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Whereas the Confederate Parish Confederate Monument on the north side of the Caddo Parish

courthouse was erected from 1902 to 1906 with both public and private funds, and

Whereas the stated purpose of the monument upon its dedication on May 1, 1906, was to be in
memory of the brave soldiers who participated in the Civil War and a memorial to the dead
Confederate soldiers from Caddo Parish, and

Whereas the cause mentioned in the monument was the attempt by Louisiana and 12 other states
to unilaterally withdraw from the United States of America in order to, protect and extend the
institution of hereditary slavery of Africans and their descendants, and

Whereas the monument depicts Henry Watkins Allen, a former governor of the State of Louisiana who
lived in Caddo Parish; former generals Robert E. Lee and Thomas J. Stonewall Jackson, who
commanded Louisiana soldiers in the Civil War; Pierre Gustave Toussaint Beauregard, a general from
Louisiana who later retired in the state; and an unnamed common soldier representing men from this
parish who fought and died, never to return, often buried where they fell; and

Whereas since 1958, through Act of Congress, the United States has recognized Confederate soldiers as
American soldiers, with all the right, honors, sensibilities and customs accorded fellow U.S. veterans,
and

Whereas the memorialized persons are ancestors of some, but by no means all, of persons who
have lived in the parish since 1865, including 40% or more of those living in the parish today,
and

Whereas the cause which is memorialized by the monument is considered to be noble by some
who have lived or are living in the parish and ignoble by others, and

Whereas the monument is regarded by most historians and art scholars as an intrinsic work of art, by
the late Texas sculptor Frank Teich; and

Whereas the monument is where the Confederate state capitol was from 1863 to 1865, where the last
Southern civil jurisdiction surrendered to the Union in late May 1865 and where the last Confederate
flag was lowered on land; and

Whereas the monument is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, and

Whereas the Confederate Monument and the cause it memorializes evoke a wide range and
intensity of emotions among many citizens of the parish, and

Whereas among the citizens of Caddo Parish who care at all about the presence of the memorial
on the courthouse grounds, a significant number believe it should be left completely alone, a
significant number believe it should be moved to some location other than the courthouse, a
significant number believe it simply should be destroyed, and a significant number believe
something should be done, if it is left in place, to accurately put the monument into historical
context, and

Whereas the period 1861 to 1865 constitutes only about 2 percent of the time Louisiana has been a part
of the United States of America, and
Whereas the period of Reconstruction and of the Civil Rights Movement each constitute more
than 2 percent of that time, and

Whereas more than half of the present residents of Shreveport and at least forty percent of Caddo
Parish residents are descendants of African slaves and their descendants, and

Whereas this committee recognizes the history and significance behind the erection of the monument in
its current location, and

Whereas, the committee believes that the monument where it stands, in front of the Parish Courthouse,
is in direct contradiction to the words of the US Pledge of Allegiance stating with liberty and justice
for all.

Whereas there is no recommendation that the committee can make which will not leave at least a
significant minority of parish residents displeased, therefore

The advisory committee recommends that the Caddo Parish Commission

1) As soon as possible, a historical plaque be placed near the monument. It should be paid for with
public funds and contain the following language:

This monument, erected in 1905 is in memory of those who defended the cause of 1861 to 1865 and
the cause itself. That cause was the attempt, beginning in December 1860, in South Carolina, by
Louisiana and twelve other states unilaterally to withdraw from the United States of America and
establish the Confederate States of America in order to preserve the institution of slavery of Africans
and their descendants. The Civil War, sometimes also called The War Between the States and the
War of the Rebellion, began in April of 1861 after those states began to seize property belonging to
the United States, most famously Fort Sumter, South Carolina, and to otherwise interfere with the
functioning of the government of the United States within those states. This interference was done after
having been warned by Abraham Lincoln, then president of the United States, that it would not be
permitted. Although the Confederate general Robert E. Lee surrendered the Army of Northern
Virginia at Appomattox, Virginia, on April 9, 1865, the flag of the Confederate States of America
officially last flew within the thirteen states attempting to secede at this spot in Shreveport, Louisiana,
the last capital of the Confederate States of America, until it was lowered on May 26, 1865, at the
surrender of the Trans Mississippi command. Thus, in that sense the monument sits where the attempt
by Louisiana and the other states to withdraw ended.

It was erected after the Civil War ended, after slavery and involuntary servitude had been ended by the
13th Amendment to the Constitution of the United States of America (except as a punishment for
crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted), after the abridgment of the right to vote on
account of race, color or previous condition of servitude had been prohibited by the 15th Amendment,
and after the attempt at establishing state and local governments inclusive of former slaves and their
descendants known as Reconstruction had failed due to their being disenfranchised by poll taxes and
literacy tests, and by terror and threats of terror, including lynching, by whites. Thus, although they
constituted 47 percent of Louisianas population in 1900, former slaves and their descendants had no
say whether or not or where the monument would be erected.
2) That a monument to Reconstruction equal in size and grandeur to the Confederate
Monument be erected on the north side of the Caddo Parish courthouse and east of the Confederate
Monument with already available parish funds supplemented by funds solicited from the public.

3) That a monument to the Civil Rights Movement equal in size and grandeur to the
Confederate Monument be erected on the north side of the Caddo Parish courthouse and west of the
Confederate Monument with already available parish funds supplemented by funds solicited from the
public.