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Banking in India
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The banking system has grown enormously in the last thirty years.

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[  HISTO
Banking in India originated in the last decades of the 18th century. The first banks were
The General Bank of India which started in 1786, and the Bank of Hindustan, both of
which are now defunct. The oldest bank in existence in India is the State Bank of India,
which originated in the Bank of Calcutta in June 1806, which almost immediately
became the Bank of Bengal. This was one of the three presidency banks, the other two
being the Bank of Bombay and the Bank of Madras, all three of which were established
under charters from the British East India Company. For many years the Presidency
banks acted as quasi-central banks, as did their successors. The three banks merged in
1925 to form the Imperial Bank of India, which, upon India's independence, became
the State Bank of India.
Indian merchants in Calcutta established the Union Bank in 1839, but it failed in 1848
as a consequence of the economic crisis of 1848-49. The Allahabad Bank, established in
1865 and still functioning today, is the oldest Joint Stock bank in India. It was not the
first though. That honor belongs to the Bank of Upper India, which was established in
1863, and which survived until 1913, when it failed, with some of its assets and
liabilities being transferred to the Alliance Bank of Simla.
When the American Civil War stopped the supply of cotton to Lancashire from the Confederate
States, promoters opened banks to finance trading in Indian cotton. With large exposure to
speculative ventures, most of the banks opened in India during that period failed. The depositors
lost money and lost interest in keeping deposits with banks. Subsequently, banking in India
remained the exclusive domain of Europeans for next several decades until the beginning of the
20th century.
Foreign banks too started to arrive, particularly in Calcutta, in the 1860s. The Comptoire
d'Escompte de Paris opened a branch in Calcutta in 1860, and another in Bombay in 1862;
branches in Madras and Pondichery, then a French colony, followed. HSBC established itself in
Bengal in 1869. Calcutta was the most active trading port in India, mainly due to the trade of the
British Empire, and so became a banking center.
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The Bank of Bengal, which later became the State Bank of India.

The first entirely Indian joint stock bank was the Oudh Commercial Bank, established in
1881 in Faizabad. It failed in 1958. The next was the Punjab National Bank, established
in Lahore in 1895, which has survived to the present and is now one of the largest
banks in India.
Around the turn of the 20th Century, the Indian economy was passing through a
relative period of stability. Around five decades had elapsed since the Indian Mutiny,
and the social, industrial and other infrastructure had improved. Indians had established
small banks, most of which served particular ethnic and religious communities.
The presidency banks dominated banking in India but there were also some exchange
banks and a number of Indian joint stock banks. All these banks operated in different
segments of the economy. The exchange banks, mostly owned by Europeans,
concentrated on financing foreign trade. Indian joint stock banks were generally under
capitalized and lacked the experience and maturity to compete with the presidency and
exchange banks. This segmentation let Lord Curzon to observe, "In respect of banking
it seems we are behind the times. We are like some old fashioned sailing ship, divided
by solid wooden bulkheads into separate and cumbersome compartments."
The period between 1906 and 1911, saw the establishment of banks inspired by the
Swadeshi movement. The Swadeshi movement inspired local businessmen and political
figures to found banks of and for the Indian community. A number of banks established
then have survived to the present such as Bank of India,
Corporation Bank, Indian Bank, Bank of Baroda, Canara Bank and Central Bank
of India.
The fervour of Swadeshi movement lead to establishing of many private banks in
Dakshina Kannada and Udupi district which were unified earlier and known by
the name South Canara ( South Kanara ) district. Four nationalised banks started
in this district and also a leading private sector bank. Hence undivided Dakshina
Kannada district is known as "Cradle of Indian Banking".
P[IND[P[ND[NC[

The period during the First World War (1914-1918) through the end of the Second
World War (1939-1945), and two years thereafter until the independence of India
were challenging for Indian banking. The years of the First World War were
turbulent, and it took its toll with banks simply collapsing despite the Indian
economy gaining indirect boost due to war-related economic activities. At least 94
banks in India failed between 1913 and 1918 as indicated in the following table:

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POSTIND[P[ND[NC[

The partition of India in 1947 adversely impacted the economies of Punjab and
West Bengal, paralyzing banking activities for months. India's independence
marked the end of a regime of the Laissez-faire for the Indian banking. The
Government of India initiated measures to play an active role in the economic life
of the nation, and the Industrial Policy Resolution adopted by the government in
1948 envisaged a mixed economy. This resulted into greater involvement of the
state in different segments of the economy including banking and finance. The
major steps to regulate banking included:
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However, despite these provisions, control and regulations, banks in India except the
State Bank of India, continued to be owned and operated by private persons. This
changed with the nationalisation of major banks in India on 19 July, 1969.
N TION IS TION

By the 1960s, the Indian banking industry has become an important tool to
facilitate the development of the Indian economy. At the same time, it has
emerged as a large employer, and a debate has ensued about the
possibility to nationalise the banking industry. Indira Gandhi, the-then
Prime Minister of India expressed the intention of the GOI in the annual
conference of the All India Congress Meeting in a paper entitled "Stray
thoughts on Bank Nationalisation." The paper was received with positive
enthusiasm. Thereafter, her move was swift and sudden, and the GOI
issued an ordinance and nationalised the 14 largest commercial banks with
effect from the midnight of July 19, 1969. Jayaprakash Narayan, a national
leader of India, described the step as a "masterstroke of political sagacity."
Within two weeks of the issue of the ordinance, the Parliament passed the
Banking Companies (Acquisition and Transfer of Undertaking) Bill, and it
received the presidential approval on 9 August, 1969.
A second dose of nationalization of 6 more commercial banks followed in
1980. The stated reason for the nationalization was to give the government
more control of credit delivery. With the second dose of nationalization, the
GOI controlled around 91% of the banking business of India. Later on, in
the year 1993, the government merged New Bank of India with Punjab
National Bank. It was the only merger between nationalized banks and
resulted in the reduction of the number of nationalised banks from 20 to
19. After this, until the 1990s, the nationalised banks grew at a pace of
around 4%, closer to the average growth rate of the Indian economy.
The nationalised banks were credited by some, including Home minister P.
Chidambaram, to have helped the Indian economy withstand the global financial
crisis of 2007-2009.
IB[ IS TION
In the early 1990s, the then Narsimha Rao government embarked on a policy of liberalization,
licensing a small number of private banks. These came to be known as New Generation tech-
savvy banks, and included Global Trust Bank (the first of such new generation banks to be set
up), which later amalgamated with Oriental Bank of Commerce, Axis Bank(earlier as UTI
Bank), ICICI Bank and HDFC Bank. This move, along with the rapid growth in the economy of
India, revitalized the banking sector in India, which has seen rapid growth with strong
contribution from all the three sectors of banks, namely, government banks, private banks and
foreign banks.
The next stage for the Indian banking has been setup with the proposed relaxation in
the norms for Foreign Direct Investment, where all Foreign Investors in banks may be
given voting rights which could exceed the present cap of 10%,at present it has gone
up to 49% with some restrictions.
The new policy shook the Banking sector in India completely. Bankers, till this time,
were used to the 4-6-4 method (Borrow at 4%;Lend at 6%;Go home at 4) of
functioning. The new wave ushered in a modern outlook and tech-savvy methods of
working for traditional banks.All this led to the retail boom in India. People not just
demanded more from their banks but also received more.
Currently (2007), banking in India is generally fairly mature in terms of supply, product
range and reach-even though reach in rural India still remains a challenge for the
private sector and foreign banks. In terms of quality of assets and capital adequacy,
Indian banks are considered to have clean, strong and transparent balance sheets
relative to other banks in comparable economies in its region. The Reserve Bank of
India is an autonomous body, with minimal pressure from the government. The stated
policy of the Bank on the Indian Rupee is to manage volatility but without any fixed
exchange rate-and this has mostly been true.

In March 2006, the Reserve Bank of India allowed Warburg Pincus to increase its stake
in Kotak Mahindra Bank (a private sector bank) to 10%. This is the first time an investor
has been allowed to hold more than 5% in a private sector bank since the RBI
announced norms in 2005 that any stake exceeding 5% in the private sector banks
would need to be vetted by them.
In recent years critics have charged that the non-government owned banks are too
aggressive in their loan recovery efforts in connection with housing, vehicle and
personal loans. There are press reports that the banks' loan recovery efforts have
driven defaulting borrowers to suicide.
Different types of banks
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 Commercial banks are the oldest and fast growing financial
intermediaries in india. Their business mainly consists of receiving deposits, giving loans
and financing trade and industry in the country. The importance of different types of
commercial banks in terms of their business is in the descending order
Indian scheduled banks
Public sector banks(nationalized),
Private sector banks
Foreign banks
Regional rural banks
Non scheduled banks


  
 These banks advance loans to industrial organizations.Industries
require capital for long term for buying machinery and equipments.They provide this
type of block capital.Industrial banks have a large capital base.They also receive
deposits for longer periods.there are few industrial banks in such as IDBI,Industrial
finance Corporation of India ,Industrial Credit and Investment Corporation of India and
State financial Corporations in the states.

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 Co-operative banks work on principle of cooperation.They
operate on no-profit loss basis.They render banking services to their members and
customers.Basically they were set up provide funds to farmers for short term
funds.Long term capital is provided by land development banks.There are many Urban
Corperative banks operating efficiently in the big cities.


 
 Exchange banks finance mostly the foreign trade(import-export) of
a country. Their main function is to discount, accept, and collect bills of exchange. They
also but and sell foreign currencies and help the businessmen convert their money into
foreign currency or foreign currency into Indian rupees if
their customers need.They also carry out ordinary banking business.Exim bank in India
is an example of Exchange bank.

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 It is an apex institution promoted by central government for
monitoring,regulating,controlling and promoting the destiny of Indian Financial

System ,since its inception. Reserve bank of India is the Central bank of India.Central
Government is empowered to issue such directions to it as they might consider
necessary in the public interest. The Governor and Deputy Governor of RBI are
appointed by the Central Government.

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Î nctions of Bank
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Central bank
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A 
 
,   
, or 
  is the entity
responsible for the monetary policy of a country or of a group of member
states. It is a bank that can lend money to other banks in times of need.[1]
Its primary responsibility is to maintain the stability of the national currency
and money supply, but more active duties include controlling subsidized-
loan interest rates, and acting as a lender of last resort to the banking
sector during times of financial crisis (private banks often being integral to
the national financial system). It may also have supervisory powers, to
ensure that banks and other financial institutions do not behave recklessly
or fraudulently.
Most richer countries today have an "independent" central bank, that is,
one which operates under rules designed to prevent political interference.
Examples include the European Central Bank (ECB) and the Federal
Reserve System in the United States. Some central banks are publicly
owned, and others are privately owned. For example, the United States
Federal Reserve is a quasi-public corporation.[2]
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HISTO
In Europe prior to the 17th century most money was commodity money, typically
gold or silver. However, promises to pay were widely circulated and accepted as
value at least five hundred years earlier in both Europe and Asia. The medieval
European Knights Templar ran probably the best known early prototype of a
central banking system, as their promises to pay were widely regarded, and many
regard their activities as having laid the basis for the modern banking system. At
about the same time, Kublai Khan of the Mongols introduced fiat currency to
China, which was imposed by force by the confiscation of specie.
The oldest central bank in the world is the Riksbank in Sweden, which was
opened in 1668 with help from Dutch businessmen. This was followed in
1694 by the Bank of England, created by Scottish businessman William
Paterson in the City of London at the request of the English government to
help pay for a war.
Although central banks are generally associated with fiat money, under the
international gold standard of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries
central banks developed in most of Europe and in Japan, though elsewhere
free banking or currency boards were more usual at this time. Problems
with collapses of banks during downturns, however, was leading to wider
support for central banks in those nations which did not as yet possess
them, most notably in Australia.

With the collapse of the gold standard after World War II, central banks became
much more widespread. The US Federal Reserve was created by the U.S. Congress
through the passing of the Glass-Owen Bill, signed by President Woodrow Wilson
on December 23, 1913, whilst Australia established its first central bank in 1920,
Colombia in 1923, Mexico and Chile in 1925 and Canada and New Zealand in the
aftermath of the Great Depression in 1934. By 1935, the only significant
indepedent nation that did not possess a central bank was Brazil, which developed
a precursor thereto in 1945 and created its present central bank twenty years later.

When African and Asian countries gained independence, all of them rapidly
established central banks or monetary unions.

The People's Bank of China evolved its role as a central bank starting in
about 1979 with the introduction of market reforms in that country, and
this accelerated in 1989 when the country took a generally capitalist
approach to developing at least its export economy. By 2000 the People's
Bank of China was in all senses a modern central bank, and emerged as
such partly in response to the European Central Bank. This is the most
modern bank model and was introduced with the euro to coordinate the
European national banks, which continue to separately manage their
respective economies other than currency exchange and base interest
rates.
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DIÎÎ[[NT C[NT  B NKS  OV[


TH[ WOD
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Afghanistan ± Da Afghanistan Bank

Albania ± Bank of Albania

Algeria ± Bank of Algeria

Angola ± Central Bank of Angola

Argentina ± Central Bank of Argentina

Armenia ± Central Bank of Armenia

Aruba ± Central Bank of Aruba

Australia ± Reserve Bank of Australia

Azerbaijan ± Central Bank of Azerbaijan

Bahamas ± Central Bank of The Bahamas

Bahrain ± Central Bank of Bahrain

Bangladesh ± Bangladesh Bank

Barbados ± Central Bank of Barbados

Belarus ± National Bank of the Republic of Belarus

Belize ± Central Bank of Belize

Bermuda ± Bermuda Monetary Authority

Bhutan ± Royal Monetary Authority of Bhutan

Bolivia ± Central Bank of Bolivia


Bosnia and Herzegovina ± Central Bank of Bosnia and Herzegovina

Botswana ± Bank of Botswana

Brazil ± Central Bank of Brazil

Brunei ± Brunei Currency and Monetary Board

Burundi ± Bank of the Republic of Burundi

Cambodia ± National Bank of Cambodia

Cameroon ± see: Economic and Monetary Community of Central Africa

Canada ± Bank of Canada

Cape Verde ± Bank of Cape Verde

Cayman Islands ± Cayman Islands Monetary Authority

CFP franc ± Overseas Issuing Institute

French Polynesia

New Caledonia

Wallis and Futuna

Chile ± Central Bank of Chile

China, People's Republic of ± People's Bank of China

China, Republic of (Taiwan) ± Central Bank of the Republic of China (Taiwan)

Colombia ± Bank of the Republic

Comoros ± Central Bank of the Comoros

Congo, Democratic Republic of ± Central Bank of the Congo

Costa Rica ± Central Bank of Costa Rica

Croatia ± Croatian National Bank


Cuba ± Central Bank of Cuba

Djibouti ± Central Bank of Djibouti

Dominican Republic ± Central Bank of the Dominican Republic

East Timor - Central Bank of East Timor

Economic and Monetary Community of Central Africa ± Bank of Central African


States

Cameroon

Central African Republic

Chad

Congo, Republic of

Equatorial Guinea

Gabon

Ecuador ± Central Bank of Ecuador

Egypt ± Central Bank of Egypt

El Salvador ± Central Reserve Bank of El Salvador

Eritrea ± Bank of Eritrea

Ethiopia ± National Bank of Ethiopia

European Union / European System of Central Banks

Eurosystem ± European Central Bank

Austria ± Austrian National Bank

Belgium ± National Bank of Belgium

Cyprus ± Central Bank of Cyprus

Finland ± Bank of Finland


France ± Bank of France

Germany ± Federal Bank of Germany

Greece ± Bank of Greece

Ireland ± Central Bank and Financial Services Authority of Ireland

Italy ± Bank of Italy

Luxembourg ± Central Bank of Luxembourg

Malta ± Central Bank of Malta

Netherlands ± Netherlands Bank

Portugal ± Bank of Portugal

Slovakia ± National Bank of Slovakia

Slovenia ± Bank of Slovenia

Spain ± Bank of Spain

Bulgaria ± Bulgarian National Bank

Czech Republic ± Czech National Bank

Denmark ± National Bank of Denmark

Estonia ± Bank of Estonia

Hungary ± Hungarian National Bank

Latvia ± Bank of Latvia

Lithuania ± Bank of Lithuania

Poland ± National Bank of Poland

Romania ± National Bank of Romania

Sweden ± Bank of Sweden


Fiji ± Reserve Bank of Fiji

Gambia ± Central Bank of The Gambia

Georgia ± National Bank of Georgia Ghana ± Bank of Ghana

Guatemala ± Bank of Guatemala

Guinea ± Central Bank of the Republic of Guinea

Guyana ± Bank of Guyana

Haiti ± Bank of the Republic of Haiti

Honduras ± Central Bank of Honduras

Iceland ± Central Bank of Iceland

India ± Reserve Bank of India

Indonesia ± Bank of Indonesia

Iran ± Central Bank of Iran

Iraq ± Central Bank of Iraq

Israel ± Bank of Israel

Jamaica ± Bank of Jamaica

Japan ± Bank of Japan

Jordan ± Central Bank of Jordan

Kazakhstan ± National Bank of Kazakhstan

Kenya ± Central Bank of Kenya

Korea, Democratic People's Republic of ± Central Bank of the Democratic


People's Republic of Korea

Korea, Republic of ± Bank of Korea


Kosovo, Republic of - Central Bank of Kosovo

Kuwait ± Central Bank of Kuwait

Kyrgyzstan ± National Bank of the Kyrgyz Republic

Laos ± Bank of the Lao Democratic People's Republic

Lebanon ± Banque du Liban

Lesotho ± Central Bank of Lesotho

Liberia ± Central Bank of Liberia

Libya ± Central Bank of Libya

Liechtenstein ± National Bank of Liechtenstein

Macau ± Monetary Authority of Macao

Macedonia, Republic of ± National Bank of the Republic of Macedonia

Madagascar ± Central Bank of Madagascar

Malawi ± Reserve Bank of Malawi

Malaysia ± Bank Negara Malaysia

Maldives ± Maldives Monetary Authority

Mauritania ± Central Bank of Mauritania Mauritius ± Bank of Mauritius

Mexico ± Bank of Mexico

Moldova ± National Bank of Moldova

Mongolia ± Bank of Mongolia

Montenegro ± Central Bank of Montenegro

Morocco ± Bank Al-Maghrib

Mozambique ± Bank of Mozambique


Myanmar ± Central Bank of Myanmar

Namibia ± Bank of Namibia

Nepal ± Central Bank of Nepal

Netherlands Antilles ± Bank of the Netherlands Antilles

New Zealand ± Reserve Bank of New Zealand

Nicaragua ± Central Bank of Nicaragua

Nigeria ± Central Bank of Nigeria

Norway ± Bank of Norway

Oman ± Central Bank of Oman

Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States ± Eastern Caribbean Central Bank

Anguilla

Antigua and Barbuda

Dominica

Grenada

Montserrat

Saint Kitts and Nevis

Saint Lucia

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Pakistan ± State Bank of Pakistan

Panama ± National Bank of Panama

Papua New Guinea ± Bank of Papua New Guinea

Paraguay ± Central Bank of Paraguay


Peru ± Central Reserve Bank of Peru

Philippines ± Central Bank of the Philippines

Qatar ± Qatar Central Bank

Russia ± Central Bank of the Russian Federation

Rwanda ± National Bank of Rwanda

Samoa ± Central Bank of Samoa

San Marino ± Central Bank of the Republic of San Marino

São Tomé and Príncipe ± Central Bank of São Tomé and Príncipe

Saudi Arabia ± Saudi Arabian Monetary Agency

Serbia ± National Bank of Serbia


Seychelles ± Central Bank of Seychelles

Sierra Leone ± Bank of Sierra Leone

Solomon Islands ± Central Bank of Solomon Islands

Somaliland - Bank of Somaliland

South Africa ± South African Reserve Bank

Sri Lanka ± Central Bank of Sri Lanka

Sudan ± Bank of Sudan

Suriname ± Central Bank of Suriname

Swaziland ± Central Bank of Swaziland

Switzerland ± Swiss National Bank

Syria ± Central Bank of Syria

Tajikistan ± National Bank of Tajikistan

Tanzania ± Bank of Tanzania


Thailand ± Bank of Thailand

Timor-Leste ± Banking and Payments Office of Timor-Leste

Tonga ± National Reserve Bank of Tonga

Trinidad and Tobago ± Central Bank of Trinidad and Tobago

Tunisia ± Central Bank of Tunisia

Turkey ± Central Bank of the Republic of Turkey

Turkmenistan ± State Central Bank of Turkmenistan

Uganda ± Bank of Uganda

Ukraine ± National Bank of Ukraine

United Arab Emirates ± Central Bank of the United Arab Emirates

United States of America ± Federal Reserve System

Uruguay ± Central Bank of Uruguay

Uzbekistan ± Central Bank of the Republic of Uzbekistan

Vanuatu ± Reserve Bank of Vanuatu

Vatican City ± Institute for Religious Works

Venezuela ± Central Bank of Venezuela

Vietnam ± State Bank of Vietnam


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INTODUCTION

The xeserve Bank of India (RBI, Hindi: A  


) is the central bank of
India, and was established on April 1, 1935 in accordance with the provisions of
the Reserve Bank of India Act, 1934. The Central Office of the Reserve Bank was
initially established in Kolkata but was permanently moved to Mumbai in 1937.
Though originally privately owned, the RBI has been fully owned by the
Government of India since nationalization in 1949.
Duvvuri Subbarao who succeeded Yaga Venugopal Reddy on September 2, 2008 is
the current Governor of RBI.
The Reserve Bank of India was set up on the recommendations of the
 
 
J  
. The commission submitted its report in the
year 1926, though the bank was not set up for nine years.
The Preamble of the Reserve Bank of India describes the basic functions of
the Reserve Bank as to regulate the issue of Bank Notes and keeping of
reserves with a view to securing monetary stability in India and generally
to operate the currency and credit system of the country to its advantage.
It has 22 regional offices, most of them in state capitals.
RBI was started with a paid up share capital of 5 crore.on established it
took over the function of management of currency from government of
India and power of credit control from imperial bank of india.
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[stablishment
The Reserve Bank of India was established on April 1, 1935 in accordance with the
provisions of the Reserve Bank of India Act, 1934.

The Central Office of the Reserve Bank was initially established in Calcutta but
was permanently moved to Mumbai in 1937. The Central Office is where the
Governor sits and where policies are formulated.

Though originally privately owned, since nationalisation in 1949, the Reserve


Bank is fully owned by the Government of India.
Preamble
The Preamble of the xeserve Bank of India describes the basic functions of the
xeserve Bank as:

"...to regulate the issue of Bank Notes and keeping of reserves with a view to
securing monetary stability in India and generally to operate the currency and
credit system of the country to its advantage."
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Dr. D Subbarao
Governor
Reserve Bank of India
Central Office
Mumbai 400 001.

Shri Azim Premji


Chairman,
WIPRO Limited
Doddakannelli,
Sarjapur Road,
Bangalore - 560033
Smt. Shyamala Gopinath
Deputy Governor
Reserve Bank of India
Central Office
Mumbai 400 001.

Shri Kumar Mangalam Birla


Chairman,
Aditya Birla Group of Companies
Aditya Birla Centre,
S. K. Ahire Marg, Worli
Mumbai - 400 030

Smt. Usha Thorat


Deputy Governor
Reserve Bank of India
Central Office
Mumbai 400 001.

Smt. Shashi Rekha Rajagopalan


Plot No. 10, Saket Phase 2
Kapra, ECIL Post
Hyderabad - 500 062

Dr.K.C.Chakrabarty
Deputy Governor
Reserve Bank of India
Central Office
Mumbai 400 001.
Shri Suresh Neotia
B-32, Greater Kailash Part - I
New Delhi - 110 048

Shri Y.H. Malegam


Chartered Accountant
C/o S. B. Billimoria & Company
Meher Chambers (2nd floor)
R. Kamani Road, Ballard Estate
Mumbai 400 001.

Dr. A. Vaidyanathan
B-1, Sonali Apartment, Old No. 11
Beach Road, Kalakshetra Colony
Chennai - 600 090

Shri Suresh D. Tendulkar


Economist,
AD-86-C,
Shalimar Bagh,
New Delhi - 110 088

Prof. Man Mohan Sharma


2/3 Jaswant Baug (Runwal Park),
Behind Akbarallys, Chembur Naka
Mumbai - 400 071
Prof. U. R. Rao
Chairman, Physical Research Laboratory
Department of Space,

Government of India
Antariksh Bhavan, New BEL Road
Bangalore - 560 094

Dr. D. Jayavarthanavelu
Chairman & Managing Director
Lakshmi Machine Works Limited
34 A, Kamraj Road
Coimbatore -641018

Shri Lakshmi Chand


IAS (Retd.),
C-12, Sector 14
NOIDA, Gautham Budh Nagar
Uttar Pradesh

Shri Sanjay Labroo


Managing Director & CEO
Asahi India Glass Ltd.
Global Business Park
Tower - B, 5th Floor'
Mehrauli - Gurgaon Road
Gurgaon - 122002 (Haryana)

Shri H. P. Ranina
Advocate, Supreme Court of India,
506, Raheja Centre,
214 Backbay Reclamation,
Free Press Journal Road,
Mumbai - 400 023

Shri Ashok Chawla


Secretary
Government of India
Ministry of Finance
Department of Economic Affairs
New Delhi 110001

Dr. Ashok S. Ganguly


Firstsource Solutions Limited.
Peninsula Chambers, 6th floor,
Ganpatrao Kadam Marg,
Lower Parel
Mumbai - 400 013
ocal Boards
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Shri Y.H. Malegam,


Chartered Accountant,
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Meher Chambers (2nd floor),
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Mumbai - 400 001.

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Anna Nagar East ,
Chennai - 600040.

Shri Mitha Lal Mehta


Former Chief Secretary
Government of Rajasthan
5, Keshav Nagar, Gopalpura Road
Jaipur - 302 018

Shri Dattaraj V. Salgaocar,


Managing Director,
V.M.Salgaocar & Bro Ltd.,
Hira Vihar, Airport Road, Chicalim,
Vasco Da Gama,
Goa - 403 711.
Dr. Ram Nath
Ex-Professor & Vice Chancellor
CSA University of Agri. & Tech.
Plot No. 710, 'A' Block, Avas Vikas Colony,
Hanspur, Naubasta, Kanpur - 208 001

Shri J.B. Patel


At & Post, Adada
Via Taluka & District Navsari
Gujarat
PIN-396445

Dr. Pritam Singh


Director, Management Development Institute
Mehrauli Road, Sukhrali
Gurgaon - 122 001
EASTExN AxEA

SOUTHExN AxEA

Shri Suresh D. Tendulkar


Economist,
AD-86-C,
Shalimar Bagh,
New Delhi - 110 088

Shri Lakshmi Chand,


Retd. IAS, C-12,
Sector - 14, Noida,
U. P. 201301.

Shri A.K. Saikia, Retd. IAS,


H-8, Sector-27,
Noida - 201 301.

Shri C. P. Nair,
Retd. Chief Secretary to Government of Kerala,
Narayaneeyam,
Jawahar Nagar,
Thiruvananthapuram - 695 041.
Shri Sovan Kanungo, Retd. IAS,
17/404, East End Apartments,
Mayur Vihar I (Extension),
New Delhi - 110 096.

Dr.M. Govinda Rao.


Director,
National Institute of Public Finance and Policy,
18/2, Satsang Vihar Marg,
Special Institutional Area (Near JNU)
New Delhi - 110 067.

Smt. Devaki Jain,


Tharangavana, D-5, 12th Cross,
RMV Extension,
Bangalore - 560080.

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Subject xeleased On

xeport of G20 Working Group on Enhancing Sound xegulation April 6, 2009


and Strengthening Transparency

CFSA xeports xeleased : Financial Sector Self Assessment finds March 30,
System Broadly xobust but Identifies Specific Concerns 2009

CGFS xeport on Capital Flows and Emerging Market Economies ÎeMruary 3,


released 2009

August 27,
xBI Discussion Paper on Holding Companies in Banking Groups
2007

Master Circular on External Commercial Borrowings and Trade July 2, 2007


Credits

Comprehensive Guidelines on Derivatives April 20, 2007

Branch ricensing Policy for xegional xural Banks June 13, 2006
Authorised Persons - Categorisation March 6, 2006

Branch ricensing Policy for Scheduled Commercial Banks September. 8,


2005

Guidelines for Amalgamation/Merger of Private Banks May 11, 2005

Vision Document for Urban Co-operative Banks March 4, 2005

February 28,
xoadmap for Foreign Banks and Ownership Guidelines 2005

February 28,
riberalised Policy for Overseas Presence of India 2005
Banks and Foreign Banks' Presence in India

February 2,
Guidelines on Mergers/ Amalgamation of Urban Banks 2005

September 30,
A xevisions Policy for India¶s Balance of Payments Data
2004
P[S[NT[D B

DEEPIKA GUPTA(12)
VISHAr xOHIxA(46)
NIDHI MExCHANT(34)
POOJA SHAH(52)
SASHANK JAIN(19)
AKHIr DHADHA(6)
KHUSHBOO xATHI(43)
ESHAANT JAIN(15)
USHMITA GOSArIA(11)
KHYATI JAIN(18)