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Verb

The verb is a part of speech that indicates an action or a state of being. It tells when the action
happens.
There are three main verb tenses: present, past, and future.

Present Tense
The present tense of the verb indicates that an action is present, and is happing now relative to
the speaker or writer.

The present tense uses the verb's base form (write, work), or, for third-person singular subjects,
the base form plus an -s ending (he writes, she works).

When the subject is singular, it takes a singular form of the verb in the present tense (-s ending).
For example: A student writes a speech for his presentation.

However, when the subject is plural, it takes a plural form of the verb in the present tense (base
form). For example: The students prepare for their group presentation.
Generally, it is used to describe actions that are factual or habitual things that occur in the present
but are not necessarily happening right now. For example: "It rains a lot in Manila" is a kind of
timeless statement.
The present tense is used to describe events that are scheduled (by nature or by people):

Examples: High tide is at 3:15 p.m.


The new singing contest starts at 6:15 p.m.

The present tense can be used to suggest the past with what is sometimes called the fictional (or
historic) present:
Examples: Dr. Jose Rizal believes that the youth are the hopes of the nation.
The Spaniards, Americans, and Japanese tyrants oppress the Filipinos.
With verbs of communicating, the present tense can also suggest a past action:

Example: Dennver tells me that he took his brother to the dentist.

Most oddly, the present tense can convey a sense of the future, especially with verbs such as
arrive, come, and leave that suggest a kind of plan or schedule:
Example: The train from Blumentritt arrives this afternoon at two o'clock.
Present tense states habitual activities that are frequently signaled by time expressions such as
the following:
The following are examples of pronouns both in singular and plural number with their corresponding
verb in the present tense.

Past Tense
The past tense of the verb indicates that an action is in the past relative to the speaker or writer.

It is used to talk about a completed action in the past.

It is used: o when the time period has finished:

Example: We went to General Santos City few months ago.


when the time period is definite:

Example: They visited their grandmother last week.


with preposition for followed by a time expression, when the action is finished:

Example: My brother worked with that company for six months.


To change the verb in the past tense, you have to determine first whether the verb is regular or
irregular verb.

Regular verbs are changed into past tense by adding d or ed ending.


Examples: talk-talked dance-danced roar-roared

Irregular verbs, on the other hand, are changed into past tense by changing their spelling.
Examples: sing-sang give-gave catch-caught
The following are examples of pronouns both in singular and plural number with their corresponding verb in
the past tense

The following are examples of pronouns both in singular and plural number with their
corresponding regular verb in the past tense.
The following are examples of pronouns both in singular and plural number with their
corresponding irregular verb in the past tense.

Past tense states completely done activities that are frequently signaled by time expressions such
as the following:

All forms of the past tense of the verb can be used with nouns or pronouns whether they are
singular or plural.

Future Tense
The future tense of the verb indicates that an action is in the future relative to the speaker or
writer.

It is used to talk about an action that is about to happen in the future.

Unlike present tense and past tense, the future tense of the verb has no ending forms such as d
or ed endings (for past tense) or -s ending (for present tense).

Instead, the future tense is formed by using the helping verbs will or shall with the base form of
the verb. For example, will + leave = will leave, shall + overcome = shall overcome.

Examples:
1. She will leave soon.
2. We shall overcome this problem.

The future tense is also formed with the use be verb (is, are, am) with the verb "going" plus the
preposition to plus the base form of the verb: Examples:
1. He is going to faint.
2. I am going to illustrate the beautiful scenic spot in my province.

The future tense of the verb uses time expressions like next week, the other day, later, tomorrow,
soon, in the next few days, etc.
Task 2. Are You Tensed about Tenses?
Choose the correct form of the verb inside the parentheses by encircling the letter of your answer. Then,
identify what tense of the verb is used in each sentence. On the blank before each number, write PR if it is
present tense, PA if it is past tense, and F if it is future tense.
_____1. She always _____ (A. win B. wins C. won D. winning) the essay
writing competition.
_____2. My bestfriend and her mother _____ (A. come B. comes C. came
D. will come) to see me this coming summer.
_____3. It _____ (A. rain B. rains C. rained D. raining) everytime we hold a
program.
_____4. We always _____ (A. pray B. prays C. prayed D. praying) for
guidance and protector.
_____5. His uncle _____ (A. treat B. treats C. treated D. will treat) her to a
buffet restaurant later.
_____6. My classmates _____ (A. keep B. keeps C. kept D. keeping) quiet
yesterday.
_____7. This milk _____ (A. tastes B. taste C. tasted D. tasting) better than
the other brand.
_____8. The Philippines, located in Southeast Asia, (A. is B. are C. will be
D. was) a tropical country.
_____9. I (A. is B. am C. are D. was) going to visit Tagaytay next week.
_____10. Marco and Janz (A. give B. gives C. are going to give D. gave) their
gift to their Mother last night.