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Preparing your annotated bibliography

1. You are expected to prepare a summative annotated bibliography of six (or nine for non-first
year students) academic materials and write an entry for each of them.
2. In this form of annotation you are expected to summarize the content of each of your
selected materials (influenced by the topic you have chosen for your reflective piece) and
highlight the conclusions reached by the authors.
3. You are NOT required to explain the research methods adopted by the authors nor are you
to evaluate the conclusions reached.
4. You are to state the relevance of each material to your own reflective piece topic.
5. In summary, your major concerns in your annotation should include the following: (a) the
citation of materials used; (b) a summary of the authors arguments; (c) the conclusions
reached; and (d) the relevance of the materials to your reflective piece.
6. At the end of your annotation list all six (or nine for non-first year students) resources
annotated in alphabetical order using the Harvard referencing style.

Examples:

Harris, M. (1974). Why a Perfect Knowledge of All the Rules One Must Know to Act Like a
Native, Cannot Lead to the Knowledge Of How Natives Act. Journal of Anthropological
Research, 30, 242-251. Comment [AA1]: Citation of material

The prevalence of idealist models depicting human behaviour in a culture as determined by


a set of rules, plans and programs shared by all members of that culture is severely criticized
in this essay. Stating that behaviour cannot be fully understood without placing it in the
total behaviour patterns possible for human beings, three challenges to the idealist model
are put forth. These involve the areas of predicting ideas and behaviour, alternative
responses to situations and the absence of totally unchallenged authorities in most social
situations. Idealist strategies, and their usefulness as tools for field research, are seen as
somewhat incomplete. Comment [AA2]: Summary and
conclusion of article content

This article is relevant to my topic in supporting my argument for the relevance of broad
social contexts in understanding human behaviour. Comment [AA3]: Relevance to your
reflective piece

Asakitikpi, A. E. (2015). Health policy reform in sub-Saharan Africa. In Kuhlmann, E., Blank, R.H.,
Bourgeault, I.L., Wendt, C (eds.) The Palgrave international Handbook of Healthcare Policy and
Governance. London: Palgrave, Macmillan, Chapter 12. Comment [AA4]: Citation

Various factors are adduced to healthcare problems in sub-Saharan Africa, which include
weak regulation by states; poor regulatory capacities and monitoring systems exacerbated by
economic and political exigencies; more patronizing political systems; the fortuitous reliance
on external donors; and the poor capacities for planning and managing resources. Comment [AA5]: Content summary of
paper and conclusion reached.

This paper is interesting because of its historical underpinnings in explaining health issues in
sub-Saharan Africa, which will be dealt with in my reflective piece. Comment [AA6]: Relevance to your
reflective piece
List of References Comment [AA7]: Compilation of all
materials annotated in alphabetical order.

Asakitikpi, A. E. (2015). Health policy reform in sub-Saharan Africa. In Kuhlmann, E., Blank, R.H.,
Bourgeault, I.L., Wendt, C (eds.) The Palgrave international Handbook of Healthcare Policy
and Governance. London: Palgrave, Macmillan, Chapter 12.

Harris, M. (1974). Why a Perfect Knowledge of All the Rules One Must Know to Act Like a
Native, Cannot Lead to the Knowledge Of How Natives Act. Journal of
Anthropological Research, 30, 242-251.