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Common Collocations

On this page you can find a few short lists of common collocations to give you
more of an idea about them. Many good learner's dictionaries show collocations
associated with specific words. There are also dictionaries of collocations,
though these are more difficult to find.

Verb collocations

have do make

have a bath do business make a difference


have a drink do nothing make a mess
have a good time do someone a favour make a mistake
have a haircut do the cooking make a noise
have a holiday do the housework make an effort
have a problem do the shopping make furniture
have a relationship do the washing up make money
have a rest do your best make progress
have lunch do your hair make room
have sympathy do your homework make trouble

take break catch

take a break break a habit catch a ball


take a chance break a leg catch a bus
take a look break a promise catch a chill
take a rest break a record catch a cold
take a seat break a window catch a thief
take a taxi break someone's heart catch fire
take an exam break the ice catch sight of
take notes break the law catch someone's attention
take someone's place break the news to someone catch someone's eye
take someone's temperature break the rules catch the flu
pay save keep

pay a fine save electricity keep a diary


pay attention save energy keep a promise
pay by credit card save money keep a secret
pay cash save one's strength keep an appointment
pay interest save someone a seat keep calm
pay someone a compliment save someone's life keep control
pay someone a visit save something to a disk keep in touch
pay the bill save space keep quiet
pay the price save time keep someone's place
pay your respects save yourself the trouble keep the change

come go get

come close go abroad get a job


come complete with go astray get a shock
come direct go bad get angry
come early go bald get divorced
come first go bankrupt get drunk
come into view go blind get frightened
come last go crazy get home
come late go dark get lost
come on time go deaf get married
come prepared go fishing get nowhere
come right back go mad get permission
come second go missing get pregnant
come to a compromise go on foot get ready
come to a decision go online get started
come to an agreement go out of business get the impression
come to an end go overseas get the message
come to a standstill go quiet get the sack
come to terms with go sailing get upset
come to a total of go to war get wet
come under attack go yellow get worried

Miscellaneous collocations
Time Business English Classifiers

bang on time annual turnover a ball of string


dead on time bear in mind
early 12th century break off negotiations a bar of chocolate
free time cease trading
from dawn till dusk chair a meeting a bottle of water
great deal of time close a deal
late 20th century close a meeting a bunch of carrots
make time for come to the point
next few days dismiss an offer a cube of sugar
past few weeks draw a conclusion
right on time draw your attention to a pack of cards
run out of time launch a new product
save time lay off staff a pad of paper
spare time go bankrupt
spend some time go into partnership
take your time make a loss
tell someone the time make a profit
time goes by market forces
time passes sales figures
waste time take on staff

Cohesive Devices

A variety of useful English Conjunctions exists, which complete this list of


the most used Cohesive Devices. Together, they can help to express a
cohesive view and easy understandable and readable texts.

Definition
Words that link two parts of a sentence are called conjunctions (see "to
conjoin"). The most common ones are 'and', 'or' and 'but'. There are three
basic types of conjunctions:

coordinating conjuncion

used to connect two independent clauses


subordinating conjunctions
used to establish the relationship between the dependent clause and the rest
of the sentence

correlative conjunctions
used to join various sentence elements which are grammatically equal

Conjunctions

Coordinating Conjunctions
Comes usually in the middle of a sentence, and a comma is used before the
conjunction (unless both clauses are very short). They join individual words,
phrases, and independent clauses.
Whereas coordinating conjunctions join parts of a 'sentence', the purpose of
transitional words and phrases usually is to join two 'sentences'.
Examples:
We can draw lessons from the past, but we cannot live in it. [Lyndon B.
Johnson]
The purpose of most computer languages is to lengthen your resume by a
word and a comma. [Larry Wall]

And, but, for, nor, or, so, and yet are the seven coordinating
conjunctions. To remember them, the acronym FANBOYS can be used.

1. F = for
2. A = and
3. N = nor
4. B = but
5. O = or
6. Y = yet
7. S = so
Subordinating Conjunctions
Also called subordinators, introduce a dependent clause. These adverbs
that act like conjunctions are placed at the front of the clause - and a comma
is needed at the end of the adverbial phrase when it precedes the main
clause.
Examples:
If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a
nail. [Abraham Maslow]
Some people make headlines while others make history. [Philip Elmer-
DeWitt]
there are 9 types of it :
Conjunctions Concession
though
although
even though
while
Conjunctions Condition
if
only if
unless
until
provided that
assuming that
even if
in case (that)
lest
Conjunctions Comparison
than
rather than
whether
as much as
whereas
Conjunctions Time
after
as long as
as soon as
before
by the time
now that
once
since
till
until
when
whenever
while

Conjunctions Reason
because
since
so that
in order (that)
why
Relative Adjective
that
what
whatever
which
whichever

Relative Pronoun
who
whoever
whom
whomever
whose

Conjunctions Manner
how
as though
as if
Conjunctions Place
where
wherever

Correlative Conjunctions
They are always used in pairs and denote equality; and show the
relationship between ideas expressed in different parts of a sentence - and
thus make the joining tighter and more emphatic. When joining singular and
plural subjects, the subject closest to the verb determines whether the verb is
singular or plural.

as . . . as
just as . . . so
both . . . and
hardly . . . when
scarcely . . . when
either . . . or
neither . . . nor

if . . . then
not . . . but
what with . . . and
whether . . . or
not only . . . but also
no sooner . . . than
rather . . . than

Conjunctive Adverbs
They are often used as a linking device between ideas. They show logical
relationships expressed in clauses, sentences or paragraphs.
Conjunctive adverbs are very emphatic, so they should be used sparingly.

Similar to And
also
besides
furthermore
likewise
moreover
Similar to But
however
nevertheless
nonetheless
still
conversely
instead
otherwise
rather
Similar to So
accordingly
consequently
hence
meanwhile
then
therefore
thus