
various formats that technology in the classroom
material can be is important to student
introduced to achievement
students using
several different
technological
resources
Provided hands-on . . . . . Gave handouts to the PNE
training using the program participants listing
63

various forms of the various forms of


technology amongst technology available for
the participants of classroom use
the PNE program
Provided a CD- . . . . . Allowed for PNE program
Rom that could be participants to use advanced
used by PNE technology to create
program programs, databases,
participants to presentations, etc. to be used
practice using for classroom instruction
technology at their
own leisure
School
Involvement,
Coaching, and
Club Sponsorship
Described the . . . . . Stated that the school is
details of how a always looking for people to
new teacher can join committees and
become involved in volunteer
the school through
committee
membership and
volunteering
Gave advanced . . . . . Reinforced that coaching is a
information and good way to get involved
examples of with the school
paperwork involved
in coaching, along
with rules and
regulations of
coaching athletics
in the school
district
Provided an outline . . . . . Explained the need for clubs
for all of the club and student organizations in
sponsorship order to keep students
opportunities as interested in school outside
well as the of the academia
requirements for
clubs to maintain
their active status at
the school
Reminded the PNE . . . . . Gave specific details on how
program to collect money, maintain
participants that records, order
they will have a lot equipment/materials, and
64

of things to keep budget for


track of if they are awards/projects/banquets/etc.
involved in for clubs and organizations
coaching and/or
club sponsorship
ESE/IEPs/504
Plans/ESOL
Provided detailed . . . . . States that at some point in
information an educators career that an
regarding the IEP will be needed to be
essentials of the completed and submitted to
IEP process, the ESE department
documentation and
completion of the
IEP for ESE
students
Showed the PNE . . . . . Allowed PNE program
program participants to work together
participants what an to complete a detailed IEP
IEP form looks like form on a student in a
hypothetical situation
Discussed the . . . . . Stated that the district had
current school specific procedures that all
district procedures district employees must
for ESE/IEP/504 follow regarding IEP
Plans and how they students
are implemented in
the instructional
classroom
Defined ESOL. . . . . . Explained the needs for
Stated that ESOL is ESOL students and used
something that all examples to show how to
district employees work with these students
must be trained on
FPMS
(Performance
Pay)/National
Board
Certification
Shows a Florida . . . . . Clearly defines and describes
Performance the six (6) domains used in
Measurement the Florida Performance
System worksheet Measurement System
to all PNE program
participants
States that the . . . . . Explains, in detail, the
Florida relevance and importance of
65

Performance the FPMS and that it is an


Measurement essential measurement tool
System scale is of overall instructional needs
used to measure
instructional
deficiencies and
successes
Explains what it . . . . . Talks about the existence of
means to be the National Board Certified
Nationally Board opportunity for exceptional
Certified and why it teachers
is important to the
education system
Describes the . . . . . Explains that Nationally
details of how Board Certified Teachers
Nationally Board make additional money
Certified teachers beyond their yearly salary
not only make more
money, but how
their role as being
NBC effects other
teachers, the site-
based school and
the school district
as a whole
PNE Domains
Introduction
Provides specific . . . . . Explains that all new
details on who teachers to the district or new
participates in and to the education profession
how the PNE must complete the PNE
program prepares program
new educators
Describes the role . . . . . Provides the names of the
of each member of members of the PNE team
the PNE Team and
how they contribute
to the program
Briefly states that . . . . . Defines and details each of
there are six (6) the six (6) domains of the
domains in the PNE PNE program
program
Explains the details . . . . . Gives dates of observations
of the procedures of and assigns a mentoring
the PNE program team
including a timeline
for the program,
66

how to prepare for


the beginning of the
program, what to
expect throughout
the program, and
how to successfully
complete the
program

Appendix G

LEADSPNE Administrators Guide


67

LEAD
Leadership Survey for Preparing New Educators
A paper and pencil 360-degree measurement tool for assessing
leadership of the preparing new educators program

An Administrators

Introduction
Thank you for participating as an administrative leader for the LEADSPNE program. By
being the administrative leader, you are providing valuable feedback to the School
District of Hillsborough County in the further development, instructional leadership and
overall effectiveness of the preparing new educators program. Your assistance is greatly
appreciated.

Your role as administrative leader is to distribute copies of this survey/assessment tool to


the participants site-based school, immediate supervisor, and school districts
superintendent staff. This is a 360-degree measurement tool which allows the evaluator
to look at three dimensions (a survey across, up, and down), providing a statistically
significant amount of information which simplistic forms of surveys cannot attain.
Unlike other measurement instruments, this LEADSPNE is completely anonymous
therefore you should answer the survey as honest as possible. The survey/assessment is
completely objective and user-friendly. As an administrator your role is to ensure the
68

confidentiality of the results. Please remember to treat these survey/assessments and


their results as a confidential as you would with your own personal records.

INSTRUCTIONS FOR EVALUATORS

1. Select participants for the survey/assessment.

LEADSPNE is an assessment tool to measure the Preparing New Educators program in


the School District of Hillsborough County. Participants in the assessment must have
been enrolled in the program within the previous three years of this assessment to be
eligible for the survey.

2. Select evaluators.

LEADSPNE will attain evaluators from each site-based school and monitor their role
through a secondary source unknown to the evaluator. The site-based evaluator must
agree to the provisions and procedures of the LEADSPNE program.

3. Distribute survey materials to evaluators.

The distribution of the survey will be done by each site-based evaluator and their role
will to distribute, monitor the completion of, and collect the survey/assessment via sealed
envelope and/or personal collection. Any tampering to the materials will invalidate the
responses of the participants at the site-based school. The evaluator must provide the
participants an opportunity to turn-in their surveys anonymously in order to maintain
confidentiality of the assessment tool.

4. Compile statistics.

Using Appendix H, I, and J (in the proceeding sections), it is the role of the evaluator to
compile all of the data and create a measurement summary based on the answers
provided by the LEADSPNE participants.

5. Compile a summary for each participant.

LEADSPNE wants to provide all participants with statistical feedback on the survey they
participated in and believes that numerical information provides the best source for
69

comparison and developing conclusions. The evaluator will create an individualized


summary for each participant displaying their assessment score and compare it to the
overall results of the survey.

6. Hold a feedback session with each participant.

LEADSPNE program would like to encourage the evaluator to provide an opportunity for
each participant to discuss the results of the survey/assessment if necessary.
Appointments can be made with the evaluator at the evaluators/participants
convenience.

LEADSPNE evaluator will discuss the following with participants


Review the scoring, using Appendix H, to ensure the participant understands
the scoring process. Note: Evaluator will retain Appendix H after review

Review Appendices I and J with the participant. The evaluator will allow the
participant enough time to consider the results and to ask questions. Note:
Evaluator may give the participant Appendices I and J to keep if they so
choose.

Ask the participant and evaluators for feedback on LEADSPNE program

Thank you for your assistance in this important measurement tool!

Marc J. Summa
Nova Southeastern University
Joe E. Newsome High School
70

Appendix H

LEADSPNE Scoring Key


71

APPENDIX H

LEADSPNE
Curriculum
Development
Provided several Spoke briefly on questioning
5 4 3 2 1
ways to ask strategies
effective questions
Mentioned that 1 2 3 4 5 Described how to provide
corrective and corrective and effective
effective feedback feedback
are important
Talked about 1 2 3 4 5 Gave examples and details
engaging students on how to engage students in
in class discussions the curriculum using
relevant materials
Practiced situations 5 4 3 2 1 Spoke about activities that
thorough role play can be used in the classroom
/ interactions with
PNE program
participants
Time
Management,
Multitasking, and
Syllabus
Development
Described time 1 2 3 4 5 Provided specific examples
management as of time management skills
something you and techniques
should have as a
professional
educator
Exemplified 5 4 3 2 1 Stated that there are times
multitasking when multitasking is
through extended necessary during the school
72

discussion on day
continuity and
withitness
Reminded the 1 2 3 4 5 Provided detailed examples
participants that and non-examples of
they should have a effective and informative
syllabus for the syllabi
students on the first
day
Told everyone that 1 2 3 4 5 Allowed for PNE program
a syllabus is participants to practice
required, but writing syllabi for their
should be courses
completed during
pre-planning time
Classroom
Management and
Discipline
Provided useful 5 4 3 2 1 Explained that it is necessary
and relevant to control the students in the
classroom classroom in order to teach
management
strategies
Used examples and 5 4 3 2 1 Stated that the instructional
non-examples of personnel handbook had
when to discipline information about when a
students according student should be disciplined
to district
guidelines
Used examples and 5 4 3 2 1 Showed the PNE program
non-examples of participants what a referral
how to discipline sheet looks like and referred
students according to the instructional personnel
to district handbook for additional
guidelines information
Stated that 1 2 3 4 5 Practiced/shared examples of
providing a safe, how to create an
caring and environment conducive to
nurturing learning
environment is the
goal of the school
district
University to
Professional
Transition
Examined, in 5 4 3 2 1 Provided a list of names of
detail, the various the different theorists and
73

theories and their what they believed


applications to the
teaching process
Briefly explained 1 2 3 4 5 Allowed PNE program
that there are four participants to use the
components of knowledge gained from the
developmental theories to develop their own
theories; personal understanding of
intelligence, the connection between
language, intelligence, language,
personality, and personality, and socialization
socialization
Provided a forum 5 4 3 2 1 Explained that these theories
for PNE program are useful, but are not a
participants to necessary part of the every
synthesize the day activities during school
information on hours
developmental
theories and
discuss them with
other educators
Stated that these 1 2 3 4 5 Asked probing questions on
theories have a how the PNE program
correlation to the participants plan on using
decision-making these theories to enhance
process and can be their decision-making and
applied to apply the theories to
instructional knowledge and instruction
techniques

Moral and Ethical


Development
Expressed the 1 2 3 4 5 Discussed the details of the
importance of need for awareness and
having morals and understanding of the morals
values as an and values expected of a
educator professional educator
Discussed the 5 4 3 2 1 Stated that the state of
details of the Code Florida had a Code of Ethics
of Ethics and and Principles of
Principles of Professional Standards to
Professional follow as an educator
Standards in the
state of Florida
Allowed for PNE 5 4 3 2 1 Gave an example of how an
program educator can be disciplined
participants to role for using unethical behavior
74

play using
hypothetical
situations
regarding moral
and ethical
decision-making
and discuss their
feelings on the
situation
Described the 5 4 3 2 1 Expressed that as educators
details of the we will face consequences
consequences that for our actions
an educator can
face if they are
questioned on their
moral and ethical
beliefs during
interactions with
students,
colleagues, or
community
members
Parent Contact
and
Communication
Described the 5 4 3 2 1 Stated that parent
various ways in communication is important
which educators
communicate with
parents at the site-
based school and at
the district level
Exemplified the 5 4 3 2 1 Expressed that it is a good
use of positive idea to contact parents for
phone calls, e- good and bad behavior
mails, notes home,
etc. to stimulate
student
achievement within
a classroom
Explained that an 1 2 3 4 5 Discussed effective parent-
educator should teacher conferences using
expect to have role play and hypothetical
parent-teacher situations with PNE program
conferences when participants
necessary
75

Eluded to the fact 1 2 3 4 5 Specified the policies and


that an educator procedures involved in
should expect to hosting conference nights
host parents for and open house for parents
conference nights and the expectations of the
and open house educator during both
night
Project CRISS
Strategies
Stated that Project 1 2 3 4 5 Presented several reasons
CRISS strategies why the school district
are an important expects all teachers in the
part of the district, including new
instructional teachers, to be Project
process CRISS trained
Defined what 1 2 3 4 5 Showed statistical
Project CRISS information and data
means to the explaining, in detail, the
teaching profession effects Project CRISS
strategies have on student
achievement
Introduced the 5 4 3 2 1 Eluded to the fact that an
many strategies of educator can use Project
Project CRISS and CRISS as a resource for
how to implement instruction every day
them into every
classroom, every
day
Allowed for PNE 5 4 3 2 1 Put an example of a Project
program CRISS strategy up on an
participants to overhead to show how
actively use the Project CRISS can be
Project CRISS applied
strategies using all
areas of curriculum
and discuss their
advantages with
other PNE program
participants
Interactive
Notebook
Stated that students 1 2 3 4 5 Presented several reasons,
loose things all the along with provided
time and need to be statistical data, to explain
more responsible why students tend to loose
points and receive lower
grades due to poor
76

organizational skills
Introduced the 5 4 3 2 1 Expressed that an Interactive
Interactive Notebook allows students to
Notebook as a get organized
great
organizational tool
and why all
educators can use it
as an easy and
functional form of
organization
Showed examples 5 4 3 2 1 Passed around an example of
of the Interactive an exemplary Interactive
Notebook, its many Notebook
uses, and how to
get students to
set-theirs-up, as
well as a how to
for teacher
organization using
the notebook
Allowed for each 5 4 3 2 1 Stated that the PNE program
PNE program participants can use this
participant and Interactive Notebook to
opportunity to organize their information
create their own from the LEADSPNE
Interactive program
Notebook using the
information from
the LEADSPNE
program
General Policies
and Procedures
(school and
district)
Passed out the 1 2 3 4 5 Distributed the school
school district district policy and procedure
policies and guidebook and went in-depth
procedures into several areas of great
guidebook and importance for new
recommended that educators to understand,
it be read at the highlight and tab
PNE program
participants
leisure
Distributed the 5 4 3 2 1 Passed out the site-based
site-based schools schools policies and
77

policy and procedures guidebook and


procedure recommended that it be read
guidebook and at the PNE program
went in-depth into participants leisure
several areas of
great importance
for new educators
to understand,
highlight and tab,
as well as discuss
how it differs from
other schools in the
district
Defined, in detail, 5 4 3 2 1 Explained that the school
how the leadership administration disciplines
at the site-based students when necessary and
school handles that the school is safe for all
disciplinary who enter its grounds
problems and what
steps are taken to
maintain a safe,
caring and
nurturing
environment for all
students, faculty,
and staff members
Stated that there 1 2 3 4 5 Described the details of the
are times when the Crisis Management Plan, the
school practices Fire-Drill procedure, and
specific drills so other important procedures
familiarize yourself that are relevant to the
with the plans educational process
First Day of
School/Semester
Procedures
Introduced the 5 4 3 2 1 Stated that Harry Wongs
PNE program The First Day of School is
participants to the an excellent book and should
work of Harry be read by all new educators
Wongs The First in the profession
Day of School
and discussed
excerpts from the
book that are
applicable to the
specific
educational setting
78

(i.e. Elementary,
Middle or High
School)
Introduced the 5 4 3 2 1 Stated that Linda Alberts
PNE program Cooperative Discipline is
participants to the an excellent book and should
work of Linda be read by all new educators
Alberts in the profession
Cooperative
Discipline and
discussed excerpts
from the book that
are applicable to
the specific
educational setting
(i.e. Elementary,
Middle or High
School
Allowed for PNE 5 4 3 2 1 Showed an example of one
program of Harry Wongs techniques
participants to role for professional educators
play using
hypothetical
situations using
Harry Wongs
The First Day of
School
Showed an 1 2 3 4 5 Allowed for PNE program
example of one of participants to role play
Linda Alberts using hypothetical situations
beliefs for using Linda Alberts
professional Cooperative Discipline
educators
Integrating
Technology into
the Curriculum
Stated that the 21st 1 2 3 4 5 Detailed the statistical
Century will need evidence showing the need
to include to integrate technology into
advanced the curriculum at all levels of
technology in the education
classrooms
Provided detailed 5 4 3 2 1 Expressed how important
examples of the using differentiated forms of
various formats technology in the classroom
that material can be is important to student
introduced to achievement
79

students using
several different
technological
resources
Provided hands-on 5 4 3 2 1 Gave handouts to the PNE
training using the program participants listing
various forms of the various forms of
technology technology available for
amongst the classroom use
participants of the
PNE program
Provided a CD- 1 2 3 4 5 Allowed for PNE program
Rom that could be participants to use advanced
used by PNE technology to create
program programs, databases,
participants to presentations, etc. to be used
practice using for classroom instruction
technology at their
own leisure
School
Involvement,
Coaching, and
Club Sponsorship
Described the 5 4 3 2 1 Stated that the school is
details of how a always looking for people to
new teacher can join committees and
become involved in volunteer
the school through
committee
membership and
volunteering
Gave advanced 5 4 3 2 1 Reinforced that coaching is a
information and good way to get involved
examples of with the school
paperwork
involved in
coaching, along
with rules and
regulations of
coaching athletics
in the school
district
Provided an outline 5 4 3 2 1 Explained the need for clubs
for all of the club and student organizations in
sponsorship order to keep students
opportunities as interested in school outside
well as the of the academia
80

requirements for
clubs to maintain
their active status
at the school
Reminded the PNE 1 2 3 4 5 Gave specific details on how
program to collect money, maintain
participants that records, order
they will have a lot equipment/materials, and
of things to keep budget for
track of if they are awards/projects/banquets/etc.
involved in for clubs and organizations
coaching and/or
club sponsorship
ESE/IEPs/504
Plans/ESOL
Provided detailed 5 4 3 2 1 States that at some point in
information an educators career that an
regarding the IEP will be needed to be
essentials of the completed and submitted to
IEP process, the ESE department
documentation and
completion of the
IEP for ESE
students
Showed the PNE 1 2 3 4 5 Allowed PNE program
program participants to work together
participants what to complete a detailed IEP
an IEP form looks form on a student in a
like hypothetical situation
Discussed the 5 4 3 2 1 Stated that the district had
current school specific procedures that all
district procedures district employees must
for ESE/IEP/504 follow regarding IEP
Plans and how they students
are implemented in
the instructional
classroom
Defined ESOL. 1 2 3 4 5 Explained the needs for
Stated that ESOL ESOL students and used
is something that examples to show how to
all district work with these students
employees must be
trained on
FPMS
(Performance
Pay)/National
Board
81

Certification
Shows a Florida 1 2 3 4 5 Clearly defines and describes
Performance the six (6) domains used in
Measurement the Florida Performance
System worksheet Measurement System
to all PNE program
participants
States that the 1 2 3 4 5 Explains, in detail, the
Florida relevance and importance of
Performance the FPMS and that it is an
Measurement essential measurement tool
System scale is of overall instructional needs
used to measure
instructional
deficiencies and
successes
Explains what it 5 4 3 2 1 Talks about the existence of
means to be the National Board Certified
Nationally Board opportunity for exceptional
Certified and why teachers
it is important to
the education
system
Describes the 5 4 3 2 1 Explains that Nationally
details of how Board Certified Teachers
Nationally Board make additional money
Certified teachers beyond their yearly salary
not only make
more money, but
how their role as
being NBC effects
other teachers, the
site-based school
and the school
district as a whole
PNE Domains
Introduction
Provides specific 5 4 3 2 1 Explains that all new
details on who teachers to the district or new
participates in and to the education profession
how the PNE must complete the PNE
program prepares program
new educators
Describes the role 5 4 3 2 1 Provides the names of the
of each member of members of the PNE team
the PNE Team and
how they
82

contribute to the
program
Briefly states that 1 2 3 4 5 Defines and details each of
there are six (6) the six (6) domains of the
domains in the PNE program
PNE program
Explains the details 5 4 3 2 1 Gives dates of observations
of the procedures and assigns a mentoring
of the PNE team
program including
a timeline for the
program, how to
prepare for the
beginning of the
program, what to
expect throughout
the program, and
how to successfully
complete the
program
83

Appendix I

LEADSPNE Calculation Worksheet

APPENDIX I

LEADSPNE
Area/Behavior
(Positive Behavior In Bold)
Average
Score for
Area/Behavior
(Positive Behavior In Bold)
Behavior
84

Curriculum Development
Provided several ways to ask ______ Spoke briefly on questioning
effective questions strategies
Described how to provide ______ Mentioned that corrective and
corrective and effective feedback effective feedback are important
Gave examples and details on Talked about engaging students
how to engage students in the in class discussions
curriculum using relevant ______
materials
Practiced situations thorough role Spoke about activities that can
play / interactions with PNE be used in the classroom
program participants ______
Add average scores for Divide by 4
Curriculum Development: Curriculum Development
______ Score:______
Time Management,
Multitasking, and Syllabus
Development
Described time management as ______ Provided specific examples of
something you should have as a time management skills and
professional educator techniques
Exemplified multitasking ______ Stated that there are times when
through extended discussion on multitasking is necessary
continuity and withitness during the school day
Reminded the participants that ______ Provided detailed examples and
they should have a syllabus for non-examples of effective and
the students on the first day informative syllabi
Told everyone that a syllabus is ______ Allowed for PNE program
required, but should be participants to practice writing
completed during pre-planning syllabi for their courses
time
Add average scores for Divide by 4
TM / Multitasking / Syllabus TM / Multitasking / Syllabus
Development:_________ Development
Score:__________
Classroom Management and
Discipline
Provided useful and relevant ______ Explained that it is necessary to
classroom management strategies control the students in the
classroom in order to teach
Used examples and non- ______ Stated that the instructional
examples of when to discipline personnel handbook had
students according to district information about when a
guidelines student should be disciplined
Used examples and non- ______ Showed the PNE program
examples of how to discipline participants what a referral sheet
85

students according to district looks like and referred to the


guidelines instructional personnel
handbook for additional
information
Stated that providing a safe, ______ Practiced/shared examples of
caring and nurturing environment how to create an environment
is the goal of the school district conducive to learning
Add average scores for Divide by 4
Classroom Management / Classroom Management /
Discipline: _______ Discipline Score:________
University to Professional
Transition
Examined, in detail, the various ______ Provided a list of names of the
theories and their applications to different theorists and what they
the teaching process believed
Briefly explained that there are ______ Allowed PNE program
four components of participants to use the
developmental theories; knowledge gained from the
intelligence, language, theories to develop their own
personality, and socialization personal understanding of the
connection between intelligence,
language, personality, and
socialization
Provided a forum for PNE ______ Explained that these theories are
program participants to useful, but are not a necessary
synthesize the information on part of the every day activities
developmental theories and during school hours
discuss them with other
educators
Stated that these theories have a ______ Asked probing questions on
correlation to the decision- how the PNE program
making process and can be participants plan on using these
applied to instructional theories to enhance their
techniques decision-making and apply the
theories to knowledge and
instruction
Add average scores for Divide by 4
University-Professional University-Professional
Transition:________ Transition Score:__________
Moral and Ethical
Development
Expressed the importance of ______ Discussed the details of the need
having morals and values as an for awareness and understanding
educator of the morals and values
expected of a professional
educator
86

Discussed the details of the Code ______ Stated that the state of Florida
of Ethics and Principles of had a Code of Ethics and
Professional Standards in the Principles of Professional
state of Florida Standards to follow as an
educator
Allowed for PNE program ______ Gave an example of how an
participants to role play using educator can be disciplined for
hypothetical situations regarding using unethical behavior
moral and ethical decision-
making and discuss their feelings
on the situation
Described the details of the ______ Expressed that as educators we
consequences that an educator will face consequences for our
can face if they are questioned on actions
their moral and ethical beliefs
during interactions with students,
colleagues, or community
members
Add average scores for Moral / Divide by 4
Ethical Development: Moral / Ethical Development
___________ Score:__________
Parent Contact and
Communication
Described the various ways in ______ Stated that parent
which educators communicate communication is important
with parents at the site-based
school and at the district level
Exemplified the use of positive ______ Expressed that it is a good idea
phone calls, e-mails, notes home, to contact parents for good and
etc. to stimulate student bad behavior
achievement within a classroom
Explained that an educator ______ Discussed effective parent-
should expect to have parent- teacher conferences using role
teacher conferences when play and hypothetical situations
necessary with PNE program participants
Eluded to the fact that an ______ Specified the policies and
educator should expect to host procedures involved in hosting
parents for conference nights and conference nights and open
open house night house for parents and the
expectations of the educator
during both
Add average scores for Parent Divide by 4
Contact and Communication: Parent Contact and
___________ Communication
Score:__________
Project CRISS Strategies
87

Stated that Project CRISS ______ Presented several reasons why


strategies are an important part of the school district expects all
the instructional process teachers in the district, including
new teachers, to be Project
CRISS trained
Defined what Project CRISS ______ Showed statistical information
means to the teaching profession and data explaining, in detail,
the effects Project CRISS
strategies have on student
achievement
Introduced the many strategies of ______ Eluded to the fact that an
Project CRISS and how to educator can use Project CRISS
implement them into every as a resource for instruction
classroom, every day every day
Allowed for PNE program ______ Put an example of a Project
participants to actively use the CRISS strategy up on an
Project CRISS strategies using overhead to show how Project
all areas of curriculum and CRISS can be applied
discuss their advantages with
other PNE program participants
Add average scores for Project Divide by 4
CRISS Strategies: ___________ Project CRISS Strategies
Score:__________
Interactive Notebook
Stated that students loose things ______ Presented several reasons, along
all the time and need to be more with provided statistical data, to
responsible explain why students tend to
loose points and receive lower
grades due to poor
organizational skills
Introduced the Interactive ______ Expressed that an Interactive
Notebook as a great Notebook allows students to get
organizational tool and why all organized
educators can use it as an easy
and functional form of
organization
Showed examples of the ______ Passed around an example of an
Interactive Notebook, its many exemplary Interactive Notebook
uses, and how to get students to
set-theirs-up, as well as a how
to for teacher organization using
the notebook
Allowed for each PNE program ______ Stated that the PNE program
participant and opportunity to participants can use this
create their own Interactive Interactive Notebook to
Notebook using the information organize their information from
from the LEADSPNE program the LEADSPNE program
88

Add average scores for Divide by 4


Interactive Notebook: Interactive Notebook
___________ Score:__________
General Policies and
Procedures (school and
district)
Passed out the school district ______ Distributed the school district
policies and procedures policy and procedure guidebook
guidebook and recommended and went in-depth into several
that it be read at the PNE areas of great importance for
program participants leisure new educators to understand,
highlight and tab
Distributed the site-based ______ Passed out the site-based
schools policy and procedure schools policies and procedures
guidebook and went in-depth guidebook and recommended
into several areas of great that it be read at the PNE
importance for new educators to program participants leisure
understand, highlight and tab, as
well as discuss how it differs
from other schools in the district
Defined, in detail, how the ______ Explained that the school
leadership at the site-based administration disciplines
school handles disciplinary students when necessary and
problems and what steps are that the school is safe for all
taken to maintain a safe, caring who enter its grounds
and nurturing environment for all
students, faculty, and staff
members
Stated that there are times when ______ Described the details of the
the school practices specific Crisis Management Plan, the
drills so familiarize yourself with Fire-Drill procedure, and other
the plans important procedures that are
relevant to the educational
process
Add average scores for General Divide by 4
Policies and Procedures: General Policies and
___________ Procedures Score:__________
First Day of School/Semester
Procedures
Introduced the PNE program ______ Stated that Harry Wongs The
participants to the work of Harry First Day of School is an
Wongs The First Day of excellent book and should be
School and discussed excerpts read by all new educators in the
from the book that are applicable profession
to the specific educational setting
(i.e. Elementary, Middle or High
School)
89

Introduced the PNE program ______ Stated that Linda Alberts


participants to the work of Linda Cooperative Discipline is an
Alberts Cooperative excellent book and should be
Discipline and discussed read by all new educators in the
excerpts from the book that are profession
applicable to the specific
educational setting (i.e.
Elementary, Middle or High
School
Allowed for PNE program ______ Showed an example of one of
participants to role play using Harry Wongs techniques for
hypothetical situations using professional educators
Harry Wongs The First Day of
School
Showed an example of one of ______ Allowed for PNE program
Linda Alberts beliefs for participants to role play using
professional educators hypothetical situations using
Linda Alberts Cooperative
Discipline
Add average scores for First Divide by 4
Day of School/Semester First Day of School/Semester
Procedures: ___________ Procedures Score:__________
Integrating Technology into
the Curriculum
Stated that the 21st Century will ______ Detailed the statistical evidence
need to include advanced showing the need to integrate
technology in the classrooms technology into the curriculum
at all levels of education
Provided detailed examples of ______ Expressed how important using
the various formats that material differentiated forms of
can be introduced to students technology in the classroom is
using several different important to student
technological resources achievement
Provided hands-on training using ______ Gave handouts to the PNE
the various forms of technology program participants listing the
amongst the participants of the various forms of technology
PNE program available for classroom use
Provided a CD-Rom that could ______ Allowed for PNE program
be used by PNE program participants to use advanced
participants to practice using technology to create programs,
technology at their own leisure databases, presentations, etc. to
be used for classroom
instruction
Add average scores for Divide by 4
Integrating Technology into the Integrating Technology into the
Curriculum: ___________ Curriculum Score:__________
90

School Involvement, Coaching,


and Club Sponsorship
Described the details of how a ______ Stated that the school is always
new teacher can become looking for people to join
involved in the school through committees and volunteer
committee membership and
volunteering
Gave advanced information and ______ Reinforced that coaching is a
examples of paperwork involved good way to get involved with
in coaching, along with rules and the school
regulations of coaching athletics
in the school district
Provided an outline for all of the ______ Explained the need for clubs and
club sponsorship opportunities as student organizations in order to
well as the requirements for keep students interested in
clubs to maintain their active school outside of the academia
status at the school
Reminded the PNE program ______ Gave specific details on how to
participants that they will have a collect money, maintain records,
lot of things to keep track of if order equipment/materials, and
they are involved in coaching budget for
and/or club sponsorship awards/projects/banquets/etc.
for clubs and organizations
Add average scores for School Divide by 4
Involvement, Coaching, and School Involvement, Coaching,
Club Sponsorship: ___________ and Club Sponsorship
Score:__________
ESE/IEPs/504 Plans/ESOL
Provided detailed information ______ States that at some point in an
regarding the essentials of the educators career that an IEP
IEP process, documentation and will be needed to be completed
completion of the IEP for ESE and submitted to the ESE
students department
Showed the PNE program ______ Allowed PNE program
participants what an IEP form participants to work together to
looks like complete a detailed IEP form on
a student in a hypothetical
situation
Discussed the current school ______ Stated that the district had
district procedures for specific procedures that all
ESE/IEP/504 Plans and how they district employees must follow
are implemented in the regarding IEP students
instructional classroom
Defined ESOL. Stated that ______ Explained the needs for ESOL
ESOL is something that all students and used examples to
district employees must be show how to work with these
91

trained on students
Add average scores for Divide by 4
ESE/IEPs/504 Plans/ESOL: ESE/IEPs/504 Plans/ESOL
___________ Score:__________
FPMS (Performance
Pay)/National Board
Certification
Shows a Florida Performance ______ Clearly defines and describes
Measurement System worksheet the six (6) domains used in the
to all PNE program participants Florida Performance
Measurement System
States that the Florida ______ Explains, in detail, the relevance
Performance Measurement and importance of the FPMS
System scale is used to measure and that it is an essential
instructional deficiencies and measurement tool of overall
successes instructional needs
Explains what it means to be ______ Talks about the existence of the
Nationally Board Certified and National Board Certified
why it is important to the opportunity for exceptional
education system teachers
Describes the details of how ______ Explains that Nationally Board
Nationally Board Certified Certified Teachers make
teachers not only make more additional money beyond their
money, but how their role as yearly salary
being NBC effects other
teachers, the site-based school
and the school district as a whole
Add average scores for Divide by 4
FPMS/NBC: ___________ FPMS/NBC Score:__________
PNE Domains Introduction
Provides specific details on who ______ Explains that all new teachers to
participates in and how the PNE the district or new to the
program prepares new education profession must
educators complete the PNE program
Describes the role of each ______ Provides the names of the
member of the PNE Team and members of the PNE team
how they contribute to the
program
Briefly states that there are six ______ Defines and details each of the
(6) domains in the PNE program six (6) domains of the PNE
program
Explains the details of the ______ Gives dates of observations and
procedures of the PNE program assigns a mentoring team
including a timeline for the
program, how to prepare for the
beginning of the program, what
92

to expect throughout the


program, and how to successfully
complete the program
Add average scores for PNE Divide by 4
Domains: ___________ PNE Domain
Score:__________
---------------------------------------- ---------- ---------------------------------------
--- ---
-
Add average scores for 15
LEADSPNE areas:
___________
Divide by 15 =
_______________
Overall LEADSPNE score
93

Appendix J

LEADSPNE Feedback Summary Sheet

APPENDIX J

LEADSPNE
Leadership Area/Behavior Your
Score
*Anticipated Average Score
*(Based on LEADSPNE
development team
expectations)
Curriculum Development ______ 3.5

Time Management, ______ 3.0


Multitasking, and Syllabus
94

Development
Classroom Management and ______ 3.5
Discipline
University to Professional ______ 4.0
Transition
Moral and Ethical ______ 4.0
Development
Parent Contact and ______ 3.0
Communication
Project CRISS Strategies ______ 4.0

Interactive Notebook ______ 3.0

General Policies and ______ 3.5


Procedures (school and
district)
First Day of School/Semester ______ 3.5
Procedures
Integrating Technology into the ______ 3.0
Curriculum
School Involvement, Coaching, ______ 2.5
and Club Sponsorship
ESE/IEPs/504 Plans/ESOL ______ 2.0

FPMS (Performance ______ 2.0


Pay)/National Board
Certification
PNE Domains Introduction ______ 2.5

------------------------------ --------- ----------------------------


OVERALL 3.13
95

Appendix K

References: LEADSPNE Reading List

APPENDIX K

LEADSPNE
Leadership
Area/Behavior
Reading

Curriculum Floden, R.E., & Wilson, S.M. (2003). Creating Effective


Development Teachers: Concise Answers for Hard Questions. An Addendum
to the Report Teacher Preparation Research: Current
Knowledge, Gaps, and Recommendations. Michigan: Education
Commission of States, American Association of Colleges for
Teacher Education, & ERIC Clearinghouse on Teaching and
Teacher Education. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service
96

No. ED476366)
Time Bethower, D. & Smalley, K. (1998). Performance-based
Management, instruction: Linking training to business results. San Francisco:
Multitasking, Jossey-Bass.
and Syllabus
Development
AND Classroom
Management
and Discipline
University to Neville, K. & Robinson, C (2003). The Delivery, Financing,
Professional and Assessment Professional Development in Education: Pre-
Transition Service Preparation and In-Service Training. Washington D.C.:
Institute of Education Services. (ERIC Document Reproduction
Service No. ED482979).
Moral and Knowles, M., Holton, E., & Swanson, R. (2005). The adult
Ethical learner (6th ed.). Houston: Gulf Publishing.
Development
AND
Parent Contact
and
Communication
Project CRISS Joe E. Newsome High School Advisory Council (2004).
Strategies School Improvement Goals for 2004 - 2005.
AND Retrieved October 31, 2005 from
Interactive http://apps.sdhc.k12.fl.us/sdhc2/schoolsite/SIPPLANS/3171.pdf
Notebook
AND
General Policies
and Procedures
(school and
district)
AND
First Day of
School/Semester
Procedures
AND
Integrating
Technology into
the Curriculum
School Moir, E. (2003). Launching the Next Generation of Teachers
Involvement, through Quality Induction. California: National Commission on
Coaching, and Teaching and Americas Future. (ERIC Document
Club Reproduction Service No. ED479764)
Sponsorship
ESE/IEPs/504 Vermont Early Childhood Work Group (2001). Planning Your
Plans/ESOL Professional Growth: Creating an Individualized Professional
Development Plan for Early Care and Education. Vermont:
97

Professional Preparation and Development Committee of the


Vermont Early Childhood Work Group. (ERIC Document
Reproduction Service No. 455970)
FPMS The National Board for Professional Teaching Standards
(Performance (2006). Retrieved on July 27, 2006, from www.nbpts.org
Pay)/National
Board
Certification
PNE Domains School District of Hillsborough County (2005).
Introduction Office of Staff Development: Preparing New Educators.
Retrieved November 1, 2005, from
http://apps.sdhc.k12.fl.us/public/dept/staffdev/PNE
98

Tables
99

Table 1

Teacher Number and Percentage of the Rate of Participation in the LEADSPNE Survey
Process

Table 1

Teacher Number and Percentage of the Rate of Participation in the LEADSPNE Survey

Process

Survey Form Number of Participants Response Rate (%)

IPDP 20 85

LEADSPNE 20 85

Workshop Evaluation 20 100


100

*Attrition rate for participation set at 25 percent


101

Table 2

Participants Responses to the Individual Professional Development Plan Survey

Table 2

Participants Responses to the Individual Professional Development Plan Survey

Area of IPDP (Questions) Average Score (Quality Points)

i. Inclusive Process (1-2) 2.58

ii. School/District Educational Plan (3-8) 2.42

iii. Professional Development Needs Assessment (9-12) 2.11

iv. Professional Development Goals (13-15) 2.44

v. Professional Development Activities (16-20) 2.27


102

vi. Research to Support Professional Development (21-23) 2.22

vii. Resources to Support Professional Development (24-28) 2.45

viii. Share the Professional Development Plan with

School Community (29-31) 2.30

ix. Implementing Professional Development (32-38) 1.83

x. Evaluating and Improving Professional Development (39-45) 2.34

xi. Sharing Professional Development (46-47) 2.04

TOTAL AVERAGE SCORE 2.27


103

Table 3

Participants Responses to New Teacher Induction Program Teambuilding Workshop

Table 3

Participants Responses to New Teacher Induction Program Teambuilding Workshop

(Appendix D) 1 = Lowest to 5 = Highest (Standard error = .11)

Question Average T- Z-
Number Score Score Score
1 3.15 -25.40 -7.54

2 4.15 65.40 1.54

3 4.05 56.30 0.63

4 4.10 61.80 1.18


104

5 2.68 -61.80 -11.18

6 4.05 56.30 0.63

7 4.42 90.00 4.00

8 4.47 94.50 4.45

9 4.42 90.00 4.00

10 4.36 84.50 3.45

Totals: 3.98 511.60 1.16*

Confidence Limit z-score True score

95% -1.96 and Sample mean +/- (1.96 X standard

+1.96 error)

99% -2.58 and Sample mean +/- (2.58 X standard

+2.58 error)
105

Table 4

Results of the LEADSPNE Survey Using the LEADSPNE Feedback Summary


Worksheet

Table 4

Results of the LEADSPNE Survey (Appendix F) Using the LEADSPNE Feedback

Summary Worksheet (Appendix J)

Leadership Area/Behavior Treatment *Anticipated Average Score


Group *(Based on LEADSPNE
Score development team
expectations)
Curriculum Development 2.72 3.5

Time Management, 2.56 3.0


Multitasking, and Syllabus
Development
Classroom Management and 2.81 3.5
Discipline
106

University to Professional 2.85 4.0


Transition
Moral and Ethical 3.37 4.0
Development
Parent Contact and 2.56 3.0
Communication
Project CRISS Strategies 2.81 4.0

Interactive Notebook 2.96 3.0

General Policies and 2.71 3.5


Procedures (school and
district)
First Day of School/Semester 3.31 3.5
Procedures
Integrating Technology into the 2.98 3.0
Curriculum
School Involvement, Coaching, 2.77 2.5
and Club Sponsorship
ESE/IEPs/504 Plans/ESOL 2.65 2.0

FPMS (Performance 2.60 2.0


Pay)/National Board
Certification
PNE Domains Introduction 2.85 2.5

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OVERALL 2.83 3.13