Anda di halaman 1dari 35

MALAYSIAN MS 1064: PART 1:2001

STANDARD

GUIDE TO MODULAR COORDINATION IN


BUILDINGS :
PART 1 : GENERAL PRINCIPLES
(FIRST REVISION)

ICS : 25.060.10
Descriptors : modular coordination, dimension coordination, modules, reference systems,
submodular increment, horizontal coordination dimension, vertical coordinating
dimension, joints

Copyright

DEPARTMENT OF STANDARDS MALAYSIA


DEVELOPMENT OF MALAYSIAN STANDARDS
The Department of Standards Malaysia (DSM) is the national standardisation and
accreditation body.

The main function of the Department is to foster and promote standards, standardisation and
accreditation as a means of advancing the national economy, promoting industrial efficiency
and development, benefiting the health and safety of the public, protecting the consumers,
facilitating domestic and international trade and furthering international cooperation in relation
to standards and standardisation.

Malaysian Standards are developed through consensus by committees which comprise of


balanced representation of producers, users, consumers and others with relevant interests,
as may be appropriate to the subject in hand. These standards where appropriate are
adoption of international standards. Approval of a standard as a Malaysian Standard is
governed by the Standards of Malaysia Act 1996 (Act 549). Malaysian Standards are
reviewed periodically. The use of Malaysian Standards is voluntary except in so far as they
are made mandatory by regulatory authorities by means of regulations, local by-laws or any
other similar ways.

The Department of Standards appoints SIRIM Berhad as the agent to develop Malaysian
Standards. The Department also appoints SIRIM Berhad as the agent for distribution and
sale of Malaysian Standards.

For further information on Malaysian Standards, please contact:

Department of Standards Malaysia OR SIRIM Berhad


Tingkat 21, Wisma MPSA 1, Persiaran Dato' Menteri
Persiaran Perbandaran P.O. Box 7035, Section 2
40675 Shah Alam 40911 Shah Alam
Selangor D.E. Selangor D.E.

Tel: 60 3 5519 8033 Tel: 60 3 5544 6000


Fax: 60 3 5519 2497 Fax: 60 3 5510 8095

http://www.dsm.gov.my http://www.sirim.my

Email:central@dsm.gov.my
MS 1064: PART 1: 2001

CONTENTS

Page

Committee representation ... iii

Foreword .... iv

SECTION 1 : GENERAL

1.0 Introduction . 1
1.1 Scope . 1
1.2 Field of application . 2
1.3 Referenced documents ... 2
1.4 Definitions .. 2
1.5 Principles and rules .. 10
1.6 Basic module .... 16
1.7 Submodular increments . 16

SECTION 2 : HORIZONTAL COORDINATING DIMENSIONS

2.1 Preferred multimodular sizes for horizontal dimensions .. 18


2.2 Multimodules for horizontal coordinating dimensions ... 21
2.3 Reference lines of horizontal controlling coordinating dimensions . 21

SECTION 3 : VERTICAL COORDINATING DIMENSIONS

3.1 Modular floor plane for vertical dimensions ... 23

SECTION 4 : JOINTS

4.1 Fundamental principles for design of joints in buildings .. 26

Table 1 Series of preferred multimodular sizes for horizontal dimensions .. 19

Figures
1 Example of a modular space grid .... 13
2 Examples of superimposed modular grids . 14
3 Interruption of modular grids ..... 14
4 Example of displacement of modular grids ..... 15
5 Example of a building component located in its allotted modular space ... 15
6 Example of modular planes in boundary position ... 15
7 Example of modular planes in axial position .. 16
8 Example of specifications for preferred modular sizes in a floor plan of a building 20

i
MS 1064: PART 1:2001

9 Example of specification for preferred modular sizes for partitioning of floor


spaces in building 20
10 Controlling dimension between boundary planes ... 21
11 Controlling dimensions between axial planes . 21
12 Controlling dimensions between two modular planes spaced at 300 mm
(3M) apart and in axial position (by displacement of grids) . 22
13 Illustration of floor levels 23
14 Modular floor plane coinciding with upper surface of floor covering (level A) 24
15 Modular floor plane coinciding with upper surface of rough floor (level B) .. 24
16 Modular floor plane coinciding with upper surface of structural floor (level C) ... 25

ii
MS 1064: PART 1: 2001

Committee representation

The Building and Civil Engineering Industry Standards Committee (ISC D) under whose supervision this Malaysian
Standard was developed, comprises representatives from the following organisations:

Association of Consulting Engineers Malaysia


Chartered Institute of Buildings Malaysia
Construction Industry Development Board Malaysia
Department of Standards Malaysia
Jabatan Bekalan Elektrik dan Gas
Jabatan Bomba dan Penyelamat Malaysia
Master Builders Association Malaysia
Ministry of Housing and Local Government (Housing Department)
Ministry of Works (Public Works Department)
Pertubuhan Akitek Malaysia
The Institution of Engineers, Malaysia
Universiti Teknologi Malaysia

The Technical Committee on Modular Coordination which developed this standard was managed by the Construction
Industry Development Board Malaysia (CIDB) in its capacity as an authorised Standards-Writing Organisation and
comprises of the following organisations:

Association of Consulting Engineers Malaysia

Construction Industry Development Board Malaysia (Secretariat)

Federation of Malaysian Manufacturers

International Islamic University Malaysia

Institution of Surveyors Malaysia

Jabatan Kerja Raya Malaysia

Jabatan Perumahan Negara

Malaysian Timber Industry Board

Master Builders Association Malaysia

Pertubuhan Akitek Malaysia

SIRIM Berhad

The Institution of Engineers, Malaysia

Universiti Putra Malaysia

Universiti Teknologi MARA

iii
MS 1064: PART 1:2001

FOREWORD

This Malaysian Standard was developed by the Technical Committee on Modular


Coordination under the authority of the Building and Civil Engineering Industry Standards
Committee. Development of this standard was carried out by the Construction Industry
Development Board Malaysia (CIDB) which is the Standards-Writing Organisation (SWO)
appointed by SIRIM Berhad to develop standards for the construction industry.

This Malaysian Standard is the first revision of the following standards:

- MS 1064 : Part 1 : 1988, Guide to modular coordination in buildings : Part 1 : Basic


module
- MS 1064 : Part 2 : 1988, Guide to modular coordination in buildings : Part 2 : Terminology
and graphics conventions
- MS 1064 : Part 3 : 1988, Guide to modular coordination in buildings : Part 3 : Principles
and rules
- MS 1064: Part 4 : 1988, Guide to modular coordination in buildings : Part 4 : Submodular
increments
- MS 1064 : Part 5 : 1988, Guide to modular coordination in buildings : Part 5 : Series of
preferred multimodular sizes for horizontal dimensions
- MS 1064 : Part 6 : 1988, Guide to modular coordination in buildings : Part 6 :
Multimodules for horizontal coordinating dimensions
- MS 1064 : Part 7 : 1988, Guide to modular coordination in buildings : Part 7 : Modular
floor plane for vertical dimensions
- MS 1064 : Part 11 : 1988, Guide to modular coordination in buildings : Part 11 :
Reference line of horizontal controlling coordinating dimensions
- MS 1064 : Part 14 : 1988, Guide to modular coordination in buildings: Part 14 :
Fundamental principles for design of joints in buildings.

MS 1064 consists of the following parts under the general title, Guide to modular
coordination in buildings :

Part 1 : General principles


Part 2 : Storey heights and room heights
Part 3 : Coordinating sizes and preferred sizes for stairs and stair openings
Part 4 : Coordinating sizes and preferred sizes for doorsets
Part 5 : Coordinating sizes and preferred sizes for windowsets
Part 6 : Coordinating sizes and preferred sizes for rigid flat sheets
Part 7 : Coordinating sizes and preferred sizes for tiles
Part 8 : Coordinating sizes and preferred sizes for masonry bricks and blocks
Part 9 : Coordinating sizes and preferred sizes for cabinets
Part 10 : Coordinating sizes and preferred sizes for reinforced concrete components

This Malaysian Standard cancels and replaces MS 1064 : Part 1 : 1988, MS 1064 : Part 2 :
1988, MS 1064 : Part 3 : 1988, MS 1064 : Part 4 : 1988, MS 1064 : Part 5 : 1988, MS 1064 :
Part 6 : 1988, MS 106 4 : Part 7 : 1988, MS 1064 : Part 11 : 1988 and MS 1064 : Part 14 :
1988.

Compliance with a Malaysian Standard does not of itself confer immunity from legal
obligations.

iv
MS 1064: PART 1: 2001

GUIDE TO MODULAR COORDINATION IN BUILDINGS :


PART 1 : GENERAL PRINCIPLES
(FIRST REVISION)

SECTION 1 : GENERAL

1.0 Introduction

The programme for change to the metric system since 1972 has faced much difficulty due to
the complexity and fragmented nature of the building industry itself. A coherent system of
coordinating dimensions in the building process is crucially needed to facilitate the
communication at all levels from the designers to the manufacturers in the building trade.

The introduction of modular coordination in building will constitute a positive step to


streamline the industry towards proper metrication in building planning, design, construction,
assembly and manufacturing of building materials and components.

Thus the aim of this Malaysian Standard is to provide a practical approach towards achieving
the following objectives:

a) Facilitates cooperation between building designers, manufacturers, distributors,


contractors and authorities.

b) In the design work, enables buildings to be so dimensioned that they can be erected with
standard components without undue restriction on freedom of design.

c) Permits a flexible type of standardisation, which encourages the use of a limited number
of standardised building components for the construction of different types of buildings.

d) Optimises the number of standard sizes of building components.

e) Encourages as far as possible the interchangeability of components, whatever material,


form or method of manufacture.

f) Simplifies site operations by rationalising setting out, positioning and assembly of building
components.

g) Ensures dimensional coordination between installation (equipment, storage units, other


fitted furniture, etc.) as well as with the rest of the building.

1.1 Scope

The scope of this Malaysian Standard is as follows:


1.1.1 To specify the aims of modular coordination and states the general principles and
rules to be applied in determining the dimensions of buildings and the positioning and
dimensioning of component, equipment and assemblies.

1
MS 1064: PART 1:2001

1.1.2 To establish the value of the basic module for use in modular coordination of
buildings. It applies to the design and construction of buildings of all types.

1.1.3 To establish the value of submodular increments for use in modular coordination of
buildings.

1.1.4 To establish the values of multimodules for horizontal coordinating dimensions for
use in modular coordination of buildings.

1.1.5 To specify series of preferred multimodular sizes for horizontal dimensions in


buildings and gives guidance for their use.

1.1.6 To define three positions of the modular floor plane as reference plane for vertical
modular dimensions in building design and give rules for the position of the floor in relation to
this plane.

1.1.7 To fix the position of the reference lines of horizontal controlling coordinating
dimensions.

1.1.8 To outline some basic principles for the design of joints in buildings.

1.2 Field of application


Modular coordination applies to the design of buildings of all types, to the design and the
production of building components of all types and to the construction of buildings.

1.3 Referenced documents


The following referenced documents contain provisions which, through reference in this text,
constitute provisions of this Malaysian Standards. For dated references, where there are
subsequent amendments to, or revisions of, any of these publications do not apply. However,
parties to agreements based on this Malaysian Standard are encouraged to investigate the
possibility of applying the most recent editions of the referenced documents. For undated
references, the latest edition of the publication referred to applies.

ISO 1803, Building construction Tolerances for building Vocabulary.

1.4 Definitions
For the purposes of this Malaysian Standard, the following definitions and those given in ISO
1803 shall apply.

1.4.1 Terminology

1.4.1.1 General

a) Dimension

A distance (e.g. between two points, lines or planes).

b) Size

The magnitude of a dimension in terms of a defined unit.


2
MS 1064: PART 1: 2001

c) Preferred size

A size chosen in advance of others for specific purposes.

d) Length

One of two horizontal dimensions, normally the greater.

e) Width

One of two horizontal dimensions, normally the lesser.

f) Height

The vertical dimension above a horizontal reference line.

g) Depth

The vertical dimension below a horizontal reference level.

h) Thickness

A dimension in any plane when its size is small compared to that of the other
dimensions.

1.4.1.2 Coordination

a) Dimension coordination

The application or a range of related dimensions to the sizing of building components


and assemblies and the buildings incorporating them.

b) Modular coordination

Dimensional coordination using the international basic module, multimodules, sub-


modules and a modular reference system.

1.4.1.3 Modules

a) Module

A convenient unit of size which is used as an increment or coefficient in dimensional


coordination.

b) Basic module

The fundamental module used in modular coordination, the size of which is selected
for general application to building and components. The value of the basic module
has been chosen as 100 mm for maximum flexibility and convenience. The symbol
for the basic module is M.

c) Multimodule

A module whose size of an agreed multiple of 100 mm.

3
MS 1064: PART 1:2001

d) Sub-module

A module whose size of an agreed subdivision of 100 mm.

e) Submodular increment

An increment size of the value of which of a selected fraction of the basic module.

f) Infra-module

A size smaller than basic module.

g) Modular

A descriptive term that indicates the use or application of the basic module (100mm)
or a multiple thereof.

1.4.1.4 Building reference system

a) Reference system

A system of points, lines and planes to which sizes and positions building component
or assembly may be related.

b) Reference points

A point of a reference system.

c) Reference line

A line of a reference system.

d) Reference plane

A plane of a reference system.

e) Reference grid

A network of reference lines in one plane, generally rectangular.

f) Grid line

A line in a reference grid.

g) Structural grid

A planning grid for locating structure.

h) Space grid

A three-dimensional network of reference lines, generally rectangular.

4
MS 1064: PART 1: 2001

i) Zone

A space between reference planes within or in relation to which building components


is arranged. The space may be left unfilled.

j) Neutral zone

A zone which interrupts the regular increments of a reference system.

k) Modular reference system

A reference system in which the distance between consecutive parallel planes or


lines is the international basic module or a multiple thereof.

l) Modular point

A point of a modular reference system.

m) Modular line

A line of a modular reference system.

n) Modular plane

A plane of a modular reference system.

o) Modular grid

A reference grid in which the distance between consecutive parallel lines is the
international basic module or a multiple thereof.

p) Modular grid line

A line in a modular grid.

q) Modular planning grid

A planning grid in which the distance between consecutive parallel lines is the
international basic module or a multiple thereof.

r) Modular structural grid

A structural grid in which the distance between consecutive parallel lines is the
international basic module or a multiple thereof.

s) Modular space grid

A space grid in which the distance between consecutive parallel lines is the
international basic module or a multiple thereof.

t) Modular zone

A zone between modular planes.

5
MS 1064: PART 1:2001

u) Modular space

A space bounded by modular planes.

v) Modular axis

A line in modular grid, which defines the position in plan of a main load-bearing
element (for example wall, row of columns).

w) Modular dimension

A dimension between modular planes.

x) Modular size

The size of a modular dimension.

y) Modular floor plane

Horizontal modular planes continuous over the whole of each storey of a building and
coinciding with the upper surface of structural floor.

1.4.1.5 Controlling reference system

a) Controlling plane

A plane in a planning grid by reference to which the theoretical positions of structural


elements are determined.

b) Controlling line

A line representing a key reference plane.

c) Controlling zone

A zone between key reference planes, provided for a floor, roof, load-bearing wall or
column.

d) Controlling dimension

A dimension between key reference planes.

e) Floor-to-floor height

The height between the upper key reference plane of one floor and the upper key
reference plane of the floor immediately above.

f) Floor-to-ceiling height

The height between the upper key reference plane of one floor and the lower key
reference plane of the floor immediately above.

6
MS 1064: PART 1: 2001

g) Floor-to-roof height

The height between the upper key reference plane of one floor and the upper key
reference plane of the roof immediately above.

1.4.1.6 Component reference system

a) Coordinating plane

A plane by reference to which a building component or assembly is coordinated with


another.

b) Coordinating space

A space bounded by coordinating planes, allocated to a building component or


assembly, including allowance for joints and tolerances.

c) Coordinating dimension

i) A dimension of a coordinating space.


ii) A dimension which is common to two or more building components to permit
their assembly.

d) Coordinating size

The size of a coordinating dimension.

1.4.1.7 Building component sizing

a) Building material

Matter from which a building is made.

b) Building section

Building material formed to a definite cross-section but of unspecified length.

c) Building component

Building material formed as a distinct unit.

d) Building element

A part of a building or structure having its own functional identity, such as a footing, a
floor, a roof, a wall or a column.

e) Assembly

An aggregate of building component used together.

f) Profile

The outline of faces of a building component or section.

7
MS 1064: PART 1:2001

g) Work size

A size of a building component specified for its manufacture, to which its actual size
should conform within specified permissible deviations.

h) Nominal size

Size of a component used in descriptions and catalogues to designate its format.

i) Technical size

A size governed by important economic considerations. It may be modular only


coincidentally.

j) Limits of size

The extreme permissible manufacturing sizes, between which the actual size should
lie.

k) Maximum limit of size

The upper limit of size.

l) Minimum limit of size

The lower limit of size.

m) Tolerance

The difference between the limits within a size of position should lie.

n) Actual size.

A size found by measurement.

o) Manufacturing size

The difference between a size or position (actual limit, etc) and a specified size or
position.

1.4.2 Graphic convention

Terms Draughting conventions

1.4.2.1 Modular reference plane

1.4.2.2 Sequential modular reference


plane

8
MS 1064: PART 1: 2001

Terms Draughting conventions

1.4.2.3 Modular axial plane

1.4.2.4 Key modular reference plane

1.4.2.5 Modular zone

1.4.2.6 Non-modular zone (neutral


zone, technical coordination
space)

1.4.2.7 Modular coordinating dimension

1.4.2.8 Other general dimension


(Work or technical dimensions)

1.4.2.9 Running dimension

1.4.2.10 Small dimension

1.4.2.11 Non-modular axial plane

1.4.2.12 Hidden line

9
MS 1064: PART 1:2001

Terms Draughting conventions

1.4.2.13 Break in dimension line

1.4.2.14 Break in continuity

1.4.2.15 Other lines

1.5 Principles and rules

1.5.1 Basis of modular coordination

Modular coordination is essentially based on:

a) the basic module;

b) standardised multimodules;

c) a reference system to define coordinating spaces and zones for building elements

and for the components which form them;

d) rules for locating building element within the reference system;

e) rules for sizing building component in order to determine their work sizes; and

f) rules for defining preferred sizes for building components and coordinating
dimensions for buildings.

1.5.2 Modules

1.5.2.1 Basic module

The basic module is the fundamental unit of size in modular coordination.

Multiples of the basic module form the modular sizes of building components, of the parts of
building they form and of buildings themselves.

10
MS 1064: PART 1: 2001

1.5.2.2 Multimodules

Multimodules are standardised selected whole multiples of the basic module. Different
multimodules will suit particular applications. However, if modular coordination is to be
achieved, the values of multimodules should not be chosen arbitrarily and only standardised
multimodules (see Section 2) shall be used.

By using multimodules, it is possible to achieve a substantial reduction in the number of


modular sizes, particularly for component having at least one dimension equal to one of the
dimentions of the functional element of which they are a part.

A further reduction in the number of modular sizes may be achieved by means of general
series of multimodular sizes based on selected multimodules.

1.5.2.3 Submodular increments

Submodular increments are selected fractions of the basic module and are used when there
is a need for an increment smaller than the basic module.

By using submodular increments, it is possible to achieve modular coordination both for


components needing smaller increments than 1M and for component with one or more
dimensions smaller than 1M.

In order to produce a solution appropriate to a project as a whole, submodular increments


may also be used for determining the displacement of different modular grids.

However, submodular increments should not be for determining the distance between
modular reference planes of a modular space grid.

1.5.3 Coordination of non-modular sizes

It will not always be possible or economical to use modular coordination totally, and the use of
non-modular sizes will sometimes have to be envisaged. In particular, the thickness of many
building components and assemblies may still have to be non-modular. Such thickness is
strongly determined by economic and functional considerations. In some cases, such sizes
should be coordinated by the use of simple fractions of the basic module.

1.5.4 Reference system

The reference system is a system of points, lines and planes to which the size and positions
of building components or assemblies relate.

A reference system should mainly be used during the design stage, and may also form the
basis of the system of lines from which measurements on site are set out.

11
MS 1064: PART 1:2001

1.5.4.1 Modular space grid

A modular space grid is a three-dimensional reference system within which a building and its
component are located. Thus, the planes form free modular spaces which, according to the
design, may be filled out with modular components. The distance between the planes in such
a system is equal to the basic module (basic module grid) or to a multimodule (multimodular
grid) (an example is shown in Figure 1). The reference planes in the modular space grid are
termed modular planes.

NOTE. The multimodule may differ for each of the three directions of the modular space grid.

1.5.4.2 Modular grids

Designs have to be expressed in two dimensions. To this end, horizontal and vertical
projections of the modular space grid, which are known as modular grids, are used.

Different modular grids may be superimposed on the same plane or elevation for different
purposes (examples are shown in Figure 2).

The advantage of using grids is that they provide a continuous reference system in a project,
provided that the basic module grid is kept uninterrupted all over the building. The positions of
components and their corresponding modular dimensions can thus be recognized both by
those preparing drawings and, and as far as they appear in the final drawings, also by those
reading them.

1.5.4.3 Basic module grid

The fundamental modular grid is that in which the spacing of consecutive parallel lines is
equal to the basic module.

1.5.4.4 Multimodular grids

In addition to the basic module grid, multimodular grids in which the spacing of the lines is a
multimodule, may be used. This multimodule may differ for each of the two directions of the
grid.

Lines in a multimodular grid normally coincide with the lines in the basic module grid. In
practice, however, it may be advantageous to displace modular grids used for different
purposes in relation to each other. One example may be the displacement of the horizontal
grid determining the position of floor components from the horizontal grid determining the
position of wall components with a dimension equal to the support of the floor components.

1.5.4.5 Zones of interruptions of modular grids

In some cases it may be necessary to interrupt a modular grid (for example, in order to
accommodate dividing elements). The width of the zone of interruption of the modular grid
may be modular or non-modular (see Figure 3).

12
MS 1064: PART 1: 2001

1.5.4.6 Displacement of modular grids

When several modular grids are used in designing the same plan, it may be advantageous to
displace the grids with reference to each other in one or both directions. The displacement
between the grids shall be chosen so as to produce a solution appropriate to the project as a
whole (example is shown in Figure 4).

1.5.5 Location and dimensioning

For the purposes of design, each building component and assembly is assumed to be located
in a space within the reference system defined by reference planes or lines, i.e. its allocated
modular space. This space includes the space required for joints and permitted dimensional
deviations (see Figure 5). Thus, in modular planning, the modular plane or grid line defining
the location of a component does so by boundary reference (see Figure 6). In some cases it
may be practical, however to define the location of, for example, the centerline of a
component in relation to the modular grid (see Figure 7). The latter can, however, be
considered as a special case of a boundary reference.

In practice, work-sizes of components and assemblies are derived from modular sizes.
Allowances have to be made in particular for manufacturing, site setting-out and erection
deviations. In modular coordination, free spaces (rooms openings in walls and floors, etc.)
should be larger than their modular dimensions, while components which are intended to fit
into such spaces shall be smaller than the modular dimensions.

1.5.6 Preferred modular sizes

A further reduction in the range of sizes, as well as greater facility for addition and division
can be achieved by the used of a general series of preferred modular sizes (see Section 2).

3M 3M

1M
1M 6M
1M
1M
1M
6M
1M

6M

Figure 1. Example of a modular space grid

13
MS 1064: PART 1:2001

1M
1M 2M 1M
3M
6M
12 M

a) 1 M, 3 M, 6 M, 12 M - grids b) 1 M, 2 M tartan grids

Figure 2. Examples of superimposed modular grids

Dividing element

Modular or Non modular Zone

Figure 3. Interruption of modular grids

14
MS 1064: PART 1: 2001

nxM nxM nxM nxM nxM nxM nxM

2n x M 2n x M 2n x M

Figure 4. Example of displacement of modular grids

Space required for joint and


permitted dimensional deviations

nxM
Door
Wall n' x M

Figure 5. Example of a building component located in its allotted modular


space

Endwall Wall, column Wall, column


etc etc

nxM nxM

Figure 6. Example of modular planes in boundary position

15
MS 1064: PART 1:2001

Endwall Wall, column Wall, column


etc etc

n 1x M * n2x M

* In the case of asymmetric element (for example endwalls), the modular plane may not coincide with the centre plane.

Figure 7. Example of modular planes in axial position

1.6 Basic module

1.6.1 Symbol

The basic module is represented by the letter M.

1.6.2 Specification

The standardised value of the basic module is 1M = 100 mm.

1.7 Submodular increments

1.7.1 Specification

The standardised values of the submodular increments are:

M M
= 50 mm and = 25 mm
2 4

1.7.2 Application

1.7.2.1 Submodular increments are to be used where there is a need for an increment
smaller than the basic module.

1.7.2.2 Submodular increments should not be used for determining the distance between
modular reference planes of a modular grid.

1.7.2.3 Submodular increments may be used for determining the displacement of different
modular grids in order to produce a solution appropriate to the project as a whole.

1.7.2.4 Submodular increments may be used:

a) For determining the coordinating sizes of building products smaller than 1M (for
example certain types of ceramic tile).

16
MS 1064: PART 1: 2001

b) For determining the coordinating sizes of building components and products large
than 1M which need to be sized in increments smaller than 1M (for example bricks,
tiles, thickness of walls and floors, and the sizing and location of pipes).

17
MS 1064: PART 1:2001

SECTION 2 : HORIZONTAL COORDINATING DIMENSION

2.1 Preferred multimodular sizes for horizontal dimensions

2.1.1 Specification

The series of preferred multimodular sizes for horizontal dimensions are shown in Table 1.

The 12M series can be extended further to use larger increments such as 24M where
technical and economical advantages are evident.

The 15M, 30M and 60M series correspond to the series in a system of preferred numbers,
which contain the factor five. These series can also be extended to use larger increments in
the series of the multimodule 60M such as 120M or larger.

In the selection of sizes from the Table 1, preference should be given to the series of the
largest multimodule compatible with functional requirements and economic design.

The preferred multimodular sizes for horizontal dimensions are primarily intended for sizing of
components, group of components and spaces.

The series are standardised for general guidance. Functional, economical and especially
national considerations may justify the standardisation of modular sizes which are not
included in the series.

Example of specifications for the preferred modular sizes in a building are as shown in Figure
8 and Figure 9.

18
MS 1064: PART 1: 2001

Table 1. Series of preferred multimodular sizes for horizontal dimensions

Multimodules

3M 6M 12M 15M 30M 60M

3M
6M 6M
9M
12M 12M 12M
15M 15M
18M 18M
21M
24M 24M 24M
27M
30M 30M 30M 30M
Series of multimodules

33M
36M 36M 36M
39M
42M 42M
45M 45M
48M 48M 48M
54M
60M 60M 60M 60M 60M
66M
72M 72M
75M
78M
84M 84M
90M 90M 90M
96M 96M
105M
108M
120M 120M 120M 120M
etc. etc. etc. etc.

19
MS 1064: PART 1:2001

B
E
E
E
E

C
E
E
E
E
F F F F F F

D D D D

NOTE. The sizes of C, D, E and F are taken from Table 1. The sizes A and B are resultant modular sizes

Figure 8. Example of specifications for preferred modular sizes in


a floor plan of a building

G G G G G H J

NOTE. In this example G, H and J are modular sizes, which may or may not be taken from the table. K is resultant
modular size.

Figure 9. Example of specifications for preferred modular sizes for


partitioning of floor spaces in buildings

20
MS 1064: PART 1: 2001

2.2.1 Multimodules for horizontal coordinating dimensions

2.2.1 Specifications

The standardised values of multimodules for horizontal coordinating dimensions are 3M, 6M,
12M, 30M and 60M.

NOTE. The multimodule 15M may also be used for special applications.

2.2 Reference lines of horizontal controlling coordinating dimensions

2.3.1 Specifications

Horizontal controlling coordinating dimensions should be applied between modular reference


planes* which may be boundary (see Figure 10) or axial (see Figure 11) or displacement of
grids (see Figure 12).

n x 3M

Figure 10. Controlling dimension between boundary planes

n 2 x 3M n 3 x 3M

Figure 11. Controlling dimensions between axial planes

* Modular reference plane: Theoretical planes by reference to which the positions of the building elements are fixed
and which are separated from one another by modular distances.

21
MS 1064: PART 1:2001

n 2 x 3M n 3 x 3M

n 1 x 3M n 4 x 3M

3M 3M 3M

Figure 12. Controlling dimensions between two modular planes


spaced at 300 mm (3M) apart and in axial position
(by displacement of grids)

22
MS 1064: PART 1: 2001

SECTION 3 : VERTICAL COORDINATING DIMENSIONS

3.1 Modular floor plane for vertical dimensions


3.1.1 Introduction

In order to apply modular coordination to vertical dimension in building construction, it is


necessary to define a reference plane from which such modular dimensions may be taken.
This reference plane is called the modular floor plane. In this Malaysian Standard, the
modular floor plane is defined such a way as to be continuous all over each storey of a
building, regardless of the fact that the level of the upper surface of floor covering may vary
within each storey. This standard also provides for the condition that the upper surface of the
structural floor is normally continuous over the whole of each storey.

3.1.2 Specification

The three positions of the modular floor plane* defined as reference plane for vertical modular
dimensions in building design is shown in Figure 13.

Vertical modular dimensions should be taken from the modular floor plane. Illustrations of
vertical dimensioning are as shown in Figure 14, Figure 15 and Figure 16.

Figure 13. Illustration of floor levels

*The plane and floor will not totally coincide due to unevenness of floor surfaces, joints and tolerances.

23
MS 1064: PART 1:2001

Load Bearing Wall


Non-load Bearing Wall
(partitions and doors)

A B C Modular Floor Plane

Stair

or

Figure 14. Modular floor plane coinciding with upper


surface of floor covering (level A)

Load Bearing Wall


Non-load Bearing Wall
(partitions and doors)

A B C Modular Floor Plane

Stair

Figure 15. Modular floor plane coinciding with upper


surface of rough floor (level B)

24
MS 1064: PART 1: 2001

Load Bearing Wall


Non-load Bearing Wall
(partitions and doors)

A B C Modular Floor Plane

Stair

Figure 16. Modular floor plane coinciding with upper


surface of structural floor (level C)

NOTE. The non-load-bearing components can also be placed on level B.

25
MS 1064: PART 1:2001

SECTION 4 : JOINTS

4.1 Fundamental principles for design of joints in buildings


4.1.1 Introduction

This Section describes the fundamental principles for design of joints in buildings under three
main headings of properties:

- geometrical;

- structural;

- environmental.

It is necessary to distinguish between:

- joints between components;

- joints between the parts of one component.

While general conventions will be directly applicable only to the joints between components,
some aspects may also be relevant to joints between the parts of a component.

4.1.2 Basic principles

4.1.2.1 Geometrical properties of joints

A joint design shall include the clear specification of;

a) the position of the joint profiles of the components in relation to the common joint
reference plane;

b) the joint clearance based on the specified positions of the joined components and
expressed as:

i) its size, in relation to the work sizes of the components, with a view to
standard conventions for dimensional coordination;

ii) its maximum and minimum value to accommodate deviations occurring in the
manufacture, setting out, erection and functioning of the components.

c) the jointing products in relation to the joint profiles.

4.1.2.2 Structural properties of joints

Joints shall be designed for all the dynamic and static conditions deriving from the joint
situation within the building for the life of the components in the building.

26
MS 1064: PART 1: 2001

4.1.2.3 Environmental properties of joints

Joints shall be designed to provide a performance such that the assembly by the components
achieves the required overall performance.

In many cases, this implies a suitable continuity of the specified performances of the joined
components during the life of these components in the building, taking into account
maintenance.

27
Acknowledgements

Technical Committee Members :

Puan Dang Anom Md. Zin (Chairman), Encik Hassan Abdullah (Secretary), Encik Yap Chee
Lin, Encik Chew Nane Cheong, Encik Chong Lee Siong, Puan Zaharah Yahya, Prof. Madya
Norwina Mohd. Nawawi, Puan Zawidatul Asma Ghazali, Encik Aminudin Abd. Aziz, Ir.
Hamdan Uda Mohd. Esa, Ir. Wong Loo Min, Ir. Tan Teck Eng, Ir. Elias Ismail, Encik Ling
Pen Ting, Encik Lee Choon Bin, Puan Mahsuri Mat Dris, Encik Masran Saruwono, Dr. Mohd
Saleh Jaafar, Puan Zainora Zainal