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What is this?

This document outlines the course content for Introduction to Networks v5.0 and details all labs and activities,
including Hands-on Labs, Packet Tracer Activities, Interactive Media Activities, and Syntax Checker Activities.

Where are the objectives for each section and chapter?


A complete listing of the course objectives is located at CCNA Routing and Switching (Instructor Resources).
Why do I want this document?
This document is intended to show instructors how each chapter's labs and activities integrate into the course
content, and to assist instructors in planning how students can complete those activities within the time constraints
of their course offering. An instructor might use this as a resource while creating weekly lesson plans. For example,
an instructor will make decisions on when to provide direct instruction; and will plan when and where students will
complete labs and activities both in class and outside of class.

How is this document structured?


There is a worksheet for each chapter of this course which provides an outline of the chapter content and how the
activities are placed within that content.

There are tabs for each course chapter. Each tab outlines the chapter and details all labs and activities. The details
of each lab or activity include its page within the course, the type of activity, the learning objectives, and equipment
needed to complete the lab.

How do I display specific types of activities for a chapter?


Each column contains an AutoFilter dropdown list.

Selecting (NonBlanks) in the Activity/Lab column will display all of the labs and activities for that chapter.

Additional filters can be used to display only the:


Hands-on Labs
PT Activities
Interactive Media Activities
Syntax Checker Activities

What are Hands-on Labs?


These activities use physical equipment in a classroom. Routers, switches, and different types of cabling are used to
provide learning support for the curriculum content. In some instances, the PDF accompanying the Hands-on Labs
may require students to answer general and reflection questions about the objectives specified in the labs.
What are the different types of Packet Tracer activities?
There are two types of PT activities included in the course:
PT Activity: Skills Practice -- These e-doing activities guide students through a specific skillset, providing just-in-
time skills reinforcement and practice.
PT Activity: Skills Integration Challenge -- These summary activities provide a skills integration challenge which
build upon skills learned in this chapter and in previous chapters.

It is important to note that Packet Tracer was not designed to replace the use of physical equipment in a classroom.
Packet Tracer is more than a network lab simulator, providing many other opportunities for instruction and learning.

What are Syntax Checker and Interactive Media Activities?


Syntax Checker and Interactive Media Activities are found in the content sections of the course. These types of
activities focus on providing command-configuration practice and learning checks of the content sections and topics.
They are integral to student learning and understanding of the content principles.
abs and activities,
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n plans. For example,
where students will

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ives, and equipment

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g the Hands-on Labs
d in the labs.
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nt sections and topics.
Page Activity/Lab Title

Section 1.0 Introduction


1.0.1 Introduction
1.0.1.1 Introduction

Draw Your Concept of the


1.0.1.2 Activity Class Activity Internet

Section 1.1 Globally Connected


1.1.1 Networking Today
1.1.1.1 Networks in Our Daily Lives
1.1.1.2 Technology Then and Now
1.1.1.3 The Global Community
1.1.1.4 Networks Support the Way We Learn
1.1.1.5 Networks Support the Way We
Communicate
1.1.1.6 Networks Support the Way We Work
1.1.1.7 Networks Support the Way We Play

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 5 of 59


Page Activity/Lab Title

Researching Network
1.1.1.8 Activity Hands-On Lab Collaboration Tools

1.1.2 Providing Resources in a Network


1.1.2.1 Networks of Many Sizes
1.1.2.2 Clients and Servers
1.1.2.3 Clients and Servers (Cont.)
1.1.2.4 Peer-to-Peer
Section 1.2 LANs, WANs, and the Internet
1.2.1 Components of a Network
1.2.1.1 Components of the Network
1.2.1.2 End Devices
1.2.1.3 Intermediary Network Devices
1.2.1.4 Network Media
1.2.1.5 Network Representations
1.2.1.6 Topology Diagrams

Network Component
1.2.1.7 Activity Interactive Activity Representations and
Functions

1.2.2 LANs and WANs


1.2.2.1 Types of Networks
1.2.2.2 Local Area Networks
1.2.2.3 Wide Area Networks
1.2.3 The Internet
1.2.3.1 The Internet
1.2.3.2 Intranet and Extranet

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 6 of 59


Learning Objectives Resources Needed

Demonstrate how networks are made of many different Activity PDF


components by drawing how the Internet connects to a Device with Internet access
home or school/university location.

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 7 of 59


Learning Objectives Resources Needed

Identify network collaboration tools.


Research popular collaborative tools.
Activity PDF
Work with Google Drive. Device with Internet access
Investigate conferencing and Internet meeting tools.
Create a wiki page.

Identify the common components of a network based on


the function of the component. Curriculum content
Recognize the relationship of network functions to device
names/icons.

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 8 of 59


Page Activity/Lab Title

Section 2.0 Configuring a Network Operating System


2.0.1 Introduction
2.0.1.1 Introduction to Cisco IOS
It Is Just an Operating
2.0.1.2 Activity Class Activity System!
Section 2.1 IOS Bootcamp
2.1.1 Cisco IOS
2.1.1.1 Operating Systems
2.1.1.2 Purpose of OS
2.1.1.3 Location of the Cisco IOS
2.1.1.4 IOS Functions
2.1.1.5 (Video) CCO Accounts and IOS Image
Exploration
2.1.2 Accessing a Cisco IOS Device
2.1.2.1 Console Access Method
2.1.2.2 Telnet, SSH, and AUX Access Methods

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 9 of 59


Page Activity/Lab Title

2.1.2.3 Terminal Emulation Programs

2.1.2.4 Activity Interactive Activity Access Methods

2.1.3 Navigating the IOS


2.1.3.1 Cisco IOS Modes of Operation
2.1.3.2 Primary Modes
2.1.3.3 Global Configuration Mode and
Submodes
2.1.3.4 Navigating Between IOS Modes

2.1.3.5 Navigating Between IOS Modes (Cont.)

2.1.3.6 (Video) Navigating the IOS


2.1.4 The Command Structure
2.1.4.1 IOS Command Structure
2.1.4.2 Cisco IOS Command Reference
2.1.4.3 Contest-Sensitive Help
2.1.4.4 Command Syntax Check
2.1.4.5 Hot Keys and Shortcuts
2.1.4.6 IOS Examination Commands
2.1.4.7 The show version Command

2.1.4.8 Activity Packet Tracer Lab Navigating the IOS

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 10 of 59


Page Activity/Lab Title

Establishing a Console
2.1.4.9 Activity Hands-On Lab Session with Tera Term

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 11 of 59


Learning Objectives Resources Needed

Describe the command structure of Cisco IOS software. Activity PDF

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 12 of 59


Learning Objectives Resources Needed

Select the most appropriate access method for each Curriculum content
scenario.

Explore basic physical network connections, access the CLI,


and explore IOS Help methods.
Activity PDF
Explore privileged EXEC mode and issue additional Packet Tracer
commands.
Explore clock commands; change date and time settings.

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 13 of 59


Learning Objectives Resources Needed

Activity PDF
1 Router (Cisco 1941 with Cisco IOS Release
15.2(4)M3 universal image or comparable)
Connect to a Cisco switch using a serial console cable. 1 Switch (Cisco 2960 with Cisco IOS Release
Establish a console session using a terminal emulator, such 15.0(2) lanbasek9 image or comparable)
as Tera Term. 1 PC (Windows 7, Vista, or XP with terminal
emulation program, such as Tera Term)
Use show commands to display device settings.
Rollover console cable (DB-9 to RJ-45) to
Configure the clock on the switch. configure the switch or router via the RJ-45
console port
Mini-USB cable to configure the router via the
USB console port

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 14 of 59


Page Activity/Lab Title

Section 3.0 Network Protocols and Communications


3.0.1 Introduction
3.0.1.1 Introduction

3.0.1.2 Activity Class Activity Let's just talk about this

Section 3.1 Rules of Communication


3.1.1 The Rules
3.1.1.1 What is Communication?
3.1.1.2 Establishing the Rules
3.1.1.3 Message Encoding

3.1.1.4 Message Formatting and Encapsulation

3.1.1.5 Message Size


3.1.1.6 Message Timing
3.1.1.7 Message Delivery Options
Section 3.2 Network Protocols and Standards
3.2.1 Protocols

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 15 of 59


Page Activity/Lab Title

3.2.1.1 Protocols: Rules that Govern


Communications
3.2.1.2 Network Protocols
3.2.1.3 Interaction of Protocols
3.2.2 Protocol Suites

3.2.2.1 Protocol Suites and Industry Standards

3.2.2.2 Creation of the Internet and


Development of TCP/IP
3.2.2.3 TCP/IP Protocol Suite and
Communication Process
Mapping the Protocols of
3.2.2.4 Activity Interactive Activity the TCP/IP Suite
3.2.3 Standards Organizations
3.2.3.1 Open Standards
3.2.3.2 ISOC, IAB, and IETF
3.2.3.3 IEEE
3.2.3.4 ISO
3.2.3.5 Other Standards Organizations

Researching Network
3.2.3.6 Activity Hands-on Lab Standards

Standards Body Scavenger


3.2.3.7 Activity Interactive Activity Hunt
3.2.4 Reference Models

3.2.4.1 The Benefits of Using a Layered Model

3.2.4.2 The OSI Reference Model


3.2.4.3 The TCP/IP Protocol Model

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 16 of 59


Learning Objectives Resources Needed

Explain the role of protocols and standards organizations in Activity PDF


facilitating interoperability in network communications.

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 17 of 59


Learning Objectives Resources Needed

Identify the functions of the TCP/IP layers by protocol names. Curriculum content

Gather information about the major networking standards


organizations by going on a web surfing treasure hunt. Activity PDF
Identify important characteristics of some of the major Device with Internet access
networking standards organizations.

Differentiate six networking standards organizations by Curriculum content


descriptions and functions.

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 18 of 59


Page Activity/Lab Title

Section 4.0 Network Access


4.0.1 Introduction
4.0.1.1 Introduction

4.0.1.2 Activity Class Activity Managing the Medium

Section 4.1 Physical Layer Protocols


4.1.1 Getting It Connected
4.1.1.1 Connecting to the Network
4.1.1.2 Network Interface Cards
4.1.2 Purpose of the Physical Layer
4.1.2.1 The Physical Layer
4.1.2.2 Physical Layer Media
4.1.2.3 Physical Layer Standards

Identifying Network
4.1.2.4 Activity Hands-on Lab Devices and Cabling

4.1.3 Fundamental Principles of Layer 1


4.1.3.1 Physical Layer Fundamental Principles

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 19 of 59


Page Activity/Lab Title

4.1.3.2 Bandwidth
4.1.3.3 Throughput
4.1.3.4 Types of Physical Media

4.1.3.5 Activity Interactive Activity Physical Layer Terminology

Section 4.2 Network Media


4.2.1 Copper Cabling
4.2.1.1 Characteristics of Copper Media
4.2.1.2 Copper Media
4.2.1.3 Unshielded Twisted-Pair Cable
4.2.1.4 Shielded Twisted-Pair (STP) Cable
4.2.1.5 Coaxial Cable
4.2.1.6 Copper Media Safety
Copper Media
4.2.1.7 Activity Interactive Activity Characteristics
4.2.2 UTP Cabling
4.2.2.1 Properties of UTP Cabling
4.2.2.2 UTP Cabling Standards
4.2.2.3 (video) UTP Connectors
4.2.2.4 Types of UTP Cable
4.2.2.5 Testing UTP Cables

4.2.2.6 Activity Interactive Activity Cable Pinouts

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 20 of 59


Learning Objectives Resources Needed

Describe the purpose and function of the data link layer in Activity PDF
preparing communication for transmission on specific media.

Identify network devices by describing their functions and


physical characteristics. Activity PDF
Describe the functions and physical characteristics of
network media.

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 21 of 59


Learning Objectives Resources Needed

Identify physical layer terms by description. Curriculum content

Identify copper media types by characteristics. Curriculum content

Construct a UTP 568B, straight-through cable by placing the


wire colors in the correct order on the RJ-45 image in the Curriculum content
graphic.

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 22 of 59


Page Activity/Lab Title

Section 5.0 Ethernet


5.0.1 Introduction
5.0.1.1 Introduction

5.0.1.2 Activity Class Activity Join My Social Circle!

Section 5.1 Ethernet Protocol


5.1.1 Ethernet Operation
5.1.1.1 LLC and MAC Sublayers
5.1.1.2 MAC Sublayer
5.1.1.3 Media Access Control
5.1.1.4 MAC Address: Ethernet Identity
5.1.1.5 Frame Processing

5.1.1.6 Activity Interactive Activity MAC and LLC Sublayers

5.1.2 Ethernet Frame Attributes


5.1.2.1 Ethernet Encapsulation

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 23 of 59


Page Activity/Lab Title

5.1.2.2 Ethernet Frame Size


5.1.2.3 Introduction to the Ethernet Frame

5.1.2.4 Activity Interactive Activity Ethernet Frame Fields

5.1.3 Ethernet MAC


5.1.3.1 MAC Addresses and Hexadecimal
5.1.3.2 MAC Address Representations
5.1.3.3 Unicast MAC Address
5.1.3.4 Broadcast MAC Address
5.1.3.5 Multicast MAC Address

Viewing Network Device


5.1.3.6 Activity Hands-on Lab MAC Addresses

5.1.4 MAC and IP


5.1.4.1 MAC and IP
5.1.4.2 End-to-End Connectivity, MAC, and IP

Using Wireshark to
5.1.4.3 Activity Hands-on Lab Examine Ethernet Frames

Identify MAC and IP


5.1.4.4 Activity Packet Tracer Lab Addresses

Section 5.2 Address Resolution Protocol


5.2.1 ARP
5.2.1.1 Introduction to ARP
52.1.2 ARP Functions
5.2.1.3 ARP Operation

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 24 of 59


Page Activity/Lab Title

5.2.1.4 ARP Role in Remote Communication

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 25 of 59


Learning Objectives Resources Needed

Describe the impact of ARP requests on network and host Activity PDF
performance.

Match the MAC and LLC sublayers with their descriptions. Curriculum content

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 26 of 59


Learning Objectives Resources Needed

Match the Ethernet frame field names with their Curriculum content
descriptions.

Activity PDF
1 Router (Cisco 1941 with Cisco IOS Release 15.2(4)M3
universal or comparable)
Set up the topology and initialize devices. 1 Switch (Cisco 2960 with Cisco IOS Release 15.0(2)
lanbasek9 image or comparable)
Configure devices and verify connectivity.
1 PC (Windows 7, Vista, or XP with terminal emulation
Display, describe, and analyze Ethernet MAC addresses. program, such as Tera Term)
Console cables to configure the Cisco IOS devices via the
console ports
Ethernet cables as shown in the topology

Activity PDF
Examine the header fields in an Ethernet II frame.
1 PC (Windows 7, Vista, or XP with Internet access and
Use Wireshark to capture and analyze Ethernet frames. Wireshark installed)

Gather PDU information. Activity PDF


Summarize information from captured PDU information. Packet Tracer

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 27 of 59


Learning Objectives Resources Needed

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 28 of 59


Page Activity/Lab Title

Section 6.0 Network Layer


6.0.1 Introduction
6.0.1.1 Introduction

6.0.1.2 Activity Class Activity The Road Less Traveled

Section 6.1 Network Layer Protocols


6.1.1 Network Layer in Communication
6.1.1.1 The Network Layer
6.1.1.2 Network Layer Protocols
6.1.2 Characteristics of the IP Protocol
6.1.2.1 Characteristics of IP
6.1.2.2 IP - Connectionless
6.1.2.3 IP - Best Effort Delivery
6.1.2.4 IP - Media Independent
6.1.2.5 Encapsulating IP

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 29 of 59


Page Activity/Lab Title

6.1.2.6 Activity Interactive Activity IP Characteristics


6.1.3 IPv4 Packet
6.1.3.1 IPv4 Packet Header
6.1.3.2 IPv4 Header Fields
6.1.3.3 Sample IPv4 Headers
6.1.3.4 Activity Interactive Activity IPv4 Header Fields
6.1.4 IPv6 Packet
6.1.4.1 Limitations of IPv4
6.1.4.2 Introducing IPv6
6.1.4.3 Encapsulating IPv6
6.1.4.4 IPv6 Packet Header
6.1.4.5 Sample IPv6 Header

6.1.4.6 Activity Interactive Activity IPv6 Header Fields

Section 6.2 Routing


6.2.1 How a Host Routes
6.2.1.1 Host Forwarding Decisions
6.2.1.2 Default Gateway
6.2.1.3 IPv4 Host Routing Table
6.2.1.4 IPv4 Host Routing Entries
6.2.1.5 Sample IPv4 Host Routing Table
6.2.1.6 Sample IPv6 Host Routing Table

Identify Elements of a Host


6.2.1.7 Activity Interactive Activity Routing Table Entry

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 30 of 59


Learning Objectives Resources Needed

Explain how network devices use routing tables to direct Activity PDF
packets to a destination network.

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 31 of 59


Learning Objectives Resources Needed

Identify IP delivery methods by characteristics. Curriculum content

Identify IPv4 header fields by their functions. Curriculum content

Match IPv6 header descriptions to their associated header Curriculum content


fields.

Select the routing table entry segment for each output Curriculum content
statement.

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 32 of 59


Page Activity/Lab Title

Section 7.0 Transportation Layer


7.0.1 Introduction
7.0.1.1 Introduction

7.0.1.2 Activity Class Activity We Need to Talk - Game

Section 7.1 Transport Layer Protocols


7.1.1 Transportation of Data
7.1.1.1 Role of the Transport Layer
7.1.1.2 Role of the Transport Layer (Cont.)
7.1.1.3 Conversation Multiplexing
7.1.1.4 Transport Layer Reliability
7.1.1.5 TCP
7.1.1.6 UDP
7.1.1.7 The Right Transport Layer Protocol for
the Right Application

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 33 of 59


Page Activity/Lab Title

7.1.1.8 Activity Interactive Activity TCP, UDP, or Both

7.1.2 Introducing TCP and UDP


7.1.2.1 Introducing TCP
7.1.2.2 Role of TCP
7.1.2.3 Introducing UDP
7.1.2.4 Role of UCP
7.1.2.5 Separating Multiple Conversations
7.1.2.6 TCP and UDP Port Addressing
7.1.2.7 TCP and UDP Port Addressing (Cont.)
7.1.2.8 TCP and UDP Port Addressing (Cont.)
7.1.2.9 TCP and UDP Port Addressing (Cont.)
7.1.2.10 TCP and UDP Segmentation
Compare TCP and UDP
7.1.2.11 Activity Interactive Activity Characteristics
Section 7.2 TCP and UDP
7.2.1 TCP Communication
7.2.1.1 TCP Reliable Delivery
7.2.1.2 TCP Server Processes
7.2.1.3 TCP Connection Establishment and
Termination
7.2.1.4 TCP Three-Way Handshake Analysis -
Step 1
7.2.1.5 TCP Three-Way Handshake Analysis -
Step 2

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 34 of 59


Learning Objectives Resources Needed

Explain how transport layer protocols and services support Activity PDF
communications across data networks. Timer/Clock

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 35 of 59


Learning Objectives Resources Needed

Identify the application protocols as transport layer delivery Curriculum content


methods TCP, UDP, or both.

Identify the characteristics as transport layer TCP or UDP Curriculum content


delivery methods.

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 36 of 59


Page Activity/Lab Title

Section 8.0 IP Addressing


8.0.1 Introduction
8.0.1.1 Introduction
The Internet of Everything
8.0.1.2 Activity Class Activity (IoE)
Section 8.1 IPv4 Network Addresses
8.1.1 IPv4 Address Structure
8.1.1.1 Binary Notation
8.1.1.2 Binary Number System

8.1.1.3 Converting a Binary Address to Decimal

Binary to Decimal
8.1.1.4 Activity Interactive Activity Conversions
8.1.1.5 Converting from Decimal to Binary
8.1.1.6 Converting from Decimal to Binary
(Cont.)
Decimal to Binary
8.1.1.7 Activity Interactive Activity Conversion Activity

8.1.1.8 Activity Interactive Activity Binary Game

8.1.2 IPv4 Subnet Mask

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 37 of 59


Page Activity/Lab Title

8.1.2.1 Network Portion and Host Portion of an


IPv4 Address
8.1.2.2 Examining the Prefix Length
8.1.2.3 IPv4 Network, Host, and Broadcast
Addresses
8.1.2.4 First Host and Last Host Addresses
8.1.2.5 Bitwise AND Operation
8.1.2.6 Importance of ANDing

Using the Windows


8.1.2.7 Activity Hands-on Lab Calculator with Network
Addresses

Converting IPv4 Addresses


8.1.2.8 Activity Hands-on Lab to Binary

ANDing to Determine the


8.1.2.9 Activity Interactive Activity Network Address
8.1.3 IPv4 Unicast, Broadcast, and Multicast
8.1.3.1 Assigning a Static IPv4 Address to a
Host
8.1.3.2 Assigning a Dynamic IPv4 Address to a
Host
8.1.3.3 Unicast Transmission
8.1.3.4 Broadcast Transmission
8.1.3.5 Multicast Transmission

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 38 of 59


Page Activity/Lab Title

Unicast, Broadcast, or
8.1.3.6 Activity Interactive Activity Multicast

Calculate the Network,


8.1.3.7 Activity Interactive Activity Broadcast, and Host
Addresses

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 39 of 59


Learning Objectives Resources Needed

Explain how network devices use routing tables to direct Activity PDF
packets to a destination network. Device with Internet access

Convert binary numbers from octets to decimal values. Curriculum content

Convert decimal numbers to binary octets. Curriculum content

Practice converting eight-digit binary numbers to decimal Curriculum content


numbers. Device with Internet access

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 40 of 59


Learning Objectives Resources Needed

Access the Windows calculator.


Convert between numbering systems.
Convert host IPv4 addresses and subnet masks into binary
values. Activity PDF
Determine the number of hosts in a network using powers 1 PC (Windows 7, Vista, or XP)
of 2.
Convert MAC addresses and IPv6 addresses to binary
values.

Convert IPv4 addresses from dotted decimal format to


binary values.
Use the bitwise ANDing operation to determine network
addresses. Activity PDF
Apply network address calculations by identifying the
networks to which they belong and identifying the default
gateway addresses.

Determine the network addresses in binary and decimal Curriculum content


values by using the ANDing process.

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 41 of 59


Learning Objectives Resources Needed

Identify devices which will receive unicast, broadcast, or


multicast transmissions using a destination IP address. Curriculum content
Note: This is a timed activity.

Calculate the network broadcast addresses, first usable


hosts, and last usable hosts based upon IP addresses and Curriculum content
their prefixes.

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 42 of 59


Page Activity/Lab Title

Section 9.0 Subnetting IP Networks


9.0.1 Introduction
9.0.1.1 Introduction

9.0.1.2 Activity Class Activity Call Me!

Section 9.1 Subnetting an IPv4 Network


9.1.1 Network Segmentation
9.1.1.1 Reasons for Subnetting
9.1.1.2 Communication Between Subnets
9.1.2 Communication Between Subnets
9.1.2.1 The Plan
9.1.2.2 The Plan - Address Assignment
9.1.3 Subnetting an IPv4 Network
9.1.3.1 Basic Subnetting
9.1.3.2 Subnets in Use
9.1.3.3 Subnetting Formulas

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 43 of 59


Page Activity/Lab Title

9.1.3.4 Creating 4 Subnets


9.1.3.5 Creating 8 Subnets

Determining the Network


9.1.3.6 Activity Interactive Activity Address - Basic

Calculate the Number of


9.1.3.7 Activity Interactive Activity Hosts - Basic

Determining the Valid


9.1.3.8 Activity Interactive Activity Addresses for Hosts - Basic

9.1.3.9 Activity Interactive Activity Calculate the Subnet Mask

9.1.3.10 Creating 100 Subnets with a /16


prefix.
9.1.3.11 Calculating the Hosts
9.1.3.12 Calculating the Hosts (Cont.)

Determining the Network


9.1.3.13 Activity Interactive Activity Address - Advanced

Calculating the Number of


9.1.3.14 Activity Interactive Activity Hosts - Advanced

Determining the Valid


9.1.3.15 Activity Interactive Activity Addresses for Hosts -
Advanced
9.1.4 Determining the Subnet Mask
9.1.4.1 Subnetting Based on Host
Requirements
9.1.4.2 Subnetting Network-Based
Requirements
9.1.4.3 Subnetting to Meet Network
Requirements

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 44 of 59


Page Activity/Lab Title

9.1.4.4 Subnetting to Meet Network


Requirements (Cont.)

Determining the Number


9.1.4.5 Activity Interactive Activity of Bits to Borrow

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 45 of 59


Learning Objectives Resources Needed

Explain why routing is necessary for hosts on different Activity PDF


subnets to communicate.

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 46 of 59


Learning Objectives Resources Needed

Enter the correct network address in binary and decimal Curriculum content
format based upon specific IP addresses and subnet masks.

Enter the number of valid hosts per network based upon a Curriculum content
specific network address and subnet mask.
Define the range of hosts, the broadcast address, and the
next network address based upon specific network Curriculum content
addresses and subnet masks.

Determine the binary representation of given subnet masks


for octet representation. Curriculum content
Convert subnet masks to prefix notations.

Determine the network address in binary and decimal format


in the octet fields based upon a given host address, subnet Curriculum content
mask, binary host, and binary subnet mask notation.

Enter the number of valid hosts based upon specific network


addresses, subnet masks, binary network addresses, and Curriculum content
binary subnet masks notations.

Define the range of hosts, the broadcast address, and the


next network address based upon specific network Curriculum content
addresses and subnet masks.

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 47 of 59


Learning Objectives Resources Needed

Determine the subnet mask to support the number of


specified hosts. Curriculum content
Enter answers in binary, decimal, and prefix notation
formats.

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 48 of 59


Targeted Learning Objectives and Enabling Learning Objectives are posted to Cisco NetSpace, CCNA Introductio
Page Activity/Lab Title
Section 10.0 Application Layer
10.0.1 Introduction
10.0.1.1 Introduction

Application Investigation
10.0.1.2 Activity Class Activity (What would happen if)

Section 10.1 Application Layer Protocols


10.1.1 Application, Session, and Presentation
10.1.1.1 OSI and TCP/IP Models Revisited
10.1.1.2 Application Layer
10.1.1.3 Presentation and Session Layers
10.1.1.4 TCP/IP Application Layer Protocols
Application Protocols and
10.1.1.5 Activity Interactive Activity Standards
10.1.2 How Application Protocols Interact with End-
User Applications
10.1.2.1 Peer-to-Peer Networks

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 49 of 59


Targeted Learning Objectives and Enabling Learning Objectives are posted to Cisco NetSpace, CCNA Introductio
10.1.2.2 Peer-to-Peer Applications
10.1.2.3 Common P2P Applications

Researching Peer-to-Peer
10.1.2.4 Activity Hands-on Lab File Sharing

10.1.2.5 Client-Server Model


10.2 Well-Known Application Layer Protocols and
Services
10.2.1 Common Application Layer Protocols

10.2.1.1 Application Layer Protocols Revisited

10.2.1.2 Hypertext Transfer Protocol and


Hypertext Markup Language
10.2.1.3 HTTP and HTTPS
10.2.1.4 SMTP, POP, and IMAP
10.2.1.5 SMTP, POP, and IMAP (Cont.)
10.2.1.6 SMTP, POP, and IMAP (Cont.)
10.2.1.7 SMTP, POP, and IMAP (Cont.)

10.2.1.8 Activity Packet Tracer Lab Web and Email

10.2.2 Providing IP Addressing Services


10.2.2.1 Domain Name Service
10.2.2.2 DNS Message Format
10.2.2.3 DNS Hierarchy
10.2.2.4 nslookup

DNS CLI Commands in


10.2.2.5 Activity Syntax Checker Windows and UNIX

10.2.2.6 Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 50 of 59


tives are posted to Cisco NetSpace, CCNA Introduction to Networks, Instructor Resources.
Learning Objectives Resources Needed

Explain the operation of the application layer in providing Activity PDF


support to end-user applications.

Identify the protocol names and standards on the OSI and Curriculum content
TCP/IP model network locations.

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 51 of 59


tives are posted to Cisco NetSpace, CCNA Introduction to Networks, Instructor Resources.

Identify P2P networks, file sharing protocols, and


applications. Activity PDF
Research P2P file sharing issues. Device with Internet access
Research P2P copyright litigations.

Configure and verify web services. Activity PDF


Configure and verify email services. Packet Tracer

Use the nslookup command to begin a manual query of


domain name servers. Curriculum content
Use the nslookup command to verify the status of domain
names.

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 52 of 59


Page Activity/Lab Title

Section 11.0 It's a Network


11.0.1 Introduction
11.0.1.1 Introduction

11.0.1.2 Activity Class Activity Did You Notice?

Section 11.1 Create and Grow


11.1.1 Devices in a Small Network
11.1.1.1 Small Network Topologies
11.1.1.2 Device Selection for a Small Network
11.1.1.3 IP Addressing for a Small Network
11.1.1.4 Redundancy in a Small Network
11.1.1.5 Design Considerations for a Small
Network
Identifying Network
11.1.1.6 Activity Interactive Activity Planning and Design
Factors
11.1.2 Protocols in a Small Network
11.1.2.1 Common Applications in a Small
Network

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 53 of 59


Page Activity/Lab Title

11.1.2.2 Common Protocols in a Small Network

11.1.2.3 Real-Time Applications for a Small


Network
11.1.3 Growing to Larger Networks
11.1.3.1 Scaling a Small Network
11.1.3.2 Protocol Analysis of a Small Network
11.1.3.3 Evolving Protocol Requirements
Section 11.2 Keeping the Network Safe
11.2.1 Network Device Security Measures
11.2.1.1 Categories of Threats to Network
Security
11.2.1.2 Physical Security
11.2.1.3 Types of Security Vulnerabilities

Security Threats and


11.2.1.4 Activity Interactive Activity Vulnerabilities

11.2.2 Vulnerabilities and Network Attacks


11.2.2.1 Viruses Worms, and Trojan Horses
11.2.2.2 Reconnaissance Attacks
11.2.2.3 Access Attacks
11.2.2.4 DoS Attacks
11.2.2.5 Activity Interactive Activity Types of Attack

Researching Network
11.2.2.6 Activity Hands-on Lab Security Threats

11.2.3 Mitigating Network Attacks


11.2.3.1 Backup, Upgrade, Update, and Patch
11.2.3.2 Authentication, Authorization, and
Accounting

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 54 of 59


Learning Objectives Resources Needed

Explain how a small network of directly connected segments Activity PDF


is created, configured, and verified.

Identify network planning and design factors by major focus Curriculum content
areas.

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 55 of 59


Learning Objectives Resources Needed

Identify security and vulnerability threat types by scenario


examples. Curriculum content
Identify security management types by recommended
security management practices.

Identify security attack types by scenario descriptions. Curriculum content


Activity PDF
Explore the SANS website.
Device with Internet access
Identify recent network security threats.
Presentation device with PowerPoint or other
Detail a specific network security threat. presentation software installed

DHomesb_v40_ActivityMap June 2007 page 56 of 59


Introduction to Networks Ch 1 Ch 2 Ch 3
Class (Content) Activities 2 2 2
Hands-on Labs (equipment-based) 4 3 3
Interactive (Content) Activities 2 1 4
Packet Tracer Labs 1 4 2
Syntax Checker (Content) Activities 0 8 0
Ch 4 Ch 5 Ch 6 Ch 7 Ch 8 Ch 9 Ch 10
2 2 2 2 2 2 2
3 4 3 3 6 5 3
8 4 7 3 11 9 1
1 3 5 1 6 5 5
0 0 3 0 2 0 1
Ch 11
2 22
8 45
4 54
5 38
0 14
173