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A STUDY ON QUALITY OF WORK LIFE AMONG THE EMPLOYEES IN NUTRO

VESSELS INDO GROUPS LIMITED

CHAPTER 1

INTRODUCTION

QUALITY OF WORK

Working Life is a process of work organizations which enables its members at all levels to
actively participate in shaping the organization environment, methods and outcomes. Concept
ual categories whichtogether make up the quality of working life are adequate and fair
compensation, safe and healthy working conditions, immediate opportunity to use and
develop human capacities, opportunity for continued growth and security, social integration
in the work organization and the social relevance of work life.

Quality of work life also refers to the favorableness or unfavorableness of a job environment
for people. It is a generic phase that covers per sons feelings about every dimension of work
including economic rewards and benefits, security, working conditions, organization and
interpersonal relationship and its intrinsic meaning in a persons life.

The basic purpose of quality of work life is to develop work environment that are excellent
for people as well as for production. It aims at healthier, more satisfied and more productive
employees and more efficient, adaptive and profitable organization.

Quality of work life is a subset of the quality of life which contains the relationship between
employees and their total working environment with human dimension.\

Quality of work life is the degree to which members of an organization are able to satisfy
their personal needs through their experience in the organization.

Its focus is on the problem of creating a human work environment where employees work co-
operatively and contributes to organizational objectives.
Quality of work life is important for job performance, job satisfaction, labor turnover, labor
management relations and such other factors which play an important part in determining the
overall well being of any industrial organization.

The quality of work life movement aims at integrating the socio-psychological needs
of employees. Several experiments indicate that the interest in improving the QWL reflects
societal changes.

The developments have an influence on the growth of the quality of work life movement;
ensure higher productivity and greater job satisfaction.

Factors affecting quality of work life:

Job satisfaction:

Job satisfaction is the favorable or unfavorable with which employees view their
work. As with motivation, it is affected by the environment. Job satisfaction is impacted by
job design. Jobs that are rich in positive behavioral elements such as autonomy, variety,
task identity, task significance and feedback contribute to employees satisfaction. Likewise,
orientation is important because the employees acceptance by the work group contributes to
satisfaction. Insert each element of the environmental system, can add to, or detract from, job
satisfaction.

Pay:

Quality of work life is basically built around the concept of equitable pay. In these days
ahead, employees may want to participate in the profit of the organization.

People:

Almost everyone has to deal with three set of people in the work place. Those are namely
boss, co-workers in the same level and subordinates. Apart from this, some professions need
interaction with people like patients, media persons, public, customers, thieves, robbers,
physically disabled people, mentally challenged, children, foreign delegates, gangsters,
politicians, public figures and celebrities. These situations demand high level of prudence,
cool temper, tactfulness, humor, kindness, diplomacy and sensitiveness.
Health conditions of employees:

Organization should realize that their true wealth lies in their employees and so providing
healthy environment for employees should be their primary objective.

Personal and career growth opportunities:

An organization should provide employees with opportunity for personal/professional


development and growth and to prepare them to accept the responsibilities at higher level.

Participative management style and recognition:

Flat organization structure helps organization facilitate employee participation. A


Participative management style improves the quality of work life. Workers feel that they have
control over their work process and they also offer the innovative ideas to improve them.
Recognition also helps in motivating employees to perform better. Recognition can be in
form of rewarding employees for their best performance

Autonomous Work Teams:

An autonomous work team is one which can plan, regulate and control its own work
world. The management only specifies the goals that too in collaboration with the team. The
team organizes the contents and structure of its job, evaluates its own performance,
establishes its speed and chooses its production method. It makes its own internal distribution
of tasks and decides its own membership. Autonomous team approach increases satisfaction
and reduces turnover and absenteeism.

Motivation:

Motivation is a complex subject. It involves the unique feelings, thoughts and past
experiences of each of us as we share a variety of relationships within and outside
organizations. To expect asingle motivational approach work in every situation is probably
unrealistic. In fact, even theorists and researches take different points of view about
motivation. Nevertheless, motivation can be defined as a persons drive to take an action
because that person wants to do so. People act because they feel that they have to. However,if
they are motivated they make the positive choice to act for a purpose because, for example,
it may satisfy some of their needs.
Work life balance:

Organization should provide the relaxation time for employees and offer tips to
balance their personal and professional lives. They should not strain employees personal and
social life by forcing on them by demanding working hours, overtime work, business travel,
untimingtransfers.By the globalization the modern employees are experiencing distress. To
meet the challenges posed by present standards, organizational must focus their attention in
bringing a balance between work life and personal life. The underlying assumption is that
work life balance will ultimately ensure Quality of work life. Today an employee desires
work to be more meaningful and challenging because quality is the acid test. A Quality of
work life gives an opportunity for deep sense of fulfillment. Employees seek a supportive
work environment that will enable them to balance work with personalinterests.Quality of
work life provides a more humanized work environment. It attempts to serve the higher order
needs of workers as well as their basic needs. Quality of Work Life indicates that the work
should not have excessively negative conditions. It should not put workers under undue
stress. It should not damage or degrade their humanness. It should not be threatening or
undulydangerous.Employees in several companies that instituted Quality of work life
experienced better health and greater safety on the job. Other benefits included improved
employee satisfaction, morale, job interest, commitment and involvement; increased
opportunity for individual growth ; greater sense of ownership and control of the work
environment development of managerial ability for circle leaders, improved communication
in the organization and greater understanding and respect between management and workers.
The term Quality of work life has been applied to a wide variety of organizational
improvement efforts. The common elements seem to be, has good man indicates, an attempt
to restructure multiple dimensions of the organizational and to institute a mechanism which
introduces and sustains changes overtime . Aspects of the change mechanism are usually an
increase in problem solving between the union and management Responsiveness to employee
concerns. In every organization, people and their behavior assumes vital role in determining
the performance and effectiveness. While many studies concentrated on physical and
financial performance of organization. Studies on behavioral aspects seem to be inadequate.
So, the attempts must to understand the human side of the enterprise. The Quality of work life
movement provides a value frame work and a philosophy which has along term implication
for the human development and enrichment. It tries to balance both the work and family life.
Hence integrated approach with regard to Quality of work life is required for the success of
an individual and an organization. This underlines the necessity of searching studies on the
nature of human relations and the problems of human relations and the problems of human
behavior in the organization and suggests measures to cope with the problems. Hence,an in
depth on aspects like Quality of work life can throw light on many non-identified aspects of
human behavior which may help in understanding the issues involved and improving the
overall performance of these organizations. There it is found that there is need to study in
greater detail about the topic

STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM:

A study of quality of work life is a paramount importance, the nature being different
for each category of employees depending upon their needs. A good quality of work life
reduces absenteeism, accidents &attrition. Quality of work life is useful to improve
production, organizational effectiveness, morale of an employees and economic development
of the country. So an attempt has been made to know about the employees satisfaction on
QWL and its influence on their working and social environment

SCOPE OF QUALITY OF WORK LIFE:

Work plays a central role in the life of the workers engaged in a productive
organization. It has an improvement impact on
1) Shaping his personality.
2) Determining his performance.
3) Commitment of follow employees.
4) Commitment to the organization and the society

NEED FOR THE STUDY

The most significant resources of an organization are human resources, without it the
organization cannot function. In fact, challenges, opportunity and also the frustration of
creating and managing organization very often originate from the people relate problems
that arise within them. People related problems often steam from the mistaken belief that
people are alike, that they may be treated identically. There would be a lot of variability in
psychological features, which demand attention.
OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY:

To determine the factors influencing the quality of work life


To measure the level of satisfaction of employees towards quality of work life.
To find out the way to improve quality of work life
To identify the attributes/factors influencing QWL in an organization
To analyze the level of satisfaction of the employees on QWL in an organization.
To study the expectation of the employees to improve the QWL in their work force.
To know the influence of QWL on employees performance

NUTRO VESSELS INDO GROUPS LIMITED

COMPANY PROFILE

ABOUT NUTRO VESSELS INDO GROUPS LTD:

Nutro Boilers Engineering began manufacturing boilers in Establishment 2002. The


company CEO G. Perumal Managing Director,- P.Anbhuselvan, As the demand for
boilers grew, Nutro vessels indo groups Ltd was soon in need of a larger facility. In 2002.
Nutro vessels indo groups Ltd broke ground for a new factory just south of Los Angeles in an
area where orange groves once stood. Just down the street was Downeys North American
Rockwell plant that built many of the Apollo spacecraft and another company that made
Apollo Motor Homes. In 2006, Nutro vessels indo groups Ltd opened a second plant in
Puerto Rico to better serve East Coast customers. A few years later, the finished interstate
highway system made this plant obsolete and it closed.

Much has changed since then. The Apollo factory closed and became a movie studio. The
motor home facility now makes trolley tourist buses. One thing that hasn't changed is that
Nutro vessels indo groups Ltd is still making boilers in Southern California. The reasons for
that can be found in these beliefs that shape our family owned business:
We believe our boilers and tanks should be built to last.
We believe boiler maintenance should be simple.
We believe in treating customers with respect.
We believe in helping boiler operators and owners understand our products.
We keep a file on every boiler we've ever built. We may know more about your Nutro
vessels indo groups Ltd than you do.
We believe in research, development and long term testing.

We recently moved to a new location in nearby Commerce, California. We were


fortunate to find a building twice as large as our former one and yet close enough to retain all
our employees. We have just completed a new R&D lab with full boiler testing and
demonstration capability. We have also added a machine shop to enhance our manufacturing
processes.

From our dependable steam and water boilers to our high efficiency Dura fins, Nutro
vessels indo groups Ltd has boilers for almost every application and budget. Our dedicated
representatives throughout the United States and Canada offer strong local support while our
in-house tech service hot line is ready to answer any questions you might have. We greatly
appreciate your interest in Nutro vessels and look forward to working together.

MILESTONES:

Year Achievement

2005 Introduced Take-A-Part (Knockdown)


Boilers, Weatherproof Boilers, UL "A"
Labeled Boiler - Burner Packages, Hinged
Head plates.
Introduced Nutro vessels Blow down Tanks
2006 and Condensate Return Tanks.
Shipped 1,100 Oil Fired Domestic Hot Water
2008 Heaters
First Durafin Boilers Ship.
2011

2014 Moved to NEW Location: 5832 Garfield


Avenue, Commerce, CA 90040.

MISSION STATEMENT

Nutro vessels indo groups Ltd manufactures the worlds largest Scotch marine firetube boiler.
Nutro vessels indo groups Ltd pioneered the first water backed boiler over 15 years ago and
the first packaged boiler over 10 years ago. Nutro vessels indo groups Ltd are built to last and
carry the only 15-year warranty in the industry. In addition to the quality and dependability,
the conservative design provides excellent fuel to steam efficiency resulting in the best life
cycle costs in the industry.

Nutro vessels indo groups Ltd also offers a full line of desecrators, surge tanks and
blow down heat recovery systems. These feed water systems are also designed and
built to a quality standard which allows us to offer a 10 year warranty, the only one in
the industry.
Nutro vessels indo groups Ltd is well aware of the changing environmental
requirements. While our standard Nutro vessels indo groups Ltd burners can attain
less than 30 ppm , we know that some regions of the United States are requiring
emissions as low as 9 PPM. High efficiency, availability and low emissions:
VISION STATEMENT

Nutro vessels indo groups Ltd is recognized as one of the most innovative biomass
boiler suppliers in the world. We have a well-known and established reputation for supplying
biomass boilers and combustion systems with exceptionally high efficiencies and
availabilities, high fuel flexibility, and low emission impact.

Moreover, the systems have very low maintenance costs. The companys boiler and
combustion system concept is based on more than 30 years of hands-on experience with
steam generation and biomass combustion.
INDUSTRY PROFILE

INTRODUCTION OF THE ORGANIZATION

INTRODUCTION

Nutro vessels indo Company, manufacturer of quality hydronic-heating products,


has introduced more new, high efficiency products over the last several years than any other
company at any time in the history of hydronic heating! From new ENERGY STAR certified,
gas-fired residential boilers to high efficiency oil-fired boilers including advanced design,
three-pass, cast iron boilers along with the industrys only, three-pass, oil-fired, boiler
steam boiler and the only atmospheric gas boiler made in India, , the expansive lineup of
heating products from Nutro vessels Company boasts the highest average efficiency,
exceeding 85% with maximum efficiencies over 95%.

And it doesnt stop there! Nutro vessels indo groups now offers the broadest line of
condensing boilers available from any manufacturer anywhere. In addition, Nutro vessels
group has developed and introduced exclusive user-friendly boiler control systems for many
of its products. The Nutro vessels indo groups IQ and Nutro groups Sage2.2 Control Systems
offer unparalleled features and benefits that are unmatched in the boiler industry.

Truly, the nutron vessels indo groups brand has set the new standards for hydronic
heating equipment in residential and commercial product for gas-fired and oil-fired
application with water and boiler steam boiler and super high efficiency condensing boilers.
To provide this extensive product lineup, nutro vessels indo groups has invested in world
class manufacturing facilities and new assembly operations in Lancaster, Pennsylvania with
state-of-the art computer numerical controlled machines providing exacting product
tolerances. Quality, made in India cast iron sections are produced for Nutro groups by
Casting Solutions,. Along with the best engineering capabilities available anywhere, nutro
vessels groups with its made in the India, quality product lines delivers world-class
marketing, technical sales, and sales support unmatched in South India.
Profile of nutro vessels indo groups ltd:

Nutro vessels indo groups private limited is established at thekkalur, 35 kms from
Salem, the Manchester of south side. The company has carved niche of its own in the
competitive yarn market. The promoter's group of garments embodies the true spirit of
enterprise, a trait the Manchester of south Nutro vessels is well-known for. Our state-of-art,
fully integrated unit is to produce highest quality medium, find and super-fine count cotton
yarn, at par with the best in the world promoted by far sighted visionaries with technical
expertise and impeachable business acumen.

Sales Turnover: 1 million USD


Year Estd : 2005
Main Business Area : Manufacturing and Agent services
Other Area Of Business : Manufacturer of Heat Recovery Boiler steam
Generators (HRSG), Utility Boilers, Water
Tube Boiler and Pressure Vessel.

Share Capital & Number of Employees:

Authorized Capital: 150,000,000


Paid up capital: 9,000,000
Number of Employees: 1800

Nutro vessels Co. is a highly qualified company in design, supplying,


manufacturing, installation and commissioning of different types of heat recovery boiler
steam generators (HRSGs), package, industrial and power plant boilers as well as other
related equipments and accessories in the field of power, oil, gas, petrochemical industries,
power plants and other industrial in domestic and foreign markets.

Relying on the expert human resources, learning and developing technical


knowledge, utilizing maximum production capacity and cooperating with foreign and
domestic suppliers, while observing the shareholders rights and gaining customers
satisfaction, this company advances toward the sustainable development of society and aims
to realize Irans 20-year perspective. In line with the country is policies and objectives to
developer power plans and related technology, the license agreement of technologies transfer
was concluded.

Under this license agreement, over 70 heat recovery boiler steam generators have
been installed and utilized in the downstream of 160 MW gas turbines up to now. The
significant role of oil, gas and petrochemical industries has lead Nutro vessels and Equipment
Co. in to accomplishes several projects for supplying boiler steam and utilities in the form of
EP and EPC for these industries. These boilers were mostly manufactured by outsourcing and
by using the capacity and skills of domestic subcontractors in the frame work of cohesive
management and supervision on suppliers up to early 2010.

According to the new perspective of the company since 2010, adjoining a factory to
the company near Tehran, has provided the possibility of manufacturing the main parts of
boiler and other related products. Creating new horizons in fulfilling the customers needs
and gaining their satisfaction on quality, cost and time.

Nowadays, regarding the actualization of energy costs, while various industries and
investors need increasing efficiency, Nutro vessels and Equipment Co. has focused on
developing products variety in order to design and supply industrial heat recovery boilers and
boiler steam recovery from the wasted heat in industries and also process packages
particularly in oil, gas and petrochemical industries and in the next years, this company major
activities will be devoted to these plans.

Customers requirement regarding after sale services in global level as well as


Nutro vessels and Equipments commitment to competitor the product and service chain, has
led us to codifying some particular roles since 2010 in the form of customer and after sale
services.

Managements and personnels commitment to fulfill the actual needs of stakeholders


and environmental conservation as well as benefiting from the modern scientific management
systems ensure a prosperous future in achieving the customers satisfaction and expanding
the companys contribution to the domestic and foreign markets.

INDUSTRY PROFILE

INTRODUCTION TO THE INDUSTRY


INTRODUCTION:

In many cases, manufacturing facilities provide Boilers are pressure vessels designed
to heat water or produce boiler steam , which can then be used to provide space heating
and/or service water heating to a building. In most commercial building heating applications,
the heating source in the boiler is a natural gas fired burner. Oil fired burners and electric
resistance heaters can be used as well. Boiler steam is preferred over hot water in some
applications, including absorption cooling, kitchens, laundries, sterilizers, and boiler steam
driven equipment.

Boilers have several strengths that have made them a common feature of buildings.
They have a long life, can achieve efficiencies up to 95% or greater, provide an effective
method of heating a building, and in the case of boiler steam systems, require little or no
pumping energy. However, fuel costs can be considerable, regular maintenance is required,
and if maintenance is delayed, repair can be costly.

Guidance for the construction, operation, and maintenance of boilers is provided


primarily by the ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers), which produces the
following resources:

Rules for construction of heating boilers, Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section
IV-2007
Recommended rules for the care and operation of heating boilers, Boiler and Pressure
Vessel
Boilers are often one of the largest energy users in a building. For every year a
boiler system goes unattended, boiler costs can increase approximately 10% (1).
Boiler operation and maintenance is therefore a good place to start when looking for
ways to reduce energy use and save money.

MATERIALS FOR BOILER INDUSTRY:


The pressure vessel of a boiler is usually made of steel (or alloy steel), or historically
of wrought iron. Stainless steel, especially of the austenitic types, is not used in wetted parts
of boilers due to corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. However Nutro vessels stainless
steel is often used in super heater sections that will not be exposed to boiling water, and
electrically-heated stainless steel shell boilers are allowed under the European "Pressure
Equipment Directive" for production of boiler steam for sterilizers and disinfectors.

In live boiler steam models, copper or brass is often used because it is more easily
fabricated in smaller size boilers. Historically, copper was often used for fireboxes
(particularly forboiler steam locomotives), because of its better formability and higher
thermal conductivity; however, in more recent times, the high price of copper often makes
this an uneconomic choice and cheaper substitutes (such as steel) are used instead.

For much of the Victorian "age of boiler steam ", the only material used for boiler
making was the highest grade of wrought iron, with assembly by riveting. This iron was often
obtained from specialist ironworks, such as at Creator Moor , noted for the high quality of
their rolled plate and its suitability for high-reliability use in critical applications, such as
high-pressure boilers.

In the 20th century, design practice instead moved towards the use of steel, which is
stronger and cheaper, with welded construction, which is quicker and requires less labour. It
should be noted, however, that wrought iron boilers corrode far slower than their modern-day
steel counterparts, and are less susceptible to localized pitting and stress-corrosion. This
makes the longevity of older wrought-iron boilers far superior to those of welded steel
boilers.

Cast iron may be used for the heating vessel of domestic water heaters. Although such heaters
are usually termed "boilers" in some countries, their purpose is usually to produce hot water,
not boiler steam , and so they run at low pressure and try to avoid actual boiling. The
brittleness of cast iron makes it impractical for high-pressure boiler steam boilers.

CONFIGURATIONS OF BOILER:

Boilers are classified into different types based on their working pressure and
temperature, fuel type, draft method, size and capacity, and whether they condense the water
vapor in the combustion gases. Boilers are also sometimes described by their key
components, such as heat exchanger materials or tube design. These other characteristics are
discussed in the following section on Key Components of Boilers.

Two primary types of boilers include

Fire Tube Boiler


Cast iron sectional
Fire Tube Boiler:

In a Fire tube boiler, hot gases of combustion flow through a series of tubes surrounded
by water. Alternatively, in a Water tube boiler, water flows in the inside of the tubes and the
hot gases from combustion flow around the outside of the tubes. A drawing of a water tube
boiler is shown in Figure

Fire tube boilers are more commonly available for low pressure boiler steam or hot water
applications, and are available in sizes ranging from 500,000 to 75,000,000 BTU input. Water
tube boilers are primarily used in higher pressure boiler steam applications and are used
extensively for comfort heating applications. They typically range in size from 500,000 to
more than 20,000,000 BTU input.

Cast Iron Sectional Boilers:

Cast iron sectional boilers are another type of boiler commonly used in commercial space
heating applications. These types of boilers dont use tubes. Instead, theyre built up from
cast iron sections that have water and combustion gas passages. The iron castings are bolted
together, similar to an old boiler steam radiator. The sections are sealed together by gaskets.
Theyre available for producing boiler steam or hot water, and are available in sizes ranging
from 35,000 to 14,000,000 BTU input.

Cast iron sectional boilers are advantageous because they can be assembled on site, allowing
them to be transported through doors and smaller openings. Their main disadvantage is that
because the sections are sealed together with gaskets, they are prone to leakage as the gaskets
age and are attacked by boiler treatment chemicals.

Water-tube boiler:

In this type, tubes filled with water are arranged inside a furnace in a number of possible
configurations. Often the water tubes connect large drums, the lower ones containing water
and the upper ones boiler steam and water; in other cases, such as a mono-tube boiler, water
is circulated by a pump through a succession of coils. This type generally gives high boiler
steam production rates, but less storage capacity than the above. Water tube boilers can be
designed to exploit any heat source and are generally preferred in high-pressure applications
since the high-pressure water/boiler steam is contained within small diameter pipes which can
withstand the pressure with a thinner wall.
THE USE OF BOILER SYSTEMS IN PRACTICE

Industrial hot water boiler systems for generating thermal heat are very
similar to the household heating boilers in our cellars. The main difference is that industrial
boilers are dimensioned significantly larger, so their heating capacity is not only sufficient for
a family home but also for hotels, hospitals, skyscrapers, industrial buildings or entire
districts. When using process heat generated by boiler steam boiler systems the individual
applications are far more versatile. They are used in many industry sectors. But is all this just
hot air or what exactly is the boiler steam used for Let us choose a few industrial sectors and
have a closer look at them.

SAFETY ISSUES IN MANUFACTURING OF BOILER:

All combustion equipment must be operated properly to prevent dangerous


conditions or disasters from occurring, causing personal injury and property loss. The basic
cause of boiler explosions is ignition of a combustible gas that has accumulated within the
boiler. This situation could arise in a number of ways, for example fuel, air, or ignition is
interrupted for some reason, the flame extinguishes, and combustible gas accumulates and is
reignited. Another example is when a number of unsuccessful attempts at ignition occur
without the appropriate purging of accumulated combustible gas.

There is a tremendous amount of stored energy within a boiler. The state change of
superheated water from a hot liquid to a vapor releases an enormous amount of energy. For
example, 1 ft3 of water will expand to 1600 ft3 when it turns to boiler steam . Therefore, if
you could capture all the energy released when a 30 gallon home hot water tank flashes into
explosive failure at 332o F, you would have enough force to send the average car to a height
of nearly 125 feet. This is equivalent to more than the height of a 14 story apartment building,
starting with a lift off velocity of 85 miles per hour.

Boiler safety is a key objective of the National Board of Boiler and Pressure Vessel
Inspectors. This organization reports and tracks boiler safety and the number of incidents
related to boilers and pressure vessels each year. Their work has found that the number one
incident category resulting in injury was poor maintenance and operator error. This stresses
the importance of proper maintenance and operator training. Boilers must be inspected
regularly based on manufacturers recommendations. Pressure vessel integrity, checking of
safety relief valves, water cutoff devices and proper float operation, gauges and water level
indicators should all be inspected.

Best Practices for Efficient Operation:

Efficiency

The percentage of the heat energy contained in the fuel that is captured by the working fluid
in the boiler is defined as the combustion efficiency of the boiler. Combustion efficiencies of
80% or higher are usually possible for hot water boilers and low pressure boiler steam
boilers for commercial buildings.

Complete combustion results when a hydrocarbon fuel such as natural gas or oil burns and
produces only carbon dioxide, water and heat. If there is insufficient oxygen and/or poor
mixing of fuel and oxygen, then incomplete combustion will occur resulting in other products
of combustion including carbon monoxide and unburned fuel.
When incomplete combustion occurs, the chemical energy of the fuel is not completely
released as heat and the combustion efficiency is reduced. This is also a safety concern as
unburned fuel could ignite in the stack and cause an explosion. Boilers must be tuned to
achieve complete combustion. One strategy to ensure complete combustion is to provide
some amount of excess air. However, as shown in the figure below, a small amount of excess
air will improve combustion efficiency, but a large amount will reduce efficiency.

Use Boiler Controls for Optimized Air-to-Fuel Ratio

To ensure that complete combustion occurs, extra air is introduced at the burner. But
too much will result in air being wastefully heated and exhausted out of the boiler flue,
penalizing combustion efficiency, and creating a safety issue. When a boiler is tuned, the goal
is to maximize combustion efficiency by providing just enough excess air to assure complete
combustion but not too much to reduce efficiency. How much excess air is enough to assure
complete combustion? That varies with the design and condition of the burner and boiler, as
well as with the different firing rates of the burner, but is typically considered to be between
2% - 3%. Excess air must also be adjusted to allow for variations in temperature, density, and
humidity of the boiler combustion air throughout any daily and seasonal variations. Its
desirable to maintain a constant amount of excess air across the entire firing range.

The important idea to remember is that complete combustion is critical to ensuring efficient
boiler operation. Incomplete combustion of the fuel can significantly reduce boiler efficiency
by 10% or more, while increasing excess air by 10% may only impact boiler efficiency by
about 1%. Signs of incomplete combustion are a smoky exhaust, a yellow flame, flame
failures, and sooty boiler tubes. It is a good idea to tune up a boiler annually to ensure the
combustion process is optimized.

SUPERHEATED BOILER STEAM BOILERS:

Most boilers produce boiler steam to be used at saturation temperature; that is, saturated
boiler steam . Superheated boiler steam boilers vaporize the water and then further heat the
boiler steam in a super heater. This provides boiler steam at much higher temperature, but
can decrease the overall thermal efficiency of the boiler steam generating plant because the
higher boiler steam temperature requires a higher flue gas exhaust temperature. There are
several ways to circumvent this problem, typically by providing an economizer that heats the
feed water, a combustion air heater in the hot flue gas exhaust path, or both. There are
advantages to superheated boiler steam that may, and often will, increase overall efficiency
of both boiler steam generation and its utilization: gains in input temperature to a turbine
should outweigh any cost in additional boiler complication and expense. There may also be
practical limitations in using wet boiler steam , as entrained condensation droplets will
damage turbine blades.

Superheated boiler steam presents unique safety concerns because, if any system component
fails and allows boiler steam to escape, the high pressure and temperature can cause serious,
instantaneous harm to anyone in its path. Since the escaping boiler steam will initially be
completely superheated vapor, detection can be difficult, although the intense heat and sound
from such a leak clearly indicates its presence.
CHAPTER II

REVIEW OF LITERATURE:

REVIEW OF LITERATURE:

Walton (1973) has stated that the major conceptual areas have to be identified viz., adequate
and fair compensation, safe and healthy working conditions, development of human
competencies, growth and security, social integration for understanding quality of work life.
Delamater and Walker (1974) have indicated that emphasis have been made in the
humanization of work which includes the need to protect the worker from hazards to health
and safety. Katz ell et. Al (1975) have observed that an employee may enjoy a high quality of
working life when he has positive feelings towards his job and its future prospects, to stay on
the job and performs well. A report by QWL taskforce in George Manson University in
Virginia, USA assess the quality of their employees work lives and identified that the major
source of stress in work and the aspects of satisfaction /dissatisfaction of work affected the
QWL of their employees.

Glasier (1976) has revealed that quality of work life implies job security, good working
conditions, adequate and fair compensation and more even equal employment opportunity all
together.

Lawler (1978) has suggested that the plan based on participative culture inQWL principles
have been found to be more effective than traditionally managed plans. Runcie (1980) has
viewed that when an employee have positive perception of the quality of work life in the
company, he would further probably strive to further improve the working conditions ,
increase production and can give quality products.

Lawler & Ledford (1982), Buchanan and body (1982) leviathan and weenie (1984) have
demonstrated that the improvement in QWL has definite potential and scope for improving
productivity & overall organizational effectiveness. The degree of goal and integration of
individual is significantly influenced by the quality of organization climate & work life was
the observation made by berrett (1991) while studying the individual goals & organization
objectives.

Singh (1994) has observed that Indian managers on the meaning of work, the managerial
communist assigned higher preferences to psychological rewards compared to monetary
rewards. Both employer and employee better appreciate the importance of the Quality of
work life of an organization.

Quality of work life is a recent day topic of organizational psychology, some of the elements
that are relevant in defining an individuals quality of work life would include the task, the
physical work environment, social environment within the organization, administrative
system and relationship between life on and off the job (Che Rose, Beh, Uli and Idris, 2006).

His study further concluded that the most important predictor of quality of work life
is organizational climate, followed by career achievement, career satisfaction and career
balance. A high quality of work life is essential for organizations to continue, to attract and
retain employees (Sand rick, 2003).In a Research report (2010) it is stated that the quality of
work life had an effect onemployeeslife and working environment.

QWL provides for the balanced relationship among work, non- work and family aspects of
life. In a working paper (2011) it is given that Quality of working Life enables members at all
levels to actively participate in shaping the organization environment, methods and outcomes.
CHAPTER III
RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY:

To determine the factors influencing the quality of work life


To measure the level of satisfaction of employees towards quality of work life.
To find out the way to improve quality of work life
To identify the attributes/factors influencing QWL in an organization
To analyze the level of satisfaction of the employees on QWL in an organization.
To study the expectation of the employees to improve the QWL in their work force.
To know the influence of QWL on employees performance

RESEARCHMETHODOLOGY

A Research is a careful investigation or inquiry; especially through search for new


facts in any branch of knowledge .It is a systemized effort to gain more knowledge.
Research methodology is a way to systematically solve the research problem. It may be
understood as a science of studying how research is done scientifically. It is necessary for the
researcher to know not only the research methods or technique but also the methodology.
Researcher always needs to understand the assumption underline various technique and they
need to know the criteria by which they can decide that certain technique and procedures will
be applicable to certain problems and other will not.

TYPE OF RESEARCH:

The method of conducting research deals with research design, data collection
method, sampling method. It explained about the nature of research work to be done such as
descriptive nature of research, which is used in this study.
DESCRIPTIVE RESEARCH:

The researcher has adopted descriptive research design for the purpose of this survey.
Descriptive studies are those studies which are concerned with describing the characteristics
of a particular individual, or of a group.

TYPES OF DATA
1) Primary data
2) Secondary data

PRIMARY DATA:
First time collected data are referred to as primary data. In this research the primary
data was collected by means of a Structured Questionnaire. The questionnaire consists of
number of questions in printed form. It has both open-end closed end questions in it.

SECTION IPERSONAL DATA:


This section includes questions soliciting the respondents details such as Age,
Gender, Marital status, Education, Designation, section and Work experience.

SECTION IISCALE FOR MEASURING THE ISSUES:

It comprises of single open ended type and various close ended questions
which includes yes no type, scaling and other optional questions.

SECONDARY DATA:

Data which has already gone through the process of analysis or were used by someone
else earlier is referred to secondary data. This type of data was collected from the books,
journals, company records etc
SOURCE OF DATA:

The data has been collected from the employees NUTRO VESSELS INDO
GROUPS LTD, SALEM.

SAMPLING UNIT:
Sampling unit refers to process of defining the target population that will be sample.
Hence for the present study, data was collected by means of questionnaire from the
employees.

SAMPLE SIZE:
Sample size plays a critical role, because the generalizability of the conclusion
depends on sample size. Sample size for the present study is 120.

SAMPLING METHOD:
Sampling means the method of selecting a sample from a given universe with a view
to draw conclusions about the universe. Sample means representative of universe selected for
the study. Sampling is a process of units (e.g. People) from a population of the interest
Sampling method is divided into 2 types1) Probability Method2) Non Probability Method
The sampling method that was chosen is entirely non probabilitistic in nature. In
non probabilitistic method the researcher has adopted convenience sampling method. In this
method, the researcher select the accessible population members from which to get
information and the items selected are easy to approach or easy to measure.

PERIOD OF STUDY:
The researcher done this study from JUNE 2017 TO JULY 2017
TOOLS AND TECHNIQUES:

In this research the tools such as Simple percentage analysis, chi square, and correlation are
used for data analysis.
LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY
The individual perspective appears to be different.
Some of the respondents are hesitated to tell the truth so that it may result in wrong
statistical data.
The department has allowed the researcher to collect the data from the limited
respondents only and limited departments only
The purpose from the sample not reveals the accurate facts.
Lack of respondents interest in answering the questions, and also might not have
revealed true information.
Even though the researcher created a report respondent, some of them doubted that
the researcher has been send on behalf of the management and so they were reluctant.
Unavailable of enough time.
CHAPTER-IV

DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATIONS

TABLE 4.1:
Age

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent

27 22.3 22.5 22.5


Below 20

21-30 32 26.4 26.7 49.2

Valid 31-40 35 28.9 29.2 78.3

26 21.5 21.7 100.0


Above 40

Total 120 99.2 100.0

1 .8
Missing System

Total 121 100.0


CHART

INTERPRETATION:

The above tables shows that he age of the employee are 22.3% of the respondents are
Below 20 years, 26.4% of the respondents are 21-30 years, 28.9% of the respondents are 31-
40 years, 21.5% of the respondents are Above 40 years.
TABLE 4. 2:
GENDER OF THE RESPONDENT

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative


Percent

Male 60 49.6 50.0 50.0

60 49.6 50.0 100.0


Valid Female

Total 120 99.2 100.0

1 .8
Missing System

Total 121 100.0

CHART
INTERPRETATION:

The above table can be interpreted that the Gender of the respondent are 49.6% of the
respondent of male, 49.6% of the respondent of female.

TABLE 4.3

MARITAL STATUS OF THE RESPONDENT

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative


Percent

Married 60 49.6 50.0 50.0

60 49.6 50.0 100.0


Valid Unmarried

Total 120 99.2 100.0

1 .8
Missing System

Total 121 100.0


CHART

INTERPRETATION:

The above table can be interpreted that the marital status of the respondent are 49.6% of the
respondent of married, 49.6% of the respondent of Unmarried.
TABLE 4.4:

QUALIFICATION OF THE RESPONDENT


Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent

SSLC 15 12.4 12.5 12.5


HSC 18 14.9 15.0 27.5
30 24.8 25.0 52.5
Diploma/ITI
Valid
Degree 32 26.4 26.7 79.2
PG 25 20.7 20.8 100.0
Total 120 99.2 100.0
1 .8
Missing System

Total 121 100.0


CHART:

INTERPRETATION:

The above table can be interpreted that the Educational Qualification of the respondent are
12.4% of the respondent of SSLC, 14.9% of the respondent of HSC, 24.8% of the
respondent of Diploma/ITI and 26.4% of the respondent of Degree,20.7% of the respondent
PG.
TABLE 4.5:
SALARY OF THE RESPONDENT

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative


Percent

24 19.8 20.0 20.0


Below 10000

28 23.1 23.3 43.3


10001 to 20000

Valid 36 29.8 30.0 73.3


20001 to 30000

32 26.4 26.7 100.0


Above 30000

Total 120 99.2 100.0


1 .8
Missing System

Total 121 100.0


CHART

INTERPRETATION:

The above table can be interpreted that the Salary of the respondent are 19.8% of the
respondent of Below 10000, 23.1% of the respondent of 10001-20000, 29.8% of the
respondent of 20001-30000 and 26.4% of the respondent Above 30000.
TABLE 4.6

EXPERIENCE OF THE RESPONDENT

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative


Percent

1 to 2 years 38 31.4 31.7 31.7

2 to 3 years 50 41.3 41.7 73.3

Valid 32 26.4 26.7 100.0


Above 3years

Total 120 99.2 100.0

1 .8
Missing System

Total 121 100.0


CHART

INTERPRETATION:

The above table can be interpreted that the Experience of the respondent are 28.1% of the
respondent of 1 to 2 years, 33.1% of the respondent of 2 to 3 years, 26.4% of the
respondent of Above 3 years.
TABLE 4.7
JOP PROFILE

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative


Percent

Yes 63 52.1 52.5 52.5

Valid No 57 47.1 47.5 100.0

Total 120 99.2 100.0

1 .8
Missing System

Total 121 100.0


CHART

INTERPRETATION:

The above table can be interpreted that the Job Profile of the respondent are 52.1% of the
respondent of Yes, 47.1% of the respondent of No.
TABLE 4.8

FIND EVERY WORK

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative


Percent

Always 70 57.9 58.3 58.3

50 41.3 41.7 100.0


Valid Some times

Total 120 99.2 100.0

1 .8
Missing System

Total 121 100.0


CHART

INTERPRETATION:

The above table can be interpreted that the Find Every work of the respondent are 57.9% of
the respondent of Always, 47.1% of the respondent of Some times.
TABLE 4.9

REQUIRE THE GUIDANCE


Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative
Percent

Always 30 24.8 25.0 25.0

46 38.0 38.3 63.3


Some times
Valid
Never 44 36.4 36.7 100.0

Total 120 99.2 100.0

1 .8
Missing System

Total 121 100.0


CHART

INTERPRETATION:

The above table can be interpreted that the Require The Guidance of the respondent are
24.8% of the respondent of Always, 38.0% of the respondent of Some times,36.4% of the
respondent of Never.
TABLE 4.10

NEED TRAINING TO PERFORM

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative


Percent

Yes 30 24.8 25.0 25.0

No 50 41.3 41.7 66.7

Valid 40 33.1 33.3 100.0


Cant say

Total 120 99.2 100.0

1 .8
Missing System

Total 121 100.0


CHART

INTERPRETATION:

The above table can be interpreted that the Need Training to perform of the respondent are
24.8% of the respondent of Yes, 41.3% of the respondent of No,33.1% of the respondent of
Cant say.
TABLE 4.11

TYPE OF WORK

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative


Percent

Yes 68 56.2 56.7 56.7

No 52 43.0 43.3 100.0


Valid

Total 120 99.2 100.0

1 .8
Missing System

Total 121 100.0


CHART

INTERPRETATION:

The above table can be interpreted that the Type of work the respondent are 56.2% of the
respondent of Yes, 43.0% of the respondent of No.
TABLE 4.12

KIND OF ORGANIZATION
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative
Percent

Yes 31 25.6 25.8 25.8

no 47 38.8 39.2 65.0

Valid 42 34.7 35.0 100.0


Can`t say

Total 120 99.2 100.0


1 .8
Missing System

Total 121 100.0


CHART

INTERPRETATION:

The above table can be interpreted that the Kind of Organization of the respondent are 25.6%
of the respondent of Yes, 38.8% of the respondent of No, 34.7% of the respondent of Cant
say.
TABLE 4.13

JOB SECURITY

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative


Percent

28 23.1 23.3 23.3


Strongly Agree

Agree 39 32.2 32.5 55.8

Valid Disagree 16 13.2 13.3 69.2

37 30.6 30.8 100.0


Strongly Disagree

Total 120 99.2 100.0

1 .8
Missing System

Total 121 100.0


CHART

INTERPRETATION:

The above table can be interpreted that the Job security of the respondent are 23.1% of the
respondent of Strongly Agree, 32.2% of the respondent of Agree, 13.2% of the respondent of
Disagree,30.6% of the respondent Strongly Disagree.
TABLE 4.14
FIND WORK
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative
Percent
Always 17 14.0 14.2 14.2
Often 42 34.7 35.0 49.2

39 32.2 32.5 81.7


Valid Sometimes

Never 22 18.2 18.3 100.0

Total 120 99.2 100.0


1 .8
Missing System

Total 121 100.0


CHART

INTERPRETATION:

The above table can be interpreted that the Find Work of the respondent are 14.0% of the
respondent of Always, 34.7% of the respondent of Often, 32.2% of the respondent of
Sometimes,18.2% of the respondent Never.
TABLE 4.15
SOURCE OF KNOWLEDGE

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative


Percent

Report and journals 31 25.6 25.8 25.8

Meeting and group 38 31.4 31.7 57.5


discussion

Valid Experience of the incidence 31 25.6 25.8 83.3


sharing

Others 20 16.5 16.7 100.0

Total 120 99.2 100.0

1 .8
Missing System

Total 121 100.0


CHART

INTERPRETATION:

The above table can be interpreted that the Source of knowledge the respondent are 25.6% of
the respondent of Report and journals, 31.4% of the respondent of Meeting and group
discussion, 25.6% of the respondent of Experience of the incidence sharing,16.5% of the
respondent Others.
TABLE 4.16
DIFFERENT DEPARTMENTS

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative


Percent

Formal meeting 48 39.7 40.0 40.0

72 59.5 60.0 100.0


Valid Informal meeting/ chat

Total 120 99.2 100.0

1 .8
Missing System

Total 121 100.0


CHART

INTERPRETATION:

The above table can be interpreted that the Different Departments the respondent are 39.7%
of the respondent of Formal Meeting, 59.5% of the respondent of Informal Meeting/Chat.
TABLE 4.17
QUALITY OF WORK LIFE

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative


Percent

14 11.6 11.7 11.7


Not in existence at all

Nascent stage 34 28.1 28.3 40.0

Valid 41 33.9 34.2 74.2


Introduction stage

Growth stage 31 25.6 25.8 100.0

Total 120 99.2 100.0

1 .8
Missing System

Total 121 100.0


CHART

INTERPRETATION:

The above table can be interpreted that the Quality of work life the respondent are 11.6% of
the respondent of Not in existence at all, 28.1% of the respondent ofNaent stage, 33.9% of the
respondent of Introduction stage, 25.6% of the respondent of Growth stage.
TABLE 4.18

FOOD TESTING
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative
Percent
Yes 48 39.7 40.0 40.0
No 41 33.9 34.2 74.2
Valid 31 25.6 25.8 100.0
Can't say

Total 120 99.2 100.0


1 .8
Missing System

Total 121 100.0


CHART

INTERPRETATION:

The above table can be interpreted that the Food Testing the respondent are 39.7% of the
respondent of Yes, 33.9% of the respondent of no, 25.6% of the respondent of Cant say.
TABLE 4.19

AVAILABLE KNOWLEDGE
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative
Percent
Yes 35 28.9 29.2 29.2
No 60 49.6 50.0 79.2
Valid 25 20.7 20.8 100.0
Can't say

Total 120 99.2 100.0


1 .8
`Missing System

Total 121 100.0


CHART

INTERPRETATION:

The above table can be interpreted that the Available Knowledge the respondent are 28.9% of
the respondent of Yes, 49.6% of the respondent of No, 20.7% of the respondent of Cant say.
TABLE 4.20

ADDITIONAL PERSONAL EFFORTS

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative


Percent

16 13.2 13.3 13.3


Invariably

36 29.8 30.0 43.3


Frequently
Valid
Rarely 29 24.0 24.2 67.5

Never 39 32.2 32.5 100.0

Total 120 99.2 100.0


1 .8
Missing System

Total 121 100.0


CHART

INTERPRETATION:

The above table can be interpreted that the Additional Personal Efforts the respondent are
13.2% of the respondent of Invariably, 29.8% of the respondent of Frequently, 24.0% of the
respondent of Rarely, 32.2% of the respondent of Never.
TABLE 4.21

KNOWLEDGE LEVEL

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative


Percent

Further education and 22 18.2 18.3 18.3


training in my own time
Personal effort 30 24.8 25.0 43.3
Valid
Private research work 32 26.4 26.7 70.0
Magazines 36 29.8 30.0 100.0
Total 120 99.2 100.0
Missing System 1 .8
Total 121 100.0
CHART

INTERPRETATION:

The above table can be interpreted that the Knowledge Level the respondent are 18.2% of the
respondent of Further education and training in my own time, 24.8% of the respondent of
Personal Efforts, 26.4% of the respondent of Private research work, 29.8% of the respondent
of Magazines.
TABLE 4.22

LEARNING

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative


Percent
32 26.4 26.7 26.7
Invariably

37 30.6 30.8 57.5


Frequently
Valid
Rarely 30 24.8 25.0 82.5

Never 21 17.4 17.5 100.0

Total 120 99.2 100.0


1 .8
Missing System

Total 121 100.0


CHART

INTERPRETATION:

The above table can be interpreted that the Learning the respondent are 26.4% of the
respondent of Invariably, 30.6% of the respondent of Frequently, 24.8% of the respondent of
Rarely, 17.4% of the respondent of Never.
TABLE 4.23
BIGGEST CULTURAL BARRIERS
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative
Percent

14 11.6 11.7 11.7


I am in position attitude

In different of people toward 33 27.3 27.5 39.2


developmental process

Valid Lack of significant and 45 37.2 37.5 76.7


recognition to knowledge
sharing

Lack of open mindedness 28 23.1 23.3 100.0

Total 120 99.2 100.0


Missing System 1 .8
Total 121 100.0
CHART

INTERPRETATION:

The above table can be interpreted that the Biggest cultural barriers the respondent are 11.6%
of the respondent of I am in position attitude, 27.3% of the respondent of In different of
people toward developmental process, 37.2% of the respondent of Lack of significant and
recognition to knowledge sharing, 23.1% of the respondent of Lack of open mindedness.
TABLE 4.24

EFFECTIVE IMPLANTATION OF QWL

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative


Percent

Changing peoples 14 11.6 11.7 11.7


behaviour from knowledge
hoarding to knowledge
sharing
Lack of understanding of 18 14.9 15.0 26.7
QWL and its benefits.
Determining what kind of 19 15.7 15.8 42.5
knowledge to be managed &
making it available.
20 16.5 16.7 59.2
Valid
Justifying the use of scarce
resources for QWL

Lack of top management 21 17.4 17.5 76.7


commitment to QWL
Overcoming technological 15 12.4 12.5 89.2
limitations.
Attracting & retaining 13 10.7 10.8 100.0
talented people.
Total 120 99.2 100.0
Missing System 1 .8
Total 121 100.0
CHART

INTERPRETATION:

The above table can be interpreted that the Effective implementation of QWL the respondent
are 11.6% of the respondent of Changing peoples behaviour from knowledge hoarding to
knowledge sharing, 14.9% of the respondent of Lack of understanding of QWL and its
benefits, 15.7% of the respondent of Determining what kind of knowledge to be managed &
making it available, 16.5% of the respondent of Justifying the use of scarce resources for
QWL,17.4% of the respondent of Lack of top management commitment to QWL, 12.4% of
the respondent Overcoming technological limitations, 10.7% of the respondent of Attracting
& retaining talented people.
TEST

T-TEST

One-Sample Statistics

N Mean Std. Deviation Std. Error Mean

Age 120 2.5000 1.06904 .09759


120 1.4167 .49507 .04519
Find Every Work

One-Sample Test

Test Value = 0

t df Sig. (2-tailed) Mean 95% Confidence Interval of the


Difference Difference

Lower Upper

Age 25.617 119 .000 2.50000 2.3068 2.6932

Find Every 31.346 119 .000 1.41667 1.3272 1.5062


Work
ANOVA:

Gender
Sum of df Mean F Sig.
Squares Square
Between .075 1 .075 .296 .587
Groups
Within Groups 29.925 118 .254
Total 30.000 119

CORRELATION:

Correlations
Marital Status Find Work

1 .123
Pearson Correlation
Marital Status
Sig. (2-tailed) .180
N 120 120
.123 1
Pearson Correlation
Find Work
Sig. (2-tailed) .180
N 120 120

CHI-SQUARE:

Qualification

Observed N Expected N Residual


SSLC 15 24.0 -9.0

HSC 18 24.0 -6.0


30 24.0 6.0
Diploma/ITI

Degree 32 24.0 8.0

PG 25 24.0 1.0

Total 120

Experience

Observed N Expected N Residual

34 30.0 4.0
1 to 2 years

40 30.0 10.0
2 to 3 years

32 30.0 2.0
Above 3years

4.00 14 30.0 -16.0

Total 120

Test Statistics

Qualification Experience

9.083a 12.533b
Chi-Square

Df 4 3
.059 .006
Asymp. Sig.

a. 0 cells (0.0%) have expected frequencies less than 5. The minimum expected cell frequency
is 24.0.

b. 0 cells (0.0%) have expected frequencies less than 5. The minimum expected cell frequency
is 30.0.

CHAPTER-V

FINDINGS, SUGGESTION, CONCLUSION

FINDINGS

The employee are 22.3% of the respondents are Below 20 years, 26.4% of the
respondents are 21-30 years, 28.9% of the respondents are 31-40 years, 21.5% of the
respondents are Above 40 years.
It can be interpreted that the Gender of the respondent are 49.6% of the respondent of
male, 49.6% of the respondent of female.
It can be interpreted that the marital status of the respondent are 49.6% of the
respondent of married, 49.6% of the respondent of Unmarried.
It can be interpreted that the Educational Qualification of the respondent are 12.4%
of the respondent of SSLC, 14.9% of the respondent of HSC, 24.8% of the
respondent of Diploma/ITI and 26.4% of the respondent of Degree,20.7% of the
respondent PG.
It can be interpreted that the Salary of the respondent are 19.8% of the respondent of
Below 10000, 23.1% of the respondent of 10001-20000, 29.8% of the respondent of
20001-30000 and 26.4% of the respondent Above 30000.
It can be interpreted that the Experience of the respondent are 28.1% of the
respondent of 1 to 2 years, 33.1% of the respondent of 2 to 3 years, 26.4% of the
respondent of Above 3 years.
It can be interpreted that the Job Profile of the respondent are 52.1% of the respondent
of Yes, 47.1% of the respondent of No.
It can be interpreted that the Find Every work of the respondent are 57.9% of the
respondent of Always, 47.1% of the respondent of Some times.
It can be interpreted that the Require The Guidance of the respondent are 24.8% of
the respondent of Always, 38.0% of the respondent of Some times,36.4% of the
respondent of Never.
It can be interpreted that the Need Training to perform of the respondent are 24.8% of
the respondent of Yes, 41.3% of the respondent of No,33.1% of the respondent of
Cant say.
It can be interpreted that the Type of work the respondent are 56.2% of the respondent
of Yes, 43.0% of the respondent of No.
It can be interpreted that the Kind of Organization of the respondent are 25.6% of the
respondent of Yes, 38.8% of the respondent of No, 34.7% of the respondent of Cant
say.
It can be interpreted that the Job security of the respondent are 23.1% of the
respondent of Strongly Agree, 32.2% of the respondent of Agree, 13.2% of the
respondent of Disagree,30.6% of the respondent Strongly Disagree.
It can be interpreted that the Find Work of the respondent are 14.0% of the respondent
of Always, 34.7% of the respondent of Often, 32.2% of the respondent of
Sometimes,18.2% of the respondent Never.
It can be interpreted that the Source of knowledge the respondent are 25.6% of the
respondent of Report and journals, 31.4% of the respondent of Meeting and group
discussion, 25.6% of the respondent of Experience of the incidence sharing,16.5% of
the respondent Others.
It can be interpreted that the Different Departments the respondent are 39.7% of the
respondent of Formal Meeting, 59.5% of the respondent of Informal Meeting/Chat.
It can be interpreted that the Quality of work life the respondent are 11.6% of the
respondent of Not in existence at all, 28.1% of the respondent ofNaent stage, 33.9%
of the respondent of Introduction stage, 25.6% of the respondent of Growth stage.
It can be interpreted that the Food Testing the respondent are 39.7% of the
respondent of Yes, 33.9% of the respondent of no, 25.6% of the respondent of Cant
say.
It can be interpreted that the Available Knowledge the respondent are 28.9% of the
respondent of Yes, 49.6% of the respondent of No, 20.7% of the respondent of Cant
say.
It can be interpreted that the Additional Personal Efforts the respondent are 13.2% of
the respondent of Invariably, 29.8% of the respondent of Frequently, 24.0% of the
respondent of Rarely, 32.2% of the respondent of Never.
It can be interpreted that the Knowledge Level the respondent are 18.2% of the
respondent of Further education and training in my own time, 24.8% of the
respondent of Personal Efforts, 26.4% of the respondent of Private research work,
29.8% of the respondent of Magazines.
It can be interpreted that the Learning the respondent are 26.4% of the respondent of
Invariably, 30.6% of the respondent of Frequently, 24.8% of the respondent of Rarely,
17.4% of the respondent of Never.
It can be interpreted that the Biggest cultural barriers the respondent are 11.6% of the
respondent of I am in position attitude, 27.3% of the respondent of In different of
people toward developmental process, 37.2% of the respondent of Lack of significant
and recognition to knowledge sharing, 23.1% of the respondent of Lack of open
mindedness.
It can be interpreted that the Effective implementation of QWL the respondent are
11.6% of the respondent of Changing peoples behaviour from knowledge hoarding
to knowledge sharing, 14.9% of the respondent of Lack of understanding of QWL and
its benefits, 15.7% of the respondent of Determining what kind of knowledge to be
managed & making it available, 16.5% of the respondent of Justifying the use of
scarce resources for QWL,17.4% of the respondent of Lack of top management
commitment to QWL, 12.4% of the respondent Overcoming technological limitations,
10.7% of the respondent of Attracting & retaining talented people.
SUGGESTION

Job satisfactions are found to be good and it can improve by providing the satisfactory
seating arrangement.
The organization can provide separate computers on each table so that they can
reduce paper works and increase speed and accuracy in maintenance and retrieval of
records
The organization can provide regular medical checkup for improving the medical
facilities.
The organization can provide bus/cab facilities from quarters to office.
The organization can provide effective training for efficient performance of
employees.
The Organization can appoint special computer trainee to meet out the present
computerization of the department.
Separate vigilance checks can be there to ensure punctuality of all employees.
The Organization can improve the infrastructure for efficient working of individuals
The Organization can review the promotion policies
The Organization can concentrate on transfer policies especially for North Indian
employees.

CONCLUSION

Every organization has to satisfy some of the basic needs and demands of its employees
because the satisfied and motivated employees are the source of achieving the organizational
goals and objectives. In order to use the maximum potential of the human resource, the
organization has to provide them with the best quality of their working life. Therefore every
organization needs to update and improve the quality of work life of the employees. From the
study it is clear that the overall quality of work life of employees is good in the office of
commissioner of central excise and service tax department of Chennai. This research
highlights some of the small gaps in employees satisfaction towards the quality of work life.
REFERENCE

Books:

1. K. Aswathappa (1997),Human Resources and Personnel ManagementTata McGraw-Hill


Publishing Company Limited, New Delhi-110 0012. C.R. Kothari (2001) Research
Methodology of WishwaPrakashan publishing, Chennai -17

Websites

www.citehr.edu

www.mbaguys.net

www.centralexciseChennai.gov.in

A STUDY ON QUALITY OF WORKLIFE IN NUTRO VESSELS INDO GROUP


LIMITED AT SALEM

QUESTIONARIES

1. Name of the employee


2. Age
A. Below 20
B. 21 to 30
C. 31 to 40
D. Abov40
3. Gender
A. Male
B. Female
4. Marital Status
A. Married
B. Unmarried
5. Qualification
A. SSLC
B. HSC
C. Diploma/ITI
D. Degree
E. PG
6. Salary
A. Below 10000
B. 10001 to 20000
C. 20001 to 30000
D. Above 30000

7. Experience
A. 1 to 2 years
B. 2 to 3 years
C. Above 3 years
8. Do you feel when you are doing the job according to your job profile?
A. Yes
B. No

9. Do you finish every work assigned to you within the time limit?
A. Always
B. Some times

10. Do you require the guidance from your superior?


A. Always
B. Some times
C. Never

11. Do you feel you need training to perform your work?


A. Yes
B. No
C. Cant say

12. Do you feel the type of work you were performing at the time of your joining and
today are the same?
A. Yes
B. No

13. Knowledge is critical for your kind of organization?


A. Yes
B. No
C. Cant say

14. There is job security


A. Strongly agree
B. Agree
C. Disagree
D. Strongly Disagree

15. How often do you find work stressful?


A. Always
B. Often
C. Sometimes
D. Never

16. What are the sources of knowledge in this organization?


A. Report and journals
B. Meeting and group discussion
C. Experience of the incidence sharing
D. Others

17. How knowledge is shared among different departments of this organization?


A. Formal meeting
B. Informal meeting/ chat

18. What is the current status of Quality of work life in your company?
A. Not in existence at all
B. Nascent stage
C. Introduction stage
D. Growth stage

19. Does food testing a part in sharing knowledge in this organization?


A. Yes
B. No
C. Cant say

20. Is available knowledge exploited to an adequate extent in this organization?


A. Yes
B. No
C. Cant say
21. Do you undertake additional personal efforts to enhance your knowledge level and
improve your competency?
A. Invariably
B. Frequently
C. Rarely
D. Never

22. What additional personal efforts do you undertake to enhance your knowledge level
improve your competency?
A. Further education and training in my own time
B. Personal effort
C. Private research work
D. Magazines
23. Do you share your learning with your colleagues?
A. Invariably
B. Frequently
C. Rarely
D. Never

24. Which one is the biggest cultural barrier in Quality of work life in company?
A. I am in position attitude
B. In different of people toward developmental process
C. Lack of significant and recognition to knowledge sharing
D. Lack of open mindedness

25. What is the biggest hurdle in effective implementation of QWL in company

A. Changing peoples behaviour from knowledge hoarding to knowledge sharing


B. Lack of understanding of QWL and its benefits.
C. Determining what kind of knowledge to be managed & making it available.
D. Justifying the use of scarce resources for QWL
E. Lack of top management commitment to QWL
F. Overcoming technological limitations.
G. Attracting & retaining talented people.