Anda di halaman 1dari 5

Mary Our Help Technical Institute for Women

Mabiga Mabalacat City, Pampanga

S.Y 2016-17

Guidelines in Writing a Research Question

Submitted to: Ms. April Lalaine Navarro

Submitted by: Gianne M. Falla

Grade 11- Don Bosco


What is a Research Question?

A research question is the fundamental core of a research project, study, or review of literature.

It focuses the study, determines the methodology, and guides all stages of inquiry, analysis, and

reporting.

Characteristics of a Research Question

* The question is feasible.

* The question is clear.

* The question is significant.

* The question is ethical.

How do I come up with a good Research Question?

Step 1: Find an issue that interests you

Step 2: Explore the issue

Step 3: Start asking questions

Step 4: Refine and focus on your question


Top Tips in writing a Research Question

1. Relevant- The question will be of academic and intellectual interest to people in the field you

have chosen to study. The question arises from issues raised in the literature or in practice.

2. Manageable- You need to be realistic about the scope and scale of the project. The question

you ask must be within your ability to tackle.

3. Substantial and original- The question should not simply copy questions asked in other final

year modules, or modules previously undertaken

4. Consistent with the requirements- The question should not simply copy questions asked in

other final year modules, or modules previously undertaken

5. Clear and Simple- The complexity of a question can frequently hide unclear thoughts and lead

to a confused research process.

6. Interesting- This is essential. The question needs to intrigue you and maintain your interest

throughout the project. There are two traps to avoid.

*Some questions are convenient - the best you can come up with when you are asked to state a

question on a form, maybe or perhaps the question fits in with your units so you decide it will

suffice.

*Some questions are fads - they arise out of a particular set of personal circumstances, for

example a job application. Once the circumstances change you can lose enthusiasm for the topic

and it becomes very tedious.


A Few Good Wording Tips:

1. When a relationship is expected among a certain type of subject, reference the population.

Example: Among young children, there is a positive relationship between level of psychomotor

coordination and degree of self-esteem.

2. Make RQs and Hs as specific and succinct as possible.

OK: Administrators who provide wellness programs for their employees project positive

effectiveness.

Better: Administrators who provide wellness programs for their employees receive higher

employee ratings on selected leadership qualities than administrators who do not provide

wellness programs.

3. Avoid words or terms that do not add to the meaning of RQs and Hs.

Rather than: Among elementary school teachers, those who are teaching in year-round schools

will report having higher morale than those who are teaching in elementary schools that follow a

more traditional school-year schedule.

Try: Among elementary school teachers, those who teach in year-round schools have higher

morale than those who teach on a traditional schedule.


4. Stick to what will be studied, not implications or your value judgments.

Rather than: Religion is good for society.

Try: Regular attendance at religious services is inversely associated with cheating behaviour

while taking classroom tests.

5. Name the variables in the order in which they occur or will be measured.

Example. There is a positive relationship between College Board Scholastic Aptitude Test scores

and first-semester grades earned in college.

6. Avoid the words significant or significance.

7. Avoid using the word prove.

8. Avoid using two different terms to refer to the same variable.