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Title: Compare numbers between 1 and 10 using greater, less and equal to symbols

Topic: Inequalities

Grade: Kindergarten

Rationale: It is important for students to understand the difference in quantities between


numbers. Through this lesson they will be able to compare numbers through the use of
greater (>) less than (<) equal to (=). This will serve as a great skill to them in the real
world; they will be able to make real world comparisons through mathematics.

Standards:
Reason abstractly and quantitively:

Explain the relationship between quantities in problem situations


Represent situations using symbols (e.g., writing expressions or equations)
Create representations that fit the problem

Objectives:

Students will demonstrate an understanding of the terms greater than, less than,
equal to.
Students will be able to compare numbers between 1 and 10 through the use of
greater than less than and equal to.

Motivation: Read aloud of More or less by Stuart J. Murphy

Materials/Manipulatives:

More or less by Stuart J. Murphy


Big Dice (one for each student)
Counters
Greater than, less than or equal to hand out
Crayons
Pencils

Grouping: Students will work individually during this lesson. They will however be
reminded that they can ask their partners at their tables for support if they need it.

Procedure:
Step 1: Read and discuss More or less by Stuart J. Murphy
Students will discuss the story and the concept of having one number and finding a
number that is less than or greater than that number.
Step 2: The read aloud and discussion will be followed by a review of the terms greater
than, less than and equal to. Students should have prior knowledge of the terms,
reviewing them will reinforce their knowledge of the topic. The review will be done
using pictures of sharks with their mouths open in the shape of greater than (>) and less
than (<). It will be explained that the shark eats the group of fishes with the larger
amount; this will be modeled on the board.
Step 3: Introduce activity, give students instructions and model the activity before having
them do it on their own.

Group students in heterogeneous pairs


Roll a die
Make a set of counters equal to the number rolled and draw a picture
showing the number you rolled
Create a set of counters greater than the number rolled. Write the number
on the hand out and draw a picture showing the number.
Create a set of counters less than the number rolled. Write the number on
the hand out and draw a picture showing the number.
Allow students to use pictures, numbers, or words to show a number
equal, less than, or greater than the number rolled. This will be done on a
hand out that will be provided.
This will be repeated four times.

Step 4: After the activity students will take part in a math discussion, they will discuss
their results and explain how they came up with their numbers. Students will also
complete an exit ticket to show that they have grasped an understanding of the content.

Strategies:

Modeling
Repetition
Discourse
Let students use what makes sense to them.
Multiple entry points:

Instead of writing the numbers, students can draw objects that represent each
number
Students can pick a partner to work with ( the teacher has to make sure it is a
heterogeneous pair)
Students will be allowed to use pictures, numbers or words to show greater, less,
and equal.
Long/short term assessments:

Teacher will monitor student progress by walking around the class during the
lesson checking their work and listening to students discussions.

Student Reflection: Students will reflect on the lesson through a math talk, they will
discuss what they have learned and any difficulties they may have had.
Questions such as the following may be asked:

What did you learn about the relationship between numbers?


What are the symbols for greater than, less than and equal to (have students draw
it on the board)
Did you have any trouble understanding the topic of the lesson?
What could I have done differently to help you better understand?

Next Steps: Although students had some difficulties throughout the lesson they were able
to grasp the concept and engage in the lesson. Students were used to using a crocodile to
help them with the symbols for greater than, less than, or equal to. In my lesson I used
sharks, this was intended to help them see that a visual understanding of the symbols can
be made with the help of any object. Students were reluctant at first but after I explained
that it is the same concept they began to name other things that can help them remember
the symbols, such as their pets or even themselves. They were able to make a connection
between the real world and mathematics. This lesson was done with four students, they
did not need much scaffolding from me, but instead I encouraged them to ask each other
for help if they were stuck on a question. The lesson proved to be effective, students were
able to work independently as well as to collaborate when needed, and they were able to
grasp an understanding of the content.