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Xingyi Quan JAM JONG (Standing Post Qi Gung) Skills

Xingyi Quan basic skills, that is the specific regulation of inner door Xingyi Quan, are for prolonging
years and nurturing life. Study the routines well and the correct grasp of the essential skills is
absolutely necessary for fundamental training. This is the so-called “If the roots are deep, the leaves
will be profuse; if the roots are solid, the branches will be luxuriant.”

Xingyi Quan is an excellent combination of Body, Function, and Skill. It is one of the Internal mar-
tial arts. It pays attention to inner and outer dual cultivation combining spirit qi and form into one.
Inside has the qi flying and soaring. Outside has the posture changing and transforming. The energy
has rising and falling, vertical and horizontal, sucking in and spitting out, hard and soft, three combined
to make one. The methods allow for nurturing life and subtle function in fighting. Because of this, the
beginning student must first progress through the basic training exercises of the three aspects of qi,
form and energy. Then you can begin to practice the fists. Therefore Xingyi Quan basic skills must
include the four aspects of regulating the meridians, nurturing the zhen qi, fixed forms, and solidifying
the lower basin.

All the old martial arts teachers each had their own methods for training these basic skills. The author
studied with Mr. Liu Weixiang in Beijing. Mr. Liu had Guo Yunshen’s strength, Song Shirong’s soft-
ness, and Bai Siyuan’s skills. His basic exercises emphasized the post skills. These train simultaneous-
ly the qi, form and energy. His training methods can be divided into standing post and moving posts
which are described below.
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STANDING POST SKILLS

“Standing Post” is a type of training method where one stands erect without
moving according to specified requirements. It is the foundation of the inner
door patterns of Xingyi Quan. The skills of the old masters come from post
training. Mr. Liu Lao commonly said, “Three Pi Quan’s are not as good as
one post.” Shang Yunxiang’s students first had to stand in the post for three
years. When they were tested on their ability to do fixed step Pi Quan, the
importance of standing post was clearly seen. There are many forms of
standing post. These are four fairly commonly used one, Fixed Energy Post,
Qian Kun Post, Chicken Leg Post and San Ti Post.

1. Fixed Energy Post


Both feet are parallel and open to about shoulder width. Both arms naturally hang down. Both hands
are by the outsides of the thighs. The palms face inward. The knees are slightly bent. The kneecaps are
aligned directly over the toes. The upper body is straight. The muscles of the back and chest must be
relaxed. The waist relaxes. The buttocks hang. The head pushes up. The neck is vertical. (picture 1)
Then both arms gradually rise up to the front until they are level with the shoulders. Bend the elbows
and sink the shoulders. It is like embracing a ball in front of the chest. The palms face inward. Both
middle fingers point at each other from about three inches away. (picture 2) Stop slightly, then both
forearms rotate inwards. The palms overturn to face outward (toward the front). The tiger’s mouths are
rounded. Their height is even with the mouth. The eyes look between the fingertips. (picture 3 front
and side) At this time the vitality must be lead inward. The eyes are like they are closed, but not
closed. Emphasize looking inward. The mouth is like it is closed, but not closed. The tongue pushes up
to the upper palate. Naturally purify the breathing from rough to fine, from quick to slow, from having
to not, from moving to stillness. Imagine the qi inside the lower abdomen rising and falling turbulent-
ly. Imagine the qi in the four limbs flowing up and down. The mind arrives in the lower limbs.
Gradually become aware of the lower legs and soles of the feet. The toes feel like they are swollen
with sinking qi. The toes grip the ground with the idea of having them enter three feet into the ground.
The mind arrives in the hands causing an awareness of itching and tingling in the fingers. Both palms
generate heat and swell. Feel that the changes are deep and profound. At this time if you close your
eyes. You should be aware of the emptiness between heaven and earth, only a remnant of yourself in
the two hands, it is great boundlessness. This is then created throughout the body. The beginner, after
standing for 10 minutes may become aware of being tired. You can move ever so slightly and then con-
tinue to stand. Eventually your skill will progress and the length of time you are able to stand will
become longer and longer. Every morning set aside a time for standing. Each period of standing
should not be less than 40 minutes, there is no limit on the maximum time.

2. Qian Kun Post

Both feet are parallel about shoulder width apart. The soles of the feet are empty and arched, like walk-
ing in the mud. The knees are relaxed and slightly bent and aligned with the toes. The arms gradually
rise up to the front. Bend the elbows and sink the shoulders. The palms face inward. The height of the
palms is even with the chest. They are like embracing a ball. Do not use strength. (picture 4) The
head pushes up and the neck is vertical. The spine is straight. Expand the back and hollow the chest.
The muscles are completely relaxed. Allow the qi to flow naturally and sink into the dantian.

Maintain this form without moving.


Concentrate the vitality. Eliminate
mixed thoughts. The brain is empty
and clean, spotless. Then empha-
size looking inward. Carefully
adjust the breathing. After the
breathing is even, push the tongue
up to the upper palate. Use the idea
of leading the qi from the Tian Xin
(that is the Yin Tang) and again
down. It lingers in the Shan Zhong (the area between the nipples), again it moves along the Ren chan-
nel down to the dantian. You can move the qi like this many times.

After the qi is flowing, both arms naturally drop down. The inside and outside laogong points of the
hands come together. The hands rest on the dantian area with the left hand on the inside and the right
hand is on the outside. (picture 5) Relax the shoulders and sink the elbows. The soul is empty and
the belly sinks and is full. The breathing gradually becomes deep, long, careful, and even. It is like it is
there, but not there. Gradually become aware that you have hot qi moving up and down. This is the
skill of moving the breath and moving the qi.
Do the above method each day until you can do it for 40 minutes without disruption. After a while
you will be unable to stop even if you wanted to. When you practice for a long time, the qi in the
dantian will feel very full. Then the inhaled qi must not again be carried down. Breathing must
gradually be allowed to still and stop. Do not allow the dantian to emit too much heat. Strong fire eats
qi. This is most important! Most important!

After your skill is pure and deep, sometimes you will manifest the zhen qi thrusting movement phe-
nomena, your movements will arise. This type of phenomena should not be insisted upon. Also you
must not force it to stop. Allow it to be natural. Then you will have the benefits and not the harm.
3. Chicken Leg Post

Both feet front and back stand open. The toes of the front foot hook inward. The toes of the back foot
also slightly hook inward. The distance between the front foot heel and the back foot toes is about one
and a half feet. Both knees bend as much as possible causing the rear foot kneecap to be about two
inches from the back of the front knee. The head pushes up. The neck is vertical. The spine is straight.
The waist is relaxed. The buttocks hang. The sacrum rises up. The chest is curved inward. The left
palm pushes on top of the dantian. The right palm is on top of the left palm. The inside and outside
laogong points are in contact. The shoulders relax. The elbows drop. The side of the upper body is
open and extended. (picture 6)

Both knees close inwards. The toes of both feet hook inward. Both heels twist outward. Up and
down, left and right, and everywhere the energy is closed. The tongue pushes up to the upper palate.
Breathe evenly through the nose. There should not be too much noise. When inhaling, the qi is swal-
lowed down. The eyeballs must overturn up to let loose the yang fire, causing the zhen qi to return to
the dantian. When you get tired of standing, you can change your feet. This posture is similar to the
one described above. Take turns changing the post like this. Do two sessions every day early in the
morning. Each session should be a minimum of 40 minutes. There is no maximum time limit. This
form is for training lower basin skills in Xingyi Quan. It is simple and easy to study. You can quickly
gain skill. It you practice for a long time then the stance will be firm and stable. For the time being,
do not treat it lightly.

4. San Ti Post (also called Ziwu Post or San Cai Post)

Stand erect. The heels are next to each other. The toes are open about 45-60 degrees. The body faces
halfway to the right (45 degrees). The left foot toe points to the front. The knees are slightly bent. The
knee caps are aligned over the toes. Both hands make fists next to the dantian. The palms face up.
(picture 7)

The right fist rises up. The


forearm rotates outwards.
The elbow sticks next to the
ribs as the fist drills out to
the upper front. Inhale as the
drill goes out. The palm of
the fist faces in toward your
face. The height of the fist is
even with the nose. Inhale
as much as possible as the
form is completed. (picture 8)

When exhaling, the left fist rises up. The forearm rotates outward. The elbow sticks next to the left ribs
and the fist reaches out toward the front of the chest. The eye of the fist faces left. It passes over the
right fist towards the front. When the fists separate, it changes to a palm. The palm rotates inward,
overturns and simultaneously splits towards the lower front. The left palm height is even with the
shoulder. Simultaneously, the right fist also changes to a palm. The center of the palm faces down. It
is pulled back and pushes down below the right ribs by the Riyue point. The left foot steps straight
towards the front simultaneously with the splitting palm. The distance between the front foot and back
foot is about 18 inches. The hand and foot must move simultaneously. The palm follows the exhale and
drops down. Exhale as much as possible as the form is completed. (picture 9)

When the form is complete, the body is angled at 45 degrees. Both knees bend about 135 degrees. The
back arm bends 120 degrees and the front arm bends 150 degrees. The three points of the rear foot
heel, front foot heel and front foot toe are aligned in a straight line. The tip of the nose, the tip of the
front hand middle finger, and the tip of the front foot must be aligned. The base of the sacrum is sus-
pended directly over the back heel. The hand is aligned over the foot. The elbow is aligned over the
knee. The shoulder is aligned over the hip. These are the so-called “Outer Three Combinations”. The
head pushes up. The neck is vertical. The shoulders relax. The elbows drop. The chest is hollow and the
back is expanded. The tiger’s mouths are rounded. The eyes gaze forward.

The requirements for using energy are: The whole body is relaxed. The head is like it is suspended
from a lintel. Both shoulders naturally hang down. This causes the muscles of the upper arms and upper
spine to have the feeling of sinking down. Start from the cervical vertebra. Relax and hang the tho-
racic vertebra one by one straight down to the sacrum. Then carry the sacrum toward the front. Move
it up and around and overturn it. Bring the lower abdomen to uphold and stop. The gudao contracts
inwards. Have the idea of holding back your stool. This is what is spoken of as “raising the anus and
contracting the kidneys.” Both knees have closing energy toward the insides. Both hips have embracing
energy. The toes grip the ground. The palm presses toward the front. The hearts of the palms con-
tract. Both knees bend as much as possible. The sacrum must be as straight as possible. The energy of
the entire body is unified. The inner qi jumps and rises.

Your mood should be very peaceful. The vitality is gathered within. The body is relaxed but the manner
is moving. It is bent like a crossbow and ready to issue. The mind moves and the will follows it. The
breathing is pure and natural. Not one thread is strained. Use the will to lead the qi. If you cause it to
rise, then it rises. If you cause it to descend, then it descends. When inhaling, the qi rises up and the
internal zang organs follow it and contract. When you exhale, the qi descends and the internal zang
organs follow it and relax. When both hands and both feet feel warm, swollen and tingly, then you
have qi passing through the four extremities. It feels like strength fills the palms and fingers. This is
the so-called “Inner Three Combinations.”
After you have practiced the above for half a year, you will feel that the dantian is full of qi. The qi
moves throughout the body and the qi of the four limbs and four extremities feels very strong. This
can be like practicing “Jin Gong” [energy skill]. Also you instantly follow the breathing of the outer qi
and the rise and fall of the inner qi. This makes the fixed form of the relaxing and contracting exer-
cise. The practice method is first gazing fixedly at an object forward three or four meter in the dis-
tance (perhaps a tree). Use the mind to guide you. Reach out with your qi and energy. Cause the palms
and fingers to work with the object as though they are joined in coming and going. When the qi rises
up, the energy returns and contracts. I imagine that I have gripped the object and pull it back to me.
When the qi descends, the rear leg has kicking energy and the front leg has treading energy. The toes
grip the ground. The qi penetrates to both hands. Use the qi to hasten the strength to issue out to the
front. Feel as though the strength is pushing the object away. Like this one rise one fall, one relax one
contract, one suck in one spit out. Instantly you have the fundamentals of being able to strike down
with explosive energy. You must pay attention, when practicing to do these things. The outer form of
the Standing Post cannot move. Only use the will to direct and coordinate the degree of movement.
For strength to be issued from the dantian to the wrists palms and fingers, etc., the extreme joints must
be temporarily relaxed, and the shoulders, hips, and waist etc. (the root joints) then must also be loose.
You must avoid having a tight strained energy simultaneously all over. This causes the body to have a
root like a wooden post, and lose it springy nature. You will not achieve the results that the standing
post must have.

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MOVING POST SKILLS


(Coiling Root Moving Skills)

Meticulously investigate the skills of the Coiling Root. It is also the training of the fundamental skills.
What are the dissimilarities? The fixed post is nurturing the zhen qi in an unmoving form. It solidi-
fies the lower basin. The form is fixed. The moving post then uses advancing, retreating, and chang-
ing as a way of training the inner qi. It solidifies the lower basin. It is a more advanced level of training
the basic skills. After practicing for a long time, whether in the walking frame or in fighting, even if
you are advancing or retreating, quick or slow, you will be light and yet not lose your sinking stability.
The inner qi is not separated. The method’s changes are nimble and normally can have the inner ener-
gy sucking in and spitting out smoothly. Strength permeates to the four extremities. It is as Song
Shirong said, “I have the coiling root and maintain a true count, revolving turning flying leaping skill
unbroken ...” The Coiling Root skills are Mr. Song’s version of Baguazhang, as he envisioned it and
trained it.

The specific training methods of the Coiling Root Moving Skill are very similar to Baguazhang, only in
Baguazhang the circle is comparatively large (about 3 meters in diameter) whereas the Coiling Root
circle is relatively small (Mr. Jia Yun’gao’s circle had a diameter of about one meter). When walking
in Baguazhang, the outer foot toes-in but the inner foot does not toe-out. The Coiling Root step then is
one toe-in and one toe-out. Baguazhang’s steps rise levelly and fall levelly. In the Coiling Root step-
ping, the heel touches the ground first and then the whole sole of the foot touches the ground. In
Baguazhang stepping, both feet walk on a single line. In Coiling Root stepping, the feet walk along two
lines. The proper body method is relatively low. There are eight forms in the Coiling Root Moving
Skill. There methods are given below.

1. Qi Sinks into the Dantian

Begin by using the Chicken Leg Post (you can also use the San Ti Post). Both hands make fists oppo-
site each other. The palms face downwards near the sides of the dantian. The distance is about 2 inches
away. Both shoulders sink down. Both elbows open to the outsides. The chest is slightly concave and
the back is rounded. The spine is straight. The head pushes up. The neck is erect. The eyes look toward
the front. (picture 10) This posture is said to make Chicken Legs, Dragon Body, Bear Arms, and
Monkey Back.

The posture of the upper body and upper arms does not change. The feet walk counter-clockwise (left)
along double lines around a circle with a diameter of 1 to 1.5 meters. Walk many circles without limit.
When walking use Xingyi stepping. The bottom of the foot is even with the surface of the ground. The
distance from the ground is about half an inch. When falling, the heel touches the ground first, then
the whole sole of the foot touches the ground. In walking, the height of the posture does not change,
the body cannot be rising and falling. The steps must not be fast and the steps must not be big. The
waist must be relaxed. Completely rely on using the strength of the kneecap and lower leg. The inside
foot toes-out and the kidney meridian’s qi moves. The outside foot toes-in and the bladder meridian’s
qi moves. When raising the foot, inhale. When the foot falls, exhale. The qi descends to the dant-
ian. One rise, one fall; one swallow, one spit out. Inhaling is without intent. Exhaling has intent.
When changing direction, the upper body does not change. The right foot toes-in as much as possible.
Turn the body 180 degrees toward the left. The left foot steps up half a step. The right foot rises up
next to the left ankle. It is about an inch from the ground. Rub the shins. (picture 11) The right foot
stops slightly and then steps towards the front. It drops down half a step in front of the left foot. The
foot slightly toes-out. (picture 12) Then walk the circle clockwise (to the right). The stepping method
and breathing are like before. Walk the circle without limit.

2. Three Basins Drop to the Ground

Begin using the Chicken Leg Post (you can also use the San Ti Post). Both forearms rotate inwards.
They turn until both hands face outward. Instantly push diagonally down towards the right and left
directions. The elbows must open outwards. The shoulders must sink down. The arms are rounded.
The chest is concave. Open the back. The spine is erect. The body turns left 45 degrees. Look
towards the left front direction. (picture 13)

The upper body posture does not change. The weight and height do not change. Walk the circle to
the left. The stepping, breathing, and turning are like in Form #1.

Both arms are rounded and push down. The fingers are spread open. The centers of the palms are
concave. Then the qi moves freely along the hand’s three yang and three yin meridians. Push up the
head. The neck is erect. Open the back, then the Ren and Du meridians flow together. As a result
the qi in the dantian moves along the du meridian up the spine, divides into two branches along the
hands’ three yin meridians spreading down the arms and filling the fingers. Then it also returns up the
hands’ three yang meridians. It passes through the six organs and again descends into the dantian. It
follows the rise and fall of the feet. The inner qi billows. The yin rises and the yang descends. It flows
everywhere without stopping. After practicing a long time, you can get the movement of the will, qi,
and strength to subtly mutually transform each other.

3. Heavenly King Upholds the Pagoda

Begin using the Chicken Leg Post (you can


also use the San Ti Post). Both forearms
rotate outwards making the palms face up.
The palms rise up from the chest and uphold
toward the front. The palms rise up until they
are even with the center of the nipples and
then reach out toward the front. The hands
open slightly to the left and right until they are
about three feet apart. The palms face up
level with the shoulders. The fingers are
spread open. The tiger’s mouths are rounded. The bends of the elbows is about 130 degrees. The
elbows are closed inwards. The shoulders relax toward the front. The armpits pull down as much as
possible. The head pushes up. The neck is erect. The chest is concave. The back is rounded. The
head turns slightly toward the left. The eyes look toward the front left direction. (picture 14) This
form is also called Tiger Upholding Form.
After the form is finished, first walk around the circle toward the left. Walk many circles without
limit. Then change directions and walk toward the right. Walk many circles without limit. The step-
ping method, breathing, and turning methods are like in Form 1.

This form, as before, is for guiding the qi of the hands’ three yin and three yang meridians. And oppo-
site the heart embrace the meridian qi lead single or multiple. Each change is one step. The inner qi
can be transported from the bubbling well up to the laogong causing the heart and kidneys to mix, get
the water and fire already aid of skill.

4. Push the Mountain into the Sea

Begin using the Chicken Leg Post (you can also use the San Ti Post). Both hands make fists and over-
turn making the palms face up. They drill up in front of the chest until they are even with the mouth.
(picture 15) The waist then turns left 45 degrees. Simultaneously, the forearms rotate inwards and the
fists change to palms. The hearts of the palms face outwards. They push together towards the left
front direction. When the form is completed, the fingers are spread open and the tiger’s mouths are
rounded. Both tiger’s mouths are opposite each other. The index fingers are about three inches apart.
The elbows are open and, as before, must hang down. The back is spread. The chest is concave. The
head pushes up. The neck is erect. Both shoulders are loose towards the front. The centers of the
hands have returning contracting energy. The eyes look towards the left front direction. (picture 16)

The upper body posture does not change. Walk the circle
towards the left. The walking method is like Form #1. Walk
many circles without limit. Each change is one step. When the
foot drops, exhale. The qi descends to the bubbling well and feels
like it sinks three feet into the ground. Simultaneously with the
dropping foot and sinking qi, both shoulders relax towards the
front. Both palms push towards the front. One step, one push.
They must be well coordinated. When pushing, the arms must
not straighten towards the front. Only use the will to lead the qi
to permeate the fingers. Issue strength from the spine. Use the
back to push the shoulders. Use the shoulders to push the
elbows. Use the elbows to push the hands. The extreme joints contract and the root joints relax. This
is the conscious mind leading the relaxing and contracting actions of the fixed forms.

When changing directions, both hands go down and grip like eagle talons. They return to make fists by
the sides of the dantian. Simultaneously the right foot steps up and toes-in as much as possible. The
body turns to the left. The left foot rises up next to the inside of the right ankle. The sole of the foot is
about an inch from the ground. Rub the shins. (picture 17) Slightly stop. Then the left foot steps for-
ward and drops down half a step in front of the right foot. Then the right foot steps forward.
Simultaneously both fists drill up in front of the chest about level with the mouth. They then change to
palms and overturn so that the palms face outward. They push out to the right front direction. This form
is similar to the beginning form only it is a mirror image. (picture 18) After the form is complete,
walk the circle to the right. The stepping method is the same as before. Walk many circles without limit.
This form not only regulates the yin and yang meridians of the hands and feet so that the qi and blood
flow unimpeded, but it also connects the taiyang bladder meridian with the du meridian on the spine.
5. Scaly Dragon Swims in the Water

Begin the form like before. Both hands make the Alligator Form palms. The index fingers are slight-
ly hooked and the thumbs make crab pincers. The tiger’s mouths are rounded. The remaining fingers
are curled back. The left hand drills up along the right front of the chest. The palm faces left. The
right palm is below the left elbow. The palm faces up. (picture 19) The above form does not stop.
The body turns left. Simultaneously the left forearm rotates inwards. The left palm continues to over-
turn, pull, and twist. It pushes out to the left front direction. The left arm slightly bends making a half
moon shape. The palm faces outward. The right forearm also rotates inward. The hand overturns so
that the palm faces the lower left direction below the inside of the left elbow. Look toward the left
front direction. (picture 20) As before, the head must push up. The neck is erect. Open the back. The
chest is concave. Twist the waist. Embrace the hips. The shoulders relax toward the front. The elbows
hang down.

The upper body shape does not change. Walk the circle towards the left. The stepping method and
breathing are like the first form. Walk many circles without limit. The falling step makes the exhale.
The qi sinks down and the shoulders sink down. The back pushes toward the front. The forearms,
wrists, palms, and fingers are like they are relaxed, yet contracted. They have stretched energy but are
not stiff. One step, one change of the energy, changing endlessly.

When changing directions, the right foot


steps up and toes-in as much as possible.
The body turns 180 degrees to the left.
Raise the left foot. Rub the shins like before.
Simultaneously, the right palm drills up
inside the left arm and arrives at the left
shoulder. The palm faces right. The left
palm overturns causing the palm to face up
below the right elbow. (picture 21) The left
foot steps to the front. It drops down a half
a step in front of the right foot. Simultaneously, the body turns 45 degrees to the right. The right arm
rotates inwards and wards-off to the right. When it overturns, it causes the palm to face outward and is
rounded. The left palm overturns so that the palm faces the lower right direction. Everything is like
the previous form, only it is the mirror image. (picture 22) The right foot goes out. Walk the circle
to the right. Walk many circles without limit.

Because the back is rounded, the arms are rounded, and the tiger’s mouths are rounded, this form is
also called the “Three Rounded Form.” The energy of stretching outward must be round and have a
springy nature. The whole body has strength, is lively and not stiff. The whole body is moved by the
waist and hips rotating and turning. Give free reign to the big or small cosmic orbit actions. The idea
is that both hands’ thumb and index fingers cause the Lung meridian and Large Intestine meridian to
become unblocked. When changing the forms and overturning the palms, use energy in the palm’s
outer edge and little finger. The elbow is slightly lifted and has hanging down energy. This causes the
qi of the Spleen meridian to travel up the inside of the legs along the heart meridian and penetrate
straight to the shao chong. Yin and yang change. Its flavor is unfathomable.

6. Push the Window to See the Moon

The beginning form is like before. Both forearms simultaneously rotate outwards. They overturn caus-
ing the palms to face up. (picture 23) The right arm rises up. The forearm rotates inwards. As the
right arm rises, it overturns so that the palm faces outwards. It rises until it is close to the upper front
of the forehead. Its distance from the forehead is about two inches. Simultaneously the left forearm
rotates inwards. It overturns so that the palm faces outward and downward. Its distance from the left
front of the belly is 7 or 8 inches. The body turns left 45 degrees. The eyes look toward the left front.
(picture 24) Both shoulders must relax towards the front. Both elbows open to the outsides. They must
also hang down. The fingers are spread open. The tiger’s mouth is rounded. The right hand upholds
upwards. The left palm presses outward. The center of the palm contracts. The head pushes up. The
neck is erect. Relax the waist. Embrace the hips.

The upper body posture does not change. Walk the circle toward the left. The stepping method,
breathing method and moving are like the first form. Walk many circles without limit. When chang-
ing directions the right foot steps up and toes-in. Raise the left foot, Rub the shins. The body turns
towards the left... this is similar to the “Push the Mountain into the Sea” form. Simultanesouly both
forearms rotate inwards and retract. The right palm drops down. Both palms face upwards. Bring
them together in front of the lower abdomen. (picture 25) As the left foot steps to the front, the left
palm rises up and overturns. The right palm presses down. They are like the previous form, only left
and right are reversed. (picture 26) Then walk the circle to the right. Walk many circles without
limit. The stepping method, breathing, and actions are like the previous form.

7. Hold the Tablet toward Heaven

The beginning form is like the previous one. Both arms drill up in front of the
chest. The drilling stops when the middle finger tip is even with the eyebrows.
The palms face your face. Their distance from the face is 5 to 6 inches. Sink
the shoulders, drop the elbows. Open the back. Concave the chest. The head
pushes up. The neck is erect. The eyes look towards the front. (27)

The upper body and upper arms do not change. Walk the circle towards the left.
Walk many circles without limit.

Changing directions is like the first form. Turn the body then walk the circle to
the right, Walk many circles without limit.

This form is used for getting the qi into your palms. The qi emits from the laogong points and returns
to the point between the eyes. Use your own outer qi to stimulate your own inner qi. This called
makes “Create things in myself return back method.” When you practice this for a long time, then the
face and forehead will always be fresh, the eyes bright, and spirit full.
8. The Woodsman Points the Way

Begin the form like before. The left hand palm faces inward. It passes the front of the chest and drills
up the center. When the middle finger rises up even with the eyebrows, it rotates inwards and reaches
out to the left. It is level with the shoulder. The elbow hangs down. The bend of the elbow is about
150 to 170 degrees. Simultaneously, the right hand reaches out toward the left. It is below the inside
of the left elbow. The body turns toward the left. The eyes look at the tip of the middle finger. (pic-
ture 28)

The upper body posture does not change. Walk the circle toward the left. The stepping method,
breathing, and walking actions are similar to the fourth form. Walk many circles without limit.

When changing directions, toe-in the right foot and raise the left foot. Rub the shins like the previous
form. The upper arm actions are like picture 28, only reversed.

After the form is complete, the upper body posture does not change. Walk the circle to the right.
Walk many circles without limit.

When closing the form, the left foot is in the front and the right foot is in the rear. Stop. Both arms
bend the elbows and return. Both palms inner and outer laogong points come in contact. The left is on
the inside and the right is on the outside. They are placed on the dantian. As before make the Chicken
Leg Post. (picture 29) Both legs gradually straighten up. Stop for a short while. Then you can
walk.

In this form, both palms rise, fall, overturn, and turn. The hands’ three yin and three yang meridians
together make turning and transforming. The Heart meridian and Pericardium meridian qi flow is
unimpeded. It can rise to nourish the heart and regulate the heart’s main functions.

The above eight forms can be used as single form practices. They can also be combined together .
Only no matter how you train, in general the use of the will is pre-eminent. The posture must be the
standard. The post steps must be rigorous. The advancing steps must be well coordinated with the rise
and fall of the qi. The relaxing and contracting of the muscles and spitting and swallowing of the ener-
gy, all must follow the will. The extreme joints moreover have the transformation of relaxing and con-
tracting. The shoulders, back, waist, and hips must definitely be relaxed. The qi must drop down. The
vitality must rise up. Be sure to carefully commit this to memory and not forget.