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NATION PAGE 6

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MOTIVE SOUGHT

FBI AGAIN SEARCHES VEGAS GUNMAN’S PROPERTY

NATION PAGE 7

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A LITTLE 49ERS DYNASTY AFOOT

SPORTS PAGE 11

Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula

Monday Oct. 9, 2017 XVIII, Edition 45

www.smdailyjournal.com

Burlingame sees competitive school board race

Four candidates vie for three open seats in first contested election in more than a decade

By Austin Walsh

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Despite earning relatively high test scores and enjoying easier access to financial support than some surrounding communities, Burlingame educators are interest- ed in continuing to push the aca- demic bar higher. Burlingame Elementary School District Board of Trustee incum- bents Davina Drabkin, Kay Coskey and Doug Luftman plus

Kay Davina Coskey Drabkin challenger Elizabeth Kendall are seeking
Kay
Davina
Coskey
Drabkin
challenger
Elizabeth
Kendall
are
seeking
Elizabeth Doug Kendall Luftman
Elizabeth
Doug
Kendall
Luftman

election to the school board to lead that pursuit.

Focusing on social and emo- tional student learning, managing an engaged and supportive parent community, supporting a staff of teachers pressed by affordability concerns as well as other district initiatives are before the four can- didates seeking three seats in the

fall elections.

Coskey, who is running as a slate with Drabkin, concisely summarized the sentiment regard- ing the essential academic chal- lenge from those running in the

first competitive district election in more than a decade. “I’m confident our scores will continue to be strong. But we have some work to do,” said Coskey, referring to the district’s achieve- ment on the recent round of Smarter Balanced standardized

tests. Seventy-seven percent of the district students met or exceeded their grade standard in the 2017

See RACE, Page 20

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AUSTIN WALSH/ DAILY JOURNAL

English teacher Mikki McMillion works with Oxford Day Academy students at the school’s East Palo Alto campus.

New school, new rules

Oxford Day Academy grapples with innovative approach

By Austin Walsh

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

San Mateo County’s newest charter high school is focused on building independently-driven stu- dents bonded closely with their community, but some are finding sizable hurdles come with the ambitious vision. Oxford Day Academy opened in East Palo Alto to a class of roughly 50 freshmen who comprise the inaugural class of the most recent addition to the Sequoia Union High School District. The school founded by educator Mallory Dwinal aims to enhance a student’s self-determination by offering them more authority in

managing their learning, both in

and out of the classroom.

But after nearly two months since the first class started, offi- cials are beginning to wonder whether refinements of their vision are in order to more appro- priately implement the innovative model. “There are challenges. The ques- tion is whether these are chal- lenges that are insurmountable,” said Dwinal, who last year received charter approval from the county Office of Education to launch the school following the district Board of Trustees initially reject- ing it due to feasibility concerns. Beyond the baseline difficulties of getting a new school up and run-

ning with all the technology and requisite infrastructure in place, Dwinal said there are also kinks to be worked out in the academic pro- gram promoting critical thinking through real world scenarios, with a special emphasis on social serv- ice. Students are expected to spend half their school time working with community service organiza- tions such as churches, nonprofits and public safety agencies, which Dwinal said requires administrators of those programs to raise their expectations of the teens. She added more coordination is required with the surrounding com- munity as well to train residents

See SCHOOL, Page 18

City to study new Skyline traffic lanes

Some claim project is unnecessary, while San Bruno officials seek traffic congestion calming

By Austin Walsh

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

San Bruno officials will consider moving ahead with a proposal to examine widening a heavily-traf- ficked stretch of Skyline Boulevard, but some critics feel the project is flawed and unneces- sary. The San Bruno City Council will weigh Tuesday, Oct. 10, an offer by the San Mateo County Transportation Authority to finance a second phase of the examination to increase the state highway’s capacity between Sneath Lane and Interstate 280.

The authority claims the project

could be useful in clearing the con-

gestion which forms during com- mute hours while opponents feel the initiative would only com- pound the problem. One of those opponents is resi- dent Adam Cozzette, who suggests the proposal to add two more lanes of road — one in each direction — to the highway administered by Caltrans would invite additional cars to the northern end of San Bruno and generate more traffic than there is currently. “Widenings don’t help, they

See SKYLINE, Page 20

Housing trust loan provides bridge for new development

By Aimee Lewis Strain

DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT

Sixty-seven affordable rental housing units for low-income fam- ilies and homeless at-risk veterans are being planned on El Camino

Real in the county’s North Fair

Oaks area, after a loan funded by

nonprofit HEART to developer

Palo Alto Housing Corp.

The Housing

Endowment

and

Regional Trust, known simply as HEART and dedicated to creating affordable housing in San Mateo County, made its largest loan in the amount of $3.5 million for

See HEART, Page 8

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102 S. El Camino Real — San Mateo CA 94401
102 S. El Camino Real — San Mateo CA 94401
102 S. El Camino Real — San Mateo CA 94401

102 S. El Camino Real — San Mateo CA 94401

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  • 2 Monday Oct. 9, 2017

FOR THE RECORD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Thought for the Day

“The world is divided into people who think they are right.”

— Author unknown

This Day in History

1967 Marxist revolutionary guerrilla leader

Che Guevara, 39, was summarily exe-

cuted by the Bolivian army a day after

his capture.

In 1514 , Mary Tudor, the 18-year-old sister of Henry VIII, became Queen consort of France upon her marriage to 52- year-old King Louis XII, who died less than three months later.

In 1776 , a group of Spanish missionaries settled in pres- ent-day San Francisco.

In 1888 , the public was first admitted to the Washington Monument.

In 1914 , the Belgian city of Antwerp fell to German forces during World War I.

In 1936 , the first generator at Boulder (later Hoover) Dam began transmitting electricity to Los Angeles.

In 1946 , the Eugene O’Neill drama “The Iceman Cometh” opened at the Martin Beck Theater in New York.

In

1958 , Pope Pius XII died at age 82, ending a 19-year

papacy. (He was succeeded by Pope J ohn XXIII.)

In 1975 , Soviet scientist Andrei Sakharov was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

In 1985 , the hijackers of the Achille Lauro cruise liner sur- rendered two days after seizing the vessel in the Mediterranean. (Passenger Leon Klinghoffer was killed by the hijackers during the standoff.)

In 1987 , author, politician and diplomat Clare Boothe Luce died in Washington at age 84.

In 1995 , a sabotaged section of track caused an Amtrak train, the Sunset Limited, to derail in Arizona; one person was killed and about 80 were injured (the case remains unsolved).

Birthdays

TV personality Actor Tony Actor Scott Bakula Sharon Osbourne Shalhoub is 64. is 63. is 65.
TV personality Actor Tony Actor Scott Bakula Sharon Osbourne Shalhoub is 64. is 63. is 65.
TV personality Actor Tony Actor Scott Bakula Sharon Osbourne Shalhoub is 64. is 63. is 65.

TV personality

Actor Tony

Actor Scott Bakula

Sharon Osbourne

Shalhoub is 64.

is 63.

is 65.

Retired MLB All-Star Joe Pepitone is 77. Former Sen. Trent

Lott, R-Miss., is 76. C-SPAN founder Brian Lamb is 76. Rhythm-and-blues singer Nona Hendryx is 73. Singer Jackson Browne is 69. Nobel Peace laureate Jody Williams is

  • 67. Actor Gary Frank is 67. Actor Richard Chaves is 66. Actor

Robert Wuhl is 66. Musician James Fearnley (The Pogues) is

  • 63. Actor John O’Hurley is 63. Writer-producer-director-actor

Linwood Boomer is 62. Pro and College Football Hall of

Famer Mike Singletary is 59. Actor Michael Pare is 59. Jazz musician Kenny Garrett is 57. Rock singer-musician Kurt Neumann (The BoDeans) is 56. Country singer Gary Bennett is 53. Movie director Guillermo del Toro is 53. Former British Prime Minister David Cameron is 51. Singer P.J. Harvey is

  • 48. Movie director Steve McQueen is 48.

Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 FOR THE RECORD THE DAILY JOURNAL Thought for the Day

REUTERS

A woman and her dog perform during the Alfa dog festival in Kiev, Ukraine.

Have wife, will carry: Couples vie in wife-carrying contest

NEWRY, Maine — It was a messy slog but a Virginia couple reaped the rewards of cash — and beer — in the North American Wife Carrying

Championship. Jake and Kirsten Barney, from Lexington, Virginia, finished first

Saturday on an alpine course made all

the more difficult because Jake was car- rying his wife on his back when he trudged through water and jumped over logs. The couple placed second last year. The event is based on the Finland legend of “Ronkainen the Robber,” whose gang pillaged villages and took

the women.

These days, men usually carry women, but they don’t have to be mar- ried and the couple can choose who car- ries whom. The Barneys won five times Kirsten Barney’s weight in cash — or $630 — and 12 cases of beer.

Mayoral candidate needs only his own vote to win

MANHATTAN, Mont. — There’s one person running for mayor of Manhattan, Montana, and he only needs to vote for himself to win. The Bozeman Daily Chronicle reports Glen Clements was the only person to apply to be a write-in candi-

In other news ...

date for the position on the November

tary and a police officer — told him no

Man sets up fake speed

servant

and displaying improper

ballot. Under Montana law, any other write-in votes won’t be counted because he’s the only registered write- in candidate. If he had applied to be a formal candidate, all write-in votes would be counted. The Navy veteran and geological

lights. McMillen says he’s been using the lights for a while and they’ve worked well. McMillen has been mailed a sum- mons to appear for a preliminary hear- ing Dec. 15.

engineer has lived in the town of about 1,500 people for six years. Clements said his neighbors — the city’s secre-

one was running and encouraged him to. He says he’s excited to fill the posi- tion that no one else wanted.

trap to curb smelly dead deer

‘Jeopardy!’ champ wins fans with quirky antics

NEW YORK — A New York City bar- tender’s on-screen antics and big bets while competing on “Jeopardy!” are winning him cash to go along with a cult following. By the end of Thursday’s show, Austin Rogers had won eight days in a row and more than $300,000.

He’s

also

making big wagers.

JONES

MILLS,

Pa.

A

“Jeopardy!” says that total put him at

Pennsylvania man says he used flash- ing dashboard lights to mimic a police speed trap — but only so he could slow down vehicles speeding past his rural home and killing deer and endangering people.

fifth on the show’s list of all-time reg- ular season money winners. Rogers has done it while sporting wild hair and a bushy beard and making animat- ed gestures after correct answers.

Fifty-seven-year-old Ricky McMillen tells WPXI-TV that he used the flashing lights on his car b ecause

Rogers won a whopping $34,000 bet on the show’s “Final Jeopardy” seg- ment Tuesday.

he’s been complaining about speeders

Fans

are singing

his

praises

on

for years and getting few results. What

Twitter

by

using

the

hashtag

he says he has gotten is very smelly deer carcasses along the road in Donegal Township, about 50 miles southeast of Pittsburgh. State police charged McMillen on Thursday with impersonating a public

#AustinOnJeopardy. Rogers tells “Good Morning America” that the secret to his success is uncovering patterns in clues by watching hundreds of “Jeopardy!” episodes.

Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 FOR THE RECORD THE DAILY JOURNAL Thought for the Day

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

ASUPE ©2017 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved. KKUSN TOTOTA LAPOWL
ASUPE
©2017 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
KKUSN
TOTOTA
LAPOWL
Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE app
Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE app

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as

suggested by the above cartoon.

Print answer here: (Answers tomorrow) Jumbles: ABOVE HEFTY ADRIFT WICKER Saturday’s Answer: When asked if she
Print answer here:
(Answers tomorrow)
Jumbles:
ABOVE
HEFTY
ADRIFT
WICKER
Saturday’s
Answer:
When asked if she wanted a ring made of

gold or silver, she said — EITHER “ORE”

Lotto

Local Weather Forecast

Oct. 7 Powerball

Fantasy Five

Co l umbus

Day : Sunny.

Highs

in

the

Oct. 7 Powerball Fantasy Five Co l umbus Day : Sunny. Highs in the
10 49 61 63 65 7 Powerball
10
49
61
63
65
7
Powerball
2
2
3
3
13
13
16
16
23
23

60s to upper 70s. Northeast winds 10 to

20 mph

becoming

south

in

the after-

 

noon.

Oct. 6 Mega Millions

Daily Four

21 33 36 45 56 Mega number
21
33
36
45
56
Mega number
  • 12 the

8
8
8
8
7
7
3
3

Daily three midday

Oct. 7 Super Lotto Plus

5
5
6
6
1
1

Mo nday

50s.

ni g ht: Mostly clear. Lows in

South

winds

10

to

15

mph

becoming

after midnight.

southwest around 5 mph

Tues day : Sunny. Highs in the 60s to lower 70s. Northwest

16 18 24 41 47 Mega number
16
18
24
41
47
Mega number
  • 23 Daily three evening

 

winds around 5 mph becoming west 10 to 15 mph in the afternoon.

4 2 5 The Daily Derby race winners are Money Bags, No. 11,
4
4
2
2
5
5

The Daily Derby race winners are Money Bags, No. 11,

Tues day ni g ht: Mostly clear in the evening then becom- ing mostly cloudy. Patchy fog. Lows in the upper 40s to mid

50s.

in first place; Whirl Win, No. 06, in second place; and Gorgeous George, No. 8, in third place. The race time was clocked at 1:45.50.

Wednes day : Mostly cloudy in the morning then becom- ing sunny. Patchy fog. Highs in the lower to mid 60s.

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As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing. To submit obituaries, email information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com. Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed more than once, longer than 200 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL

Monday Oct. 9, 2017

3

Call for Golden Gate trains unlock Key System memories

THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 3 Call for Golden Gate trains unlock

E arlier this year, a columnist for a San Francisco newspaper urged the Bay Area to “be bold” and run trains

across the Golden Gate Bridge. Surprisingly, the writer never noted that decades ago trains carried commuters over the Bay Bridge. The electric-powered trains that ran on tracks on the lower section of the bridge were part of the Key System, which operat- ed an extensive street car and bus network in the East Bay as well as a fleet of ferry boats. The trains started carrying passengers across the span on Jan. 15, 1939, the day after the opening of the Transbay Terminal in downtown San Francisco, located just a few blocks from the Ferry Building. The ter- minal site is now being converted to a regional transit center for the Bay Area. Supporters of the approximately $8 billion

THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 3 Call for Golden Gate trains unlock

For years, trains like this one were part of the Key System that connected parts of the Bay

Area with San Francisco across the Bay Bridge.

project hope it will become the “Grand Central Station of the West” by connecting eight Bay Area counties through 11 transit systems. The original terminal at First and Mission streets was designed to handle as many as 35 million passengers a year. According to the Transbay Center website, the system’s heyday was at the end of World War II when the rail system transported 26 million people annually. After wartime gas rationing ended, the passenger load gradual- ly decreased, declining to around 5 million

people traveling by rail per year. In 1958, the lower deck of the bridge was converted to auto traffic only and, in 1959, the termi- nal was a strictly bus-only facility. The Key System name disappeared in 1960 when the Alameda-Contra Costa

See HISTORY, Page 17

THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 3 Call for Golden Gate trains unlock

Police reports

Bad business

An office was broken into through the front door on Baywood Avenue in San Mateo, it was reported at 9:40 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 23.

REDWOOD CITY

Sus pended l i cens e. A Redwood City man was cited for driving with a suspended license on Second Avenue and Edison Way, it was reported at 11:07 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 27. Sus pended l i cens e. A Santa Clara woman was cited for driving with a sus- pended license on Broadway and Woodside Road, it was reported at 2:41 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 26. DUI. A vehicle was seen swerving and couldn’t drive straight on Bonita Avenue, it was at reported at 10:43 a.m. Monday, Sept. 18. Petty theft. Someone stole a license

plate on Bonita Avenue, it was reported at

10:43 a.m. Monday, Sept. 18.

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  • 4 Monday Oct. 9, 2017

LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Obituary

Christos Michael Pallas, late of San Bruno and San Mateo County resident for 59 years, died Oct. 5, 2017. Husband of Ruth Pallas. Father of Dorie Lynn Hodkinson (Ed), Michael Pallas (Roselyn); Eugene Pallas (Amy) and the late Charlotte Eastman. Brother of Harry Pallas and Theodore Pallas (Irma); the late Andrew Pallas and the late Gus Pallas. Also survived by his grandchildren Pam, Laura, Kristilyn, Jessica, Mike, Marianna, Jason, Nicholas; and great-grandchildren Christi Paige and Bryce. A native of San Francisco, California, age 93. Veteran U.S. Army Air Force World War II; Founded Pallas

4 Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 LOCAL THE DAILY JOURNAL Obituary Christos Michael Pallas, late of
4 Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 LOCAL THE DAILY JOURNAL Obituary Christos Michael Pallas, late of

Chris Pallas

Bros. Television in San Francisco; former San Bruno Park Elementary School District Board official; Former San Bruno council- man and vice mayor; past commander, American Legion Post 409; thirty-second degree mason and past master; initiated and active with San Bruno Senior Center. Visitation 4 p.m.-8 p.m. Thursday, Oct.

12 at Chapel of the Highlands, El Camino

Real at 194 Millwood Drive, Millbrae,

with Trisagion at 7 p.m. Funeral 11 a.m. Friday, Oct. 13 at Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church, San Francisco. Interment Greek Orthodox Cemetery, Colma. Donations preferred to Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church, San Francisco or to American Legion Post 409.

Peninsula LGBTQ+ folks finally have a space to call their own! Over a decade in the

Peninsula LGBTQ+ folks finally have

a space to call their own!

Over a decade in the making, the Pride Center is San

Mateo County’s one and only LGBTQ+ community

center. We provide social and educational programming

for all ages and a variety of mental health and

substance use related services.

This is your Center!

Come visit, hang out, and volunteer with us.

Hours of Operation:

M-Th: 10am - 7pm

F: 10am - 9pm Sa: 11am - 4pm

1021 S. El Camino Real (at 11th Ave.) San Mateo

info@sanmateopride.org

650-591-0133 | @SanMateoPride

Peninsula LGBTQ+ folks finally have a space to call their own! Over a decade in the

Visit our website for Calendar of Events and Newsletter

sign-up. Donations are always welcome.

Local brief

Ride-sharing driver background checks sought

A proposal to strengthen background checks for ride-share drivers was released by the California Public Utilities Commission, CPUC officials said. It requires that the background check companies that ride-

sharing companies use to check the backgrounds of their driv-

ers be accredited by the Background Screening Credentialing Council of the National Association of Professional Background Screeners. Each ride-sharing company must get proof that their back- ground screening company is accredited and provide that to the CPUC, as well.

4 Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 LOCAL THE DAILY JOURNAL Obituary Christos Michael Pallas, late of

 

LEI LUO, DDS

 
San Bruno Over 20 years of experience 2009-2017 American Top Dentists

San Bruno

Over 20 years of experience 2009-2017 American Top Dentists

 
 

 

 

 
 

 

THE DAILY JOURNAL

NATION

Monday Oct. 9, 2017

5

A weakened Nate brings flooding, power outages to Gulf Coast

By Jeff Amy

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BILOXI, Miss. — Hurricane Nate brought a burst of flooding and power outages to the U.S. Gulf Coast before weakening rapidly Sunday, sparing the region the kind of cata- strophic damage left by a series of hurri- canes that hit the southern U.S. and Caribbean in recent weeks. Nate — the first hurricane to make landfall in Mississippi since Katrina in 2005 — quickly lost strength, with its winds dimin- ishing to a tropical depression as it pushed northward into Alabama and toward Georgia with heavy rain. It was a Category 1 hurri- cane when it came ashore outside Biloxi early Sunday, its second landfall after ini- tially hitting southeastern Louisiana on Saturday evening. The storm surge from the Mississippi Sound littered Biloxi’s main b eachfront highway with debris and flooded a casino’s lobby and parking structure overnight. By dawn, however, Nate’s receding flood- waters didn’t reveal any obvious signs of

widespread damage in the city where

Hurricane Katrina had leveled thousands of

beachfront homes and businesses. No storm-related deaths or injuries were immediately reported. Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant praised state and local officials and coastal resi- dents for working together to avoid loss of life. Lee Smithson, director of the state emer- gency management agency, said damage from Nate was held down in part because of work done and lessons learned from Katrina. “If that same storm would have hit us 15 years ago, the damage would have been extensive and we would have had loss of life.” Smithson said of Nate. “But we have rebuilt the coast in the aftermath of Katrina higher and stronger.” Nate knocked out power to more than 100,000 residents in Mississippi, Alabama, Louisiana and Florida, but crews were working on repairs. As of Sunday afternoon, Alabama Power said more than 62,000 customers remained

THE DAILY JOURNAL NATION Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 5 A weakened Nate brings flooding, power

REUTERS

A man washes shutters damaged by Hurricane Nate in Biloxi, Mississippi.

without power, while utilities and coopera- tives in Mississippi said more than 21,000 were without electricity. In Louisiana, there

were scattered outages during the storm, while Florida Gov. Rick Scott said 6,800 customers had lost power in his state.

Feinstein: Congress, not exec branch, must ban ‘bump stocks’

By Hope Yen and Stephen Braun

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Seeking momentum for gun restrictions, Sen. Dianne Feinstein on Sunday said only broader leg- islation would be effective in outlawing “bump stocks” like the device used by the Las Vegas gunman. But the National Rifle Association urged more limited regula- tions that stopped short of a ban.

THE DAILY JOURNAL NATION Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 5 A weakened Nate brings flooding, power

Diane Feinstein

It

was

a

sign

of

a

rocky road ahead for action by Congress even with growing bipartisan support for regulating or banning the devices that convert semi-automatic weapons

into rapid-fire guns.

“Regulations aren’t

going to do it. We need a law. It can’t be changed by another presi- dent,” said Feinstein, D-Calif., a longtime

Indigenous People’s Day gets backlash

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Americas to European domination also has

NEW YORK — Is it time to say arriveder- ci to Christopher Columbus? A movement to abolish Columbus Day and replace it with Indigenous Peoples Day has gained momentum in some parts of the U.S., with Los Angeles in August becoming the biggest city yet to decide to stop honor- ing the Italian explorer and instead recog- nize victims of colonialism. Austin, Texas, followed suit Thursday. It joined cities including San Francisco, Seattle and Denver, which had previously booted Columbus in favor of Indigenous Peoples Day. But the gesture to recognize indigenous people rather than the man who opened the

prompted howls of outrage from some Italian-Americans, who say eliminating their festival of ethnic pride is culturally insensitive, too. “We had a very difficult time in this coun- try for well over a hundred years,” said Basil Russo, president of the Order Italian Sons and Daughters of America. “Columbus Day is a day that we’ve chosen to celebrate who we are. And we’re entitled to do that just as they are entitled to celebrate who they are.” It’s not about taking anything away from Italian-Americans, said Cliff Matias, cultur- al director of the Redhawk Native American Arts Council, which is hosting a Re- Thinking Columbus Day event Sunday and Monday in New York.

THE DAILY JOURNAL NATION Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 5 A weakened Nate brings flooding, power
Now open on Saturdays!
Now open on Saturdays!

advocate of stricter gun control measures who introduced legislation to outlaw bump stocks. She lamented the stratified lines of debate in “a gun-happy country.” The debate over how to regulate bump stocks comes in the aftermath of the shooting at a Las Vegas music festival last week that killed more than 50 people

and injured 500, America’s deadliest in

modern history. The NRA, some senior congressional Republicans and the Trump administration have expressed openness in restricting bump stocks, but lawmak-

ers remain divided over whether to rely on legislation or push for an executive branch order. Bump stocks are accessories that sub- stitute for the regular stock and grip of a semi-automatic rifle and allow the weapon to fire continuously, some 400 to 800 rounds in a single minute. Bump stocks were found among the weapons used by sniper suspect Stephen Paddock and explain why victims in Las Vegas heard what sounded like automatic- weapons fire.

     
 

Obituary

 
 

Kenneth John Weigel

Kenneth John Weigel, 66, passed away at home Saturday, Sept. 30. He was a dedicated father and loyal veterinarian who had an unmatched enthusiasm for life. With a boyish curiosity that never wavered, he loved learning and was truly a lifelong student. Born in San Francisco, he graduated from Palo Alto High School in 1969. With a passion for medicine and animals, he immediately embarked on what would become a more than 40-year career. He attended the University of California, Davis, graduating in 1976 with a doctorate in veterinary medicine. Ken traveled the world and lived in Mexico before settling back down in the Bay Area where he raised three children. Ken formerly owned the Palo Alto Pet Hospital and was serving clients at the VCA before his untimely death. Ken loved spending time outdoors hiking, skiing, fishing, exploring the world and visiting his Nevada City home. He enjoyed dancing, riding motorcycles and tinkering with mechanics. Ken had a scientific mind but a creative spirit and deeply appreciated the arts. He cared for his community and gave back through the Rotary Club. Ken’s sense of humor ran deep and his belly-aching laughs reverberated within friends and loved ones. His life was cut tragically short after a five-month battle with pancreatic cancer. Ken is survived by his children Samantha, Callie and Cameron; his brother Doug

Kenneth John Weigel, 66, passed away at home Saturday, Sept. 30. He was a dedicated father

(wife Karen) and sister Linda (husband Bob); and his loving girlfriend Pam Lim. He is

preceded in death by his parents Arthur and Rose. His family appreciates the care Ken received from PAMF, Stanford and Mission Hospice. A Celebration of Ken’s Life will be held 1-4 p.m. Friday Oct. 13 at the Lucie Stern

Community Center, 1305 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto.

 

To honor his memory please consider making a donation in Ken’s name to the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, pancan.org; or the American Humane Society, americanhumane.org.

THE DAILY JOURNAL NATION Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 5 A weakened Nate brings flooding, power
  • 6 Monday Oct. 9, 2017

NATION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

White House links border wall, green card overhaul to DACA

By Jill Colvin

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — The Trump administra- tion released a list of hard-line immigration priorities on Sunday that threaten to derail efforts to protect from deportation hundreds of thousands of young immigrants, many of whom were brought into the U.S. illegally as children. The demands include overhauling the country’s green-card system, hiring 10,000 more immigration officers and building President Donald Trump’s promised wall along the southern border. Many are poli- cies Democrats have explicitly said are off the table. But Trump administration officials said the president will insist on their passage in exchange for supporting legislation that would extend the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, program. “These priorities are essential to mitigate the legal and economic consequences of any grants or status to DACA recipients,” White House legislative affairs director Marc Short told reporters. “We’re asking that these reforms be included in any legis- lation concerning the status of DACA recipients.” Initiated under President Barack Obama,

DACA protected hundreds of thousands of

young people from deportation and allowed

them to continue working legally in the U.S. Trump announced a phase-out of the program last month, but he has given Congress six months to come up with a legislative fix. Included on the list of demands: limiting family-based green cards to spouses and the minor children of U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents and creating a point- based system. The White House also said it wants to boost fees at border crossings, make it eas- ier to deport gang members and unaccompa- nied children, and overhaul the asylum sys- tem. And it wants new measures to crack down on “sanctuary cities,” which don’t share information with federal immigration authorities, among other proposals. Democrats vehemently oppose many of the demands laid out in the administration list. In a joint statement, House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi and Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer said the list “goes so far beyond what is reasonable” and “fails to represent any attempt at compromise. “The Administration can’t be serious about compromise or helping the Dreamers if they begin with a list that is anathema to

Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 THE DAILY JOURNAL White House links border wall, green card

REUTERS

President Donald Trump talks to the media on South Lawn of the White House in Washington

before his departure to Greensboro, North Carolina.

the Dreamers, to the immigrant community and to the vast majority of Americans,” they wrote. “If the President was serious about pro- tecting the Dreamers, his staff has not made

a good faith effort to do so,” they said. Rep. Joaquin Castro, D-Texas, accused the administration of trying to “use Dreamers as bargaining chips to achieve the administra- tion’s deportation and detention goals.”

White House to order health care alternatives

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — The White House is finalizing an executive order that would expand health plans offered by associations to allow individuals to pool together and buy insurance outside their states, a unilater- al move that follows failed efforts by Congress to overhaul the health care sys- tem. President Donald Trump has long asserted that selling insurance across state lines would trigger competition that brings down premiums for people buying their own poli- cies. Experts say that’s not guaranteed, part- ly because health insurance reflects local medical costs, which vary widely around the country. Moreover, White House actions may come too late to have much impact on premiums for 2018.

Trump was expected to sign the executive

order next week, likely on Thursday, a sen- ior administration official said Sunday. Under the president’s executive action, membership groups could sponsor insur- ance plans that cost less because — for example — they wouldn’t have to offer the full menu of benefits required under the Affordable Care Act, also called “Obamacare.” It’s unclear how the White House plans to overcome opposition from state insurance regulators, who see that as an end-run to avoid standards. “There are likely to be legal challenges that could slow this effort down,” said Larry Levitt of the nonpartisan Kaiser Family Foundation. Similar alternatives have been promoted by Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul, a Republican holdout during the health care debate.

Testy tweeting between Trump, GOP Senator

By Richard Lardner

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — An enraged President Donald Trump and a prominent Republican senator who fears the country could be edg- ing toward “chaos” engaged in an intense and vitriolic back-and-forth bashing on social media Sunday, a remarkable airing of their party’s profound rifts. In political discourse that might once have seemed inconceivable, the GOP’s for- eign policy expert in the Senate felt com- pelled to answer his president’s barbs by tweeting: “It’s a shame the White House has become an adult day care center. Someone obviously missed their shift this morning.” Trump earlier had laid bare his perceived grievances against retiring Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., in a series of stinging

Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 THE DAILY JOURNAL White House links border wall, green card

Bob Corker

tweets that contended Corker:

• Was “largely respon- sible for the horrendous” Iran nuclear deal, which the Democratic Obama administration negotiat- ed and Corker considered

badly flawed. The senator

also tried to require that

President Barack Obama submit the accord to Congress for approval. • Intended to obstruct the White House agenda, though he offered no evidence for saying he expected Corker “to be a negative voice.” • ”Begged” for Trump’s endorsement in his 2018 re-election, then opted against seek- ing a third term when Trump declined, show- ing the senator “didn’t have the guts to run.”

Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 THE DAILY JOURNAL White House links border wall, green card
Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 THE DAILY JOURNAL White House links border wall, green card
Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 THE DAILY JOURNAL White House links border wall, green card
Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 THE DAILY JOURNAL White House links border wall, green card
Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 THE DAILY JOURNAL White House links border wall, green card
Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 THE DAILY JOURNAL White House links border wall, green card
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Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 THE DAILY JOURNAL White House links border wall, green card
Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 THE DAILY JOURNAL White House links border wall, green card

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NATION

Monday Oct. 9, 2017

7

FBI searches Las Vegas gunman’s house again

By Regina Garcia Cano and Ken Ritter

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LAS VEGAS — Federal investigators returned to search the home of Las Vegas gunman Stephen Paddock on Sunday, while the officers who raided his hotel room door the night of the shooting gave a harrowing account of a barricaded door they had to bust through and the booby-traps they feared they’d find. The search of Paddock’s three-bedroom house on a cul-de-sac in a retirement commu- nity in Mesquite, Nevada, was for “re-docu- menting and rechecking,” said local police Chief Troy Tanner, who accompanied FBI agents as they served the search warrant. “I don’t think they are after anything spe- cific,” Tanner told The Associated Press. “They’re going through everything and photographing everything again.” The home was first searched Monday by Las Vegas police, who said they found 19 guns and several pounds of potentially explosive materials at the house that Paddock bought in early 2015. The search came exactly a week after Paddock opened fire on a country music crowd, killing 58 and injuring nearly 500. Meanwhile, the makeshift SWAT team of police officers who made it to Paddock’s door at the Mandalay Bay hotel casino 12 minutes after the first shots were fired described how they got there and the “gun store” they found inside in an appearance on the CBS television program “60 Minutes” on Sunday night. One of them said he hurried from police headquarters to the Mandalay Bay in cowboy boots and ditched them before ascending to the 32nd floor in search of the gunman. “I just threw them in the casino,” Detective Matthew Donaldson said. “That was slowing’ me down. I was faster barefoot, and I was gonna be more effective barefoot.”

The officers said they heard reports of gun- men on both the 29th and 32nd floor, so

“we’re thinking multiple shooters at this

point,” Sgt. Joshua Bitsko said. They zeroed in on the 32nd floor after Paddock unleashed about 200 rounds at a security guard outside his door. When they got to the stairwell door on that floor near Paddock’s room, they found he had taken special measures to slow them down. “He had screwed shut the door — with a piece of metal and some screws,” Bitsko said. “Cause he knew we’d be coming out that door to gain entry into his door. So he tried to barricade it as best he could.” But another officer had a pry bar and was able to easily pop it open, Bitsko said. Authorities would later reveal that Paddock had surveillance cameras rigged inside and outside his room. But the officers didn’t know that at the time. “There’s a room service cart with wires going on it underneath the door,” Officer Dave Newton said. “There was something black on top of the cart. So initially I’m, you know, I’m thinking, ‘This is a booby- trap. It’s, it’s going to explode.’ “ Bitsko and Newton are K9 officers who had been training dogs when they got the call about Mandalay Bay. They said they were at a disadvantage approaching b ecause “cause he knew we were coming and we were going to have to come through,” Newton said. “We didn’t know where he was going to be in that room.” Bitsko said it was “like a deadly game of hide and seek,” and thought “ ‘Man, I wish I had my dog with me,’ b ecause, you know, it’s nice to have him lead a team.” It turned out Paddock had already shot and killed himself when they finally entered. Inside, Newton said he found “so many guns. So many magazines. Stacks and stacks of magazines everywhere. Just in suitcases all neatly stacked against pillars,

THE DAILY JOURNAL NATION Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 7 FBI searches Las Vegas gunman’s house

REUTERS

A woman writes a message on one of the white crosses set up for the victims of the Route 91

Harvest music festival mass shooting in Las Vegas, Nevada.

around the room, all stacked up, rifles placed all throughout. All kinds of monitors and electrical equipment he had in there. It just looked like almost a gun store.” Also Sunday, authorities began returning the baby strollers, shoes, phones, back- packs and purses that have been strewn for days across the huge crime scene that a week ago was home to 22,000 country music fans at the Route 91 Harvest festival. Federal agents have spent the week col- lecting evidence amid the thousands of items that were abandoned in panic, some of

them stained with blood. “Whatever was dropped when people start- ed running, those items we’re collecting and we’re going to provide back,” Paul Flood, unit chief in the FBI’s victim services divi- sion said at a news conference. The items have been catalogued with detailed descriptions, and some have been cleaned of things including blood. They are now being returned to people at the Las Vegas Convention Center, starting with a few sections of the concert scene and expanding to others.

Coming to terms with another mass murder

By Jerry Schwartz

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

We live in an age of mass murders. Sometimes we can explain the carnage — the bloody outcome of a grievance, the casu- alties of terrorism — and sometimes we can- not. But always, we are stricken. Even if we do not know the victims. Even if we are thou- sands of miles away from the gunfire. Once again, we are mourning the victims of a gunman — 58 people who set out to lis- ten to country music and wound up dead. And we wonder: Why is this happening? And how does it affect a society when repeatedly, streets and plazas and movie theaters and workplaces become blood-soaked battle- fields? There are no good answers. “There’s what we might call a natural post- traumatic stress disorder reaction,” says Alan Lipman, a clinical psychologist and director of the Center for the Study of Violence in Washington, D.C. “More and more, what we see is a kind of emotional numbing — an acceptance that this is part of the reality of life,” and that nothing can be done to stop it, he says.

Mother Jones magazine and the

Washington Post have counted the number

of U.S. mass shootings since Aug. 1, 1966. They included killings in which four people or more died, but not gang murders or slay- ings linked to domestic disputes or other crimes, like robberies. The total: 948 dead in 131 shootings. The 1966 date is not random. It was then that Charles Whitman, a 25-year-old archi- tectural engineering major and ex-Marine, killed his wife, his mother and three others before climbing the 27 stories of a tower at the University of Texas and raining gunfire on the plaza below. Over 96 minutes, anoth- er 11 people were killed and 31 injured before Whitman was killed by police offi- cers. “I do not really understand myself these days,” he wrote, in a suicide note. “I am sup- posed to be an average reasonable and intel- ligent young man. However, lately (I cannot recall when it started) I have been a victim of many unusual and irrational thoughts.” Some authorities would later blame his behavior on a p ecan-sized tumor an autopsy found in Whitman’s brain, though others disagreed — they said it was just a way of trying to explain the inexplicable.

In Vegas, Pence praises country’s resolve to find hope after terror

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LAS VEGAS — Vice President Mike Pence praised the heroic response by police and the resolve of the American peo- ple at a prayer service in Las Vegas, while federal agents hauled away belongings left behind by terrified concertgoers trying to escape raining bullets from a gunman who was shooting from his high-rise hotel suite. “It was a tragedy of unimaginable pro- portions,” Pence said as he addressed near- ly 300 people at Las Vegas City Hall

THE DAILY JOURNAL NATION Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 7 FBI searches Las Vegas gunman’s house

Mike Pence

Saturday afternoon. “Those we lost were taken before their time, but their names and their stories will forever be etched into the hearts of the American people.” At the same time, feder-

al agents started remov-

ing piles of backpacks,

baby strollers and lawn chairs still strewn about the site of a coun-

try music festival that Stephen Paddock fired upon last Sunday night.

THE DAILY JOURNAL NATION Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 7 FBI searches Las Vegas gunman’s house
  • 8 Monday Oct. 9, 2017

WORLD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Hundreds of thousands rally against Catalonia secession

By Joseph Wilson

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BARCELONA, Spain — Hundreds of thousands of people rallied Sunday in downtown Barcelona to protest against the plans of Catalonia’s regional government to secede from the rest of Spain. The march

was the largest pro-union showing since

the rise of separatist sentiment in the pros-

perous northeastern region that has pushed Spain to the brink of a national crisis. Barcelona police said 350,000 people participated, while march organizers Societat Civil Catalana said that 930,000 people turned out.

Those numbers resemble the pro-inde- pendence rallies that Barcelona has seen in recent years. Many in the crowd who marched through the city center under the slogan of “Let’s recover our common sense!” carried Spanish, Catalan and European Union flags. Some chanted “Don’t be fooled,

Catalonia is Spain” and called for Catalan president Carles Puigdemont to go to prison. Sunday’s rally comes a week after the Catalan government went ahead and held a referendum on secession that Spain’s top court had suspended and the Spanish gov- ernment said was illegal.

HEART

Continued from page 1

PAH to purchase a 0.59-acre parcel of land at 2821 El Camino Real where an Enterprise Rent-a-Car lot currently sits. Don Horsley, HEART board chair and president of the San Mateo County Board of Supervisors, said the investment helps PAH purchase the land in a timely fashion, thus securing another solid amount of affordable housing in San Mateo County. Plans call for 67 studio and one-bedroom apartments for households with incomes between 30 percent and 60 percent of the area median income. According to the San Mateo County Department of Housing, that’s between $39,500 annually for a fam- ily of four, considered extremely low income, and $78,960, which is 60 percent of the county’s AMI and classified as low income. Of those units, 27 will be reserved for homeless or at-risk veterans and an addi- tional six units will be set aside for home- less or at-risk individuals with mental ill- ness. Support services for those individu- als will be on site as well, Horsley said. “This is a higher density project — to have 67 units in just over a half of an acre is very exciting,” said Armando Sanchez, HEART’s executive director. At its preliminary stages, Sanchez said the development is going through the application process while PAH waits for

8 Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 WORLD THE DAILY JOURNAL Hundreds of thousands rally against Catalonia

A rendering of the project proposed in North Fair Oaks, as seen from El Camino Real.

the property to be rezoned, which will likely occur in November. Sanchez said PAH anticipates beginning construction in early 2019 and hopes to have the property fully leased by late 2020. The loan is very short term, Horsley said. Most loans through HEART are for one, three or five years, at a very low inter- est rate. The PAH loan is for one year, expressly to facilitate ownership of the property. “This is exactly the kind of critical, high-impact lending that HEART was cre- ated to do,” Horsley said.

Horsley explained that HEART of San Mateo County is a public/private partner- ship among the county, cities and labor, education, business and nonprofit groups to create more affordable housing opportu- nities in the county. Each city in San Mateo County is a member with the excep- tion of Daly City. “San Mateo County originally made a loan of $5 million to HEART to provide nonprofit developers the money they need up front for such things as land purchase, architectural drawings, [environmental impact reports] … there are a whole lot of

things they have to get in order before they can put shovels into the ground,” Horsley said. HEART has existed since 2003, and has received more than $14 million in funding gifts and pledges, enabling the nonprofit to invest an estimated $12.4 million to fund more than 950 affordable homes, Sanchez said. The rise in jobs in the county does not coincide with an increase in the number of homes available for workers, resulting in a housing shortage that is causing serious problems for first-time buyers as well as lower-income, non-tech-salaried individu- als who choose to live here. Identifying this need, Horsley said HEART also works to support first-time homebuyers as well by loaning a potential first-time buyer a second mortgage at a low interest rate, and one that is ultimately purchased by a bank. “We have an agreement with Meriwest [Credit Union] and the San Mateo Credit Union, who loan up to $790,000,” Horsley said. “We will loan 10 percent to a new homeowner in a second mortgage, providing them with a silent second mort- gage — that’s the advantage for them.” HEART is also turning its attention to teachers and school district employees, who show a critical need for housing near their schools of employment. In coming months, HEART hopes to announce its efforts to aid the Pacifica School District with a proposal to build 45 school employee units on district land. Visit heartofsmc.org for more informa- tion about HEART.

Advertisement

Who Or What Is Gladstone And

Why This Is Important

By Paul Larson

8 Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 WORLD THE DAILY JOURNAL Hundreds of thousands rally against Catalonia

MILLBRAE – I recently read an article in the trade journal “American Funeral Director” about the famous quote by the late “Sir William

Ewart Gladstone”, the celebrated English four term Prime Minister who was known for his colorful oratories and speeches on the floor of Parliament. This 19 th century statesman was renowned for many unique sayings, but he is most noted among Funeral Directors for saying

this: “Show me the manner in which a nation cares for its dead, and I will measure with mathematical exactness the tender mercies of its people, their respect for the laws of the land and their loyalty to high

ideals.” This quote is very lyrical and well thought out. It has become a long time custom for many Funeral Homes to display this quote on a plaque for all to see. The meaning is obvious and is a direct comparison between caring for our fallen loved ones and the way we care for ourselves, our community and our society. To many observers, though, it may appear that we’ve lost the motivation to care for our loved ones in a proper way, and that our society has become misguided. Taking into consideration the way our government leaders sometimes act, without the maturity to function unselfishly, is disturbing, and the reasons they got elected can be alarming. Also, in the eyes of logical people violence should be against our nature, but seemingly is embedded in our way of life. It is topsy- turvy for a culture to view cruelty and tribal brutality as a form of normality, and for love to be viewed as an obscenity.

Yes, some say our society is falling apart,

but looking at the overall big picture I see

most people yearning to live a peaceful and

courteous life with those around them. Most people are not violent. Most people want to be accepted. Most people want to be happy. Remember that “hate” is taught. Wouldn’t it make more sense for “love” to be taught? Teaching youngsters to be curious and to enjoy the “differences” of

those around them would be a good start.

They say that it’s hard to teach old dogs new tricks. But old dogs will not be here forever, and with effort every young dog could be cultivated with ideals for supporting others with respect. Putting this into practice may seem daunting, but it’s not impossible and over time could be valuable for our future. Humanity has always been burdened with a good percentage of bad guys. But, all in all, the ideals that the majority of us value and strive to promote, life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness, are shared in our core. Going back to Gladstone’s quote, I see the vast majority of the families we serve at the CHAPEL OF THE HIGHLANDS deeply committed to doing the right thing for their loved ones. They come to us with a desire for closure and to enact final tributes for those they’ve cherished. Whether public or private their feelings are similar, and showing one last bit of proper care is their goal. For me this is a sign of hope, showing that overall we are a society of good people with a nature to live in harmony and peace. If you ever wish to discuss cremation, funeral matters or want to make pre- planning arrangements please feel free to call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650) 588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you in a kind and helpful manner. For more info you may also visit us on the internet at:

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8 Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 WORLD THE DAILY JOURNAL Hundreds of thousands rally against Catalonia

THE DAILY JOURNAL

OPINION

Monday Oct. 9, 2017

9

Finding a way to end nationwide gun violence

The Modesto Bee

T he survivors heard popping

noises, like fireworks. Only

when people began dropping

did they realize the noises weren’t fireworks, but gunshots. Fifty-nine murdered; 525 wounded. This is unfathomable, indefensible; yet, only the scale makes it shock- ing. We’re used to senseless whole-

sale murder by now. That someone would acquire a small arsenal, haul it to the 32nd floor of a high-rise Las Vegas hotel, then rain hundreds of deadly rounds into a packed crowd of innocent people below, is horrendous beyond words. But we’ve seen such madness before. Forty-nine dead in Orlando in

  • 2016. Fourteen in San Bernardino in

  • 2015. Twenty-six at Sandy Hook,

Conn., in 2012. Thirty-two at Blacksburg, Va., in 2007. The slaugh- ter goes on. It was worse in Las Vegas. The only warning 22,000 concertgoers got as the madman put them in his sights were the reports from the bullets he fired. This week, the House of Representatives is scheduled to con- sider a bill — essentially written by the National Rifle Association — that will remove the ban on silencers. If

Other voices

the madman’s shots had been silenced, would even more have died? There’s no good reason to remove this ban; no public good being served. The NRA simply dislikes any limit on its immoral pursuit of prof- its. We already have enough guns to arm every man, woman and child in America; so now they want to sell deadly accessories. It gets worse. In the same damnable bill, the “Sportsmen’s Heritage And Recreational Enhancement Act,” would allow armor-piercing bullets to be sold under the guise of “sport” - though we’ve never seen an armored deer. What this law will really do is make it easier for madmen to kill us more efficiently and quietly.

We’re not asking for a gun ban or

that law-abiding people give up their guns. We’re asking Republicans to stand against legislation that makes everyone less safe. Even if this bill fails, there are oth- ers in the pipeline. Later this year, Congress will consider a bill requir- ing states with sensible gun control measures — such as California — to honor con cealed-carry permits issued by states with weaker laws. In a less polarized time, sensible Republicans considered this an infringement on states’ rights. But

this year, 13 California Republicans are co-sponsoring “reciprocity legis-

lation,” one of the NRA’s top priori-

ties. Rep. Jeff Denham has not signaled how he will vote on the reciprocity bill, but he isn’t among its 212 Republican co-sponsors. We hope that means he’ll vote against it. We hope, too, that he will cast his vote against legalizing cop-killer bullets and overturning the 75-year-old ban on silencers. If he does, he’s likely to be a lonely Republican. Two weeks ago, Rep. Tom McClintock defended lifting the silencer ban in a press release:

“Suppressors are important devices to reduce hearing damage for shooters — my father suffered from it — as well as to reduce noise at shooting ranges located near residential areas.” Hearing loss? Those who visit shooting ranges or carry guns into the field wear headsets or ear plugs or both. Fifty cents worth of foam works better than a $1,000 silencer. We suggest co-sponsors McClintock, Devin Nunes and David Valadao tune out the sinister whispers of gun lobbyists and listen instead to the cries of the wounded in Las Vegas. Or the echoes of those who died in San Bernardino or Blacksburg or Sandy Hook. In memory of those who have died, don’t make it easier to kill more of us.

Letters to the editor

Being civil

Editor, How do we learn to be civil? It starts at the top. If you don’t already have your own values, you tend to follow those in charge, from politi- cal, religious, business leaders, and most importantly, parents. Obviously, America is going the wrong way from the top down, and I recently saw an awful example by a parent driving her son to Aragon High School. She was driving an SUV behind me as I was about to enter a heavily congested school intersec- tion in front of Baywood Elementary. I was going slower than the 25 MPH speed limit because there were easily 50 small children within a 200-foot radius from me on sidewalks or get- ting ready to cross the street. She became exasperated and threw her hands up in the air at me, so I gave the same gesture back and the next thing I know she is using her middle finger, with her son at her side. I felt really badly for him having to see his parent behave that way. They were probably running late and she doesn’t know CA vehicle code 22350 that states “No person shall drive

a vehicle at a speed greater than is rea- sonable or prudent…having due regard

for

the safety of persons or property.”

... She held no regard for prudence, safety, civility or t eaching her son how to act like an adult. Let’s hope he has other role models to follow and that he doesn’t watch the news.

Tim Grant

San Mateo

Questions for San Mateo City Council candidates

Editor, I would like to ask a couple of ques- tions to the candidates running for San Mateo City Council. I would appreciate if the council candidates could answer three questions so vot- ers could get a clear understanding on issues many of us feel are relevant and important. Your constituents would be very interested in the responses, as there are many voters on both sides of these issues. Here are the questions:

1. What are your thoughts on the rent control measure (Measure Q) that

was defeated last year after the City

Council was unable to pass a tempo- rary just-cause eviction ordinan ce?

  • 2. What are your thoughts about the

city’s current pension obligations to current and retired city workers? Do you believe they are adequately funded

or do you feel future tax increases are needed to shore them up?

  • 3. What are your thoughts on police

cooperation or non-cooperation with federal immigration officers in the city of San Mateo as it pertains to illegal immigration? There are no right or wrong answers; however I think a clear, transparent answer would give San Mateo voters a good understanding on who you are and what you believe. The San Mateo Daily Journal has a terrific website. You can post your answers right under this letter and it will get out to voters at no cost to you. Thank you in advance for taking the time to answer these questions, I believe you will be doing you and your community a great service.

Christopher P. Conway San Mateo

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perspectives are those of the individual writer and do not necessarily represent the views of the Daily Journal staff.

or by phone at: 344-5200, ext. 107 Editorials represent the viewpoint of the Daily Journal editorial board and not any one individual.

Guest

perspective

Oh, what to do with Foster City’s extra $17.65 million?

By Bob Cushman

F or a politician, anything labeled “excess funds” represents a temptation to spend money on pet projects and initiatives that may be

nice, but not essential. For this reason, Foster City taxpayers need to keep a careful eye on city plans for allocating our $17.65 million in excess reserves. Ideally, I believe that excess reserves — especially if they are large — should be returned to the taxpayers in some way. If that is not possible, they should be allocated to something that is essen- tial, not optional, and certainly not to pet projects. I propose that our current $17.65 million in excess reserves be used to partially pay down the estimated $90 million bond issue for levee improvements. Financing these improvements is an example of something that is essential. Reducing the load that property owners will shoulder from $90 million to $73 million would reduce their bond payments by 19 percent. It would be one way to give the money back to taxpayers. Since the bond levee will require a two-thirds vote to pass, the $17.65 million contribution from city

THE DAILY JOURNAL OPINION Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 9 Finding a way to end nationwide

funds would make it easier to pass the bond levy. Actually, the city could contribute even more if the City Council were willing to reduce the reserves to somewhere between one-third to 50 percent of budget- ed expenditures. Doing so would help propel a two- thirds approval for this essential project. But, both the city manager and the City Council have said they do not want to use the excess reserves to reduce the size of the bond. It is clear they want to

reserve the $17 million for other purposes. What could these other purposes be? One possibility is the purchase of land from Sares Regis, now under discus- sion in closed sessions of the City Council. Another possibility is the need to refurbish/repl ace/rebuild the city’s Recreation Center. It is not likely that

either of these two projects would r eceive the neces- sary two-thirds vote needed to pass, if put to the vot- ers. According to city policy, our city reserve account should be kept somewhere between a low of one-third to a high of one-half of our budgeted operating expenses. These are the funds that we would rely on for emergencies or to carry us through difficult eco- nomic slumps. The city refers to funds that ex ceed the 50 percent threshold as “excess reserves.” At times, during the last quarter of the fiscal year that ended June 30, our reserve account exceeded 104 percent of our operating budget. Various expenditures and transfers took pl ace to reduce the reserve account to a bit more than 90 percent by July 1, the start of this new fiscal year. The allocation of a little more than $2 million to finance the Employee Home Loan and Rent Assistance program took pl ace dur ing this time. At the beginning of the current fiscal year, we had $17.65 million in “excess reserves” left; that is, funds one-third to one-half in excess over the actual budget. The vote of the levee bond issues is now scheduled to take place in June 2018. If the $17.65 million is no longer available at that time, the idea of using it to partially fund the levee will no longer be an option. Will it be allocated for other purposes before then? Would these other purposes have r eceived a two- thirds voter approval? What if the bond issue fails? These are questions that should cause citizens to mon- itor the activities of our City Council. On Sept. 18, the council held its second closed ses- sion with Sares Regis concerning price and terms to purchase property from them. We do not know if any action was taken at that meeting or if any general

understanding was r eached

some thing that might

... be short of any official action. On Oct. 23, the council will meet in a study session to discuss the Recreation Center. It is time for citi-

zens to say alert, to listen in on these discussions and to write the council to let them know how you feel.

Bob Cushman is a longtime Foster City resident and a member of the leadership team of Foster City Residents for Responsible Dev elopment.

  • 10 Monday Oct. 9, 2017

BUSINESS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Tourism drop means Harvey still punishing Texas beach towns

By Will Weissert

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PORT ARANSAS, Texas — Born and raised in this Texas Gulf Coast b each town, James Wheeler Jr. finds himself sawing ply- wood and hanging sheet rock at a time when he would normally be leading deep-sea fish- ing excursions, trying to hook tuna or Spanish mackerel by the cooler-full. Since Hurricane Harvey came through Port Aransas just before Labor Day — dam- aging or destroying 80 percent of homes and business and wiping out the lucrative summer season’s final weeks — the 38-year- old boat captain has become an amateur builder, working to repair the roof of a sea headquarters building where he and others dock their pleasure crafts. “Port Aransas is built on the tourist dol- lar,” said Wheeler, ticking off attractions besides fishing: surfing, nature reserves, seafood restaurants and beaches where it’s always cocktail hour. “That dollar’s not coming right now.” In many Texas seaside enclaves, the own- ers of bars and eateries, inns and T-shirt shops are facing a painful paradox: Tourists

10 Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 BUSINESS THE DAILY JOURNAL Tourism drop means Harvey still punishing

REUTERS

Homes across Houston and surrounding southern Texas communities still struggle to recover

after being ravaged by Hurricane Harvey.

who are their economic lifeblood likely won’t return until the rebuild is in full swing, but picking up the pieces after Harvey may not truly begin without the profits tourists bring. “That’s the risk,” said David Teel, presi-

dent of the Texas Travel Industry Association. “The recovery will come. But it will never be fast enough for these folks.” Insurance money and support from federal grants will help residents rebuild homes and businesses, and in some cases even cover

businesses’ lost income and employees’ lost wages. But that will pale in comparison to what tourists would normally be spend- ing, likely helping ensure that recovery moves more slowly. Locals expect the normally busy Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s holidays to be slow. Even the possibility of getting back to business by spring break looks bleak. Visitors to Texas’ Gulf Coast spent $18.7 billion last year, according to state esti- mates, and the region’s tourism industry employed 170,000-plus people. Visitors spent $221 million in 2016 just in Port Aransas, a onetime fishing village that’s now home to around 4,000 full-time resi- dents. In other years, October is when “Winter Texans” — part-time residents from colder locales — take up temporary residence, while shorter-term tourists come for the weekends. The influx of people is normally enough to keep the economy robust through the holidays and until spring. Wheeler says he’d usually be organizing large fishing trips nearly every day, but now takes just one smaller excursion a week.

Losses at Trump’s Scottish resorts doubled

By Bernard Condon

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Donald Trump boasts of making great deals, but a financial report filed with the British government shows he has lost millions of dollars for three years running on a couple of his more recent big investments: his Scottish golf resorts. A report from Britain’s Companies House released late Friday shows losses last year at the two resorts more than doubled to 17.6 million pounds ($23 million). Revenue also fell sharply. In the report, Trump’s company attributed the results partly to having shut down its Turnberry resort for half the year while

building a new course there and fixing up an

old one.

His company has faced several setbacks since it ventured into Scotland a dozen years ago, and its troubles recently have mounted. The company has angered some local res- idents near its second resort on the North Sea with what they say are its bullying tac- tics to make way for more development. The company also has lost a court fight to stop an offshore windmill farm near that resort drew objections from environmental regula- tors over building plans there in August and appears at risk of losing a bid to host the coveted Scottish Open at its courses. Amanda Miller, a spokeswoman for the Trump Organization, declined to comment.

Foster City-based Antevia, Inc. earned the 2017 “Commitment to Excellence — Gold” by the industry leading Cartus Global Rental Network. Antevia offers destination services, rental housing

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Big tech has big plans to help connect Puerto Rico

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Facebook and Google once aimed to con- nect the world. Now they would be happy just to reconnect part of it. In the wake of Hurricane Maria, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg pledged to send a “con- nectivity team” to help restore communica- tions in ravaged Puerto Rico. Google parent company Alphabet offered to send its Wi-Fi balloons. They were among several tech com- panies proposing disaster response ideas, most aimed at getting phone and internet serv- ice up and running. Some of these plans, of course, are more aspirational than others. Tesla CEO Elon Musk often takes to Twitter

to mull over ideas, but on Friday his musings about sending his company’s solar-powered batteries to help restore Puerto Rico’s power attracted the attention of the island’s governor. “Let’s talk,” said Gov. Ricardo Rossello in a Friday tweet . Musk agreed. Hours later, he announced he was delaying the unveiling of Tesla’s new semi-truck and diverting resources, in part to “increase battery production for Puerto Rico and other affected areas.”

The need for help in restoring power and

communication after Hurricane Maria is great:

The Puerto Rican energy authority reported Saturday that about 88 percent of the island is still without power. The Federal Communications Commission said Saturday that 82 percent of cell sites remain out in Puerto Rico; 58 percent are out of service in the U.S. Virgin Islands. The FCC’s daily status report also shows significant wireline, TV and radio outages remain in both U.S. territories. The agency formed a task force this week and approved an advance of $77 million to support carriers working to restore telecommunications serv- ices. But many offers of help from big companies remain somewhat vague. Google parent com- pany Alphabet has proposed launching bal- loons over the island to bring Wi-Fi service to hard-to-reach places, as it has in other parts of the world. The FCC announced Saturday that it’s approved an experimental license for Project Loon to operate in Puerto Rico. But that does- n’t mean it will able to get them in the air soon.

10 Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 BUSINESS THE DAILY JOURNAL Tourism drop means Harvey still punishing
WINLESS WOES: NINERS LOSE IN OVERTIME FOR SECOND STRAIGHT WEEK TO FALL TO 0-5 ON SEASON
WINLESS WOES: NINERS LOSE IN OVERTIME FOR SECOND STRAIGHT WEEK TO FALL TO 0-5 ON SEASON >> PAGE 13
<<< Page 15, Yankees stave off
elimination with Game 3 victory
Monday • Oct. 9, 2017
WINLESS WOES: NINERS LOSE IN OVERTIME FOR SECOND STRAIGHT WEEK TO FALL TO 0-5 ON SEASON

Edelman authors children’s book

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEWTON, Mass. — NFL star Julian Edelman is getting a different kind of recep- tion these days — as a children’s book author. The New England Patriots wide receiver is out for the season with an injury and is scheduled to perform a special reading of his new book, “Flying High,” at the Jewish Community Center in Newton, Massachusetts. The center says Edelman will read on Tuesday from a special edition of the book,

which originally was released last year.

WINLESS WOES: NINERS LOSE IN OVERTIME FOR SECOND STRAIGHT WEEK TO FALL TO 0-5 ON SEASON

Julian Edelman

His book tells the semi-autobiographical story of a football-playing squirrel named Jules.

Edelman’s appearance is part of PJ Library, a global Jewish children’s book program.

His book tells the

semi-autobiographical

not. Edelman reconnected with his Jewish heritage during a 2015 trip to Israel. Edelman is a 2005 graduate of Woodside High School, where he led Wildcats football to

an undefeated 13-0 record and the program’s

last Central Coast Section championship. He went on to play at College of San Mateo in 2005 before transferring to Kent State University in Ohio.

story of a football-play- ing squirrel named Jules. Edelman’s father is Jewish but his mother is

RWC 49ers clinch crown

PopWarner PeeWees earn conference title with 30-0 win vs. rival

By Terry Bernal

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

You want a 49ers dynasty? The Redwood City 49ers of the Pop Warner Football League Peninsula Conference are laying claim to one. The 12-year-olds of the RWC 49ers Pee Wee squad (7-0) Sunday clinched the Peninsula Conference title and a berth in the Pop Warner Super Bowl with a 30-0 win over their rival Menlo-Atherton Vikings. It is the second straight year the RWC Pee Wee team will advance to the 32-team Super Bowl tournament in Orlando, Florida. Entering into Sunday’s showdown, the Vikings (5-2) were the only team that could stand between the 49ers and Orlando. It was a tall order for RWC, as the Vikings had pre- viously recorded five straight shutouts. In fact, the only touchdown Menlo-Atherton had allowed was on the season’s first drive in an eventual 6-0 loss to Santa Clara. After a gritty defensive first half, the 49ers took a slim 8-0 lead into halftime. They erupted in the second half, though, scoring on their first three drives after the break to put the game away. “At the beginning of the game it just goes like that sometimes,” RWC 49ers head coach Shamir Bey said. “I think we have a disciplined team. A strong, disciplined team. So we played hard for four quarters.” The win punctuated the weekend with some redemption for Bey, whose son Shamir Jr. is the starting varsity quarterback at Archbishop Mitty. Meanwhile, Vikings head coach Harold Atkins’ son Andres is a senior wide receiver for the Serra Padres, who scored a lopsided 64-21 win over Mitty Friday night. “There was a little redemption today,” Bey joked. “But this is a crosstown rivalry. We have fun with it.”

See PEE WEES, Page 14

WINLESS WOES: NINERS LOSE IN OVERTIME FOR SECOND STRAIGHT WEEK TO FALL TO 0-5 ON SEASON

TERRY BERNAL/DAILY JOURNAL

Danny Niu, middle, of the Redwood City 49ers celebrates after an interception by Anthony

Delguidice, right, in the second half of a 30-0 win over the Menlo-Atherton Vikings Sunday at

Menlo-Atherton High School.

Ravens 30, Raiders 17

WINLESS WOES: NINERS LOSE IN OVERTIME FOR SECOND STRAIGHT WEEK TO FALL TO 0-5 ON SEASON

CARY EDMONDSON/USA TODAY SPORTS

Raiders quarterback EJ Manuel is sacked by

Ravens safety Tony Jefferson Sunday at the

Oakland Coliseum.

Baltimore sacks Carr-lessRaiders

By Josh Dubow

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OAKLAND — The Raiders (2-3), playing without injured star quarterback Derek Carr and two key cornerbacks, played from behind all day Sunday as the Baltimore Ravens rolled to a 30-17 victory Sunday.

Mike Wallace caught a tone-setting 52- yard pass from Joe Flacco on the first play from scrimmage to set up an early touchdown for the Ravens, and Jimmy Smith added a fumble return for a score on the next drive.

Smith returned Jared Cook’s fumble 47 yards for a touchdown that made it 14-0 just 3:50 in.

Backup quarterback E.J. Manuel, making his fourth start in the past three seasons, threw a 41-yard touchdown pass to Michael Crabtree and led another TD drive that ended in Marshawn Lynch’s 3-yard run. He fin- ished 13 for 26 for 159 yards.

But that wasn’t nearly enough for the Raiders, who have dropped three straight

See RAIDERS, Page 14

WINLESS WOES: NINERS LOSE IN OVERTIME FOR SECOND STRAIGHT WEEK TO FALL TO 0-5 ON SEASON

The San Francisco 49ers during the national anthem

Sunday at Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis.

VP Pence leaves 49ers game after protest

By Michael Marot

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

INDIANAPOLIS — Vice President Mike Pence left the 49ers-Colts game after about a dozen San Francisco play- ers took a knee during the national anthem Sunday. The former Indiana governor flew in so he could watch Peyton Manning’s jersey retirement ceremony. Pence didn’t stick

around long. Right around kickoff, Pence wrote on Twitter: “I left today’s Colts game

WINLESS WOES: NINERS LOSE IN OVERTIME FOR SECOND STRAIGHT WEEK TO FALL TO 0-5 ON SEASON

Mike Pence

because (at)POTUS

and I will not dignify

any event that disre- spects our soldiers, our Flag, or our National Anthem.” The White House also issued a statement

from Pence, in which

he said Americans

should rally around the flag. Pence said: “I don’t think it’s too much to ask NFL players to respect the Flag and our National Anthem.”

San Francisco 49ers safety Eric Reid said Pence’s departure looked like “a PR stunt.” “He knew our team has had the most players protest, he knew that we were probably going to do it again,” Reid said. “This is what systemic oppression looks like: man with power comes to the

game, tweets a couple things out and

leaves the game in an attempt to thwart our efforts.” NFL spokesman Brian McCarthy

See VEEP, Page 13

  • 12 Monday Oct. 9, 2017

LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Monday Oct. 9, 2017

13

Niners still winless after OT drama

By Michael Marot

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

INDIANAPOLIS — Adam Vinatieri brought the perfect gift to Peyton Manning’s big celebration Sunday. Another game-winning kick. After Indianapolis blew a 14-point lead in the final eight minutes of reg- ulation, the last remaining Colts player from Manning’s first Super Bowl team easily made a 51-yard field goal with 1:38 left in overtime for a 26-23 victory over San Francisco. “I obviously knew that it was our last opportunity to put points on the board,” Vinatieri said. “You know what that means if you make it, and you know what it doesn’t if you don’t. So you have to focus in.” He and Manning used to perform that routine together. Like Manning, Vinatieri is considered one of the best to ever play the game at his position. And, like Manning, few have per- formed as calmly or consistently for so long as Vinatieri, who made four more kicks Sunday. The last one not only gave Indy (2- 3) its second win in three weeks, both against winless teams, but it also moved him into second all-time on the NFL’s career list for field goals made. Vinatieri has one more than Gary Anderson (538). San Francisco (0-5) is one of three winless teams still left in the NFL. Cleveland and the New York Giants

Colts 26, 49ers 23

THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 13 Niners still winless after OT drama

BRIAN SPURLOCK/USA TODAY SPORTS

Adam Vinatieri kicks a 51-yard game-winning field goal Sunday in overtime.

are the others. On the field, it didn’t resemble the masterpieces Manning often created on this same field. Vinatieri and Robbie Gould each made two field goals in the first half and Vinatieri broke the tie with a 38- yarder midway through the third quar- ter. Marlon Mack finally scored the first TD on a 22-yard run late in the third and Jacoby Brissett added a 3- yard scoring run early in the fourth to give the Colts a seemingly safe 23-9 lead. Again, the Colts couldn’t put it

away. “I thought we were able to stick with it, press through; the defense gave us a chance to stay in it,” coach Kyle Shanahan said. “They gave us some time to where we could start clicking.” The 49ers rallied behind Kyle Juszczyk’s 6-yard TD catch with eight minutes left and forced overtime when tight end George Kittle bulled his way across the goal line on a 7- yard TD catch on fourth-and-goal with 20 seconds to go. But, naturally, Vinatieri sent Manning home with a win.

VEEP

Continued from page 11

declined to comment on Pence’s walkout. The Colts also had no com- ment, and after their 26-23 overtime victory, Indianapolis coach Chuck Pagano steered clear of the issue.

“No,” Pagano said when asked if he had any reaction to what Pence did.

Colts players stood in unison, locking arms but standing through- out the anthem.

But the 49ers have been among the most visible protesters in the league. Last year, former quarterback Colin Kaepernick started the movement to kneel or sit during the anthem, and Reid and other teammates backed him up on and off the field.

President Donald Trump later tweeted: “I asked (at)VP Pence to leave stadium if any players kneeled, disrespecting our country. I am proud of him and (at)SecondLady Karen.”

Pence is a noted sports fan and it was the second major event he’s attended in his home state since tak- ing office in January. He also attend- ed May’s Indianapolis 500, a family tradition.

Manning b ecame the first Indianapolis-era player in Colts history to have his number retired. He also was inducted into the team’s Ring of Honor.

Pence flew in on Saturday after a statue of Manning was unveiled, an event attended by a number of lumi- naries including NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell. Instead, Pence spent most of Saturday honoring victims of the Las Vegas shooting before returning to his home state.

Vice President Mike Pence and
Vice
President
Mike
Pence
and

Second Lady Karen Pence during the

national anthem Sunday.

Local football roundup

Menlo-Atherton 42, Sacred Heart Prep 35

Another one in the crosstown rivalry department — heavily- favored Menlo-Atherton (2-0 PAL Bay, 4-2 overall) held out to win an absolute thriller on its home turf Friday night against Sacred Heart Prep (0-2, 1-5), breaking a 35-35 tie in the closing minutes

THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 13 Niners still winless after OT drama

Nick Anderson

on a 15-yard scoring pass from Miles Conrad to Jake Wang. M-A took a 28-21 lead into halftime after a spectacular showing by senior Nick Anderson, who scored three touchdowns before the break. He broke two epic kickoff returns, one for 96 yards and another for 85, and added a 51-yard scoring run.

In the third quarter, M-A went up 35-21 on a

pick-6 by Rashad Johnson. SHP quarterback

Brad Yaffe (21 of 34, 272 yards passing) led the Gators back though with two scores, one via rush and another via pass to senior Kyle Cody to tie it midway through the fourth quarter.

Half Moon Bay 39, Burlingame 15

Half Moon Bay (1-0 PAL Bay, 6-0 overall) needed just 242 total yards of offense to dismantle Burlingame 39-15 Friday night on the Coastside. The victory marks the Cougars’ first in Peninsula Athletic League Bay Division play since Nov. 9, 2006. Senior running back Chase Hofmann continued to front the

THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 13 Niners still winless after OT drama

Chase Hofmann

Cougars, rushing for four touchdowns on 22 car- ries for 90 yards. His younger brother, freshman Tristan Hofmann, continues to electrify en route to possibly becoming the best freshman varsity player HMB has ever produced, leading the defensive charge with nine tackles. After the Panthers (0-2, 4-2) swept through their nonleague slate, they struggled to score points for the second straight week in

Peninsula Athletic League Bay Division play.

Burlingame managed just 230 total yards, 80 of which came on a long scoring run by Youcef Benchohra (six rushes for 99 yards).

King’s Academy 49, Woodside 6

The King’s Academy (1-1 PAL Ocean, 1-5 overall) rushed for 222 yards, including 123 yards from sophomore Jayden Frazier, to earn its first victory of the year over winless Woodside (0-2, 0-6). Frazier added an 85-yard kickoff return for a touchdown, giving him 208 all-purpose yards on the evening. Woodside quarterback Trevor Cook was 8-of-19 passing for 159 yards and produced the Wildcats’ lone score with the first touchdown pass of his varsity career.

Jefferson 35, Capuchino 3

Jefferson running back Angelo Velez produced his third 200-yard- plus, four-touchdown game of the season to lead the Grizzlies (2-0 PAL Lake, 5-1 overall) to a blowout of Capuchino (0-1, 2-4) in Daly City. Velez rushed for 225 yards on a career-high 22 carries to surpass the 1,000-yard mark on the season. He currently has 1,027 yards through five games, according to MaxPreps.com, currently ranking third in the Central Coast Section.

Mills 22, El Camino 8

Nuku Vahai enjoyed a career night, nabbing three interceptions

and rushing for a touchdown on offense as the Vikings (1-0 PAL Lake, 3-3 overall) cruised past El Camino (0-2, 2-4). Andrew Killigrew added a scoring run for Mills in the team’s Peninsula Athletic League Lake Division opener.

THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 13 Niners still winless after OT drama
THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 13 Niners still winless after OT drama
THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 13 Niners still winless after OT drama
THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 13 Niners still winless after OT drama
THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 13 Niners still winless after OT drama
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SPORTS

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PEE WEES

Continued from page 11

The fun stems from Atkins having strong ties with the RWC 49ers. He has coached through the Vikings’ system for seven years since his younger son Alexander started playing at the Pop Warner Tiny-Mite level. Previously, Atkins served as a head coach for the RWC 49ers from 2008-10, and previous- ly coached for the Bayside Broncos from

1999-2007.

While the RWC 49ers have clinched Peninsula Conference crown, the Vikings still have a playoff berth in their sights. Currently tied for second pl ace in the confer- ence, Menlo-Atherton can wrap up a spot in the regional playoffs with a win this Sunday against the Bayside Broncos. By virtue of clinching the conference title, RWC receives a regional-round bye and advances straight to the national tourna- ment. “Holding that team to 8 for a half, that tells me a lot about our team,” Atkins said. It was an exciting first half of defense. RWC shut down the Vikings’ opening drive on four plays for a turnover on downs, then — thanks to a fourth-down screen pass from Kyrie Harper to running back Danny Niu going for 36 yards into the red zone — the 49ers advanced to the Vikings’ 4-yard line. Menlo-Atherton responded with a clutch goal-line stand though, fronted by middle linebacker Greyson Mobley, who got in on three consecutive stops to force fourth down. “Super stud,” Atkins said of Mobley, who

14 Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL PEE WEES Continued from page 11
14 Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL PEE WEES Continued from page 11

TERRY BERNAL/DAILY JOURNAL

Left: Redwood City 49ers wide receiver Johno Price

gets airborne for a 19-yard reception in the fourth

quarter of the 49ers’ 30-0 win over the Menlo-Atherton

Vikings to clinch the Pop Warner League Pee Wee

Peninsula Conference championship Sunday.

Above: Vikings running back Greyson Mobley, left,

attempts to straight-arm 49ers defender Joseph Bey.

also plays running back. “You see his physi- cality. He’s our Draymond Green.” Along with a false-start penalty, RWC faced fourth-and-goal from the Vikings 6. Then Menlo-Atherton’s Teddy Chung chased down Harper to hold a bootleg to 3 yards, forcing a turnover on downs. “We do that all the time,” Atkins said. “That’s attitude.” But the RWC defense was on point as well. And after the Vikings were driven backward

from their own 3, they on fourth down opted to take the safety to give RWC a 2-0 lead. The 49ers then got favorable field position after the ensuing kick and moved 35 yards on six plays — highlighted by an 18-yard pass from Harper to Anthony Delguidice — to see Niu pound in a 1-yard touchdown run. “They hit us pretty hard at the start but then we were able to come back and move the ball against them,” Niu said. Niu totaled 85 yards rushing on 10 carries

with three touchdowns, and started the sec- ond half in spectacular fashion. On the 49ers’ first play of the half from their own 46, Niu dashed through the middle for a 31- yard pickup. Two plays later, up back Andrew Latu blasted for a 21-yard score. Then Delguidice from the cornerback spot took the ball back for the 49ers with the game’s only interception at the Vikings 22- yard line. Three plays later, Niu turned a cor- ner to sweep for a 10-yard score. With 2 points awarded from extra-point kicks in Pop Warner, 49ers place kicker Juan Patino drilled two point-after tries to start the second half as RWC took a 24-0 lead. It was Patino’s first game as the team’s place kicker. His third attempt, just four minutes later, would fail only b ecause of a botched snap. RWC’s final scoring drive included the

play of the game with Harper connecting

over the middle with Johno Price for a 19- yard pass. Price ran over the middle and got some serious hang-time on a high leap with Harper’s pass drilling him right in the numbers. “He went up and got it,” Bey said. “The quarterback pinned it on him pretty good and he was able to protect himself.” “Even if I got hit, I still would have held onto it,” Price said. He didn’t though. And on the following play, Niu scored his third TD of the day on a 3-yard sweep. “Right after we started gaining yards, we just gave the rock to our main guys and just started scoring point,” Niu said. The RWC Pee Wee team isn’t the only 49ers team making noise. The Mighty-Mite 49ers and head coach Mick Taylor are off to a 7-0 start as well.

RAIDERS

Continued from page 11

following a 2-0 start, putting a severe dent in their hopes to challenge in the AFC West. “It’s a big shock to start the season off this way,” running back Jalen Richard said. “I don’t even know what to say. It’s like a bad shock. We just keep getting whooped. It’s just going to come down to when (are) we going to get tired of getting whooped.” The Ravens had also lost two in a row fol- lowing a 2-0 start, but reversed that slide

thanks to Flacco and the opportunistic defense. Flacco completed 19 of 26 passes for 222 yards.

Vince Mayle’s 2-yard touchdown run on

an end-around and the Ravens (3-2) got

going after being held scoreless in losses the past two weeks.

Flacco had struggled to get the ball down- field against Jacksonville and Pittsburgh, averaging less than 4 yards an attempt those games. But the early deep ball to Wallace helped open things up and the two connect- ed later on a 54-yard pass and a 27-yarder, equaling the team’s season total of 20-yard pass plays in the previous four weeks.

“It definitely feels good to let the ball go

down the field and let Mike go get one,” Flacco said. “You can see it on his face, when he starts getting involved, how much he gets revved up and how much it helps our offense.”

Key drive

The Coliseum was rocking after Lynch’s TD cut Baltimore’s lead to 24-17 late in the third quarter. The Ravens, who had been held to three-and-outs the first two drives of the second half, responded with a 72-yard drive to a 21-yard field goal by Justin Tucker that gave Baltimore a 10-point lead. Fl acco con- verted a pair of third downs on the drive, completing a 13-yard pass to Breshad

Perriman on third-and-3, and a 27-yarder to Wallace on third-and-8.

Questionable decision

The Raiders drove into Baltimore territory on the next drive and faced fourth-and-3 from the Ravens 44 with about nine minutes left. Coach Jack Del Rio opted to punt despite the 10-point deficit, and Marquette King sent it into the end zone for a touch- back. Baltimore then drove 64 yards in 6:26 to take a 13-point lead.

“It didn’t go anything like it needed to,” Del Rio said. “The fourth down call with 9 minutes left in the game, was that the differ- ence today? I don’t think so.”

14 Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL PEE WEES Continued from page 11
14 Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL PEE WEES Continued from page 11
14 Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL PEE WEES Continued from page 11
14 Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL PEE WEES Continued from page 11
14 Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL PEE WEES Continued from page 11

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Monday Oct. 9, 2017

15

Tanaka gets a little help from his friends as Yanks win Game 3

By Mike Fitzpatrick

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Good thing for Masahiro Tanaka and the Yankees that Aaron Judge is

6-foot-7.

Judge prevented a home run to save Tanaka’s seven-inning gem, Greg Bird homered off relief ace Andrew Miller and New York edged the Cleveland Indians 1-0 Sunday night in Game 3 to extend their AL Division Series. “He was brilliant,” Yankees manager Joe Girardi said about Tanaka, who earned his first postseason win. “He gave us every- thing we needed.” Aroldis Chapman got a five-out save as the Yankees avoided a three-game sweep by the defending AL champions. With two on in the ninth, Chapman struck out cleanup hitter and former Reds teammate Jay Bruce before Carlos Santana flied out to end it. New York got a splendid performance from Tanaka in an old-fashioned October pitching duel with Cleveland starter Carlos Carrasco. Tanaka received a big boost when Judge robbed Francisco Lindor of a two-run homer in the sixth. Bird came through with the huge hit New York had to have when he connected against Miller in the seventh. “I was really excited, I’m not going to lie,” said Bird, who was pumped up as he returned to the dugout. Game 4 is Monday night at Yankee Stadium, with young ace Luis Severino scheduled to start for New York. Cleveland will go with Game 1 winner Trevor Bauer on three days’ rest, though there’s rain in the forecast. “I consider this normal rest for me. I

THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 15 Tanaka gets a little help from

ANTHONY GRUPPUSO/USA TODAY SPORTS

Greg Bird celebrates after hitting a solo home run in the seventh inning of the Yankees’ 1-0

win over Cleveland Sunday in Game 3 of the American League Division Series.

enjoy pitching on short (rest),” Bauer said. “If I could draw it out, personally, this is how I’d pitch every time.” New York rebounded from a bruising, 13- inning loss Friday in Game 2. This was the Yankees’ first 1-0 postsea- son victory since Game 3 of their 2001 ALDS against Oakland, when Derek Jeter’s backhanded flip beat Jeremy Giambi to the plate for a crucial, memorable out. Judge’s grab was the big defensive play Sunday. With a runner on first in a scoreless

game, Lindor lofted a sixth-inning drive toward the short right-field porch at Yankee Stadium. Judge backed up to the wall and barely needed to jump to extend his glove above the fence and make the catch, just to the right of the auxiliary scoreboard. “Who better to reach up there and grab it than him?” Bird said. The sellout crowd of 48,614 roared and Judge flashed a bright smile. It was the first time the rookie had robbed an opponent of a home run and the first time Lindor had ever

been so denied, according to ESPN Stats & Info. Tanaka tipped his cap in appreciation and held Cleveland down until he was done. The right-hander, beaten 3-0 by Dallas Keuchel and the Houston Astros in the 2015 AL wild- card game, struck out seven, walked one and allowed three hits. He whiffed three of his first four batters and was aided by two double plays. “That’s the best performance that I’ve seen from him,” Girardi said.

Sox win Game 3 to extend series

BOSTON — Hanley Ramirez waved a “Believe in Boston” flag during pregame introductions, drawing cheers from a Fenway Park crowd fearful of a second straight postseason sweep. Then he gave the Red Sox exactly what they wished for: more October baseball. “I just tried to wake everybody up,” Ramirez said after delivering four hits and three RBIs to lead the AL East champions to a 10-3 victory over the Houston Astros in Game 3 of the AL Division Series on Sunday. “I think that’s my job: Find a way to come through in big situations,” the designated hitter said. “It’s the playoffs. It’s go time.” David Price pitched four scoreless innings after another Boston starter faltered, and 20- year-old Rafael Devers hit the go-ahead homer to help the Red Sox snap a five-game postseason losing streak. Mitch Moreland had three of Boston’s 15 hits — matching its combined total from Games 1 and 2, a pair of 8-2 losses. Jackie Bradley Jr. hit his first postseason homer, a three-run shot in a six-run seventh that put the game away.

CITY OF BELMONT PUBLIC NOTICE OPEN-HOUSE AND PLANNING COMMISSION HEARING Belmont Village Specific Plan (BVSP) Belmont
CITY OF BELMONT
PUBLIC NOTICE
OPEN-HOUSE AND PLANNING COMMISSION HEARING
Belmont Village Specific Plan (BVSP)
Belmont Village Zoning (BVZ)
Tuesday, October 17, 2017
6:00 p.m. Open House
7:00 p.m. Planning Commission Hearing
Belmont City Hall, Council Chambers, 2 nd Floor
One Twin Pines Lane, Belmont
City Staff and the Consultant team will be available at the open-house to answer questions and provide
information on the Belmont Village Specific Plan (BVSP) and Belmont Village Zoning (BVZ). Information areas will
be focused on these City Policy documents. The Planning Commission Hearing will be an additional opportunity
for comment on these documents. The written comment period for the Draft Environmental Impact Report (DEIR)
for the project closed on Friday, August 18, 2017. Refreshments will be provided.
Belmont Village Specific Plan Area
For more information: All documents are available for
review at City Hall between the hours of 8:00 a.m. & 5:00
p.m., Monday to Friday and on these websites:
To submit comments: Comments must be given in person at the
public hearing or in writing by the time of the hearing. Questions
or written comments about the project or the public hearing
should be directed to:
www.belmont-2035generalplan.com
Carlos de Melo, Community Development Director
www.planbelmontvillage.com
cdemelo@belmont.gov |
650-595-7440
www.belmont.gov/ClimateActionPlan
One Twin Pines Lane, Suite 310, Belmont CA 94002
THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 15 Tanaka gets a little help from
THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 15 Tanaka gets a little help from
THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 15 Tanaka gets a little help from
  • 16 Monday Oct. 9, 2017

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

NFL STANDINGS

                 

Truex wins yet another

AMERICAN CONFERENCE

EASTERN CONFERENCE

 

DIVISION SERIES

playoff race for Toyota

East

W L T

Pct

PF

PA

Atlantic Division

GP W L

OT

Pts GF

GA

(Best-of-5; x-if necessary)

Buffalo

3

2 0

.600

89

74

Detroit

2

2

0

0

4

6

3

American League

N.Y. Jets

3

2 0

.600

92

106

Toronto

2

2

0

0

4

15

7

Thursday, Oct. 5: Houston 8, Boston 2

By Jenna Fryer

 

uled for Monday. She couldn’t

New England

Miami

3

2

2 0

2 0

.600

.500

148

142

67

 

Boston

1

1

0

0

2

4

3

Friday, Oct. 6: Houston 8, Boston 2

41

Florida

2

1

1

0

2

8

9

Sunday, Oct. 8: Boston 10, Houston 3

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

come to the race, partly b ecause

South

Jacksonville

Houston

Tennessee

Indianapolis

3

2

2

2

2 0

3 0

3 0

3 0

.600

.400

.400

.400

139

144

110

97

83

130

142

159

Tampa Bay

Ottawa

Montreal

Buffalo

2

2

3

2

1

0

1

0

1

0

2

1

0

2

0

1

Metropolitan Division

Washington 2

2

0

0

2

2

2

1

4

9

5

4

5

11

8

7

10

9

5

Monday, Oct. 9 at Boston, 10:08 a.m. (FS1)

x-Wednesday, Oct. 11 at Houston, TBA (FS1)

Cleveland 2, New York 1

Thursday, Oct. 5: Cleveland 4, New York 0 Friday, Oct. 6: Cleveland 9, NYY 8, 13 innings

Monday, Oct. 9 at New York, 4:08 a.m. (FS1)

 

CONCORD, N.C. — Standing next to his car in victory lane, in this season he never thought pos-

her weakened immune system makes crowds too risky for her. Truex gave Toyota yet another victory in NASCAR’s playoffs —

North

Philadelphia 3

2

1

0

4

8

7

Pittsburgh

3

2 0

.600

99

89

Pittsburgh

3

1

1

1

3

9

15

Sunday, Oct. 8: New York 1, Cleveland 0

sible, Martin Truex Jr. struggled

the manufacturer is 4 for 4 so far —

Baltimore

3

2 0

.600

90

97

New Jersey

1

1

0

0

2

4

1

with his emotions.

on a humid day at Charlotte. Truex

Cincinnati

2

3 0

.400

84

83

Carolina

1

1

0

0

2

5

4

x-Wednesday at Cleveland, 2:38 p.m. (FS1)

Cleveland

0

5 0

.000

77

124

Columbus

2

1

1

0

2

6

5

National League

 

He raced to his career-best s ixth

has two wins in the playoffs and

   

1

1

0

2

6

8

victory Sunday at Charlotte Motor

this one was the first time in this

West

Kansas City

Denver

Raiders

L.A. Chargers

5

3

2

1

0 0

1 0

3 0

4 0

1.000 164

.750

.400

.200

98

108

99

111

74

109

115

 

N.Y. Islanders2 N.Y. Rangers 3

1

2

0

WESTERN CONFERENCE

Central Division

Chicago

2

2

0

0

2

4

9

15

12

2

Chicago 1, Washington 1 Friday, Oct. 6: Chicago 3, Washington 0 Saturday, Oct. 7: Washington 6, Chicago 3

Speedway, and this win is worth an automatic slot in the next round of

format that Toyota has won a race in this round of postseason.

 

St. Louis

2

2

0

0

4

9

6

NASCAR’s playoffs. He’s clearly the

Kyle Busch, winner of the last

NATIONAL CONFERENCE

East

Philadelphia

4

1 0

.800

137

99

Colorado

Minnesota

Nashville

2

2

2

1

0

0

1

1

2

0

1

0

2

1

0

5

6

3

6

9

8

Monday, Oct. 9 at Chicago, 1:08 p.m. (TBS) Tuesday, Oct. 10 at Chicago, 2:38 p.m. (TBS)

x-Thursday, Oct. 12 at Washington, 2:38 p.m. (TBS)

Los Angeles 2, Arizona 0

driver to beat in this championship race, and the reality of how close it

two playoff races, wrecked early in the race yet completed it in a dam-

Washington

2

2 0

.500

91

89

Winnipeg

2

0

2

0

0

5

13

Friday, Oct. 6: Los Angeles 9, Arizona 5

really is seemed somewhat surreal.

aged race car. Complaining most of

Dallas

2

3 0

.400

125

132

Dallas

2

0

2

0

0

3

6

Saturday, Oct. 7: Los Angeles 8, Arizona 5

N.Y. Giants

0

5 0

.000

82

122

Pacific Division

Los Angeles 2

2

0

0

4

6

1

Monday, Oct. 9 at Arizona, 7:08 p.m. (TBS)

Then he thought about his part-

the 500 miles of being overheated, he needed immediate medical atten-

South

Vegas 2

2

0

0

4

4

2

x-Tuesday, Oct. 10 at Arizona, 6:08 p.m. (TBS)

Carolina

4

1 0

.800

105

94

Anaheim

2

1

0

1

3

7

7

x-Thursday, Oct. 12: at Los Angeles, 6:08 p.m. (TBS)

 

ner, Sherry Pollex, who has ovari- an cancer and chemotherapy sched-

tion when he climbed from his car.

Atlanta

3

1 0

.750

104

89

Vancouver

1

1

0

0

2

3

2

 

New Orleans

Tampa Bay

North

2

2

2 0

2 0

.500

.500

93

78

Edmonton

2

1

1

0

2

5

3

 

85

83

Calgary Arizona San Jose

2

2

2

1

0

0

1

1

2

0

1

0

2

1

0

6

5

4

6

7

9

 

Love leads Stanford past Utah

Pac-12 football

undisclosed injury. He began the

season as the starter, but was hurt

Green Bay

Detroit

4

3

1 0

2 0

.800

.600

137

123

112

97

 

SALT LAKE CITY — The Bryce

Salt Lake City on Saturday with No. 20 Utah the latest to leave frustrat- ed by
Salt Lake City
on Saturday
with No. 20
Utah the latest
to leave frustrat-
ed by the show.
Love ran for
152 yards and a
touchdown, and
Stanford handed
Bryce Love
the Utes their
first loss of the season, 23-20.

give their star the ball.

On his

two weeks ago against UCLA, and

Minnesota

Chicago

2

1

2 0

3 0

.500

.250

79

61

76

104

 

Saturday’s Games

New Jersey 4, Colorado 1

Calgary 6, Winnipeg 3

Sunday’s Games

 

Love highlight tour continued in

 

18th touch, the 5-foot-10, 196-

sophomore K.J. Costello helped

West

Washington 6, Montreal 1 Detroit 2, Ottawa 1, SO

pound speedster made two defend-

lead the team to its first two Pac- 12 wins. Both played Saturday and

Seattle

3

2 0

.600

110

87

Toronto 8, N.Y. Rangers 5

ers miss in the hole and ran away

L.A. Rams

3

2 0

.600

152

121

Pittsburgh 4, Nashville 0

Costello threw for 82 yards.

Arizona

2

3 0

.400

81

125

Carolina 5, Minnesota 4, SO

for a 68-yarder that put the

49ers

0

5 0

.000

89

120

N.Y. Islanders 6, Buffalo 3

Cardinal up 23-13 with 12:02

 

Thursday’s Games

Florida 5, Tampa Bay 4 St. Louis 4, Dallas 2

remaining.

No. 6 Washington routs Cal

New England 19, Tampa Bay 14

Sunday’s Games

N.Y. Jets 17, Cleveland 14 Philadelphia 34, Arizona 7 Cincinnati 20, Buffalo 16 Jacksonville 30, Pittsburgh 9 Carolina 27, Detroit 24

 

Chicago 5, Columbus 1 Vegas 2, Arizona 1, OT Vancouver 3, Edmonton 2 Philadelphia 3, Anaheim 2, OT

Los Angeles 4, San Jose 1

Utah (4-1, 1-1) stormed down the field on the ensuing posses- sion with Troy Williams hitting

Darren Carrington for big gains,

SEATTLE — Hunter Bryant had nine catches for 121 yards and a touchdown, Jake Browning threw for two scores and ran for another, and

Cal (3-3, 0-3) was held to 46 total

Miami 16, Tennessee 10

N.Y. Rangers 2, Montreal 0

 

but an interception essentially

No. 6 Washington (6-0, 3-0 Pac-

L.A. Chargers 27, N.Y. Giants 22 Indianapolis 26, San Francisco 23, OT

Monday’s Games

 

12)cruised to a 38-7 victory over Cal

Baltimore 30, Oakland 17 Seattle 16, L.A. Rams 10 Green Bay 35, Dallas 31

Kansas City 42, Houston 34 Open: Washington, New Orleans, Atlanta, Denver

Monday’s Games

Minnesota at Chicago, 5:30 p.m.

 

St. Louis at N.Y. Islanders, 10 a.m.

Colorado at Boston, 10 a.m. New Jersey at Buffalo, noon Chicago at Toronto, 4 p.m. Washington at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m. Winnipeg at Edmonton, 6 p.m. Calgary at Anaheim, 7 p.m.

 

Utah bottled up the nation’s leading rusher for most of the night, but the Cardinal (4-2, 3-1 Pac-12) faithfully continued to

ended the game. Keller Chryst threw for 106 yards and ran for a touchdown for Stanford. The senior got the start after missing last week with an

Saturday night.

yards in the first half and the Bears finished with just 93 total yards.

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Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 THE DAILY JOURNAL NFL STANDINGS Truex wins yet another AMERICAN
Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 THE DAILY JOURNAL NFL STANDINGS Truex wins yet another AMERICAN
Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 THE DAILY JOURNAL NFL STANDINGS Truex wins yet another AMERICAN

THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL

Monday Oct. 9, 2017

17

Purebred or mutt?

A friend was convinced that her PHS-adopted shih tzu- mix was actually a trendy new breed made up of shih tzu and French bulldog until I asked if that meant the

pup was actually a French Bull Shitz? Yea, I know, with

friends like me

Merriam-Webster defines purebred as “bred

... from members of a recognized breed, strain, or kind without admixture of other blood over many generations.” Dictionary.com states “one of a registered breed” and Wikipedia notes the key is when the animals get “recorded.” The common thread: a dog is a purebred because someone says so. Maybe that makes sense when consid- ering venerable institutions like the American Kennel Club. AKC has been recognizing, registering and recording purebreds since 1884. But 133 years of stick-to-it-iveness aside, it is a volun- tary suspension of our collective cyni- cism when we grant authority for others to “recogni ze” and in turn standardize a breed (height, color, etc.). While that ship has sailed for breeds from affenpinschers to Yorkshire terri- ers (sorry, there are no AKC recognized breeds which begin with the letter Z), what about all the new kids on the block? What about the doodles (golden- and labradoodle), pugles (pug- beagle), cockapoos (cocker spaniel-poodle), schnoodles (poo- dle-schnauzer), goldadors, (golden retriever mixed with yellow lab), Yorkipoos and Maltipoos (you guessed it), Chorkies (Chihuahua-Yorki) and pomskies (pomeranian-husky)? You can certainly find “fancier clubs” and breeders for these, the top 10 list of designer dogs, and others but personally I think it’s all a lot of poppycock (itself a combination of the Dutch word for soft food and the Latin for poop). I adore dogs and simply can’t understand why a golden retriev- er mixed with a poodle is more or less wonderful, more or less lovable, as either a goldendoodle or a mutt. The serious issue here is that people are once again monetizing dogs: breeding (some- times in very awful ways) what they know the market wants. Dogs deserve better, and that’s something we can all recognize.

THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 17 Purebred or mutt? A friend was

Ken White is the president of the Peninsula Humane Society & SPCA.

THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 17 Purebred or mutt? A friend was

‘Blade Runner 2049’ pulls in older guys but few others

By Jake Coyle

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — “Blade Runner 2049” had the pedigree, the stars and the stellar reviews. But even though the highly touted sequel had seemingly everything going for it, some- thing didn’t click with audiences. The big-budget, handsomely crafted sequel to the 1982 sci-fi classic opened surprisingly weak at the North American box office. According to studio estimates Sunday, “2049” grossed $31.5 million, a poor start for a movie that cost at least $150 million to make. The problem “Blade runner 2049” ran into is clear from opening-weekend data. The audience was overwhelmingly male (71 percent) and over the age of 25 (86 percent). The movie, starring Ryan Gosling and Harrison Ford, simply

failed to pull in moviegoers beyond fans of the 1982 origi- nal. The opening was a blow most of all to Alcon Entertainment, the production company that split the film’s cost with Sony Pictures. Warner Bros., which released the original and maintained rights for any follow-ups, distrib- uted domestically. Sony released the film internationally, where it performed better with $50.2 million in overseas ticket sales over the weekend. The 20-year-old Alcon, backed by FedEx founder Fred Smith, has been behind some notable successes with Warner Bros. (“The Blind Side,” “Prisoners.”) But its block- buster ambitions —which include flops like “Point Break” and “Transcendence” — have gone rockier. Co-founder Andrew Kosove previously called the ambitious “Blade Runner 2049” “a chips-in-the-center-of-the-table exercise.”

HISTORY

Continued from page 3

started buying railroads, street car lines and real estate in the East Bay. His company holdings included the Claremont Hotel in the Berkeley hills, a landmark once described by famed architect Frank Lloyd Wright as “one of

the few hotels in the world with warmth, character and

charm.” The realty company Smith formed with San Francisco lawyer Frank Haven and East Bay developer John Spring also owned the Key System. Plans called for running trains directly into the lobby of the Claremont. The “E” line never made it that far. It stopped between the hotel tennis courts. The tracks were removed when the line ended service in 1958. The tennis courts are still there, with a path between them where the track used to be. Now that is an unusual “rail to trail” story.

The Rear View Mirror by history columnist Jim Clifford appears in the Daily Journal every other Monday. Objects in The Mirror are closer than they appear.

Transit District took over Key System bus lines. According to the Western Railway Museum in Suisun City, which has the largest collection of surviving Key System equipment, many AC Transit buses follow the same routes used by Key System trains and streetcars. The museum’s collection includes articulated all-steel cars designed and built specifi- cally to run across the bridge. The museum’s Key System cars are in working order and operate on weekends. They are especially popular this time of year when the destination is a pumpkin patch. The official name of the system was “San Francisco, Oakland and San Jose Consolidated Railway,” which was not very catchy. The “Key” came when someone noticed that a route map resembled an old-fashioned key. The last run across the bridge came on April 20, 1956, with 500 passengers jammed in to the train for a farewell ride. The Key System traced its birth back to 1893 when Francis “Borax” Smith of “Twenty Mule Team” fame

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THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 17 Purebred or mutt? A friend was
  • 18 Monday Oct. 9, 2017

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

SCHOOL

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that it is OK for students to be off campus during school hours. Clear communication is essential to reach the school’s academic miss ion too, said Dwinal, as students are assigned work emphasizing analytical processes and problem solv- ing. When struggles occur, t eachers are encouraged to collab- orate alongside their subjects rather than hand down answers. The unconventional approach can be both chal- lenging and rewarding for some students who are more familiar with a traditional school model. “When I ask for help, the teacher gives me guidance on how to get the answer and doesn’t just give me the answer,” said Sofia Sandoval, a 14-year-old East Palo Alto native. She said the constructive interaction not only builds her confidence in working through obstacles, but it also fos- ters a trust with educators expanding beyond the class- room. Sandoval claims the dynamic encourages her to share with her t eachers details of her personal life and home issues which otherwise may have made her feel uncomfort- able discussing. But the focus on individual learning can be difficult as

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well, said Fernando Chavez, especially for students who are not accustomed to a learning environment more akin to college than middle school. Essential to the model is t eachers and administrators trusting lessons are being understood and retained but, when students fall behind, they may not feel comfortable asking for help, said Chavez, 14. Such a scenario can lead to conflicting emotions, accord- ing to Jahkim Hendrix, of East Palo Alto, who said he appreciated the intent of the curriculum but suggested improvements are in order for best implementation. Top of mind for Hendrix, 14, is a need for more dialogue between students and educators as the academy community works together in getting the school off the ground. He said the agency afforded to students can help build their character, as they gain a greater sense of responsibil- ity for taking charge of their education. But with that comes a desire to be more participatory in suggesting improve- ments, he said. A primary example offered by Hendrix is a wish that administrators would grant more opportunities for students to work with community organizations in building the

partnerships central to their education. Students can repair bikes for local churches, help the local police department with its website or social media outlets, work with performing art organizations on music or other productions and a variety of other initiatives. The educational model promotes the programs as a means of connecting students to their community and establish- ing a value to working alongside service-oriented organiza- tions, said Dwinal. While the work should better prepare students for college and careers, she said the higher emphasis is promoting a philosophy encouraging students to be active and engaged in their surroundings. Hendrix though said students should be more integral in building those opportunities and expanding them to local businesses like Facebook, which is headquartered a short distance away. “Why not have better alliances that allow us to put [Oxford Day Academy] on the map?” questioned Hendrix. To hear students sufficiently empowered to start express- ing such sentiments so early into their time at a new school is equal parts encouraging and disconcerting for Dwinal. “It’s starting to click for students. It’s heartening to see them begin to take that up, but it’s also a challenge,” she said. With such issues raising plenty of tough questions, the search for answers regarding whether the innovative acade- my endures will be revealed through the test of time.

Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 THE DAILY JOURNAL SCHOOL Continued from page 1 that it
Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 THE DAILY JOURNAL SCHOOL Continued from page 1 that it
Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 THE DAILY JOURNAL SCHOOL Continued from page 1 that it
Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 THE DAILY JOURNAL SCHOOL Continued from page 1 that it
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THE DAILY JOURNAL Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 19
THE DAILY JOURNAL
Monday • Oct. 9, 2017
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THE DAILY JOURNAL Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 19 TOM JUNG/ DAILY JOURNAL TheatreWorks Silicon Valley

TOM JUNG/ DAILY JOURNAL

TheatreWorks Silicon Valley is busy preparing for its Around the World gala at the Sharon

Heights Golf and Country Club in Menlo Park, Saturday, Nov. 4. Here, left to right, TheatreWorks

Trustee Jayne Booker, Trustee and Gala Chair Cindi Sears, and Trustee Ciro Giammona stand

before the gala centerpiece globe provided by Rick Herns Productions of Redwood City.

Established in Palo Alto in 1970, TheatreWorks has grown into one of the largest theatre

companies in the Bay Area, and one of the nation’s leading presenters of new works. Gala

proceeds will benefit TheatreWorks’ continued mission to bring the performing arts to Bay Area

audiences. For tickets or more information call 463-7112.

Round-faced comic Ralphie May dies of cardiac arrest at 45

LOS ANGELES — A s pokeswoman for Ralphie May says the comedian has died. He was 45.

THE DAILY JOURNAL Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 19 TOM JUNG/ DAILY JOURNAL TheatreWorks Silicon Valley

Ralphie May

In a statement Friday, publicist St acey Pokluda says May died of cardiac arrest. She said he had been fighting pneumo- nia, which caused him to cancel a few appearances in the past month.

His body was found

Friday morning at a pri- vate residence in Las

Vegas. On Wednesday, the round-faced May was named casino comedian of the year at the Global Gaming Expo. He was booked through the rest of 2017 at Harrah’s Las Vegas.

Around the nation

Rapper Nelly arrested on rape accusation

SEATTLE — Police arrested rapper Nelly

early Saturday after a woman said he raped

THE DAILY JOURNAL Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 19 TOM JUNG/ DAILY JOURNAL TheatreWorks Silicon Valley

Nelly

her in a town outside Seattle, an accusa tion the Grammy winner’s attorney staunchly denied. Auburn police spokesman Commander Steve Stocker said

Nelly, whose real name

is Cornell Iral Haynes

Jr., was in jail Saturday after being arrested in his tour bus at a

Walmart. He will have his first appearance before a judge “at some point,” Stocker said.

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THE DAILY JOURNAL Monday • Oct. 9, 2017 19 TOM JUNG/ DAILY JOURNAL TheatreWorks Silicon Valley

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Film producer Harvey Weinstein ousted from Weinstein Co. following allegations

By Jake Coyle

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Harvey Weinstein has been fired from The Weinstein Co., effective immediately, three days after an expose detailed decades of alle-

gations of sexual abuse against the movie mogul. In a statement, the company’s board of directors announced his termination Sunday night, capping the swift downfall of one of Hollywood’s most powerful producers and