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Greek Creatures

Contents

1 Aeternae 1
1.1 References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

2 Athos (mythology) 2
2.1 Gigantes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
2.2 Mount Athos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
2.3 Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

3 Alcyoneus 4
3.1 Early sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
3.1.1 Iconography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
3.1.2 Literature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
3.2 Other sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
3.3 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
3.4 References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

4 Almops 7
4.1 References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

5 Aloadae 8
5.1 In popular culture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
5.2 References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
5.3 Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
5.4 External links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
5.5 Text and image sources, contributors, and licenses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
5.5.1 Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
5.5.2 Images . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
5.5.3 Content license . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

i
Chapter 1

Aeternae

The Aeternae were a race of legendary creatures de-


scribed in the travels of Alexander the Great.[1] As
Alexanders army passed northern Indian plains, they
supposedly encountered the Aeternae, who killed some
of Alexanders men.[2] The Aeternae were described as
killing and wounding enemies with bony, saw-toothed
protuberances sprouting from their heads.[2]

1.1 References
[1] Giants, Monsters, and Dragons: An Encyclopedia of
Folklore, Legend, and Myth by Carol Rose page 4

[2] Matthews, John and Caitlin (2005). The Element Encyclo-


pedia of Magical Creatuers. HarperElement. p. 8. ISBN
978-1-4351-1086-1.

1
Chapter 2

Athos (mythology)

Athos ([s] Greek: , pronounced [ats]) from teries on the mountain, each having to tend to their own
Greek mythology, was one of the Gigantes. He is area. The mountain produced a very large amount of
most known for the creation of Mt. Athos, a mountain Wine and Grapes which is vital to the commerce of the
and peninsula in northern Greece, known as The Holy region. Women and children are forbidden on the moun-
Mountain, that is located in northern Greece. There are tain. In 368 B.C. the mountain became part of the state of
two versions regarding the creation of the mountain, and Phillipos of Macedonia. Then years later when Alexan-
they both involve Poseidon, Greek God of the sea, son der the Great united all the Greek states under his rule,
of Cronus and brother to Zeus and Hades. In one ver- an architect named Dinocrates suggested that they carved
sion of the story, Athos throws a mountain at Poseidon the mountain into a statue in the likeness of Alexander.
but misses. It is said that " Athos got away and the rock Alexander being humble, refused and they left the town
he was about to throw at the god slipped through his n- in peace. In the fourth century the mountain became fully
gers. Poseidon then threw it back at him, thus creat- Christian. The beginning of the Athonite Monastic Life,
ing Mt. Athos. In the other version Poseidon throws the is signaled by the arrival of two important gures. The
mountain at Athos, creating the mountain. rst being Petros of Athos who arrived in the late 8th cen-
tury, and Euthymios the New who arrived around 860. In
963 Athanasios the Athonite was key in the organization
2.1 Gigantes of the monastic life. In 1050, the monk population was
as high as 7000. Then in 1205 the mountain came un-
der the control of Frankish King of Thessaloniki. Dur-
Gigantes, not to be confused with the Titans who were ing this time the mountain suered greatly because the
even more powerful beings, are the Greek version of Gi- Athonite monks refused to accept the Union of Lyons in
ants. The Gigantes were often depicted as hoplite sol- 1274. In the 14th century more monasteries appeared
diers, dressed in full armor, or as a type of barbarian with on the mountain, but in 1424 the mountain was taken
panther skin clothing wielding aming torches and rocks over by Murat the second, who imposed high taxes and
as weapons. They were also often depicted with serpents levies on the mountain which caused many of the monks
as legs. One myth says that the Gigantes were created to leave and cause the mountain to become all but de-
when Ouranos (Uranus) was castrated by his son, Cronus, serted. The mountain only survived because of aid from
when his blood fell to the earth. Where another myth Ecumenical Patriarchate, who gave the monks a lot of
says that they were born from Gaia, with Tartaros as their support, both spiritually and scally. Some aid was also
father. They waged war on the gods during the Gigan- given by the Transdanubian Principalities but also from
tomachy. The Gigantes were spurred on and encouraged the Orthodox people. Then in 1822 the worse disaster
by Gaia, the mother of the titans, to wage war against in all of the mountains history occurred, during the rev-
the gods to avenge Cronuss death. During the Gigan- olution of Emmanuel Papas Turkish soldiers murdered
tomachy there were many battles between the Gods and anyone, monks, women and children, who sought refuge
Gigantes, to which the Gigantes eventually lost. None of on the mountain. The mountain came back under Greek
the Gigantes survived, except for Aristatios, who survived sovereignty on 5 November 1912. Then in 1963 on the
because Gaia transformed him into a dung beetle. thousand anniversary of foundation of organized monas-
tic, there was a festival, but it was not very cheery and
many considered it the funeral of the mountain. Finally
2.2 Mount Athos in the year 1988 it was made into a national heritage site.

The mountain that was created with Athoss death, has


become the center of orthodox monasticism in the re-
gion. It is mentioned in many Greek epics, including The
Iliad, by Homer.The mountain consists of many monas-

2
2.3. SOURCES 3

2.3 Sources
Gigantes. Accessed September 14, 2015.
http://www.mlahanas.de/Greeks/Mythology/
Gigantes.html.

GIGANTES : Giants of Phlegra | Greek Mythol-


ogy, W/ Pictures. Accessed September 14, 2015.
http://www.theoi.com/Gigante/Gigantes.html.

Gigantomachy: Sculpture & Vase Repre-


sentations. Accessed September 21, 2015.
http://mkatz.web.wesleyan.edu/cciv110x/hesiod/
cciv110.gigantomachy.html.

HOLY MOUNTAIN AND BULGARIAN ZO-


GRAF MONASTERY. Accessed September 21,
2015. http://berberian11.tripod.com/gulabov_
athos.htm.

Mount Athos. Sacred Sites. Accessed September


21, 2015. https://sacredsites.com/europe/greece/
mount_athos.html.
Mount Athos - Everything2.com. Accessed
September 21, 2015. http://everything2.com/title/
Mount+Athos.

Myths and Legends about Mount Athos. Accessed


September 21, 2015. http://europost.bg/article?id=
968.
Tsantali Mount Athos. Accessed September 16,
2015. http://www.tsantali.com/mount-athos/.
Chapter 3

Alcyoneus

This article is about the Giant, and the opponent of Hera- 3.1 Early sources
cles, in Greek mythology. For other uses, see Alcyoneus
(disambiguation). Early sources provide glimpses of other versions of the
Alcyoneus /lsanus/ (Ancient Greek: - story from the one that Apollodorus tells. Possibly Alcy-
oneus was not originally a Giant, but simply one of Her-
acles many monstrous opponents.[4]

3.1.1 Iconography

Alcyoneus (?), Athena, Gaia, and Nike, detail of the Gigan-


tomachy frieze, Pergamon Altar, Pergamon museum, Berlin.

, Alkuoneus) was a traditional opponent of the hero


Heracles. He was usually considered to be one of the Gi-
gantes (Giants), the ospring of Gaia born from the blood
of the castrated Uranus.[1] Heracles and Alcyoneus, metope from the rst Heraion at Foce
According to the mythographer Apollodorus, Alcy- del Sele
oneus confrontation with Heracles was part of the Depictions of Heracles ghting Alcyoneus, named by in-
Gigantomachy, the cosmic battle of the Giants with the scription, are found on several sixth century BC pots (e.g.,
Olympian gods. In Apollodorus account Alcyoneus and Lourve F208). The earliest extant representation of their
Porphyrion were the greatest of the Giants, and Alcy- battle probably occurs on a metope from the rst temple
oneus was immortal as long as he was in his native land.
dedicated to Hera at Foce del Sele, which shows Hera-
When Heracles shot Alcyoneus with an arrow, Alcyoneus cles holding a large gure by the hair, while stabbing him
fell to the ground but then began to revive, so on the ad-
with a sword. Such a scene is also depicted on several
vice of Athena, Heracles dragged Alcyoneus out of his shield-band reliefs from Olympia (B 1801, B 1010).[5]
homeland where Alcyoneus then died.[2]
A terracotta frieze (Basel BS 318) and the sixth century
For the poet Pindar, Heracles battle with Alcyoneus BC pots show a reclining Alcyoneus. And on some of
(whom he calls a herdsman), and the Gigantomachy were the pots Alcyoneus is apparently sleeping, with a winged
separate events. Hypnos nearby (Melborne 1730.4, Getty 84.AE.974,
In some accounts Alcyoneus caused the Gigantomachy Munich 1784, Toledo 52.66). These depictions suggest
by stealing the cattle of Helios.[3] Vase paintings suggest a the existence of a story in which Heracles takes advan-
version of the story in which Heracles encounters a sleep- tage of a sleeping opponent.[6]
ing Alcyoneus. The presence of cattle on several of the pots suggests that
His seven daughters are the Alkyonides. the story also involved cattle in some way (e.g., Tarquinia

4
3.3. NOTES 5

RC 2070, Taranto 7030). This last pot depicts Heracles, The late fourth century or early fth century AD Greek
with a headlock perhaps dragging his opponent, which poet Nonnus, in his poem Dionysiaca, mentions Alcy-
might be a representation of Heracles dragging Alcyoneus oneus as one of the several Giants that Dionysus battles
out of his homeland.[7] in the Gigantomachy.[17] Nonnus has Gaia set the Gi-
ants against Dionysus, promising Alcyoneus Artemis as
his wife should the Giants subdue Dionysus.[18] Nonnus
3.1.2 Literature makes Alcyoneus nine cubits high,[19] and has him ght
with mountains as weapons.[20]
The earliest mentions of Alcyoneus in literature, are by
the fth century BC poet Pindar. According to Pindar,
Heracles and Telamon were traveling through Phlegra, 3.3 Notes
where they encountered Alcyoneus, whom Pindar de-
scribes as a herdsman ... huge as a mountain,[8] and [1] Gantz, pp. 419421, 445450; Hard, p. 89. Smith has
a great and terrible warrior.[9] A battle occurs in which separate entries for the opponent of Heracles, mentioned
Alcyoneus laid low, by hurling a rock, twelve chariots by Pindar: Alcyoneus 1., and the Giant: Alcyoneus 2..
and twice twelve horse-taming heroes who were riding in For the birth of the Gigantes see Hesiod, Theogony 185.
them, before nally being destroyed by the two heroes. Hyginus, Fabulae Preface gives Tartarus as the father of
the Giants.
The participation of Telamon and other mortals in the
battle, and the lack of mention of any of the gods, or other [2] Apollodorus, 1.6.1.
Giants, seem to imply that for Pindar, unlike apparently [3] Scholiast to Pindar Isthmian 6.47; Gatz, p. 419.
Apollodorus, the battle between Heracles and Alcyoneus
was a separate event from the Gigantomachy. And in fact [4] Gantz, p. 446; MacLean, p. 100.
Pindar never actually calls Alcyoneus a Giant, although
[5] Gantz, p. 420. Louvre F208: Beazley Archive 6561;
the description of him as huge as a mountain, his use
Moon, p. 65. Metope: Bennett, p. 124. For a detailed
of a rock as a weapon, and the location of the battle at discussion see Andreae 1962.
Phlegra, the usual site of the Gigantomachy, all suggest
that he was.[10] [6] Gantz, p. 420; Staord, p. 118. Melborne 1730.4:
Beazley Archive 201048; LIMC Alkyoneus 11. Getty
Scholia to Pindar tell us that Alcyoneus lived on the isth- 84.AE.974: Beazley Archive 16201; Cohen p. 6668.
mus of Thrace and that he had stolen his cattle from Munich 1784: Beazley Archive 351331. Toledo 52.66:
Helios, causing the Gigantomachy, (Schol. Pindar Isth- Beazley Archive 2190; Moon p. 65.
mian 6.47) and that Alcyoneus, one of the Giants, at-
tacked Heracles, not in Thrace but at the Isthmus of [7] Gantz, p. 420. Tarquinia RC 2070: Beazley Archive
Corinth, while the hero was returning with the cattle of 332028. Taranto 7030: Andreae, pp. 188, 189; LIMC
Alkyoneus 17.
Geryon, and that this was according to Zeus plan be-
cause the Giants were his enemies (Schol. Pindar Ne- [8] Pindar, Isthmian 6.3035.
mean 4.43). The cattle shown on the sixth century pots,
might thus represent either Alcyoneus cattle stolen from [9] Pindar, Nemean 4.2430.
Helios, or Heracles cattle taken from Geryon.[11] [10] Gantz, pp. 419, 445, 447. Pindar knew of the larger battle
between the gods and Giants which he also located on the
plain of Phlegra, Nemean 1.6769; 7.90; Pythian 8.12
18.
3.2 Other sources
[11] Gantz, pp. 419, 448.
Alcyoneus is usually identied as the winged Giant [12] Cunningham, p. 113; Kleiner, p. 156 FIG. 5-79; for
battling Athena on the Gigantomachy frieze from the doubts concerning the identication of the Giant as Al-
Pergamon Altar.[12] cyoneus, see Ridgway, p. 39, note 59, pp. 5960.
An unascribed lyric fragment (985 PMG) calls the Giant [13] Gantz, p. 419.
Phlegraian Alkyoneus of Pallene, the eldest of the Gi-
gantes [Giants]".[13] Claudian has Alcyoneus buried un- [14] Claudian, Rape of Proserpine 3.186187 (pp. 358359).
der the volcanic Mount Vesuvius[14] while Philostratus
[15] Philostratus, On Heroes 8.1516.
says that the bones of Alcyoneus were considered a mar-
vel by the people living near Vesuvius, where it was [16] Suda, s. v. (Alcyon days, Halcyon
said that many Giants were buried.[15] The Suda says that days, kingsher days), s. v. (Pallene).
Hegesander told of a myth in which Alcyoneus had seven
[17] Nonnus, Dionysiaca 25.90 (II, pp. 256257); 48.44 (III,
daughters, the Alkyonides, who threw themselves into the
pp. 426427); 48.71 (III, pp. 428429).
sea when Alcyoneus died and were turned into birds, the
Halcyons (kingshers).[16] [18] Nonnus, Dionysiaca 48.22 (III, pp. 426427).
6 CHAPTER 3. ALCYONEUS

[19] Nonnus, Dionysiaca 36.242 (III, pp. 1819). Nonnus, Dionysiaca; translated by Rouse, W H D,
II Books XVIXXXV. Loeb Classical Library No.
[20] Nonnus, Dionysiaca 48.44 (III, pp. 426427); 48.71 (III,
345, Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press;
pp. 428429).
London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1940. Internet
Archive

3.4 References Nonnus, Dionysiaca; translated by Rouse, W H


D, III Books XXXVIXLVIII. Loeb Classical Li-
Andreae, B., Herakles und Alkyoneus, Jahrbuch brary No. 346, Cambridge, MA, Harvard Univer-
des Deutschen Archologischen Instituts 77: 130- sity Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1940.
210. 1962. Internet Archive

Apollodorus, Apollodorus, The Library, with an En- Philostratus (the Athenian), On Heroes, editors
glish Translation by Sir James George Frazer, F.B.A., Jennifer K. Berenson MacLean, Ellen Bradshaw
F.R.S. in 2 Volumes. Cambridge, MA, Harvard Aitken, BRILL, 2003, ISBN 9789004127012.
University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd.
Pindar, Odes, Diane Arnson Svarlien. 1990. Online
1921. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library.
version at the Perseus Digital Library.
Claudian, Claudian with an English translation by
Ridgway, Brunilde Sismondo, Hellenistic Sculpture
Maurice Platnauer, Volume II, Loeb Classical Li-
II, University of Wisconsin Press, 2000. ISBN 978-
brary No. 136. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Uni-
0299167103.
versity Press; London: William Heinemann, Ltd..
1922. ISBN 978-0674991514. Internet Archive. Smith, William; Dictionary of Greek and Roman Bi-
ography and Mythology, London (1873). Alcyoneus
Cohen, Beth, The Colors of Clay: Special Techniques
1., Alcyoneus 2.
in Athenian Vases, Getty Publications, 2006. ISBN
9780892369423. Staord, Emma, Harakles, Routledge, 2013. ISBN
9781136519277.
Cunningham, Lawrence, John Reich, Lois Fichner-
Rathus, Culture and Values: A Survey of the West-
ern Humanities, Volume 1, Cengage Learning, 2014.
ISBN 9781285974460.
Gantz, Timothy, Early Greek Myth: A Guide to Lit-
erary and Artistic Sources, Johns Hopkins Univer-
sity Press, 1996, Two volumes: ISBN 978-0-8018-
5360-9 (Vol. 1), ISBN 978-0-8018-5362-3 (Vol.
2).
Hard, Robin, The Routledge Handbook of Greek
Mythology: Based on H.J. Roses Handbook of
Greek Mythology, Psychology Press, 2004, ISBN
9780415186360.
Hesiod, Theogony, in The Homeric Hymns and
Homerica with an English Translation by Hugh G.
Evelyn-White, Cambridge, MA.,Harvard University
Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1914.
Online version at the Perseus Digital Library.
Hyginus, Gaius Julius, The Myths of Hyginus.
Edited and translated by Mary A. Grant, Lawrence:
University of Kansas Press, 1960.
Kleiner, Fred S. Gardners Art Through the Ages: A
Global History, Fourteenth Edition, Cengage Learn-
ing, 2012. ISBN 9781285288673.
Moon, Warren, G., Some New and Little-Known
Vases by the Rycroft and Priam Painters in Greek
Vases in the J. Paul Getty Museum: Volume 2. Getty
Publications, 1985.
Chapter 4

Almops

Almops (Ancient Greek: ) was in Greek mythol-


ogy a giant, and son of the god Poseidon and the half-
nymph Helle.[1] He was the brother of Paeon (called
"Edonus" in some accounts).[2] With the others of his
kind, the Gigantes, he waged war on Zeus and the gods
of Olympus.
It is from Almops that the now-obsolete name for the
region of Almopia and its inhabitants, the Almopes, in
Macedonia, Greece, were believed to have derived their
name.[3]

4.1 References
[1] Schmitz, Leonhard (1867). Almops. In William Smith.
Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythol-
ogy. 1. Boston: Little, Brown and Company. p. 132.

[2] Bell, Robert E. (1991). Women of Classical Mythology.


ABC-CLIO. p. 230. ISBN 0-87436-581-3.

[3] Stephanus of Byzantium, s.v.

This article incorporates text from a publication now


in the public domain: Smith, William, ed. (1870).
"article name needed ". Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biog-
raphy and Mythology.

7
Chapter 5

Aloadae

Otos redirects here. For the Spanish municipality, see According to another version of their struggle against the
Otos, Valencia. Olympians, alluded to so briey[8] that it must have been
In Greek mythology, the Aloadae (/loedi/) or already familiar to the epics hearers, they managed to
kidnap Ares and hold him in a bronze jar, a storage pithos,
for thirteen months, a lunar year. And that would have
been the end of Ares and his appetite for war, if the beau-
tiful Eriboea, the young giants stepmother, had not told
Hermes what they had done, Dione related (Iliad 5.385
391). He was only released when Artemis oered herself
to Otus. This made Ephialtes envious and the pair fought.
Artemis changed herself into a doe and jumped between
them. The Aloadae, not wanting her to get away, threw
their spears and simultaneously killed each other.[9][10]
The Aloadae were bringers of civilization, founding cities
and teaching culture to humanity. They were venerated
specically in Naxos and Boeotian Ascra,[11] two cities
they founded. Ephialtes (lit. he who jumps upon) is
also the Greek word for "nightmare",[12] and Ephialtes
was sometimes considered the daimon of nightmares. In
Titans and giants, including Ephialtes on the left, in Gustave the Inferno of Dantes Divine Comedy Ephialtes is one of
Dor's illustrations to Dante's Divine Comedy. four giants placed in the great pit that separates Dis, or
the seventh and eighth circles of Hell, from Cocytus, the
Aloads (Ancient Greek: Aloadai) were Otus Ninth Circle. He is chained.
(or Otos) () and Ephialtes (), sons of
Iphimedia, wife of Aloeus, by Poseidon,[1] whom she
induced to make her pregnant by going to the seashore
and disporting herself in the surf or scooping seawa-
ter into her bosom.[2] From Aloeus they received their
patronymic, the Aloadae. They were strong and aggres- 5.1 In popular culture
sive giants, growing by nine ngers every month[3] nine
fathoms tall at age nine, and only outshone in beauty by
Orion.[4][5]
The brothers wanted to storm Mt. Olympus and gain Ephialtes and Otis appear in The Mark of Athena
Artemis for Otus and Hera for Ephialtes. Their plan, as two of the main antagonists. In the book, they
or construction, of a pile of mountains atop which they are one of the Giants, the children of Gaea and
would confront the gods is described dierently accord- Tartarus. They are defeated in the Roman Coli-
ing to the author (including Homer, Virgil, and Ovid), seum by their Olympian enemy Bacchus, and the
and occasionally changed by translators. Mount Olym- demigods Percy Jackson and Jason Grace, sons of
pus is usually said to be on the bottom mountain, with Poseidon and Jupiter respectively. In the novel, the
Mounts Ossa and Pelion upon Ossa as second and third, Aloadae kidnap the demigod son of Hades, Nico di
either respectively or vice versa. Homer says they were Angelo and imprison him in a jar, in the same way
killed by Apollo before they had any beards,[6] consistent they captured Ares centuries earlier, and plan to de-
with their being bound to columns in the Underworld by stroy Rome. Next to Orion, they are the smallest
snakes, with the nymph of the Styx in the form of an owl Giants to appear in the books, described as only be-
over them.[7] ing 12 feet tall.

8
5.4. EXTERNAL LINKS 9

5.2 References
[1] Odyssey, 11.3058.

[2] Bibliotheke 1.7.4.

[3] Hyginus, Fabulae 28.

[4] Kernyi, 1951:154.

[5] Schmitz, Leonhard (1867). Aloeidae. In William


Smith. Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and
Mythology. 1. Boston: Little, Brown and Company. pp.
132133.

[6] Odyssey 11.31920.

[7] Hyginus.

[8] It is related in the Iliad by the goddess Dione to her daugh-


ter Aphrodite

[9] Hamilton, Edith (1942). Mythology. New York: Grand


Central Publishing. p. 144.

[10] This mytheme, of the brothers mutual murder, features in


the myth of the mutual killings of Eteocles and Polynices
that is recounted in Seven Against Thebes.

[11] Pausanias 9.29.1.

[12] Liddel, H.G. & Scott, R. A GreekEnglish Lexicon, 9th


ed. (Oxford, 1940), s.v.

5.3 Sources
Kerenyi, Karl (1951). The Gods of the Greeks. pp.
153.

5.4 External links


Theoi Project - Aloadae
10 CHAPTER 5. ALOADAE

5.5 Text and image sources, contributors, and licenses


5.5.1 Text
Aeternae Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aeternae?oldid=744732324 Contributors: BDD, Cynwolfe, Brambleberry of RiverClan,
Stephanie Lahey, Candleabracadabra, Greek Legend and Bender the Bot
Athos (mythology) Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Athos_(mythology)?oldid=765283152 Contributors: Robbot, Flauto Dolce,
Xezbeth, Kwamikagami, GeeJo, BOT-Superzerocool, SmackBot, Strabismus, Yamaguchi , Pfhreak, Bluebot, Fordmadoxfraud, Agent-
Peppermint, Deective, T@nn, Axidos, Katalaveno, STBotD, Oshwah, Gerakibot, Catalographer, Addbot, Dawynn, Jay-lou, AnakngAraw,
Niki81, LilHelpa, Erik9bot, Greedyhalibut, I dream of horses, MondalorBot, EmausBot, Bamyers99, ClueBot NG, 00cjk, Close-paren and
Anonymous: 16
Alcyoneus Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alcyoneus?oldid=782163230 Contributors: Tucci528, Paul August, Stemonitis, Sburke,
FlaBot, Chobot, Rtkat3, Mark Ironie, Deucalionite, Pfhreak, Atlantas, Ser Amantio di Nicolao, Breno, The Man in Question, Inedible-
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