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HOW TO BUILD MODERN FURNITURE

HOW TO BUILD

Mario Dal Fabbro


MODERN FURNITURE

JOHN MURRAY

FIFTY ALBEMARLE STREET LONDON WI


Reprinted 1961

.(L't\.O \010

e' " N~""t! Ji s-


F- f!

F. W. Dodge Corporaiion 1957

Published in Great Britain 1959


by John Murray (Publishers) Ltd.
all(/ reprinted by Lithography by Jarrold and Sons Ltd, Norwich
SECTION 1, General Instructio~
General Constructing curves
General notes about wood 3 Special uses of plywood
Wood changes 4
4 Covering edges and p
,......Seasoning of timber. Edge treatment
, Selecting and buying wood 5
5 Fastening fabric to board
Cutting and assembling the parts
6 Metal borders
Wood finish
Plastic borders 54
Woodworking Application of fabric to doors 55
Marking the materials 8
9 Doors
Basic woodworking operations
9 Door stops 56
Sawing
11 Door hinges 58
Surfacing
12 Table hinges 61
Shaping
Special hinges
-- _. - - 62
. ,=,C I J f'~
Joinery 14
Pivot hinges .../
Gluing wood 17 ;' ,C~ r'- - - , /.
Methods of joining boards 18 Drop doors I '<." Go ~ .';\ ~'.

Basic joints
Special
.
doors ~'
:: ( ~.
0:: ~ .... \ I 68
~
Sl~ding doors ~ ( ,}:.._<{" .... .:) ~
Basic joints 19
Door catches \ ~. ( a::.";;; / . . ) 11
Scarf joints 21
Door bolts and locks) \. '- .; : ) $1.
Rail joints 22
25
Door locks ~G" .._J 0:;'
\..1.'-
; ; .J<J~
J--\
Middle rail joints
puns -< ..._ --:::y. 5
Rail-to-frame joints 27 /1 ()~ .,.'.........:;
Panel-td-frame joints 28 Shelve ~
-----
29 Adjustable shelves 77
Frame joints
Middle frame joints 33 Drawers
. Back panel joints 34 Drawers 79
Knock-down joints 35 Special drawers 82
Joining rails to legs 37 Drawer slides 85
Joining legs to furniture 39 Materials other than wood
Knock-down legs 40
I Joining wood and glass 88
Joining legs to upholstered furniture 41 Joining metal and wood 90
Joining metal legs to wood top 42 Joining marble and wood 92
Metal leg end fittings 43 Joining rubber and wood 93
Wood leg end fittings 44 Common metal joints 94
Plywood and curves Joining plate glass to metal 96
Plywood, blockboard! and laminated Joining rubber to metal 97
wood 45 Bonding surfacing material to plywood 98
I
Plywood hollow-frame 46 Bonding surfacing material to curved
Veneer 47 surfaces 99
Gra;]"direction in curved pieces 48 Molded plastic 99
~
Upholstery materials 105
100 Foam rubber 108
.. ... ~I-Y ....... "' .. ~-

:;:-:-\Cyp~-~'::'f frameS 101 Seats 109


chair and sofa frames 1'03 Backs 117
Armchair frame 104 Upholstery details 120
Upholstery tools 105 Chair angles 122

SECTION 2: Furniture designs


"
Instructions for reading drawings 125 27. Bench 2 164
28. Sectional bookcase 166
1. Family workbench 126 29. Chair 167
2. Professional workben~h 128 30. Dining set 1: Table 168
3. Tool cabinets 130 31. Dining set 1: Armchair 170
4. Magazine rack 131 32. Dining set 1: Side chair 112
5. Service cart 132 33. Dining set 2: Side chair 173
6. Telephone cabinet 133 34. Dining set 2: Armchair 174
7. Flower box 134 35. Dining set 2: Table 176
8. End table I 135 36. Easy chair 177
9. End table 2 136 37. 2 or 3 seater settee J 179
10. End table 3 137 38. Armless chair, 2 or 3 seater ~ttee 180
1 I. Coffee table 138 39. Armchair 182
12. Coffee table 2 139 40. Bed Settee 184
13. Side table 140 4l. Dressing table 1 186
1
14. Extension dining table 141 42. Dressing table 2 188
15. Television table 144 43. Dressing table stool 190
16. Record storage cabinet 145 44. Wardrobe 191
17. Radio cabinet 1 146 45. Chest 1 194
18. Radio cabinet 2 148 46. Chest 2 195
19. Speaker cabinet 151 47. Chest 3 196
20. Open-shelf breakfront 152 48. Chest 4 198
21. Cabinet 1 154 49. Chest 5 200
22. Cabinet 2 156 50. Single or double bed and night table 202
23. Desk 1 158 51. Double bed 204
24. Desk 2 _" 160 52. Beds and headboard 206
25. Stool 162 53. Night table 210
26. Bench I 163 Index 211
SECT ION 1: General" instructions
GENERAL NOTES ABOUT WOOD

In order to select the type of wood best A


suited to the work to be done it is essential ---_._---- - -----,
PIT H
to understand the characteristics of the ma- HEART WOOD I
terial. I have, therefore, outlined some basic ---------~ I
\ I
information regarding its structure, as well WOOD \ I
I
RAY S
as methods of sawing and handling. --------._ t
Structure of wood
Wood is derived from a tree. It is made up
of bundles of fibers or long tubes that run CAMBIUM
--------
parallel to the stem of the tree. These are
crossed by other fibers that form the medul-
lary or wood rays. These wood rays pass
from the center or pith to the bark and
\
serve to bind the units together. Concentric ", \\
rings are formed as a layer of wood is added ',.\
each year. These are called annual rings. "
----------~
ANNUAL RINGS
A-Partial section of a tree trunk
Note the location of its parts:
Medulla, or pith: This is the center of the
tree. It is lighter in color and less strong
than the heartwood.
Heartwood: This section of the trunk, lo-
cated between the medulla and the sap-
wood, gives us the best building material.
Sapwood: The recent al1nual rings are con-
tained here, between the heartwood and
cambium.
Cambium: This is the most recent
ring.
Bark: This external layer protects tnel~tree.

Sawing the tree into planks


A tree is usually cut during the
when there is little sap in the wood. At
time the wood is less subject to fungus ati
tack. After the bark has been stripped, the'
trunk is washed to prevent fungus, mold, OJ;
other growth. This process also helps to
season wood.
At the end of the seasoning period the
trunk may be sawed into planks in any of a
number of different ways. One of the most
practical methods is sawing parallel to the
grhin. This is called plain, or bastard, saw-
ing. Quarter sawing, another method, is
used for higher quality work. C-Quarter sawing

General Notes About Wood 3


WOOD CHANGES

Planks undergo both warping and shrinking


during the seasoning process. Shrinking is
most noticeable at the outer edges of the
plank, because the annual rings of the sap-
wood are fresher and less dense. Warping
refers to the general change the plank
undergoes after being cut.
A-Warping in a plank that includes the
pith
B-Warping and curvature of parallel-
sawed (plain-sawed) planks: Note how the
curvature runs in a direction opposite to
the arc formed by the annual rings.
C-Aligning or joining of two planks must
be done on their concave sides.
D-Joining two planks on their convex
sides will produce a weak joint.

c o
A
r:---
I
I
I
L:~~~~~~~~~~~~

SEASONING OF TIMBER

It is essential that timber be well seasoned month. The water entering the pores of the
before it is used. The usual methods are as wood washes out the sap. The timber is
follows: dried in the open air.
Natural seasoning: In- this -method sawed Artificial seasoning: In this method the
timber is exposed to free air after it has till1ber is placed in a drying kiln, and a
been carefully stacked. current of hot air is allowed to circulate
Water seasoning: A somewhat quicker continuously between the layers. For some
method of seasoning consists of immersing woods steam may be used. This is the fast-
. the timber in running water for about one est method.

4 Wood Changes
SELECTING AND BUYING WOOD

After the design has been selected and pheric conditions, but screws or loose joints
studied, the next step is the ordering of ma- will permit shrinkage or expansion. How-
terial. One method is to buy the timber in ever, wood and plywood may be safely
standard lengths and cut the required pieces combined in edge treatment, as shown on
as listed. Another method is to ask the tim- page 52.
ber dealer to cut the material into the sizes Another point to keep in mind is that both
you. need. There will be a minimum of soft and hard wood shrink in the process
waste whichever method is used, because of seasoning. Thus the wood is usually l!J 6
standard timber sizes have been considered in. narrower than the nominal thickness.
in the planning of the designs. This difference is of consequence only in fit-
A void using solid wood and plywood to- ting such parts as doors, shelves, or
gether in the same piece of furniture, par- drawers. If the wood is of a different thick-
ticularly if a flush board is to be visible. If ness from that specified in the design, ad-
such a combination of materials is unavoid- justments must be made in the dimensions
able, glue should never be used for bonding of the part to be applied. Therefore it is
the parts. Plywood and solid wood react best to secure timber of a thickness as close
differently to drying glue and to atmos- ~_ __ ssible to that specified.
:./ ~ ~C II/'( I
:/' ~ ''''''-'''-','' :It'.
?~Crr ,. ~ f .\- .
4. ~O!:":: c.
cL~.
;~iIN~cl.N.b
(, ~ ~ : AS~.~BLlNG
;: ~)!/ THE PARTS
Whether wood is shaped by hand or jj 6?~\\... ::; -e'liniiUaJ.n~hie joint and substituting nails.
of woodworking machines, the process c 0..).,- ,-CYl!efete"lhty.parts are joined, all should be
sists of removing small parts of wood 6 . -!:
1\ lPbe~.9fto make sure they will fit.
sawing, planing, or chiseling in accordance - ----c .
with the selected design. Instructions for assembly are provided with
each design. The glue must be spread on
After the design has been studied and suit- both surfaces to be joined, and the pieces
able wood selected, the various pieces can
clamped together for several hours. Simple
be traced directly on the wood for cutting. clamps or screws and nails may be used to
See details, page 8. The parts should be laid
apply pressure. Wood clamps may be made
out in such a way that the handsomest sur-
by nailing blocks of wood to the ends of a
faces of the wood will be seen in the fin-
rail slightly longer than the piece being
ished piece. In the cutting operation itself;
glued, and applying pressure by inserting
accuracy is very important; if the parts are I.
wedges between the wood and the blocks.
to fit together as designed, the timber must I

be cut at the correct angle. The saw cut ! Large assemblies


should fall outside the pencil line, so that
Before assembling a large piece of furni-
the board can be planed or filed to correct ture, particularly a built-in unit, it is wise to
dimensions. (A plane is used on flat sur- measure passageways to make sure it can be
faces, and a file on curved edges.) moved from the shop to the site that has
When the parts have been cut and finished been picked for it. It may be necessary to
to the right sizes, the joints may be marked assemble the piece in two or three units in
and executed as indicated in the details. the shop, and complete the assembly in the
Sometimes it is possible to save time by room where the piece is to be installed.

Selecting and Buying the Wood 5


WOOD FINISH

The kind of finish a piece of furniture finish coats, and may be dipped in water to
should receive will depend upon the quality prevent dogging and minimize dust. Other
and appearance of the wood, the use it will methods of smoothing the surfaces, such as
receive, decorating tastes, and so on. Noth- rubbing with fine steel wool, pumice, or
ing shows off the beauty of the wood-and other fine abrasives, may also be used. Dust
the builder's achievement!-quite so well should be allowed to settle before liquid
as a "natural" finish. Or it may seem pref- finishes are applied, and the air in the work-
erable to add a touch of bright color to the room should be clear and still. Be sure that
decorating scheme of a room by painting a coat of finish is thoroughly dry before
the piece. Nowadays furniture makers sanding and proceeding with the next coat,
sometimes achieve bold, striking effects by and never rub or sand the final coat of paint
the carefully planned use of contrasting .or enamel. Various rubbing compounds or
panels on the same piece: for example, the "Flour" sandpaper may be sparingly used
drawer fronts of a chest might be enameled after the final coat of shellac or varnish.
or lacquered pure white, while the frame Preparation of surface
could be a strong, deep tone of almost any
other color that would "go well" in the Most raw woods need careful preparation
room. A word of caution to the amateur before they can be painted or finished. Neg-
decorator: if you lack confidence in your lect of this essential preliminary will not
judgment, or are wavering between color only increase the number of coats necessary
and natural finish, remember that the latter to obtain proper coverage-with conse-
is never in bad taste. Furthermore, a natu- quent waste of materials and labor-but
ral. finish can later be painted over, if you will produce less satisfactory results. Fill-
find you are not happy with it. It is a far ers, primers, and unde.rcoats are' not
more difficult proposition to remove the cheaper types of finishing material to be
paint, if you later decide you prefer the used where they won't "sfiow"-they are
"natural" look. indispensable components of a proper
The subject of wood finishing is too exten- finish.
sive to receive adequate treatment here, but
In applying finishes, use good brushes and
a few general pointers are worth giving:
!ceep them in good condition. It is best to
Carefully sand smooth all surfaces, both be- keep special brushes for special uses: one
fore and between coats of finish. Grade M2 brush for shellac, another for varnish, a
sandpaper is recommended for raw wood; third for lacquer. A nylon brush should not
finer grades of waterproof sandpaper- be used with shellac, as the alcohol solvent
such as 0 or OO-are suitable between will attack the bristles.

6 Wood Finish
WOOD FINISH

Open-grained hardwoods must be filled. there are now preparations available which
If the wood is to be stained, this operation make it possible to apply this traditiomilly
should precede filling or be combined with difficult material with a brush instead of a
it-filler-stain preparations are available spray-gun.
in a number of shades. If wood filler is ap-
A "white" shellac finish will discolor wood
plied separately, it should be brushed or
less than varnish, but is not waterproof. A
wiped on and the excess rubbed off with a
"5-lb cut" shellac contains 5 lb of shellac
clean rag. It is important to follow the man-
gum to the gallon of alcohol; "4-lb cut" con-
ufacturer's instructions faithfully with all
tains only 4 lb. Either of these concentra-
finishing materials.
tions will give good results, but the "3-lb
Close-grained woods do not need to be cut" frequently found in stores is not rec-
filled, but a coat of thin shellac is recom- ommended, except for preliminary coats,
mended to seal fir before varnishing, be- which should be thin.
cause of the soft grain. If there are any Varnish finish combines durability with the
knots or resin pockets in the wood, they attractiveness of a natural finish. Spar var-
should be sealed with shellac or knot- niSh is suitable for pieces like kitchen cabi-
sealer. nets, that are exposed to moisture. Other
types of varnish are suitable for high-gloss
Plastic wood or crack filler (in shades to effects, and some types have pigment added
match the wood, if a natural finish is se- . to combine the coloring effect of paint with
lected) should be used to fill nail holes or the natural grain of the wood.
crevices after they have been primed, either
Paint or enamel finish
by the first finish coat or !by swabbing with
linseed oil or varnish. If the wood is to be painted, it must first be
primed, although some special formulations
Natural finishes and most rubber-base paints are self-prim-
Among natural finishes, the least discolora- ; ing. If it is to be enameled, best results will
tion of the raw wood is obtained with wax, ; be obtained by using an enamel undercoat
but this method also offers least protection : preparation. It is generally advisable to mix
against hard usage. A single coat of white I a little of the finish coat into the white
shellac or clear varnish should precede the; primer or enamel undercoat, in order to
wax. Combined varnish-wax preparations tint it, and provide a better base for the
are also available. j final pigment. This measure is especially
Clear lacquer can yield striking results, and! advisable if the final color is very deep.

, I

Wood Finish 7
MARKING THE MATERIALS

After obtaining the rough wood from the


timber yard, mark out the various pieces
on the wood using the straight yard rule
(A), the try square (B), or the sliding bevel
(C). If you use the two latter devices, re-
member that one edge of the material
should be straight.

The marking gauge (D) is used to trace


lines parallel to a straight border or edge.
The marker can be adjusted to vary the
distance from the edge.
The function of the compass (E) is the
scribing of circles or partial curves.

8 Marking the Materials


BASIC WOODWORKING OPERATIONS

The basic types of woodworking opera- cal operations to be performed, the degree
tions required to shape the pieces and of precision necessary, and so on. For all
make the joints shown in this book are il- operations involving power tools, the char-
lustrated on pages 9 through 16. To de- acteristics of the particular equipment and
scribe the actual method of working the the manufacturer's recommendations for
wood would require a whole book in itself, its use will also need to be considered.
but the text does suggest the tools-both
It should be understood that careful sand-
hand and power- for each operatIOn.
ing of the wood is ordinarily required after
In general, the tools mentioned are those the wood has been worked to the proper
that will do the job most efficiently, but be- size and shape. Depending upon the opera-
cause some operations can be accomplished tion, planing or filing may also be neces-
in many ways, the choice of method will sary. In the text that follows, such opera-
depend upon such factors as the equipment tions have not beell mentioned unless they
available, the number of similar or identi- are essential to the description.

SAWING

A-Rip cut (with grain) 8-Cross cut (across grain)


Hand: Rip saw recommended, but cross- I Hand: Cross-cut saw or, for small pieces,
cut saw may be used. Power: Circular saw. I tenon saw. Power: Circular saw or band
or band saw. I saw.
1

I,

C-Angle cut D-Miter cut (45 degrees)


Hand: Cross-cut saw or, for small pieces, Hand: Cross-cut saw or, for small framing
tenon saw. Power: Circular saw or band pieces, miter saw in miter guide. Power:
saw. Band saw or circular saw.

Basic Woodworking Operations 9


SAWING

A-Rip bevel (with grain) B-Cross bevel (across grain)


Hand: Rip saw recommended, but cross- Hand: Cross-cut saw or (for small pieces)
cut saw may be used. Power: Circular saw. tenon saw. Power: Band saw or circular
saw.

C-Compound bevel D-Straight and curved cut I

Hand: Cross-cut saw or tenon saw. Power: Hand: Keyhole or compass. saw. Power:
Circular saw or band saw. Band saw or jig saw.
i

E-Curved cut F-Inside cut


Hand: Keyhole or compass saw, or (for Drill hole (see 14A) to admit saw blade.
thin pieces) coping saw. Power: Band saw Hand: Keyhole or compass saw, coping
or jig saw. saw. Power: Jig saw.

10 Sawing
SURFACING

A-Surfacing a side B-Surfacing two sides


Hand: Jack plane followed by smoothing Hand: Jack plane followed by smoothing
plane. Power: Jointer or belt sander. plane, with marking gauge to control thick-
ness. Power: Jointer, thickness planer, and
belt sander.

C-Truing an edge (with grain) D-Squaring an edge (end grain)


Hand: Jack plane followed by jointer plane. Hand: Block plane or smoothing plane.
Power: Jointer. Power: Jointer, or disc sander.

E-Chamfer F-Stopped chamfer


Hand: Use planes as in C or D, above, in Hand: Planes and files. Power: Jointer or
conjunction with plane gauge if desired to spindle molder.
maintain proper angle. Power: As in C or
D, above, or disc sander.

Surfacing 11
SHAPING

A-Concave curve B-Convex curve


Hand: Mallet and chisel directed toward Hand: Mallet and chisel followed by ad-
saw cut bisecting curve, or wood rasp. Fol- justable circular plane and files. Power:
low with adjustable circular plane and files. Spindle molder.
Power: Spindle molder.

C-Rounding a corner D-Rounding a straight edg~


Hand: Block plane or files. Power: Spindle Hand: Plane and files. Po-wer: Spindle
molder. / molder.

E-Rounding a convex edge F-Rounding a concave or irreguiar edge


Hand: Plane and files. Power: Spindle Hand: Files. Power: Spindle molder.
molder.

12 Shaping
SHAPING

A-Recess on edge (drawer pull) B-Recess away from edge (drawer pull)
Hand: Chisels and gouges. Power: Spindle Hand: Chisels and gouges. Power: Spindle
molder or router. molder or router.

C-Moldings D-Relief carving


Hand: Rabbeting plane or molding plane. Hand: Gouges and special files. Power:
Power: Spindle molder. Drill press with router bits, or carving
cutters.

E-Turning F-Irregular shaping


Hatld:' Not recommended. A spokeshave Hand: Saws for plan and elevation profiles,
might be used for simple shapes. Power: followed by planes, w<?od rasp, files and
Lathe with turning chisels and gouges. spokeshave. Power: Spindle molder.

Shaping 13
JOINERY

A-Hole drilling B-Slanted hole


Hand: Brace and bit, with bit gauge if Hand: Brace and bit guided by prebored
depth of a stopped hole is to be regulated. block (jig) clamped to work (face next to
Doweling jig will insure accurate matching work having been cut to angle required for
of holes if a dowel joint is required. Power: inclination of bit). Power: Drill press.
Drill press.

..'

C-Rabbet D-Curved rabbet


Hand: Rabbeting plane, or combinatio!l Hand: Chisels or round nibbeting plane.
plane. Power: Circular saw or jointer. / Power: Drill press with router bit or spindle
molder.

E-Groove or slot F-Tongue


Hand: Groove or combination plane. Hand: Tongue or combination plane.
Power: Spindle molder, circular saw, or Power: Jointer, spindle molder, or circular
router. saw.

14 Joinery
JOINERY

A-Housing B-Stopped housing


Hand: Tenon saw and chisels. Power: Cir- Hand: Chisels. Power: Circular saw or
cular saw or router. router.

and chisels. Power: Cir-

E-!Open mortise F-Simple mortise


Hand: Tenon saw and files. Power: Circular Hand: Mortise chisel and files. Power: Drill
saw or band saw. press with mortising attachment or router.

Joinery 15
A-Box ;oint or finger lap
Hand: Tenon saw, chisel, and files. Power: B-Edge dovetail
Circular saw.
Hand: Tenon saw and chisel. Power: Dove.
tail router.

C-Dovetail housing

Hand: Tenon saw and rabbeting p1ane. D-Dovetail ;oinl


Power: Dovetail router. ,
Hand: Dovetail saw and chisel. Power:
Dovetail router. -
!

I
E-Lapped dovetail
Hand: Dovetail saw, fOllowed by chisel.
Power: Dovetail router. F-Secret mitered dovetail '
I
Hand: Dovetail saw and chisels.
16 POwer: Dovetail router.

Joinery _
GLUING WOOD
Either hot or cold glue may be used in wood
construction. After preparing the parts and
making sure that the surfaces are smooth,
spread the glue on both faces to be joined.
The glued pieces should be pressed together
for four to eight hours, dependfug on, the
type of glue used.

A-In assembling furniture, direct pressure


can be applied by use of a rope.
B- The adjustable bar clamp is used to
join boards together. Its spread is 2 ft to 8
ft. .
C-Pressure is usually maintained by the
use of clamps.
B D-Here is a simple method of joining
boards without the use of clamps. Short
pieces of wood are nailed to the ends of two'
rails, and pressure is applied by inserting
wedges.
E and F-The steel spring is another type
of clamp.
G-The handscrew is /made of wood
and used for light work. The parts must be
kept parallel as they are screwed together.
H-The double bar clamp is used to press
together thin sections of wood, as in veneer.

Gluing Wood 17
METHODS OF JOINING BOARDS

Often planks are not large enough for the


work to be done. To obtain the desired A
width or length it is necessary to glue two
or more planks together with what is called
a butt joint.
In order to obtain an invisible joint in ex-
posed panels, the grain must be accurately
aligned. There are many ways of joining
these parts, each suitable for a particular
type of work.
B

I)]))) [J ill (un ((((I


A-Because the planks sawed from the
center of the tree trunk are the weakest, it is
advisable to saw them in two and glue them
together to give them stability and strength.
c
B-To obtain best results, the two planks
should be joined by matching either ex-
ternal rings or interior rings, in order to
equalize shrinking or warping.

C-If the external part of the timber !s


connected with the internal part, a very bad
joint may result. There will be no proper
seasoning of the two pieces, and after a
period of time there will be a noticeable
demarcation of the whole joint.

D-In a solid panel it is necessary to have


the edge straight to form a perfect joint. It
is of utmost importance to see that the
grain direction is alternated from each
plank to the next in order to equalize the
strain made by the annual rings.

E-If the grain is not alternated, the panel


will have a tendency to curl.

18 Methods of Joining Boards


BASIC JOINTS

-
Butt joint Rabbet joint
This is one of the simplest and most Similar to the preceding method, but
frequently used joints. less used because it is more difficult.

Dowel joint Mortise-and-tenon joint


A common method, often used where This joint is less commonly used than
the total area is large. the one at the left.

TOhgue and groove Feather joint


Flooring is usually made this way. It This is one of the most practical ways
is also practical in furniture work. of joining parallel planks.

Basic Joints 19
BASIC JOINTS

Loose tongue and groove Shiplap joint


With edges rounded or beveled, this This method is used extensively for
joint is often used in wall paneling. siding on houses. It is easy to make a
watertight joint in thi~ way.

Tongue-and-groove joint used.in Wedge mortise and ten'on


drawing board
This method is used wlren work is to
The transverse rail is used (0 prevent /
be exposed to the weather.
warping;",

Butt joint with wedges Butt joint with dovetail wedge


This is a good method to use with a
straight joint, particularly for outside
work.

20 Basic Joints
SCARF JOINTS
A B The right angle scarf joint is not often
used in furniture work for practical
reasons: It is not strong, glue will not
adhere easily to its surfaces, and the
joint is always visible.

A-Zigzag scarf joint


This joint exposes more of the wood
grain to contact with the glue, and is,
therefore, stronger than a right-angle
scarf joint.
B-Dowel scarf joint
The dowels strengthen the joint. Glue
is used with all of these joints.
C-Fork scarf joint
A good joint is obtained because the
surfaces are held naturally in contact,
permitting firm glue adhesion.

D-Double dovetail scarf joint


This joint is used where the joint is
subject to strain.
E-Tension scarf joint
This jOint is held in place by wooden
wedges, and is used more commonly in
house carpentry than in cabinet mak-
ing.

Scarf Joints 21
RAIL JOINTS
The execution of rail joints is of great
importance, because these are the
basic structural elements in furniture
framework.
Various types of straight rails and
transverse rails may be used to form
various types of frames, and an ap-
propriate joint must be selected for the
type of work to be done. You must
consider the thickness of the straight
and transverse rails, the quality of
wood, and the position of the frame
-whether visible or concealed. A End half-lap joint
middle rail may be added to the This joint is easily constructed, but un-
straight and transverse rails for extra less reinforced with pins and bolts or
support. The series of joints illustrated screws it is not very durable. It is used
will show the various types and explain mostly in repair work.
the characteristics of each.

"
Dowel joint \. . Bridle joint .
Another joint commonly used in repa,ir This is a joint often used by the ama-
work. ',.;~. teur craftsman.

Stub mortise and tenon with square


- Open mortise-and-tenon joint haunch
This joint is easy to make and is used This is the most widely used joint in
for ordinary furniture work. the furniture field. It has all the requi-
sites of a perfect joint.

22 Rail Joints
RAIL JOINTS

Double mortise and tenon with Bridle with groove and


sloping haunch miter on the inner edge
This joint can be used where work is
exposed to the elements.

WEDGE
-----,
I

in every type of

L
I
I

Miter bridle joint Miter with stub mortise and tenon

Rail Joints 23
RAIL JOINTS

tf
- - - -_ _j
SPLI NED

Miter joint with spline Miter mortise-and-tenon joint


This joint is easy to make and is often This is a very strong joint, used for
used by the amateur craftsman. work exposed to humidity.

Miter tongue joint Miter stub tongue joint


This is very common in standard pro- Same as miter tongue, except Jhat
duction. feather joint is invisible.
/

MIDDLE RAIL JOINTS

Lap tee joint Dowel joint


This simple joint is often used by the This is a good general purpose joint.
amateur; also in repair work.

24 Rail Joints
MIDDLE RAIL JOINTS

Through mortise and tenon Stub mortise and tenon


The addition of the wedge makes this This is an easily made and widely used
a very strong joint. It is used in work joint.
exposed to weather.

Dovetail halved joint Oblique dovetail joint


This method is used to strengt4en the Same as dovetail stub except that
frame where it will be subjected to un- : tongue runs through and joint is in
usual strain. oblique position.

Special dovetail joint Double dovetail joint


I
This joint is difficult to make and is The principle here is the same as in a
used only for precision work. single dovetail'joint. Both systems are
used Jor joints subject to great strain.

Middle Rail Joints 25


MIDDLE RAIL JOINTS

Mortise and tenon with groove


Note that mortise and tenon are re-
duced in width.
Mortise and tenon with rabbet
Here is one way of joining rails to form
a panel.

Double mortise and tenon


I
This mortise and tenon has many uses
Mortise and tenon with mitered
for cross-rail joints. The rail is mor-
rail and frame
/
tised from both sides:
Another mortise and tenon variation.

Cross-lap joint (1) Cross-lap joint (2)


This easily made joint is one of the Here is another application of the
most commonly used. cross-lap principle.

26 Middle Rail Joints


SPECIAL USES OF PLYWOOD
A-Molded plywood
Light molded plywood is obtained by-
gluing layers of wood together in metal
forms. The mold is pressed together
with clamps. This method is in wide
use in the production of chair seats and
backs. ' \
\
\
------------------~
MOLDED PLYWOOD SEAT

Cylinder and cone construction

B-Cylinder with feather

C-Cone covered with plywood for


c!abin,et work
For upholstery work, cardboard may
be substituted for plywood.

Special Uses of Plywood 51


EDGE TREATMENT
In order to conceal the laminates in ply- A-Painting the edge to match the wood:
wood or a blockboard panel, the edges This is the simplest and cheapest method.
must be covered with hardwood. The B-Veneer banding
methods used are: This material is now available in rolls.
C-Solid edge
D-Tongued, frame and grooved edge
E-Tongued edge and grooved frame

~
F-Edge attached with feather
A G-Mitered edge used in fine work
H-Application of hardwood edge (C-G)
(solid edge shown)
For fine work the corner will be formed
with a miter joint.
8

-
I-Roll veneer is particularly suitable for
curved edges.

0
-
E
- I

F
- J

G
-
52 Edge Treatment
FASTENING FABRIC TO BOARD
For simple upholstery, there are several
A techniques for attaching the fabric to a
panel. Any of the methods shown will
give excellent results.
\
\ \
\
_ _ _ _ _ ....1.
------~
FABRI C COTTON A-Fabric tacked to the back
B-A strip of wood fitted into the
back

B C-Solid board attached to edge


D-Fabric stretched over a frame:
This forms an independent panel front.

o
~I
I
I

L ____ ___ _
SOLID EDGES

Fastening Fabric to Board 53


METAL BORDERS

A'_
A through D-Metal borders. and METAL BORDER
methods of fastening them to wood ~-----------
edges

B.,.

PLASTIC BORDERS
To cover wood edges one can use either
plastic material similar to that used on
surfaces, and applied by the same
method (E), or standard plastic bor-
ders (F). /

PLASTIC BORDERS
r~----------

,fE_

54 Metal Borders
APPLICATION OF FABRIC TO DOORS
A-Application of fabric to a sliding
door
B-Fabric held in place on a door by
molding

B
fA BRIC
------,
I
I
I
I
lole
~ &

C and D-Two methods of applying a


fabric panel to a frame

Application of Fabric to Doors 55


DOOR STOPS FOR SINGLE DOORS
The basic use of single or double door
stops is to seal a furniture compart-
ment and so protect its contents from
dust and other injury. Door stops also
help to mask the gaps that appear when
the wood shrinks. Stops are seldom
used in ~ass production; to save time
a straight board is used.

A
WOOD OR METAL ST OP
-----------------,I
I

RABBET STOP

....... B

"" - . - . ' . ~(
" . ~

A-Straight board door with wood or


metal stops: This is the normal method
used in standard production.
B-Straight stop board: A special so-
lution, not commonly used.
C-Rabbet stop on side
D-Rabbet stop on door: A very good
method
E-Miter stop, used in fine work

56 Door Stops
DOOR STOPS FOR DOUBLE DOORS
WOOD OR METAL STOP
------------------, I A
I
I

A-Straight board with wood or metal


stop as used in mass production
B-Rabbet stops: The score in the
front hides movement or shrinking of
doors.
C-Stop with tongue and groove: This
method allows simultaneous opening
of the doors.
D-Variation of tongue-and-groove
stop
E-Isometric drawing of door, show-
ing position of rabbet stop: The score
indicated in (B) has been omitted.

Door Stops 57
DOOR HINGES
There are several methods of attaching
standard doors to furniture; they vary with
the type of hinge to be used. Hinges are usu-
ally fastened with screws.
The common types of hinges are illustrated
here and'on the following pages. Butt hinges
are shown below.

Cabinet doors with butt hinges

BUTT HINGES

@@ (Q) @

@ @
,
.: @ @

,:' .... ~
o O
Butt hinge~ 'ar~. iised in mass proquction.
< >

oJ' I

@ @

@ @
@ @

Recess doors with butt hinges: Note that side panel


acts as door stop.

58 Door Hinges
DOOR HINGES

Q =
BUTT HI N G E

External doors with butt hinges: Doors using this


type of hinge open all the way.

Rabbet doors with butt hinges LOOSE PIN HINGE

HINGE

Rabbet doors with offset hinges ---v v

cg - @

l-

I-

@ @

PIANO 0 R
CONTINUOU5 l-
Miter doors with butt hinges, used for special work H I N G E

Door Hinges 59
DOOR HINGES

- J
OFFSET HINGE

External door application with offset hinge

sass. HINGES

Door application with Soss invisible hinges used in


fine furniture

....
/ '"
DOUBLE ACTION HINGE


0 ....
0
f
"
!

Door attached with folding-screen hinges: The dou-


ble action permits -complete rotation of the door.
Hinges work in pairs to prevent gapping.

FLUSH HINGE

COUNTER
HINGE @ @ Flush and counter hinges, commonly used for exten-
sion table tops,

60 Door Hinges
TABLE HINGES
A-Standard table hinges made to fas-
A CLOSED ten extension table tops having molded
edges
B-Another type of extension table:
The straight edges are fastened with
extension hinge. Open, the extension
part is flush to the surface; closed, it is
flush to the edge.

OPEN

TOP CLOSED
B

TABLE HINGE

TOP OPEN

Table Hinges 61
SPECIAL HINGES

I I

Cabinet with three doors: Such cabinets present spe-


\
\ ,, cial problems. Here is one solution, shown with butt
hinges.
'~ -_

1 1

..... ....... _-,.", , /

Piano hinges used with two sets of doors: This is a


practical method of hiding the central divider when
two sets of doors appear on the front. The hinge may
be cut into segments when two doors are hinged from
same post. See page 59.

62 Special Hinges
PIVOT HINGES

PIVOT
A HI N GE
@

.
A and B-Doors using internal pivots at top and bot-
tom. Note that (B) uses a stop pivot.
PI VOT HINGE WITH STOP

C-Door installation with angle pivot hinge., With


this ty,pe of pivot the door can be opened all the way.

D-Another angle pivot hinge, with a pivot of differ-


entshape

Pivot Hinges 63
PiVOT HINGES

1 II

I
~
\
\ A-This three-door problem has been solved by using an
\
I ,
external pivot hinge (above left) on the two outside doors,
_- /- "- and an internal one (above right) on the door that hides
the dividing panel.

B-Use of pivot hinges on a four-door cabinet also hides


the center divider.

t' ".

,
. ,;,~ .
"

64 Pivot Iiinges
DROP DOORS
A drop door may use almost any type
of hinge along its bottom edge. If the
open door is to serve as a desk or sup-
port, it is essential to have the door
held rigidly in position. This can be
done by using metal supports along the
outer edge.

A and B-Two types of supports for


drop doors, both attached with butt
hinges

C-A simple method of using a butt


SUPPORT hinge, without a special support. The
door overhang acts as its own stop.

.....
..... _--Y

Drop Doors 65
DROP DOORS
A-A combination hinge and support
is used with this drop door. This is a
satisfactory method so long as the door
is small.

~
COMBINATION HINGE AND SUPPORT

B-Offset hinges are used in this


scheme.

C and D-These .two similar drop door 1


stops are intended for use in fine furni-
ture construction. Both employ pivot
hinges hung sidewise from the sides of
the cabinet.

66 Drop Doors
DROP DOORS
A-This type of door stop is simpler to con-
struct than the preceding two, but the differ-
ence in level between the door and the in-
terior would be a disadvantage for some
uses.

B-Pivot door, suitable for dressing tables

_____ .~IJBB.QE

FOLDING DOORS
Folding doors leave free the space HINGE WITH GUIDE PIN
needed to open conventional doors. ""'------------
.....
-
.....
They are simple to make and to install,
but the work must be done very ac-
curately.

I
I
I
I
,I
I!
I
I
I
I
!
I
I
I I
I
"
!
I
L _..J__..J. __ --'- _ _j

Drop Doors 67
SPECIAL DOORS

----,
----1

Combination drop and sliding door


. This design utilizes a pivot and a routed track.

VERTICAL
SECTION

Tambour door
Another space-saving door. This type, once very
popular for office furniture, is not difficult to build.

68 Special Doors
SLIDING DOORS
Sliding doors also save room space, but
8 do not allow so large an opening as do
folding or tambour doors. Several
methods of installing sliding doors are
shown. Note that for both installation
and removal of sliding doors space for
clearance must be allowed in the top
1-_
I ________ _ LI _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ guide.
CLEAT TRACK GROOVE TRACK
A and B-Sliding door with cleat track
and groove track
c C-Easy-to-make guides, using
wooden strips
D and E-Metal and plastic guides
and their application
F-Plate glass or thin plywood doors
sliding in groove tracks
'---------
WOODEN STRIPS

F
CLEARANCE fO R
----- -----
\
REMOVAL Of DOORS \.-
CLEARANCE fOR
...__.__-REMOVAL Of DOORS
METAL OR
PLASTIC

Sliding Doors 69
SLIDING DOORS

7
I

l -r=---===--r - - - ---,
I
I
I

,
I
I
I l!r, I
I \ ..v ,
L ______ ..J

A A

fRONT VIEW

A-Doors will move more easily if


wheels are used. These _two methods
will give very satisfactory results.

PLATE GLASS
~---------- SID E

PLASTIC OR
C ME. TAL ROLLERS
BALL TRACK r-----------
r--------- '/
/METAL ROD
I
I / r-----------
/ I
/ I
/
I
I
,..--,
I
I
I
I

1+,
I

~
I' '\
\

B, C, D-Other methods of sliding:


Irregular groove to minimize friction,
ball track, and plastic rollers all make
for easy sliding of the doors. SI DE. SE.CTlON fRONT VIEVi

70 Sliding Doors
DOOR CATCHES
Doors may be fastened with catches,
bolts, or locks. Locks, of course, re-
quire keys. Several types of catches are
shown on this page. Bolts and locks are
illustrated on the pages that follow.

PRICTIO~
CAT C H
BULLET
CATCH

MAGNET CATCH

RUBBER ROLLER CATCH

DOOR

Door Catches 71
DOOR BOLTS AND LOCKS

DOOR KNOB

~
o
o

A-A door knob installed in position


Band C-Application of flush and neck bolts to
door back, for use with double doors

= =

MORTISE LOCK

D-The mortise lock is a common


type found in fUfl1iture work. It can be
used with single or double dqors and
with drawers.
E and F-Mortise end side lock that
may be used in either doors or drawers.
The keyhole should always be vertical.

72 Door Bolts and Locks


DOOR LOCKS

A-The cylinder lock, standard for


most doors, may be used on any type
of door.
Band C-Various ways of using a
piano lock: (B) with sliding doors;
(C) with a hinged door.

o
fii CYLINDER LOCK

_ PIANO LOC~

Door Locks 73
DOOR LOCKS
A-This bar lock method closes both doors
at the same time.
Band C-Plate glass locking devices which
are particularly useful: (B) is secured with
screws; (C) is applied to the base of the
plate glass.

Gl

7-----..i' A

PLATE
GLASS

74 Door Locks
PULLS
A through D-Many types of pulls or
knobs made of wood or metal may be
purchased and applied to furniture.
Pulls may be used decoratively, but it
is usually best to build them into the
actual furniture as shown in (E).
E-Drawer or door pulls built into the
furniture
8

I
I I
I I
I / I
If. ______ _ L __ ___ _
MtTAL KNOBS w 000 PULL

c o

PULL
-------,
I
r7I'1<:~~r--- I
I
I
I
I
I
/
'I
\
I \
I _J.LJ.:.I1L~'_ \
L _____ _ L __
METAL PULL NUT

Pulls 7S
PULLS
A
A and B-Two examples of pulls cut
into the bottom of a drawer
C and D-Pulls built into cabinet
doors
E-Sliding door pulls are cut into the
wood; a similar method is used for
plate glass sliding doors.

LI _____ I
I
METAL I
I
,,,- ~--.
PULLS
______ J I
------:1
"
- 'I
I
C "
0 \
\
"
: ' f
:",

\: .
"
"
"
. :E _1'~
,

76 Pulls
ADJUSTABLE SHELVES
Adjustable shelves have several ad-
vantages, but the chief of these is that
the spacing between them may be
varied to suit the objects to be dis-
played. These shelves are often used
for bookshelves, kitchen cabinets, and
china cupboards. Here are several
types.
Various examples of adjustable
shelves: Type (D) is one of the best
arrangements.

SHELVES
-----\--...
c
\ -...
-y--, ,-or-- \
B

./

A ./
./
./

./
I //
IL _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
L: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

SHELf BRACKETS

~ ADJUSTABLE
~ SHELf" PINS

SECTION FRONT VIEW

Adjustable Shelves 77
ADJUSTABLE SHELVES

,- AOJ\)S'TABLE. SHELF'SUPPORT AND STANDARDS


/
J~./ ":- ~

Supporting the shelves wit~~brackets


offers a simple method 9;' ?uilding
bookcases and similar disRlay.~spaces.
Several styles of brackets are available,
commercially. " .
"

'; .
\ ..... ~...
' ..
'. 0 ....

@ @

t:?
@

~
BRACKET KEYHOLE

~
::J
~
V
BRACKET KNife: ~

78 Adjustable Shelves
DRAWERS
A drawer is one of the most useful and
important parts of furniture construc-
tion, and smooth operation of the
drawer depends upon the perfect de-
sign and assembly of the furniture
piece.
Drawers may be hidden by doors or
they may be exposed. Many solutions
are possible with either design. The
drawings in this section give a clear
idea of their construction and applica-
tion.
A-Simplified drawer construction
Here is a drawer adequate for normal
use which can be easily made by hand.
It is designed in the form of a box
without cabinet joints, and is assem-
bled with nails. The front is attached
with screws driven from the inside,
so that the visible portion is unbroken
'~~~~~td resembles a standard drawer. A
~ ~ c:,C~~( &.no. . pull can be attached in ex-
~ ~ -;ae~fy
r'.... \
same way as for the more
,
/.f( IJ >- f cOr?plfca~d type.
uC:: 4
CC

~ 'oj \ \..
k. c "( :
(j ( : : : B_;Box.fbi t often used by craftsmen
.,!-cr : : )Q:.I
SECTION c;;: c: .' SIDE)~Ei TlON
~. :z: . .:..
~ ~.r-'~-#-----l
A \.... C'

~t~;~/~' 7.,... -
~.~~

I-o.-.~........,.......~~\
~~""""''''''''''''''''.>A.I \ I

JO\NlNG-l"Ht 1wo ORAWER-f-RO~


PIECES WITH fOUR seRE WS
I
PLAN VIEW
PLAN VIEW v~
r

~
II
. ~
~
I I
I

I
Drawers 79
DRAWERS
A-Drawer constructed with dovetail A
joint

SIDE SECTION

_41.

PLAN VIEW

B-For fine drawer construction the SIDE VIEW


lapped dovetail joint is often used. 8

I I ___ _
,.l_l
1- _ _ _ _

41. J
PLAN VIEW
r I I

80 Drawers
DRAWERS
A and B-Some type of dust panel is
A usually installed between drawers.
The one shown in (A) is visible from
the front of the chest; in (B) the panel
is concealed by the overlapping
drawer front.

C-Disappearing drawer front

SIDE SECTION

SIDE SECTION

c
---- --.,I
~"'N-ir------- _.J
I
/
/

/
J
/
~~~~~~~~;;r" ./

SID E SECTION

Drawers 81
SPECIAL DRAWERS

MIRROR

Drop-top mirror used inside a drawer

HOUSING
--7
/
/

m
CHANNEL I
I RON
------ \ I 1

7
\ I
\
Drawer with vertical removable divi- \\ I/
sion.strips: This method uses a housing I
!!~~_O_'{_~~!::.~1'
or a channel iron in the side of the ----------,.._ ,
drawer. I ......
II ' '-,

I "

I~
Drawer with oblique 'removable divi-
sion strips: Either housing or channel
iron may be used.

82 Special Drawers
SPECIAL DRAWERS

PENDArlEX rilE
---------- CLEAT ...
.,.,..,.,., ---~
-----
,,"'"
.,.,."'"
.".

Drawer'for correspondence file. Pat-


ented hanging folders and dividers are
available at stationery stores.

Drawer for file index Folding drawer used for storage or


stationery

Chest and box drawer for wardrobe


or cabinet II )
Special Drawers 83
SPECIAL DRAWERS
A-Interior drawer for wardrobe or
cabinet

B-Shirt drawer

C-Drawer with pull, for use as tray

D-Drawer with plate glass front

PULL
-----,
I
I
I
I

PLASTIC DRAWERS '-, ....-..


..-

4114
These drawers can be purchased in '
standard sizes, with various types of
guides. Pulls and knobs can be ap-
plied to them as easily as to wooden
types. These plastic drawers can well
be substituted for wooden ones in
many pieces of furniture. In some
designs, however, the dimensions of
the framework may have to be ad-
justed to fit the size of ready-made
drawer avaihible.

84 Special Drawers
DRAWER SLIDES

Drawer with screwed cleat

Drawer with bottom rail

>
Drawer with rail on side: A mortise
may' be cut in the side of the drawer
to lUow the drawer to slide between
two cleats attached to the side of the
chest.

Drawer Slides 85
DRAWER SLIDES

L.
I _____________________ _

Rollers are used with heavy drawers. PLASTI C OR METAL ROLLERS

"'s ..:.
'''t ;.

Drawer with center guide: A"'g~i~e


~acilitates the travel of the draWer._.
~nd some form of guide should be in-
cluded if possible.

rIeavy drawer with special ball bear-


ing glides

Drawer Slides
DRAWER SLIDES
Ball bearings in bottom of drawer:
This is still another way to assure an
easily-gliding drawer.

DRAWER STOPS

,
\
\
\
STOP FASTENED
~~D!~!.~.!~
-----------,~J
I
_j

".
I
I
I
/
/
I
I
I
/
/'
I I

{l ~

::.-

Drawer Slides 87
JOINING WOOD AND GLASS
PLATE GLASS
Attaching glass, plate glass, or a mir-
------------7 I
I
ror to wood is one of the most delicate
operations in furniture construction.
The possibility of breaking the glass
during the working process makes it
imperative that great care be taken.
Plate glass or a mirror may be at-
tached to the wood in a horizontal,
vertical, or oblique position. It may
also be welded to the wood with glue
or cement.

A through C-Application of the


plate glass shelf: (A) shows the in-
stallation of glass with a rough edge;
(B) and (C) show the method used
with finished glass.
D-Installing glass in a picture frame
E-Rabbet frame, showing plate
glass held in place with putty
F-Plate glass in a groove o
o

I
/
------'
PUTTY

88 Joining Wood and Glass


JOINING WOOD AND GLASS
_ MLR_RQJ!
_P_A"'p_E_B A and B-There are several ways of
attaching glass or mirrors to wood
.--T/UI<7....-- _'I{ Q.Q_Q surfaces such as cabinet or closet
doors. (A) and (B) use paper be-
tween mirror and wood surface. Glue
is used in both. Large glass areas
should have a molding around the
A edge. Mirrors may also be attached
to wood by cement without a paper
-
M1BBQ...R_ _f.b1J?1:I}v1ItlJ).QQ_B. __ backing.
C-Screws are used here to attach the
mirror to the wood.
Various l1).ethods may be used to at-
tach plate glass to another surface
when the glass is to be horizontal.
SCREW COVER D-Plate glass without fasteners is
advisable only for large tops, where
B c the weight of the glass will keep it in
place.
D E-Glass with molding and recess be-
neath

\ ,
--------------------~
RECESS FOR CLEARANCE
__J_.JL_JI---L..

PLATE GLASS

G
....
..._-------
RUBBER

Joining Wood and Glass 89


JOINING METAL AND WOOD
In the cQnstructiQn Qf furniture it is
Qften necessary to. jQin WQQd and
metal parts. While it is custQmary to.
jQin these materials with bQlts Qr
screws, special adhesives may be used
instead. By means Qf glue, metal
sheets can be welded to. cellular CQres
to. fQrm large waterproQf panels.

SHEET
METAL A
r-----

(]) A-Three different methQds Qf jQining


metal sheets to. WQQd panels: Glue may
also. be used.
<D A

B c

METAL

_,
~~ ~.
~_o_.9_.Q __
: ~ t .
d ,.!
~'. "->'V.. ":

.. .

Band C-(B) shQWS a WQQd and metal


panel in a rabbet frame with mQlding. (C)
is a metal sheet in a groQved frame.
I

90 JQining Metal and WQQd


JOINING METAL AND WOOD

_ _ _ _ _ ..l

METAL

A and B-Two different ways of at-


taching decorative metal strips to
METAL PIPE
wood surfaces: With Method (A) the ,------
,
metal is easily applied, but has a tend- , ~~~~~~~

ency to pull out in time. Method (B)


is preferable.
'\.
,,
C-Wooden arm rest fastened to
,,
tubular metal chair arm with screws ""
D-Metal wire or tube fastened in
wood frame by means of holes previ-
ously made in the wood

,
I
...:I

Joining Metal and Wood 91


JOINING MARBLE AND WOOD
Marble and wood may be joined in a
A number of ways. Basically, the meth-
ods are the same as those used with
glass. Several common methods are
shown on this page. Screws and bolts
may also be used.
I
I
I
A and B-Two simple methods of
I
I
using marble tops: The example be-
I low uses a stub tenon with a mortise
MARBLE!
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ..1 in the marble.

C-A short prong incased in the


B marble will prevent any sliding of the
top.
D-A rubber cup may be sufficient to
prevent the top from sliding.

MARBLE
MARBLE
-------7 /
------, o
/
\
/
~
/
~ \
.
Jf'::-'_~~ / ~

C ~ ~ ~ !':~'_/.1!:!_
\'L.Q_Q.g___ - .. c
METAL PIPE v
- - ...

---"" - Ii

92 Joining Marble and Wood


JOINING RUBBER AND WOOD
Rubber is a good material to use in
protecting furniture. Here are some
ways it may be used.
A-Flat sheet of rubber attached with
adhesive
B-Grooved rubber, also attached
with adhesive
C-A rubber dome can be attached
to the undersides of stacked tables.
D-A rubber dome can also be used
to cushion the swing of a door.

A c
RUBBER
RUB BER
-------..,
I

\
\
\
)..
I

9,
I

I
,.
/
I

Joining Rubber and Wood 93


COMMON METAL JOINTS
Here are several common metal joints.
Metal may be used for complete fur-
niture pieces or for parts of furniture.
B

I
~~=-----
-J ..... - -

I
I
------ --

A-Union of pipe and metal strip se- Band C-Sliding metal joints: Note that
cured with a locking pin either piece may be fixed in place with
screws.

D-Two metal strips joined by cross- E-Two metal strips fastened with
lap joint rivets

94 Common Metal Joints


COMMON METAL JOINTS

,----
COLLAR

A-Removable pipe joints held in place B-Metal strip joint held in place
with screws with bolts

WELDED

PIPE

WEL DE D
--------, \

C-Welded pipe and strip joints D-Pipe joints using screwed ends

Common Metal Joints 95


JOINING PLATE GLASS TO METAL

Method of applying plate glass to


metal frame
CORNER BRACKETS FOR PLATE GLASS
---------------------------~
'"

Glass box with wood base using metal


corners

Various ways of attaching metal


frames to glass

Joining Plate Glass and Metal


JOINING RUBBER TO METAL

A
RUBBER
-----..::.:.~ ..\
........... ' \
~~ ~-~-~------~\~------~
,~-

BACK SECTION SIDE SEAT VIEW

A-Rubber supports can be applied between


metal frame and seat, and between frame and
back, to make the chair more comfortable.

"'-----
RUBBER

C-Rubber bumpers can be screwed to the


undersides of tables to protect the tops.
D-A protective rubber pad under a metal tray

Joining Rubber to Metal 97


BONDING SURFACING MATERIAL TO PLYWOOD

VERTICAL SECTION

A and B-Surfacing materials can be ap-


plied to only one side when the frame is
totally enclosed.

The sketches show the steps to be followed


in attaching surface material to plywood. 8
If the panel to be laminated is securely
fastened to the frame of the cabinet, only
the outer surface need be covered, but if
the panel is simply to rest on the frame, a
balance sheet must be applied to the under
surface to prevent warpage.
I
I
I
! _____ :1
1. Smooth the plywood with sandpaper.
SUR fAe ING
2. Cut the surfacing material carefully to MATERIAL
size with a saw. For a clean cut use clamps
and keep the saw as nearly parallel to the
surface as possible.
3. Place the surfacing material on the ply-
wood to check the fit; shave off any excess.
4. A plastic adhesive and pressure give
the best contact bonding. Manufacturer's
instructions should be observed.
5. Roll the surface to insure a tight bond.
An ordinary rolling pin may be used.
6. When the surfacing is firmly bonded to
the plywood, edges may be beveled with a
file and metal molding applied, or strips of
the surfacing material may be applied to
the edges of the plywood.

98 Bonding Surfacing Material


BONDING SURFACING MATERIAL TO CURVED SURFACES
BACKING SH EET TO PREVENT WARPAGE A-A plastic sheet can also be ap-
--------------------, plied over a curved surface. Follow

~
the directions given on page 98 and
keep the plastic sheet bent until the
glue has dried. A wood form should
be used.
----------~ B, C, and D-Three methods of fas-
PLASTIC SUR f' ACE
tening plastic parts to wood

ADHESIVE NAIL
- --~ --7

MOLDED PLASTIC
Within their own domain, plastics pos-
sess at least as broad a range of prop-
erties as metals, and are capable of at
least as great a diversity of composi-
tions. In general, they have the advan-
tage that they can be molded in forms.
It is only comparatively recently that
plastics have come into common use
in the furniture field. Continuous re-
search is being conducted in further
development of their many uses.
We do know enough about the charac-
teristics of plastics today so that they
may be used with the assurance that
they will withstand wear. However, it
is best to check the specific character-
istics of each plastic before using it.
E-Heat-treated plastic can be used
to form a curve.
F-A molded plastic chair: With
molded plastic, any desired form can
be obtained.

Bonding Surfacing Material 99


UPHOLSTERY WORK
Upholstering is an art in itself. While '!>ee detail
~----------
C page 41
most other operations in furniture
construction are done by machine, up- \1\ 0
11\
holstery work is still done by hand. \ 1\
\I \
Expert workmen have usually served \\
a long apprenticeship before acquir-
ing the skill necessary for upholstering
a chair or divan. There are, however,
several ways that upholstery work can
be done by apprentices and amateurs;
for example, by substituting foam
rubber for the materials used in nor-
mal work. A
I shall not go into detail about uphol-
stering, but I have illustrated several
types of frames, materials and meth-
ods of application. I have tried to sim-
plify the presentation to enable even
the beginner to understand each
method.
The frame, in either wood or metal, is
the skeleton of the furniture piece.
Upon. its construction depend both
the comfort and the strength of the
chair.
A and B-Two different types of
bench frames
D-Frame for ~ebbing seat
C-Round frame covered with card-
board: The. }lpholstering material is
added later:

100 Upholstery Work


TYPES OF FRAMES
see detdil page 25
r------------
1\
I ,
I
I
I
I
WELDED
- - - --"\
'\
I \
I \
\
\

Metal frame stool for cord or canvas


seat
See page 95 for details of joints.

RUBBER
, ",.----------

\
\ \L
I ____ _

WE L D EO

. I
One example of a metal frame chair Common type of wooden chair frame that will
The rubber supports between the seat take an upholstered seat
and back give elasticity to the seat.

Types of Frames 101


TYPES OF FRAMES
A-Wood frame for armchair with see det'ail page 24
T----------
seat and back upholstered. I
I
B-Frame for an upholstered office
armchair. A swivel base may be sub-
stituted if desired.

I B
I
1
\ \\ 1
\ \, I 31"

_____________'\1
'l
see detail A page 41
., .. -- .....
8 - + - - - - - 24"----_+_

102 Types of Frames


CHAIR AND SOFA FRAMES
A-A modern armchair that will have
both seat and back upholstered
B-Frame for modern type of arm-
A less sofa, using an upholstered finish
for back and seat

,
",
,, . ..
~
~ee detaIl p-a-g-.-22
\
\
\

\ SACk f"ABRfC
- -;+-----------
,
\

\
I
\
r
12~

\
\ SEAT fABRIC
~----------
B
\
__ 2'L-----------~

16~

+------26~------+_

.... .....
.....
'--------
CONCAVE
RA I L

\
\
,\ \

"'-------------
see dt"tail A p a g l" 41

Chair and Sofa Frames 103


ARMCHAIR FRAME
Frame for modern armchair, with
loose seat construction. Increasing the

t
width will convert the same design to
a sofa.
11
8

\
\
\
\
\
30" \,..... - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- "
" 15
II
II
If: =- -=---- -= -=---=--= -=--=-=- == = "=

7"

4-

104 Armchair Frame


UPHOLSTERY TOOLS
WEBBING STRETCHER The tools most commonly used in up-
holstery are shown here.

CURVED STEE.L NEEDLE

~ UPHOLSTERY MALLET RIPPER AND TACK PULLER

UPHOLSTERY MATERIALS
Here are several types of springs used
in upholstery work.

E.XTENSION COT SPRING

NO-SAq,A SPRIN G
ZIGGER WI RE

-
~

COIL SPRINGS

UpholstelY Tools 105


UPHOLSTERY MATERIALS
JUT E
WEBBING

HORSE HAIR PADDING

018 hfiiiiiiS)
COTTON SEWING TWINE

@5 L, CiJ
LINEN SEWING TWINE

fA BRIC

. LEATHER

06 .~. ". ~ Upholstery Materials


UPHOLSTERY MATERIALS
A-Rubberized hair is a light and
elastic material of relative low cost
which is used in mass production. It
can be easily applied with staples or
tacks, and is available in the same
sizes as foam rubber.
B and C-Foa~ rubber is made from
liquid latex, which forms a cream-like
foam after being put through air pres-
sure. It is then poured into molds of
desired size. In upholstery work it
gives better results than stuffing, and
is quicker and easier to use. Foam
rubber is made in different grades of
firmness, and the right grade should
be selected for the job to be done.
Solid-slab utility stock (B) comes in
many thicknesses from ~~ in. to 1~ in.
Cored utility stock (C) is molded
with cylindrical openings in the core.
Its thickness varies from % in. to 4Y2
in.
D-Full molded cushions can be pur-
chased in a variety of sizes and
shapes.
E-Cut foam rubber with either scis-
sors or band saw. Cutting is easier if
the scissors are dipped into warm
water.
F-Small pieces glued together with
rubber adhesive to form one large
piece
G-Flat stock glued to a slab
H-Full cushion made from cored
stock
L
I
I

,,
,,
---------::..
FLAT STOCK

Upholstery Materials 107


FOAM RUBBER

T AC KIN G TAP E
-------------71
",
/
/ /,
/ I
/' I
I
I

,
\L ___ _

RUBBER

A-Method of applying tacking tape or ad- D and E-In making contoured edges the
pesive-backed tape around the edges of a foam rubber should be cut % in. larger than
'oam rubber slab, using cement. the piece being upholstered.

!B and C-Two different uses of tacking F and G-Another way of making a curved
~ape: The rubber cushion is cut 'l.I in. larger edge
than the piece it covers.

~08 Foam Rubber


SEATS
The seat design is very important in uphol-
stery work, for upon its construction de-
pends the usefulness of the chair or divan.
Each seat must be made in accordance with
the type of frame to which it is attached. It
may be movable or fixed, light or heavy. A
wide variety of materials may be used.

A and B-Simple leather seats like these


are easily installed, as the details show.

c
/
I
I
..Q_It.Q_/
----.,I
I
I
I
/
I ,

C and D-Seats made with cord are expen-


sive because they take time to make.

Seats 109
~EATS
<\ and B-Seats made with raffia in differ- A
!nt designs.
:-JX type of canvas seat often used with
~teel frames
)-Webbing seat used in modern furni-
ure ,
STRAW RAF"F"IA I
OR SE AGRASS .J/
_____________
-----------...,
\
\
\
\
\

,
'-----..:---
CANVAS

. -" .;-
~ ./
...'
." / ..
. .l
-'

110 Seats
SEATS
VARIATION A and B-Cane makes a good seat. Note
r-------- the alternate method of attaching the cane
shown in Diagram B.
C and D-Two different types of uphol-
stered seat: Cushions are permanently at-
tached to the chair frame.

IIY

i<
v

fABRIC

Seats III
SEATS
These four seats are made independently
of the chair frame. In commercial work,
greater speed of assembly is possible when A
frame and seat are made independently.

FABRIC COT TON PLYWOOD


-------, -------..,, -------7
c \ ,, I
\
\ , . I

I
I

NO-SAG SPRIN G COT T ON FABRIC

,
L __________ _
ANGULAR CLIP

112 Seats
SEATS
Foam rubber may be used over a
number of other materials. Plywood
or cardboard may be used as shown
in (A) and (B). Rubber over web-
bing is used in (C).

\ ,
\
\
------~
PERFORATED
PLYWOOD

E811BlC ~Q!!Q.~ B'yJ!~sl3, ~BlLD_B..9.8B!}


I I ,

i,
FABRIC MUSLIN COTTON
----_ -----, ------, RUBBER WEBBING
-----, -----...,
'l I I I ,

c f)) '::fT
~'I<
::-l

x
S(' ?SG)
J(" .A

~10
,,
~~
/
/
\ /
\
L / _____ _

------~ CARDBOARD
A " FRAME

Seats 113
SEATS
LOOSE CUSHIONS
--------...;:::?
_/'/
/' /
/
/

~ ~
Rubber straps have been developed to
serve as springs. The two methods shown.
at right are recommended for. an.choring
:~ms \
the straps under loose cushio~s.: . _______ .J.

'<~:>-:--. - METAL CLI P

fRONT RAIL
\
\r
I
I
I
I
~!! U_B_!I ~R_ _T~ ~!:S,

I
I
/
I
I
I
SEAT- BACK RAIL I
I
Upholstered seats require crossing and
./
weaving of straps. The anchoring detail ----- - -----__/
shown at right for side' rails can also be CORNER MUST BE ROUNDED
used for chair backs (see also p. 121).
SI DE RAIL

114 Seats
SEATS
Coil spring seats covered with rubber. (A)
is a tight seat. (B) is a heavy seat that is
suitable for an armchair or sofa.

Seats 115
SEATS

RUBBER OR DOWN

{:1
t
10"
30
"

+
6\\

4-
-+------30\\ -----_+_

Loose or independent seat construction


which may be used with an armchair or
sqfa

116 Seats
BACKS
The back of a chair is usually lighter
WOOD in construction and more rigid than
--------- the seat. There are exceptions; some-
times the seat is of wood and the
A back is upholstered. Like the seat, the
back :may be constructed in a number
of ways. I have illustrated a few of the
best methods.

A-Wooden back attached with


wood screws
B--Canvas back, with sheet metal
screws inserted to keep the fabric
from sliding down the metal pipe

WEBBING

'.

I
C~Webbing back

D-Caneback

Backs 117
BACKS

STRAW RAFFIA
OR SEAGRASS

A-Straw, raffia, or seagrass used to form


back.

CORD

B-Cord back, easy to make

C-Simple upholstered back suitable for


modern furniture

D-Wood back covered with foam rubber


and fabric

118 Backs
BACKS
A-Foam rubber back over webbing

B-Foam rubber applied over a No-Sag


spring, with spring clip attached to the
frame in the usual position

B ~

C-Detail showing angular spring clip

Backs 119
UPHOLSTERY DETAILS
__L.8 -'~. _I! J _
A/,J'V""'" _1:1_~"?_.b-_!_~
.\\0<~)CXXlll __ .c_Q.J_J_Q_~

~~~~~\-..R_~_~_~j:._R
~~m-tiQ:~_S!~~
~?SO<~_f-.R_ -I!.-~ _!;
CARDBOARD
=-~~~~=f~~f_IA~~
~~n~.~~~~~ __ X_~~_~_LC

A-Method of applying upholstery


material in the corner formed by the
seat and back -/

B
fABRIC
_Q._l_!_9_~ __
BURLAP
/ ARM FRAME
BURLAP
-----------
HORSE HAIR
AND COTTON
MUSLI N
r A B RIC

B-One method of attaching the ma-


terial where the arm meets the seat

120 Upholstery Details


CHAIR ANGLES

Man sits to read, work, rest, and eat. For


each purpose the furniture must be de-
signed for the comfort of the sitter.
Whether it be a chair, armchair, or divan,
the correct angles cannot be calculated me-
chanically. The real proof of comfort and
approved angle can be checked only from
a completed model. In the examples shown
I have given the basic angles which have
been found to give satisfactory results.

F;-2~ -
C HA I R DINING AND OrFICE
I I
ARMCHAIR
i
*-
i. 'caO
\
I \ B C

r
1?"
17"

19-
1 21"
1
122 Chair Angles
CHAIR ANGLES

UPHOLSTERED ARMLESS CHAIR

,
\
\
\
B

c
I,

15"

+---25. 1
Chair Angles 123
CHAIR ANGLES

t
6"

7"
I
'-; 8"~_""~-_;_,....-.22" -,-------+--j
~", :.'

B \
\
. ~' _--_90 LOUNGE CHAIR
30 - - ......
25/ / '\ " ,,
30"
r
15"

28" ----+---15"---4--17" -----<I-


4--_ _ _
-+---------'60" - - - - - - - - - +
1
124 Chair Angles
SECTION 2: Furniture designs

I
INSTRUCTIONS FOR READ ING DRAWINGS
i
The <;lrawings used in this book have been details to be used. Note, however, that let-
especially planned to help the home crafts-
I
I
ters identifying individual parts refer only
man~ visualize the finished piece, its parts, to the design in question.
and the way they are fitted together. Each
Each set of drawings is accompanied by a
design includes (a) a complete view of the
list of materials (complete except for
finished piece, (b) front, side, and sec-
minor items of hardware) and a few words
tional views as they would appear in a pro-
suggesting possible applications.
fessional cabinet maker's drawings, and
(c) an exploded drawing, with parts Variations
shown in detail for ordering and cutting.
The designs can be easily varied to fit indi-
Accompanying instructions give step-by-
vidual needs by adding or omitting doors,
step,procedure for assembly.
shelves, or units. Decorative moldings may
Most of the construction details are stand- also be added, but it is not advisable for
ard, and are repeated in many different de- beginners in woodworking to make
signs. Cross references clearly indicate the changes in basic construction.

Instructions 125
1 FAMILY WORKBENCH

List 'of Materials

DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
PART NO. FUNCTION thickness X width X length

A top 1% 24 48
B back V-i 27 35%
C bottom % 22 34lf2
D , '2 side % 22 27%
E 1 framing piece 1% 2 34lf2
F 2 framing piece % 3 34lf2
G 2 door % 17V-i 19
'-._:I-I' . 1 partition % 5lf2 21
. - ,_
J 2 base end % 3 19%
K base front % 3 33
l shelf % 16 34lf2
M 2 drawer bottom V-i 16% 21
0 2 drawer front % 5lf2 17V-i
P 2 drawer back % 5 16
Q 4 drawer side % 5% 21%
R 2 tool rack % 2 15

Instructions for Assembly

1. Join side' (D) with bottom (C),


framing pieces' (E) and (F), and
partition (H).
2. Fasten back (B) and base (J-K)
to frame.
3. Fasten tool rack (R) to door (G).
4. Install door (G) and shelf (L).
5. Join drawer sides (Q) with front
and back (0) and (P).
6. Attach drawer bottom (M).
7. Place top (A) in position.
8. Install the vise.
I 9. Apply finish.

126 Family Workbench


- + - - - - - - - - 48" --+
1.!: - -
01
__ 2.

0 0 A

I
32"
27f
0 0

)='j
-;
I I 3"
-t- 6'-'- t - - - - - 3 6 " - - - - - - + - 6"-+

-t----24' -~---+

32"
A

,
I
,
I
I /
/
//

L:_ __________ _
~ee detdil~ page 29

Family Workbench 127


2 PROFESSIONAL WORKBENCH

List of Materials

DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
PART NO. FUNCTION Ihiekne .. X widlh X lenglh

A top 1V2 . 21 57
B 9 bench stop 3
B' 2 bench stop 6
C block 2V2 6 9
0 block 1V2 4 9
E back 9 39
F 3 framing piece 2V2 39
G framing piece 1V2 39
H 4 leg 2 2 30V2
J 2 side piece 9 13V2
K .2 side piece 2V2 13V2
L 3 framing piece 2 14V2
M
'0
P
Q

R
. 1
4 .-
2
2
, ,'2
bottom
drawer side
drawer back
drawer bottom
drawer front
%
%
!4
3,4
17
5V2
5
153,4
5V2
39
153,4
1814
18%
19V2
Ii
2"'~

s cleat 3,4 15
1! q [J [J 0 o 0
~

I
,
Instructions for Assembly

1. Join legs (H) with side pieces (J)


and (K).
~ 2. Join legs (H) with back (E),
framing pieces (F) and (0), and
bottom (M).
3. Attach framing pieces (L) and
cleats (S).
4. Join top (A) to frame, insert
bench stops (B), and attach
blocks (C) and (D) and vise.
S. Build drawers by joining sides (0)
with front and back (P) and (R)
and attaching bottom (Q).
6. Apply finish.

128 Professional Workbench


, 3"
- + - - - - - - - - - - - 57' --------~+ ~

I II
u u --u-
~---~l~I
u ~ u u -u
0
I 0

32"

L- '--

see detail'il page 22


- ---------
, - - - - - - -----

'.._

Professional Workbench 129


3 TOOL CABINETS

-," .' N '~, -;-t 'i~"'~

; List of
;,;~" ".
M'atedalsj
~'~~~ ~,<~'%_~~0" "":0.1:~~
1. Join sides (C) with top and bot-
tom (A) and (B).
2. Attach back (D).
Smaller cabinet 3. Join base parts (G) and (H).
DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
PART NO. FUNCTION thickness X width X length 4. Instal~ doors (F).
A top % 12 48 5. Insert shelves (E).
6. Apply finish.
B 1 bottom % 12 46%
$e~ d~tdil 3 pdge 193
C 2 side 3,4 12 291,4 f,- -- - - - - -----
D 1 back 1,4 29% 47V2 1\ \
I ,
E 2 shelf % 10 46% II
II
1\
""
F 2 door % 231,4 28V2
I
G 2 base end % 2 10 I
I
H base front 3,4 2 46 I
I

Variation for larger cabinet

C 2 side
D back
E 4 shelf
F 2 door

/ .,

F
]1

\
\
\ -
'-=-::_----.-- - - - - - -
set' de tails page 58

30 Tool Cabinets
4 MAGAZINE RACK

~~'::;_';<I ..W;~"""I''< / , '{ J

~,Instructions for Assembly ,


~~":Y~~, ' ~"/" [, ~/~~ " ,,:( '< , 'i' ",-;;,~.. j

DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
PART NO, FUNCTION thickness X width X length
1. Join leg pieces (C) in pairs.
A 2 side % 13 25%
2. Attach sides (A) to bottom (B).
B bottom % 4 25 112 3. Join legs to (A-B).
C 4 leg % 114 21 4. Apply finish.

C +--10"-+ r 27" +-

1
21" 18"

Ii'_
l-j2~t-5"-j2(t 1 H1~" 2sf ~1I

._
detdil 2

'ioee detdil 1
r.-------
I, 1\
\
I
I \
I \
I
.1
1

Magazine Rack 131


5 TEA TROLLEY

DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
PART NO. FUNCTION thickness X width X length

A 2 shelf % 15 26
B 4 side rim % 1 26
",

J,~29"
C 4 end rim % 16
D 2 rail % 6 30
E 2 rail % 3Y2 27
F 2 brace % 2 15%
6f
~' ~
G 1 handle bar % (diam.) 17

++-_ _ 16" --~+I -+-


3"
H 2 framing piece % 2 16
+-1

J 2 whee_1 % 5 (diam.)

1. Join shelves (A) with rims (B) and (C).


2. Join rails (D) and (E) and brace (F).
3. Join handle bars (G) and framing piece (H)
with rails (D) and (E).
4. Fasten wheels (J) to rails (E).
5. Fasten shelves (A) to frame with wood screws.
6. Apply finish.

!lecHon
'""~~~ de tcs i I 1

132 Tea Trdllely


6 TELEPHONE CABINET

DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
PART NO. FUNCTION thickn ... X width X length

A 3 shelf 3,4 15 16V2


B 2 side 3,4 15 20
8
C back ',4 14% 19
0 4 % 134 24

detail 1
1. Join shelves (A) to sides (B).
2. Install back (C).
3. Join legs (D) in pairs, and attach assembly to
sides (B).
4. Apply finish.
see d~tai I 3 page 193
!t' - - - - - - _ - -- _--
'\ "
'\
I
''
"

\
\
\ ,
\ \
\ \
\ ,
\ \
\I
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _l

see detail 2 page 131

D~r
3'. -: 1"
.t+--,,---1s'---ft-

8"
bottom of I~g

Telephone Cabinet 133


7 FLOWER BOX

,---
screw
\
\

r li~t of Mate;ials '


j - . " ~ r'

DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
1etdil 1 PART NO. FUNCTION thickness X width X length

A 2 side % 8 28%
B 1 bottom 3,4 7V2 28%
C 2 end % 8 10
D 4 leg 1% 15 1

E 40 strip Vi % 8

E ~lnstructio~s-fdr:Ass~ml)i~J
~

1. Join sides (A) with bottom (B) and end (C).


2. Fasten strips (E) to sides (A).
3. Join legs (D) in pairs, and attach assembly to
side (C).
4. Apply two !Foats of roofing cement to inside of
box.
5. Apply finish to exterior.

f ,"
~---- 30" ---~I4-~

1
134 Flower Box
8 END TABLE 1

List of Moter'iols Instructions for Assembly


. . '. /

DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
PART NO, FUNCTION thickness X width X length L Attach sides (D), (E), and (F)
shelf % 13 18 to shelves (A), (B), and (C).
A
2. Join supports (0) with pedestals
B shelf % 13 24 (H).
C 1 shelf % 13 30 3. Fasten supports (0) to sides (D),
D 2 side % 2% 18 (E), and (F).
4. Apply finish.
E 2 side % 2V2 24
F 2 side % 2V2 30
G 2 support % 7 22
H 2 pedestal % 2% 22

SeE' detail 1
detail 1

~E \
\
'\
~
______ ~~ i
Sf'' d'tails i
page241

-+- I"

+22
~ 1

r
25"
J 1

1 L

~'"
2"2
16"

End Table 1 135


9 END TABLE 2

..
, ,,_. ~'"

list of Materials
~ ,.';;,' Z;" ~ n

DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
PART NO. FUNCTION thickne .. X width X length

A top % 15 15
,
B top % 15 30
C support 1V-! 1V-! 7V-!
0 2 leg 1V-! 1V-! 16 V-!
E 2 leg 1V-! 1V-! 24V-!
F 2 rail % 2 12V2
G rail % 1V2 13
H rail % 2 25

1. Join legs (D) and (E) to rails (F)


and (G).
2. Join cross rail (H) to end rails
(F).
3. Attach top (B).
, 4. Join support (C) to top (B).
I 5. Fasten top (A) to rail (G) and
I support (C).
I
_ _ _ _ _ _ __l_ 6. Apply finish.
wood strew
\
. 0 4----------30-'--------~
\ G -t3"+---- 27"------t-

----------y
see detail 1 page137
E\ \
\ I
I
/~-;
~

E
1,1
I~=====-=~=-==-=:::.=il
II
~
'TIIT'
II
\I
II

II
r1''

1-!'
4

::
II
d
II

)J,LoJ
1.....I-&I_ _ _- ' - -_ _ _..... 1t'
+--11"--+

A
rlr~t: 2~
. .'
Jl
E
tI l8

'----15--,--, _/tI 16+ I


c 1--_ _ _ _ _ _---1

t
17"

ti 1 1
1~'
7
j_' 0 a;
~
1
136 End Table 2
10 END TABLE 3

DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
PART NO. FUNCTION thickne .. X width X length

A 1 top 3,4 15 30
B 2 rail 3,4 2 12%
C 4 leg 1% 1% 16%
0 rail 3,4 2 25
\
c
I~
.\

C ,
1. Attach legs (C) to rails (B). \ /
2. Attach cross rails (D) to end rails (B). \
\ I
I

3. Fastentop (A) to rails (B) with wood screws. \ /


\ I
4. Apply finish.
~ ..\/
IL ______ _ c
'!.u detail 1

detail 1

t[~ ---- --- ~ --~-- -~ ~1


c
12~'
I I
i .t====================l
if.L __ ~ ___________ ~ j
P 24~'---++-,_ I
11' 1~ 1~ 1i L
,

r r
16~

j + - - - - - 3 0.. _ _ _ _ ~1_+__--15. -_+_

End Table 3 137


11 COFFEE TABLE 1

DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
PART NO. FUNCTION thickneu X width X lengfh

A 1 top 3,4 18 48
B 4 leg 2 20
C 4 brace 2 8
D 2 rail 2 13
detail 1
bottom of leg

1. Join legs (B) with braces (C).


2. J ojri legs (B) with rails (D).
3. Attach top (A) to (B) and (C) with wood
.screws.
4. 'Apply finish.

/
+--12"--+

2 .Wi. ='.
.f
"t D
~ , e
+-- 13''---+

:1~
-+:,-,..---- 18'--___.,_
15" t~ r 48"
-+4'+- - - - - - 4 0.. -------+4'~

17"

138
1 Coffee Table 1
12 COFFEE TABLE 2

DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
PART NO. FUNCTION thickness X width X length

A top V2 18 42
B 1 rail 2% 30
C 2 rail 2% 13
0 4 leg 2 15V2

1. Join legs (D) with rails (C).


2.
3. Apply finish.
4. Set plate glass top (A) in place.

r
=r 1'
3{'
~ ~ 2" "
16"

1
10'

4- 29"
15" ~ ..I
I"

\i 18" it
4i ~
42"
B 1i
2"
'" LiU:az . .
+----,,----::--.- 30"
,s-
t2t2~~
rub be r-
helided
,------
,
ndit ;D 1
. 1Si" .

y-- 13'---+
I
I

o
dt'tail 1

Coffee Table 2 139


13 SIDE TABLE de tail 1

tt
2l
42" - +-15-+
1'1
+=+-

IDllDl?D~1
DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
'ART NO. FUNCTION thickness X width X length

A top 3,4 15 42
30"
B rail 3,4 4 23
C 2 rail *, 4 1i
D 4 leg 2Y:z 30
0
E 1 bottom % 12 13
1" 'F 2 side Y2 4 12
G 1 drawer front 3,4 3% 13
H 2 drawer side % 3Y:z 11%
J 1 drawer bottom % llY:z 12Y:z
K 1 drawer back % 3 12%

,, '
o :/ "
," , ,.
, I "

" ,
",'
",
",
,~

[------ -----
!>ee de tdil 1

140 Side Table


14 EXTENSION DINING TABLE

DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
PART NO. FUNCTION thickness X width X length

A top 3,4 30 42
B 2 extension top % 14 30
C 4 leg 2 2 28 ',4
D 2 side rail 3~ 37~

E, E' 2 end rail 3V2 25Y2


F 3 rail % 3 26V2
G 6 guide ~ ~ 24
H 4 extension support 114 114 30

bottom of "0

Extension Dining Table 141


de ta i I

- - - - - - 4 2 " ------,.----+--- 14"

. . . - .
I
I
I
I
I
I
II
I
I
I
I
I
:
I
I
I
I
,. -----~
I
I
I
I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I
/ I
I

II_______ ._______________ .:-:dJL


I~
I I I .u:
I
I: _______
I
JI

------42" -+------- 30"

29"

142 Extension Dining Table


Instructions for Assembly

1. J oJn legs (C) with side rails (D).


2. Join rails (E) and (F) with (C-D).
3. Fasten guides (G) and top (A) to frame with
wood screws.
4. Insert extension supports (H) and extension top
(B).
5. Apply finish.

(~ o-+-t_3_____ 31~ _____3_,'+f-~~!3f


28~

I
I
/
/
I
/
wood screw
--- -- -----< ,, I

,
",

'j I

I I L
I I I
e ll,
I I'
I I
I I
II
II
II
II ,/
II /
I
[.----;-------
!:lee de tdll 1 page 142
c

Extension Dining Table 143


IS TELEVISION TABLE

DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
"'RT NO. FUNCTION thickn... X width X length

A. top 3A 14 14
B 21 block 1% 5 5
2
C 4 leg 3A 30 36
I Cut diagonally to make four.
! Four pieces cut from one sheet of plywood.

1. Join legs (C) with top (A). c I


I
2. Attach corner block (B) to (A) and (C). I

3. Apply finish. \
\ I
I

\ 'L.
I ___ _
~trew\

31..___c____
.,.-",_.-
---- .... _
'

r<:--
I "
I
I
I
I I
I
I
I
I
I
I

'- .... r~~'",~t>::'

3 ,"
~
18" ---+4+1 \-
22" ----+-

I
I I
I I

22"

44
1 Television Table
16 RECORD' STORAGE CABINET

DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
PART NO. FUNCTION thickn ... x width X length

A '1 top; 3,4 11 36


B shelf 3,4 13 34%
C 1 bottom 3,4 16 34%
D 2 side 3,4 16 2514
E back 25% 35%
F 4 partition 10 3/.1 13
G 4 partition % 13 153,4
H 4 leg 13,4 (Diam.) B

1
1. Join shelf (B) with partitions (F) and (G).
2. Join bottom (C) with partitions (G); sides (D).
3. Attach top (A) to (F) and (D).
4.: Fasten back (E) and legs (H) to bott9m (C).
5.: Apply finish.
+---.,----- 36" - - - - - _ + _
Fi===~;:::;r:r::=:::::;:r====n=~ t! +-11" -+-5"+

11i"
H

f
1~'
34"
8"

+
8"

Record Storage Cabinet 145


17 RADIO CABINET 1

List of Materials

DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
PART NO. FUNCTION thickness X width X length

A lid % 17'4 30%


B lid 34 15 17'4
C back. % 11 46V:z
D front 34 10'4 46V:z
E 2 side % 11 18
F partition % 9V:z 16V2
G bottom % 16V2 46V:z
H 4 support 34 2 1!1
J motor board V2 15 16V2
K rail % 2 36
L 2 rail % 2 14
M 2 rail % 2V:z 14
0 4 brace 1% 6
p 4 leg 2 16

Instructions for Assembly

1. Join bottom (G) with (C) and (D). 5. Attach braces (0) to legs (P).
2. Install partition (F) and sides (E). 6. Fasten legs (P) to rails (L) and .(M).
3. Attach cleats (H) to box and fasten 7. Join cross rail (K) to end rails (M).
motor board (J) to (H). 8. Fasten leg assembly to cabinet with
4. Attach lids (A) and (B) to back (C) wood screws.
with hinges. 9. Apply finish and install equipment.

146 Radio Cabinet 1


see detdils page 58
,------------
II
I~

"\'\'
""
\\\

~I
t
11"

I'ZDlf
t
13"

-+3"+,. - - - - - 42" -------+3'+._


,
I.
1"
-+----18" - - +
,"
-l~-+l-- 16" - - - H -
+
,,
"I,
I,
"

"0
J" J
II
II
~~------~~----------------

1
~ ~ 3" -
lj"" 15" If 30~ I~
+ - - - - - - - ' - - - 48"

Radio Cabinet 1 147


18 RADIO CABINET 2

list of Materials

DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
PART NO. fUNCTION thickness X width X longth

A top % 18- 48
B bottom % 18 46%
C shelf / % 17% 46Y2
0 2 side % 18 22~

E back ~ 22% 47%


F partition % 9Y2 17%
G 2 partition: % 11~ 15
H .' front % '9% 30%
J door % 11~ 24
K door % 11 ~ 23~

l drawer back Y2 2 14
M 2 drawer side % 2 17%
0 drawf;lr front % 9Y2 15
P 1 motor board % 15 17
Q 2 cleat ~ Y2 17
R 4 leg 2 (diam.) 4

148 Radio Cabinet 2


0 I I

y.
~
il
23"

0 0

Jl~ V V u
-+- 'it 36" 6"'-4-

l
18"

It~ 15"
!I~ 30~ "(II
1 27"

48
d

TJ u

detail 1

Spe6ker cabinet
See list of materials and instructions for
assembly page 151; for legs see page 150.

Radio,Cabinet 2 149
hole'!> for ventila~ion
,/~----------

,/ 1\
'!>ee detail'!> pag() 29
1\
--r------------
I
I
I
f

'!>eEl dEltail!. page 58


--'\'"--- --- -----
\
,
\
,
\

!
- ---
Instructions for Assembly

1. Join top (A), bottom (B), and shelf


(C) with sides (0) and partitions (F)
and (G).
2. Fasten back (E) and cleats (Q) to
(0) and (F).
3. Fasten legs (R) to bottom (B).
4. Attach front (H) to bottom (B) with
hinges.
5. Join sides (M) of record player drawer
to back and front (L) and (0).
6. Fasten motor board (P) to (L-M-O).
7. Install sliding doors (J) and (K).
8. Apply finish.
9. Install equipment.

150 Radio Cabinet 2


19 . I SPEAKER CABINET

.... - --_
I
/ " " "-
,

,I \

I
\
\
, ,
'...... ,/
"'----_""

r---------l
I I
L ________ _j

28" -t-- 12~--+

-list of Materials

DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
PART NO. fUNCTION thickness X width X length

Q top % 12 28
R 2 side % 12 341,41
5 1 bottom % 12 26%
T 2 bock 3,4 26V2 30%
U . toeplote 2 % 3 ; 26%
V 6 molding V2 %; 30V2
V' 6 molding % %i 25%
1 For variation on page 149 use 31 'A. I
2 For variation on page 149, substitute legs (R), page 148.

"
\ \ v_____
I

molding
_

Instructions for Assembly

1. Join top (Q) and bottom (S) with sides (R).


2. Attach cleats (V), back (T), and toeplate (U).
~. Apply finish.
4. Line speaker enclosure with insulation.
S. Inptall equipment.
6. Install baffle (T).
7. Apply protective fabric over (T) and cover tacks
with molding (V_V/).

Speaker Cabinet 151


20 OPEN-SHELF BREAKFRONT dlltail 1

DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
PART NO. FUNCTION !"ieknon X wid!" X leng!"

A 3 shelf % 12 45
B top % 15 45
C 1 bottom % 15 43Y2
0 2 side % 15 211,4
E back 1,4 21 V2 44V2
F shelf % 13 43V2
G separator % 14% 43V2
H partition % 4 143.4
J door 3,4 15 3,4 22 3,4
K door % 15% 213.4
dlltail 2 L 2 drawer front % 4 21%
M 2 drawer back % 3Y2 20Y2
0 2 drawer bottom 1,4 141,4 20~8

P 4 drawer side % .4 ,14 3,11


Q .4 supports - 11,4 6 71
~

IVarlahon:
.. Ca b'Inet Wit
. hout. d rawers "
0 Eliminate drawer parts and partitions (G) and (H).
Revise doors as follows:

J and K 2 doors 3,4 20V2 2P,4


,_ ~ 1 ,11 t I
-Instructions for Assembly .
i {~; 1

1. Join top (B), bottom (C), and separator (G)


I
1 with partition (H), side (D) and back (E).
, I 2. Join supports (Q) in pairs.
,I
'L _______ _ 3. Fasten (Q) to shelves (A) and side (D).
wood screw 4. Join drawer side (P) with front and back (L)
and (M).
5. Install drawer bottom (0).
6. Insert shelf (F) and drawers.
7. Apply finish.

152 Open-Shelf Breakfront


Q
~.!~etaiI1 page152
--------" /
/,

,
""
Q "" ',\1 " I
,,\1 / LI ________ _
',\1\L/ ___ --. ________ _
see detcul 2 page 152
see details page 79

1t' .. 1t ."
1~ "1i
. ..
1t-----45 ---:..._ -++-12 -#- -t-15 -+ +-----4~:'-------+
T
-

71"
I
0 0 Il
. . 0 0
10 0 . .
. 4-la'
+ 1/"
Open-Shelf Breakfront 153
21 CABINET 1

list of Materials Instructions for Assembly


J. '>~"
'<.' ',., y' j ';..!

DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
PART NO. FUNCTION thickness X width X length 1. Join top (A), bottom (B), and
A top % 15 42 separator (K) with sides (C) and
B 1 bottom % 15 40% partitions (D).
2. Install back (E).
C 2 side % 15' 21 %
--------------------------- 3. Attach cleats (G) to sides (C)
D 2 partition % 14% 20V2 and partitions (D).
E back % 21 % 41 V2 4. Fasten panels (J) to doors (H).
5. Fasten doors (H) to frame.
F 3 shelf 3~ 13 13
6. Install shelf (F).
G 6 cleat % % 13 7. Join drawer sides (0) with front
H 3 door % 13 15% (L) and back (M).
J 3 panel % 9% 12 8. Install drawer bottom (P).
9. Join top and bottom (Q) and
K 3 separator % 13 14% (R) to sides (T) and back (U).
l 3 drawer front % 4 13 10. Fasten doors (V) and (W) to
M 3 drawer back % 3% 12M! frame.
11. Apply finish.
o 3 drawer bottom % 12% 14%
12. Set both pieces on bench.
P 6 drawer side % 4 14%
+-10~-+
Q top % 15 24
R
T
u
2
bottom
side
back
3~

%
%
15
9%
9% 23%
22%
15 1. 1S!
v
w
sliding door
sliding door
%
% 8%
I
11 %
d~tall
.1 +--13---+
. 1
door sec t ion door front view

154 Cabinet 1
\ I
0

0
\
0)
0

0)
\
0

II
I J l \ I \ 0 0 10"

'----.:...
1 l
~ t
12" 12"

T
~
42"- I
I
24'U
., 1-11
-r3~------------- 6 0" 3+
~-~

I
I
I
I
I
I
-- .- I- - - .....
I
I
I
I
I
I
rr
13" 15"-

1
I I
I I

1-- I
11"
see detail 3 page 193
~:::::.:--- -- -------
"
I'
....... _....
I "
I "
I
I.
f
!
I
I
I
I
I

-----------_/ --- _ -~..:. _ -----y


fPg I
/
/

bench see page164 see detail 1 page 1S4

Cabinet 1 155
22 CABINET 2

list of Materials

DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
PART NO. FUNCTION thickne .. X width X length

A 1 top % 18 60
B 1 bottom % 18 58%
C 2 side % 18 20%
0 1 back % 20% 59%
E 2 partition 3,4 173,4 19%
F 2 shelf % 16 19
G 2 door % 19 19Y2
H 4 cleat Y:z % 17
K 4 drawer bottom 1,4 18% 171,4
L 8 drawer side % 4% 17%
M 4 drawer back % 4% 18Ys
0 4 drawer front 3,4 4"s 19
p 8 cleat % % 17%
Q 4 brace 1% 2 8
R 4 leg 11,4 2 13
S 4 rail 11,4 2 12Y2

Variation: Cabinet without drawers.


\

Eliminate drawer parts; add additional shelf (F) bottom of ltog


-
and additional door (G).
For support use bench on page 164. I

Instructions for Assembly

1. Join top (A) and bottom (B)


with sides (C), partitions (E),
and back (D).
2. Attach brace (Q) to leg (R).
3. Attach (Q-R) to rails (S).
4. Fasten leg assembly to cabinet.
5. Attach cleats (H) and (P) to
sides (C) and partitions (E).
6. Join drawer side (L) with back
(M) and front (0).
7. Install bottom (K).
8. Install door (G).
9. Apply finish.
10. Insert shelves (F) and drawers.

156 Cabinet 2
\ee detail 3 page 193
,f\----------
I'" \
I '
I I
\

\
\
I'
I \
I I
f

_______ j
t~ \\11
Q t R
\l"e dl"~ail 1


q
21" ;
+33
12-1
+,
k- _b_! ~ ~ ~ _\!! _P~ '!_l"_ '_6~_

so" +-t8'~






T
21", r
32" rT
+11"
-+s" 48- 6'+ -+ ;y-15" -V-
1
Cabinet 2
157
23 DESK 1

DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
PART NO. FUNCTION thickness X width X length 1. Join legs (C) with cross rails
A 1 top 3,4 22 29% (B).
B 2 side rail 2Y2 46 2. Join rails (D) with legs (C).
3. Attach bottom (F) to sides (G)
C 4 leg 2% 26 and front and back (H).
D 2 cross rail 3,4 2 17 4. Insert partitions (J).
E leaf 3,4 83,4 17 5. Fasten leaf (E) to side (G).
6. Join bottom (L ) to sides (M)
F 1 bottom % 8 16
and back and front (0).
G 2 side % 4v.. 16 7. Attach leaf (K) to side (M).
H 2 front, back Y2 4v.. 9 8. Insert partitions (P).
J 2 partition v.. 33,4 8% 9. Fasten top (A) to rails (B).
10. Attach compartments to frame
K leaf 3,4 133,4 22 with wood screws.
l bottom % 13 16 11. Apply finish.
M 2 side % 11 16
0 2 front, back % 11 14
I
p 2 partition v.. 10 13% I
I
I
I
I
I

:C

bottom of leg

detdil 1

158 Desk 1
+ \

):-
52" -
- -----r----, - - + - - - - 22" ------1"-
I

r l..._ J~
J
I

I r,_--J -- ---------
I I

n
u
L-n
LJ

29
...
It - -
r

l .,
l J L
42'~~"-+3'

-----, I i I
I ~ I I I

II

Ii-
I
---=.-

[::~--
II

l,
j
I
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:

!
:
r=====-==--=J
e~~====~l
I

-...:====::r::i
----------------:.:1=------
I
l
17"

2!!'2-

29 11 14" --+ 1"

Desk 1 159
24 DESK 2

list of Materials

DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
PART NO. FUNCTION thickne.. X width X length

A 1 top 3A 24 45
B 2 rail 11M 3 40
C 2 brace 3 13
0 4 leg 1v.. 2% 28.1M
E 2 side 3A 17 23
F 2 bottom 3A 13Y2 23
E

A1
G 1 back 3,4 13Y2 15%
H 1 support 3A 2 13Y2
K 2 support % % 20 3A
l 1 drawer fron' 3A 4 13%
M 1 drawer back % 3Y2 12% ~

284
0 2 drawer side . % 4 21%
p 2 drawer bottom 1M 13 21% de ta i I 2
Q 1 fron' % 10% 13%
R back % 10% 12%
0
T 2 side % 10 3A 21%
++
1"
U parHtion 1M 10 13

lnstructio'ns for Assembly

1. Attach legs (D) to rails (Bf


2. loin rails (B).
3. loin braces (C) toraHs (B).
4. Fasten top (A) to frame with
wood screws.
S. Join compartment top and bottom
(F) and drawer support (H) to
compartment sides (E) and back
(G).
6. Fasten drawer supports (K) to
sides (E).
7. Construct drawers by joining sides
(T) with front (Q) and back (R),
and attaching bottom (P) and
partition (U).
8. Attach drawer compartment to
rails (B).
,9. Apply finish.

160 Desk 2
o
\
\
\
,
\
\
\
\
\ , \\
, \
o ',\ \
'~3
________
!tee detail 1

r- - - -- -- -- -- - - ----- -- - - --
I
-----1
I
1 I
I
I
I
I f
I (
I
I
o I
I
I
I
I
I
L
I ________
I _ __________________
I
1

, .
24 - - - - + I J
.J-_ _ _
I I' I
4 5"
t\
~ 1 ~ IT 3" I

.
I
1
,,"
0

29" 0
,

Desk 2 161
ZS STOOL

DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
ART NO. FUNCTION thickness X width ~ length
-----
A 1 top V2 13% 22%
B 2 side 3 22
C -4 leg 2 12
0 2 rail 2 14
E foam rubber 2 13% 22V2

~.

r
12"
1
15"

1 20"
22i
,"
1"If 1 ,.1" 14"
16"
J
II

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/

I
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I //
I
I
/, It
:

/ /
/~

IL.~ _ _________ _
/
' /
/

C
.

see de t ai I 1 page 190

bottom of leg

1. Join sides (B) with legs (C).


2. Attach rails (0) to (B-C) . .
3. Apply finish.
4. Apply foam rubber (E) to top
(A).
5. Fasten (A) to frame .

.62 Stool
26 BENCH 1

DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
PART NO. FUNCTION thickneu X width X length

A top % 15 48
B 2 rail 2% 34
C 4 leg 2 1514
D 2 brace 2V2 9
see detail 1 E cushion' 15 48

:'l
1\-------
) Foam rubber.

,, \
\
,' \ \

", \\,
C
-------;- -----~ "
see detaIls page- 26

I~~<G?~I
1. Attach legs (C) to rails (B). C
2. Join rails (B).
3. Attach braces (D) to rails (B).
4. Fasten top (A) to frame.
5. Apply finish.
6. Add cushion (E).
ell' tai I
j.

I
I
I

y'
16"
I
I

I
18"

~6"
~
36"
48"
't
6"4-
1 15"
1
Bench 1 163
27 BENCH 2

dt"tail 1

DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
ART NO. FUNCTION thickn... X width X length
dt"tail 2
15 .48

j]
A 1 top %
B 2 rail 2V2 3.4
C .4 leg 2 15%
0 2 brace 2% 9
E cushion 1 15 .48
1 Foam rubber.

rariation: Bench for furniture base.

A. 1 top % 11 60
B 2 side rail 3 60 '
C .4 leg 2% 9 C
D 2 end rail 2%; 11
2 rung % (diam.) 12

1. Attach legs (C) to side rails (B).


2. Attach (B-C) to top (A), end
rails (D), and rungs (E).
3. Apply finish.
4. Add cushions.

:;4 Bench 2
,//
~l"_~_ C!e_t~~
\
! ---
pagl" 164
----
, \
\

t
12"
+--13"

-_
-+

{
1
It
12 9"

~ ++-6~W
. 42"
60"
- T
--
2Ld
........
TcA r
18"
,"

13"
rf
2I 'fxI
{
1" -r
i
9~

i l~~
12" -
1J I

I
~--'6" ~.-~,
-H
," ..I "'-t

-=-------
-J.u
18"
_ _ _ _ ____.L__

60"

i'f
t
3"

'18"

Bench 2
rt 165
28 SECTIONAL BOOKCASE

-see------
detdil 3 page 193
------;.71'

detclil 1

DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
PART NO. FUNCTION thickne.. X width X length

A 2 side % 12 22V2
B
C
0
E
1
2

2
back
top. bottom
shelf
cleats
1f.&

%
%
V2
11 V2
12
10V2 11%
23%
12

V2 11
-+-12''--+
1 ->-12'--+

24"
1. Join sides (A) to top and bottom (C).
2. Attach back (B).
3. Attach cleats (E) to sides (A) and shelf (D).
4. Apply finish.
I
~ ________~ ~I 3" L -______ ~

For bench shown in smaller drawing. see page 164.

166 Sectional Bookcase


29 CHAIR

DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
PART NO. FUNCTION thickness X width X length

(all) 30 36
Enlarge drawing of parts and trace on plywood as
indicated.

1. Join center piece (A) with cross piece (B).


2. Fasten braces (E), (F), and (G) to center (A).
3. Attach back (C) to brace (G).
4. Fasten seat (D) to (A-B).
5. Apply finish.

13li

t~ 31"

17r"2-

1 y--14" 11 1"

Chair 167
30 DINING SET 1: TABLE

List of Materials

DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
PART NO. FUNCTION thickne.. X width X length

A 1 top % 30 60
B 2 side % 1% 60
C 4 leg 114 214 2814
D 2 side rail 114 514 45
E 2 end rail 114 3 25

c Instructions for Assembly

1. Join top (A) to sides (B).


2. Attach legs (C) to side 'rails (D)
and end rails (E).
3. Fasten top (A) to end rails (E).
4. Apply finish.

168 Dining Set 1: Table


'!lee detail 1
------~

detail 1

c
c
~ __~~~!~n~p~~~3!
31~'
c
11
-
29"

,
-,
I

J
J

,I
I

I
:C -t- 6'-+-------'-----
.,
I
t ~--~----~--~--_r--------~r_
S' T
I

bottom of leg 1
23'

.
Dining Set 1: Table 169
31 DINING SET 1: ARMCHAIR

DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
I'ARl NO. fUNCllON thickness )( width X length

A 2 leg 3 31
B seat Y2 17 19%
B' seat' 17 19%
C 2 leg 2 24
D 2 arm 1 Y2 14
E 2 rail % 1% 19%
F 2 rail % 2 19%
G 2 rail % 1 Y2 15Y2
l Foam rubber.

detail 1 1. Attach rails (D) to legs (A).


2. Attach legs (C) to arms (D).
3. Attach cross rails (G) to end rails (F).
4. Join back rails (E) and end rails (F) to (A-C-
D).
5. Apply finish.
6. Apply upholstery to seat (B). ,
7. Attach seat (B) to rails (F) and (G).
8. Apply upholstery to back.
/

-+---- 22" - - - - + - -+-_ _ _ 21~ ----+


t
7"
2"
-R- 0
f~'jFJ IR+a t1~
1"" +7"
I
1_Lm~~~t31" 6======1
-+---14"--T-

F 1i .
24" I #iW~e;;. . t2"
-+---- 19~; ---+ 17"

1 Dining Set 1: Armchair


170
see detail 1 page 174 detdil 3
!\-- --- - -- -- - - ---
'\
\ \

,
\ I
\I
,\

,
I
I
>
,, ,,
, I

1/
I I
\
\
\
\
/ I
I I \
I I C \ I
\ 'LI _______ _
,I
/1
,/
" see d e td i I 2
l _______ _
~ee detail 3

upholstered 'bae k

.,

Dining Set 1: Armchair 171


32 DINING SET 1: SIDE CHAIR

DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
PART NO. FUNCTION thickne.. X width X length

A 2 leg 3 31
B 2 rail 2% 15
C 2 rail 3,4 2 13
D 2 rail 3,4 114 13
E 2 leg 2 17
F seat V2 15 17
F' seat' 15 17
, Foam rubber.
see detail 1 page 174
,-------------
\,
\~,
'
,' " , ,I
\
\
\

\, 't

r
14"

I-- /-

17"

1+--17"----+-

1. Join legs (A) with rails (B).


2. Attach legs (E) to rails (B).
3. Attach rails (C), (D) to (A-B-E).
4. Apply finish.
5. Apply upholstery to back and
foam rubber to seat.
6. Attach seat (F) to rails (C).

172 Dining Set 1: Side Chair


33 DINING SET 2: SIDE CHAIR

Im<:iJ~1
DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
'.4RT NO. FUNCTION thickness X width X length

A 2 rail 1(2 3 16
B 2 leg 4 32
C 2 leg 1% 17%
0 2 rail 2 16
E 2 rail 2 14
F 2 rail % 34 16
G seat V2 15% 18
G' seat' 15 34 18
1 Foam rubber.

1. Join legs (B) and legs (C) to rails (E) and (F).
uphol 'i>t ere d 'i>eat 2. Attach rails (A) and (D) to sides (B) and legs
(C).
3. Apply finish.
4. Apply upholstery (G') to seat (G).
5. Fastenseat (G) to rails (D).

'i>ee detail 1 page 174


-----------"1
. "
,1
,',
, I

~
!
I
---
I
B
I

lS"

+ - - - 21" - - - +
1 +---18"---+
c

Dining Set 2: Side Chair 173


34 DINING SET 2: ARMCHAIR

17~

~I

l Add the following pieces to the list on pa_ge 173:


DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
NO. FUNCTION thickness X width X length

H 2 arm 11,4 2 14V2


J 2 arm support 11,4 3

I> , -I;' ~ ~:I ,"

, I~stru~tio~~ for A~se~bly I~


~ ) ~: ~ ~"~ " ~ ~ 4'

I. Join sides (B) and legs (C) with rails (E) and
(F).
2. Attach rails (A) and (D) to sides (B) and legs
(C).
3. Attach arms (H) to supports (1) and ,fasten
(H-J) to (B) and (E).
4. Apply finish.
5. Cover seat (0) with upholstery.
6. Attach seat (0) to rails (D).

174 Dining Set .2 : Armchair


!>ee detail 1 page 174
------------")
I'
1\

detail 2

+--,----17"--_+_ 4"-+ +1+-1- - 18" -----+-+-


1" ".
I
7" ----- -
f
7"
------

32~
t
18"

-+----- 21" ___ +1-+-___ 20,,_ _ -+


Dining Set 2: Armchair 175
3S DINING SET 2: TABLE

DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
PART NO. FUNCTION thickn ... X width X length

A 1 top 3,4 36 52%


B 2 end % 2 36
C 4 leg 11,4 21,4 29
0 2 rail 11,4 3 42
E 2 brace 3 19

1
see detail 2 ~c
--------" 1. Attach legs (C) to cross rails (D).

.r' 2.
3.
4.
5.
Fasten rails (0) together at notch
Attach braces (E) to rails (0).
Fasten ends (B) to top (A).
Fasten top (A) to rails (0) with wood screws.
6. Apply finish ..

detail 2

4-----36"---+

176 Dining Set 2: Table


36 EASY CHAIR

+- 7" 21"
r"tmrc:1l~ 1
PART NO. FUNCTION
DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
thickne .. X width X length
1 13"
2 back leg 1% 2 19%

t
A
B 2 front leg 1% 2 21
C 2 arm 1% 1% 20%
0 support 1% 2 22%
E top 2% 20V2 16"

F 1 front rail 4 22
G 2 back rail 6% 20%
H 2 side 3,4 4 19%
K 2 side rail 3A 4 26 - + - - - - 258
fI'
----4.-

7 yd. common webbing; 4 yd. "No-Sag" spring; 20


extension springs; 21/2 yd. fabric; 1 piece foam rubber
1 in. thick and 23 x 40 in.

23"

1. Attach back legs (A) and front


legs (B) to arms (C).
2. Attach support (D) to front legs
(B).
3. Apply finish.
4. Join sides (H) with top (E) and
back rail (G). .
5. Attach rails (F) and (G) to side
rail (K).
6. Apply webbing to back, and springs
to seat.
7. Attach upholstery material.
8. Bolt back rails (G) together.
9. Attach assembly (A-B-C) to back
(H) and side rail (K).

Easy Chair 177


detail 1

S(>E' de tail 1 detail 3


,---------

detail 2

178 Easy Chair


37 TWO OR THREE SEATER SETTEE

Use list given on page 177, with these variations:


Two Seater Settee
DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
PART NO. FUNCTION thickne .. X width X length + - - - - - 24" - - - - +
0 support 11,4 2V2 72%
E top 2% 70V2
F 1 front rail 4 72 Additional materials for 2 Seater
G 2 back rail 6% 70V2 13 yards webbing; 8 yards No-Sag
L 2 seat brace 4 24 spring; 30 ex'tension springs; one
M 2 back brace 3 20 piece rubber I ~ in. thick and 40 by
49 in.; 4~ yards fabric.
Three Seater Settee
Additional materials for 3 Seater
0 support 11,4 2V2 48%
20 yards webbing, 12 yards No-Sag
E top 2% 46V2 spring; 50 extension springs; one piece
F front rail 4 48 rubber 1 ~ in. thick and 40 by 73 in.;
G 2 back rail ~% 46% 6~ y~rds fabric.

l seat brace 4I
24 For both pieces follow instructions on
20 page 177.
M back brace ~
~"
1,18 4Sf 2 S(taITl~
+- 7" 21" -+-4~--------- 721" 3 Seater" - - -
I
r-,
T I
1
1
1
I I
;:
1
I
I

I
I
J
) !f rl :
l1
29"

/ L j-J

M/ L

Two or Three Seater Settee 179


t------ 28"------+

72"

r
29"
I
J

I
_.1_
22" I
48" 1
1 1

T
J
!,
~
I

13"

I . t
16"
29"

1
I
I

Armless Chair, 2 or 3 Seater Settee 181


39 ARMCHAIR

DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
PART NO. FUNCTION thickness X width X length

A 2 arm 114 4 21
B 2 back leg 114 4V2 22
C 2 front leg 114 2 21%
D 2 rail 2 23
E 2 side % 4 25
F 2 side rail % 4 24
G 1 top 2 21 Va
H 2 back rail 2V2 21 Va
J front rail 3 21 Va
K 2 support 3 5

Also required: 7 yds of common webbing; 4 yds of No-Sag spring; one piece of foam rubber lYz
in. thick and 23 in. by 21 in.; and one rubber cushion 5 in. thick and 22 in. by 23 in.

~~..; ::-.-.... -"


~ .... ~--
.:- .~ ~"
t.r~. ~ . ..

.f

:' ~
_ .r ,
.'

- .'

1. Join arm (A) with legs (B) and


(C).
!2. Join legs (B) and (C) with rails
(D).
3. Apply finish.
4. Join sides (E) to side rails (F).
5. Join (E-F) with top (G), back
rail (H), and front rail (J).
6. Install support (K).
7. Install webbing and No-Sag
springs.
8. Apply upholstery and fasten up-
holstered seat and back to frame.
9. Install cushion.

182 Armchair
set" detail 1 page 178
r - - - - - ._- - - - - - -
I
\
\ see detail 4
\ p age 180
!ocrt"w
~----
G '. r-------
I

,,
I,
\
I

,,
\
\

t \........
4"
.:
+L--------''. ID"
4-----24"---~

12J 26"
2"

t
7" t t
+
a"

+
5- [ ]
130"
23"

t
10"

30"
+ 44----
1~" 1~"
23" ---~

Armchair 183
40 BED SETTEE

mmeJ~
DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
PART NO. fUNCTION thickness X width X length

A 2 side rail 3V2 74


B 2 end rail 3% 30
C 1 seat % 28 72
D 2 leg rail 3 28
E 2 cleat 70
F 2 cleat 28
G 4 leg 1'4 2V2 8%
H 2 back support 3 17
j 21 corner block 3 3
K 2 side 5% 11
L 2 brace 4 11
M back rail 3% 72 d eo t a i I
0 1 back rail 5% 72 -r-v-r
I I
I I
p 2 back support 3 5 I I
I I
R (foam rubber) 1'4 12 74 I I

S (rubber mattress) 5 30
-- 74.
I I
I
I
Seven yd. fabric; ten yd. webbing I
I
1 Cut diagonally to make four. I
/ ~-c=::~~~
I
I
I
I
1. Join side rails (A) with end rails (B).
2. Attach leg rails (D) to side rails (A).
3. Install corner blocks (J).
4. Fasten legs (G) to leg rails (D).
5. Attach cleats (E) and (F) to rails (A) arid
(B).
6. Join sides (K) and braces (L) to back rails
(M) and (0).
7. Apply upholstery.
8. Bolt back support (H) to side rail (A).
9. Attach seat (C) to frame.
lO. Fasten back support (P) to upholstered back
and to support (H).
11. Install mattress.

184 Bed Settee


,
t-- S " - + - - 23" - - - + 74" - - -

C_
t
11"

I I ,
~I
r
7'2."'
u

OPEN fOR BED

see detail -
..,-------
1 -page
--- 184
-
dE'tail 2

J
~

\ It
. J /
\ 1/
-T..Ji:.-, --
see dl?tdll 2

Bed Settee 185


41 DRESSING TABLE 1

DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
PART NO. fUNCTION thielen.1I X width X 1.ngth PLYWOOO
A top 14 42
r------
1M I RROR
B 1 bottom 14 40%
I r------
I I
I I
C 2 end 4% 14 I I

,,
I I
D back 4% 41%
E 4 leg 2 23 ,
F cross rail 3 28 : ' I
I I I
I I I
G 2 end rail 3 10 I I I

H 3 drawer front 3% 13
Mil,
I I I
I
I I I
J 6 drawer side 3% 13%
I I :
K 3 drawer back 3 12% I , ).

M
L
2
3 drawer bottom
frame
12% 13%
1% 21 I
6l-
It(.
0 ,
2, -"--frame.
~
1% 16
.
"

P 1 . mirror ". 15 20
Q .'Or 1 mirror back 15 20
R'- ',: 2 par~ition 3% 13%
.
. .
.,
.;
\
i
1. Join top (A) a"nd bottom (B)
with ends (C), partitions (R),
,. ~ ~

and back (D).


f /
I
2. Attach legs (E) to end rails (G).
I 3. Attach cross rail (F) to end rails
I (G).
, I 4. Fasten legs (E) to bottom (B)

,
I
I with wood screws.
5. Join drawer sides (1) with
I
drawer fronts (H) and drawer
backs (K).
E: 6. Attach drawer bottom (L) to
I sides (1).
I 7. Join mirror frame pieces (M)
I
and (0).
8. Fasten plywood back (Q) and
mirror (P) to frame (O-M).
9. Attach mirror frame (0) to
vanity top (A).
bottom of leg 10. Apply finish.

186 Dressing Table 1


28" - - - - - - - 4 -
'itee detdil 1 PdQ! 186
\\--------
\ ,,
--- FL. 4;;;: ", :....... :\~.
\
\\ ' \ Q o
, ,
\ ',, c:
-+---16"
\

~
E
I

"
I
'\
\I
I,
,',
~~ LI ___________ _
see detdils Pdge 79
\\ 1 /
II 1 /
'I 1/
__________ J ~ 1/
E
see detail2 page 200

+-- 13" - - + - - 16"


13" -+ I
21"

~~l~ o 5"

~~r~
27"
22"

Dressing Table 1
J +--_,," _--+- l 187
42 DRESSING TABLE 2

DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
PART NO. FUNCTION thickness X width X length
~13"--+
A top % 14 45
B
C
D
4
2
2
side
bottom
back
%
%
14
14
11 V2
12V2 18V2
1814
14
B
1 1"
18;; f'
E 2 door % 11% 17%
~pl
F
G
H
J
2
4

4
shelf
cleat
drawer support
leg
%
%
%
PI.!
11

13
1%
%
11%
10
19
9 ~t'+
14" --+
1 20"

J~ 1
K drawer front % 3 19
l drawer back % 2V2 18Ve
}'
M 1 drawer bottom 14 1214 18%
-t-tz., 12il
0 2 drawer side % 3 12% Vs
P 2 frame % 2V2 20
Q frame % 2% 14V2
R mirror 1514 19V2
S mirror back Va 1514 19V:2

1. Join sides (B) with top (A) and


bottoms (C).
2. Attach backs (D).
3. Join legs (J) to bottom (C).
4. Attach cleats (G) to sides (B).
5. Install shelves (F) and (H).
6. Fasten drawer sides (0) to
drawer front (K) and drawer
back (L) .
7. Attach drawer bottom (M) to
J sides (0).
8. Install door (E).
9. Join mirror frame pieces (Q)
and (P).
10. Install mirror (R) and plywood
back (S).
11. Fasten mirror frame (P-Q) to
vanity top (A).
bottom of leg 12. Apply finish.

l88 Dressing Table 2


-1
'I
1
20"

I
~

I--
0
-
1
0 c '9"
27"

U
J---'
~
- t
8"

- 19" 13"
+-13" ...l.
- 45
II ____ -+

!oE'E' dE'tai I 3
______ _p~g_E' _193
-7'"--
/J -
// I
/ I
// I
/ I
/ I
/ I
/ I
I
I
I

J /

, - d;'.i~ - i).-g.-3/'1J
Dressing Table 2 189
43 DRESSING TABLE STOOL

DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
PART NO, FUNCTION thickness X width X length

A top V2 1P,4 18
B 2 side 3 17V2
_'

C 4 leg 1% 13
D 2 rail 2 12
E 1 foam rubber 11% 18
cushion

1. Join sides (B) with legs (C), _._-- 17f----+-


2. Join rails (D) to leg assemblies (B-C).
3.
4.
Apply finish.
Apply upholstery, including foam rubber (E),
3t~ !2' >7%
to top (A). -+4i-t- 81 -+4~-+
5. Fasten top (A) to frame.

" 18"-"---+f--'4"-t 1
13" 15"

" , . 1,. "


--+r-- 16 --41'~' -tf--- 12 --+f
,..l
190' . Dressing Table Stool
44 WARDROBE

I~~~'~I
DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
PART NO. FUNCTION thickness X width X length

A 4 top, bottom % 22% 24


B 4 side 3,4 24 72
C 2 back 14 23V2 67%
0 2 door % 22V2 66V2
E 4 shelf % 22 22%
F 2 toe plate % 4 22%
G 8 cleat 3,4 3,4 21
H 1 dowel or pipe 1 (diam.) 22V2
J 2 top, bottom % 12 304V2
K 2 shelf % 113,4 304V2
L 2 side % 12 48
M back 14 35% 47V2
0 2 door % 17% 18

Wardrobe
t
10"


1
48" 7Z'

I
tit'.
10"
W
+--24" - - + - - - 36"-~r-- 24" --+- +--24"----+ +-15'49'+
84" - - - - - - - +

_- .. -." ." ~
,
I --.
I ,

SEIEI c3etail'l> pag~ 29


-- - - - - - - - - --::.""
." \

~ .// \
~/ "

---,
'l>crt'w'l>
1\
,1-
see detail 3 page 193
~-----------

,, \,\

,
I '

o
o

192 Wardrobe
if rabbet. joint i!o made end to end, piece!.
mu!ot be in!oerted to fit
- - - -.- - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - --,
"- ,

Instructions for Assembly


.\
/ ' 1. Fasten top and b~tom (A)to-
sides (B).
2. Install back (C).
3. Install door (D).
4. Attach dowel or pipe (H).
5. Join sides (L) to shelves (J) and
top and bottom (K).
6. Install back (M).
7. Attach toe plate (F).
8. Install doors (0).
9. Attach cleats (G).
10. Apply finish.
11. Attach sides (L) to sides (B).
12. Insert shelves (E).

Variation: Bookcase
With the addition of a base, as shown
at the left, the center section of this
wardrobe could be used independently
as a bookcase. Legs could be used in
place of the base.

Wardrobe 193
4S CHEST 1

DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
PART NO. FUNCTION thickness X width X length

A top % 18 18
B 1 bottom 34 16V2 18
C 2 side % 18 2014
0 1 bock 14 17% 20%
E 3 drawer bock % 6 15%
F 6 drawer side % 6% 17%
G 3 drawer bottom 14 16 1714
H 3 drawer front % 6V2 16V2
J .4 leg 2 8
K 3 roil 2 13
L 6 cleat 14 V2 17V2

1. Join top (A) and bottom (B) with


sides (C).
2. Install back (D).
3. Fasten cleats (L) to sides (C).
4. Attach legs (J) to end rails (K).
5. Join cross rail (K) with end rails
c
(K).
6. Attach rails (K) to bottom (B),
with wood screws.
7. Join. drawer sides (F) with drawer
back and front (E) and (H).
8. Insert drawer bottom (G). ,,
9. Apply finish. ,
- - - -.- - - - - - - ~
!.ff detail!. page 79
0

0
1
21"
II
I 28"
,I
I
I
f
I
I
f

I
0 I
I
~
7"
101
-+-_ _ 18" _ _
!oj
-+-L--+-__ 18" _ _-+- bottom of leg

194 Chest 1
46 CHEST 2

DIMENSIONS IN INCHES 1. Join top (A), facing strip (E), and


PART NO. fUNCTION thickness X width X length
bottom (B) to sides (C).
A top % 18 36
2. Install back (D).
B bottom 3,4 18 34V2 3. Fasten rails (F).tosides(C).
c 2 side % 18 231,4 4. Attach legs (L) to end rails (M).
1,4
5. Join cross rail (0) to end rails
D back 23V2 35Y2
(M).
E 2 facing strip % 2 34Y2 6. Fasten leg assembly (L-M-O) to
F 4 rail % 1 15% frame.
G 3 drawer front 34 7 34V2 7. Fasten drawer sides (J) to drawer
front and back (G) and (H), and
H 3 drawer back % 6Y2 33%
install drawer bottom (K).
J 6 drawer sides % 7 17% 8. Apply finish.
K 3 drawer bottom 1,4 171,4 34
L 4 leg 2 8
M 2 end rail 2 13
o cross rail 2 25

2 .'
-H-

Lu t
-tr,,.-f-

\
I

0 0

0 0 ,I .
0 0
II
\ ~

... U
_......------ 36" - - - - - - + - -+----18" ---+-

Chest 2 195
47 CHEST 3

DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
PART NO. FUNCTION thickne.. X width X length

A 1 top % 20 4'5
B 1 bottom %_ 20 43V2
C 2 side % 20 231.4
D back 1.4 23% 44V2
E 2 facing stri"p % 2 43%
F 4 rail % 17%
G 3 drawer front % 7 43%
H 3 drawer back % 6V2 42%
J 6 drawer side % 7 19%
K 3 drawer bottom 1.4 191.4 43
l 4 leg 2 8
M 2 end rail 2 15
0 cross rail 2 32

L
d()tail 2

Follow proc~dure given on page 195.

196 Chest 3
!o~~ d~~ail 3 pa 9 ~ 193 see ~detdjls page 29
1\------------ r..-----------
, ~
;' " ,
, I
I \\
\ \
\ \

,,
I \ \
\

I
r.
o

___________ 1
,I
!oe~ detai l!o page 79

0 '0
I
~
e !(!)
l
,
0 0
II
,

,~.' 1
8"
I U
+6-.. . . .- - - - -
LJ
3 3 ' - - - - - 4 - 6'+
45" -------~
+1~ ~

-'+I'~--
-+----
1?,'--tH-1

20" - - - + -

Chest 3 197
48 CHEST 4

l~eJ.tn!
~ >,', <,/>".;..1;\ _,. ,.

DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
PART NO. FUNCTION thickness X width X length

A top % 20 54
B 1 bottom 3A 20 52V2
C 2 side 3A 20 23lJ.i
0 partition 3A 19% 22%
E back % 23% 53%
F 4 facing strip % 2 25%
G 8 rail % 17%
H 6 drawer front % 7 251'8
J 6 drawer back % 6% 25
K 6 drawer bottom lJ.i 19lJ.i 25%
L 12 drawer side % 7 19%
M 1 cross rail 2 35
0 2 end rail 2 15
P 4 leg 2 8

1. Join top (A) and bottom (B),


partition (D), and facing strip (F)
with sides (C).
2. Install back (E).
3. Attach rails (G) to sides (C) and
I
I partition (D).
I
I 4. Attach legs (P) to end rails (0).
Ip 5. Join cross rail (M) with end rails
I

o ,
I
I
(0).
6. Join drawer sides (L) with drawer
front and back (H) and (J).
7. Install drawer bottom (K).
bQ ttom of leg 8. Apply finish.

198 Chest 4
0 0
. . .
0 0 24"
I
0 0 [
\ ,

~ 9
0'
l 0'
36
l
_.I_
1
g" -t
8'

-+ _'. . .
" L.
1-1 01---_ _ 17" --+-,~t-'
J,
J -_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ S4--------------r _.__--- 20"

~e! _!l!_l' ~ ~ __P_cl..9_! _ 3 ~ -7\


/
/

!oee detatail 3 page ~~~


1\:---- - - -----
r\'
r ,""
r
I
I
I

I
I
I

~ee detdlls page 79-

Chest 4 199
49 CHEST 5

P ",',' :~., ~) t '':-~ ',;;:.,:~ : <f:'t t>":,~~


, list of, Materials j
t,A ,;t,.m:J "'-":ill.~i2~,,$ "&1!~;-_'t,~~,1kJ~

DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
PART NO. FUNCTION thickness X width X length

A top % 18 36
B 1 bottom % 18 34%
C 2 side 3,4 18 411,4
D back \4 35% 41 V2
E 4 facing strip 3,4 2 34V2
F 8 rail 3,4 15%
G 5 drawer front % 7 34%
H 10 drawer sides % 7 17%
J 5 drawer back % 6% 33%
K 5 drawer bottom 1,4 171,4 34
L 4 leg 2 8
M 2 end rail 2 13
0 1 cross rail 2 25

bottom of Ie-g
.g '{ :Wf'~ n $ 'Ii ' '. ~ ""< ,~ f'J!i.~" %

r"':lrist{ucti~n5' fc:,r As~embly ~ cH t a i I 2


~>j}~~" !. ~jf .if ~.""" ~ ~ It<<::~

1. Join top (A), bottom (B), and facing strips (,E) L


to sides. (C) .
2. Install back (D).
3. Attach rails (F) to sides (C).
4. Attach legs (L) to end rails (M).
5. Join end rails (M) to cross rail (0).
6. Fasten leg assembly (L-M-O) to bottom (B).
7. Join drawer sides (H) to drawer front and back
(G) and (J).
8. Install bottom (K).
9. Apply finish.

200 Chest 5
s~~ (1~tajl 3 pag~ 193 st\'~ d('tails pag' 29
~::.------------ --~- - - ---------
"-
\"
\
\
"-..." ......
...........
"-
:--
"
\ ",
\
;'
,
c

st>t> dt>tails Pdgt> 79


c -----------7

0 0

0 O

I
0 0 I 42"
50"
. I-
0 0'

0 0

\ I
8"

-+-5" '1 26" U 5"


-+-_ _ _ _ _ _ 3 6 " - - - - - - - +
r:
~ 1~t44--15 .
18" -----1-1-++
,,,
1~
+
Chest 5 201
SO SINGLE OR DOUBLE BED AND NIGHT TABLE

12~;
Single Bed
PART NO. FUNCTION
DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
thickne .. X width X length
o
A 2 side rail 1~ 5% 74%
B 2 end rail 1~ ,.. 5% 40
c 2 headboard 1~
2si'
D 4 leg 1~ 2% 31 31"

1
E 2 cross rail
F 2' corner block 1~ 4 4
Twelve yd. No-Sag spring; 60 extension springs;
single mattress.
1 CUI diagonally 10 make four.

NightTable

G top 3A 12 24
J 1 bottom 3,4 12 22%
H 2 side 3,4 8~ 12 +S'~

~
K back
L rail 1% 9
M 2 rail
o 4 leg

Variation for Double Bed


DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
PART NO. FUNCTION thickn ... X width X length

B 2 end rail 1~ 5% 55
c 2 headboard 1~ 3% 37V2
E 2 cross rail
Sixteen yd. No-Sag spring; 80 extension springs;
double mattress.

202 Beds and Night Table


Bed
1. Join side rails (A) with end rails (B).
2. Attach cross rails (E) and corner blocks
(F) to assembly (A-B).
3. Apply No-Sag spring.
4._, Cover spring with muslin, tacked to
(AB), to protect mattress.
5. Attach head- and footboards (C) to
legs (D).
6. Attach legs (D) to end rails (B) with
bolts.
7. Apply finish.
8. Install mattress.
Night table
1. Join sides (H) with top and bottom
(G) and (1).
2. Install back (K) .
3. Attach legs (0) to end rails (M).
4. Join end rails (M) to cross rail (L).
,5. Attach rails (L) and (M) to (J).

~eds and Night Table 203


Sl DOUBLE BED

DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
PART NO. FUNCTION thickneu X width X length

A headboard % 21 Y2 57
B 1 footboard % 14 57
C 3 edge strip V2 58
D 2 edge strip V2 21 V2
E 2 edge strip Y2 14
(J)
F 2 side rail % 7 77
G 2 cleat 77
E
H 3 croSS rail 2 55Y2
J 4 leg 2Y2 10

Box spring; mattress detail 1

1. Attach edge strips (C) and (D) to headboard


(A).
2. Attach edge strips (C) and (E) to footboard
(B).
3. Fasten legs (1) to side rails (F).
4. Attach cleats (G) to side rails (F) .
5. Install cross rails (H).
6. Apply finish.
7. Install box spring and mattress. /

Instructions for building the night table shown are


given on page 210.

204 Double Bed


A
detail 2

o
o

I
I
I
LI ______ _
see page 35

/'
/'
" -

1
'" 77"

1, r
t7"
l
J 30"

+'1"
V
57"
V ~.
,,.'-+
1 J
SS"
l
Double Bed 205
52 BEDS AND HEADBOARD

Single Bed
DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
PART NO. FUNCTION thickn.ss X width X length

A 2 side rail 11.4 5 731h


B 2 end rail 11.4 5 40
C 2 leg rail 11.4 2V2 3~1h
D 2 corner block' 11.4 4 4
E 4 leg 11.4 2V2 111.4
, Cut diagonally to make four.

I I yd. No-Sag spring; 60 extension springs; single


mattress.

Double Bed

DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
PART NO. FUNCTION thickne .. X width X length

A 2 side rail 11.4 5 73V2 1. Join side rails (A) with leg rails
B 2 end rail 11.4 5 55 (C), and end rails (B) with side
rails (A).
C 2 leg rail 11.4 5 521h
2. Join legs (E) with rails (C).
D 2 corner block' 11.4 4 4 3. Install corner block (D).
E 4 leg 11.4 21h 111.4 4. Install No-Sag spring and apply
, Cut diagonally to make four. finish.
5. Tack muslin to (A) and (B) to
16 yd. No~Sag spring; 80 extension springs; double cover springs and protect mattress.
mattress. 6. Install mattress.

206 Beds and Headboard


~fe detail 2 pa 9 e 203
----------------7':-
I' \
box spring may be used I I
---------------,

,,
,,

~
\
,, \
\
, \
detail 1
E ""\
- - - - ______ ..:.:l

E see detail 1
LlW)c:D~ I
DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
PART NO. FUNCTION thickness X width X length

A 2 top 3,4 10 21
B 2 bottom 3,4 12 19%
C 2 side 3,4 12 121,4
0 2 side 3,4 12 381,4
E 2 back 1,4 131,4 20%
F 2 drop door 3,4 12V2 19%
G 2 top 3,4 10 41
H 2 shelf 3,4 113,4 39%
J 2 bottom 3,4 12 39%
K 4 side 3,4 12 381,4
l 2 back 1,4 34% 40%
M 2 shelf 3,4 9V2 39%
0 4 cleat 3,4 3,4 9
p 2 toe plate 3,4 4 39%
Q 2 door 3,4 12V2 20%
R door 3,4 12V2 19%
5 door 3,4 20V2 203,4
T door % 193,4 20%
SC?C? dC?tail 3 page 193 see, details page 58
~~ - - - - - - -- - - - - ----r-- - - - ---- ----
~ " ,I

"
<f>
I, " "
\,
\ I
"- ,
\'
""
\ \
\ \
\ I
\
,'' ,
\
\

,
,
I
I ,
I I
I, _-
I, __ : : : - _ -
- - - - - --":__-----_j..-_-
see detail s page 69

208 Headboard
HEADBOARD fOR DOUBLE BED
A.A.
A~
0
0 0
0
1!..t.. r
"

26\

A H! \~ . 11 " 1
~
'---------Iu
+-21" 57"-------jr- 21 -+ +101;--+t,.
1'1;
+-12 -+
HEADBOARD fOR TWIN BEDS
B~
B.B.
0 0
0 0 0 0
-

.
~! \~ J1! u-. n i~
41"
1
21" -+- 21" I
41"

DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
PART NO. FUNCTION thickne .. X width X length

A 2 top % 10 21
B 2 bottom ~ % 12 19Y2
C 2 side % 12 1214
D 2 side % 12 3814
E
F
2
2
bock
drop door
14
%
1314 20Y2
12Y2 19Y2 ( lb:"lM!x{fj.hij [}:v~ I
G top % 10 57
1. Join top (A) and bottom (B) with
H shelf % 1 p,41 55Y2 sides (C) and (D).
J bottom % 12 55Y2 2. Attach back (E).
3. Attach drop door (F) to bottom
K 2 side % 12 ! 3814
(B).
l bock 14 34Y2 56Y2 4. Join sides (K) to top (G), shelf
M shelf % 9Y2 55Y2 (H), and bottom (J).
0 2 cleat 4
3/ % 9 5. Install back (L).
p 6. Join cleats (0) to sides (K), and
1 toe plate % 4 55Y2
toe plate (P) to bottom (1) and
Q door % 12% 28 3,4 sides (K).
R door 3,4 12Y2 273,4 7. Install doors (Q, R, S, and T).
5 door 3,4 20Y2 28 3,4 8. Apply finish.
9. Insert shelf (M) and place head-
T door 3,4 20Y2 27 3,4 board in position.

Headboard 209
53 NIGHT TABLE

0 ~
T
12"
r
14"
-++--- 24"----.t-t
10"

- , I--

L__ J!2~
--~3+-1
14"

1
-r--_.

+---17" --+-

~3" 18"
I

-+---'4"--+ . 'l
r 14"
!.()l" dl"tc\il~
a oe 58
------_
P

PLAN SECTION RIGHT Siof

DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
PART NO. FUNCTION thickn... X width X length

A 2 top, bottom 14 24
B back
c side
D side
E door 10V2 11
F 4 leg 2 14
G end rail 2% 7
H cross rail a 2V2 17
K end rail 2% 10%

Join top and bottom (A) to sides (C) and (D),


and back (B).
. Install door (E).
Attach legs (F) to end rails (G) and (K).
Attach cross rail (H) to end rails (G) and (K).
Fasten rails (G) and (H) to bottom (A).
Apply finish.

10 Night Table
INDEX
Adjustable shelves, 77-78 Chairs; armless, 180
Armchairs, 170, 174, 177, 182 with arms, 170, 174, 177, 182
frames for, 102-104 easy, 177
Assembly of parts, 5 straight, 167, 168, 172-173
Chamfered edges, II
Chests, 194-201
Back panel joints, 28, 34
Chevron fasteners, 29
Backs; chair, 117-119
Chisel; uses of, 12-16
rabbeted, 34
Clamps; for gluing, 17
Bed fastener, 35
for joint fastening, 31-33
Beds, 202-210
headboards for, 206-209 Coffee tables, 138-139
Belt sander; uses of, 1I Coil springs, 115
Benches, 163-164 Compass; use of, 8
vanity; 190 Cord; for backs, 118
Bevel cuts, 10 for seats, 109
Bevel gauge, 8 Core plywood, 45
Boards; see also Planks Corner joints; see Joints
joining of, 18 Corner reinforcements; metal, 38-39
Bolts; door, 72 wood, 39, 49
incased, 35-36 Corrugated fasteners, 29
Bookcase, 166 Cross-lap joint, 26
Borders; for wood edges, 54 Curing of lumber; see Seasoning
Box joint, 30, 32 Curved panels, 47
tools for, 16 Curves; in wood, 47-49, 50
Brace and bit, 14, 16 Cutting of parts, 5
Brackets; shelf, 77-78
Breakfront, 152
Dado groove for panel, 28
Brushes; choice and use of, 6
Dado joints, 33
Bureaus;' see Chests; Vanity dressers
tools for, 15
Butt joints, 21, 29-30, 36
Demountable joints, 29, 35-36
Demountable legs, 40
Cabinets, 155, 156 Desks, 158, 160
radio-phonograph, 146, 148, 151 Dining sets, 168-176
record storage, 145 Dining tables, 141, 168, 176
speaker, 151 Disc sander; uses of, 11
telephone, 133 Door hardware; catches, 71
tool, 130 hinges, 58-60
Cane chair seats, III locks, 72-74
Canvas seats, 110, 121 Doors; see also type desired
Carpentry; basic operations in, 9-16 fabric applied to, 55
Catches; door, 71 hollow plywood, 46
Chair design, 122-124 special types, 65-70
ChaV backs, 117-119 stops for, 56-57, 93
Chair frames, 102-104 Dovetail joints; butt, 21
Chair legs; see Legs frame, 32
Chair seats, 51; 109-114, 121 leg-to-rail, 37

Index 211
Dovetail joints Glue; application of, 17, 46
middle frame, 33 Gouges; uses of, 13
middle rail, 25 Grain; alignment of, 18
rail-to-frame, 27 direction of, 48
tools for, 16 Groove; for back installation, 34
Dowel joints; basic, 19 for panel, 28
butt, 21 for sliding doors, 69-70
frame, 27, 29-31
leg, 37-39 Hand tools; uses of, 11-16
middle frame, 33 Hardware; door, 58-65, 71-75
middle rail, 24 shelf, 77-78
rail; 22-23, 27 Headboards, 206-209
for round corner, 49 High-fidelity sound cabinets, 146, 148, 157
wedge, 39 Hinges, 58-65
Drawers; construction of, 79-87 Holes; drilling of, 14
Drawings; reading of, 125
Dressers; see Chests; Vanity dressers Jig; doweling, 14
Dressing tables; see Vanity dressers Joinery, 14-16
Drill press; uses of, 13-15 Jointer; uses of, 11, 14.
Drop doors, 65-67 Joints; see also type desired
basic, 19--'20
Easy chair, 177 common, 21-40
Edges; surfacing, 11-12 demountable, 29, 35-36, 39
treatment, 52 frame, 29-32
Enamel, 7 metal, 94-95
End fittings for legs, 43 tools for making, 9-16
End half-lap joint, 22
End tables, 135-137 Kerfing, saw; for bending wood, 50
Extension dining table, 141 "Knife thr~ad" , 40
Knobs; see Pulls

Fabric; fastening of, 53, 55 Lacquer; application 9f, 7


Feather joint, 19, 24, 30--33, 52 Laminated wood, 45, 50
Files; uses of, 12-13, 16 . Lap joints; cross, 26
/
Fillers; for hardwood finish, 6 half, 22
Finishing; wood, 6-7 lap-tee, '24
Flange; for attaching table legs, 40 shiplap, 20
Flower box, 134 Lathe; uses of, 13
Flush panel doors, 46 Leather chair seats, 109
Foam rubber, 107, 108, 113-116, 118-121 Legs; attaching, 37-42
Folding doors, 67 demountable, 39-42
Fork butt joint, 21 end fittings for, 43-44
Frame; plywood-hollow, 46 Locks; door, 72-74
Frame joints, 29-33, 35-71 Loudspeaker enclosure, 151
Frames; for panels, 28 Love seats, 179-180
for upholstered furniture, 101-104 Lumber; seasoning of, 4, 18
selection and working of, 3-5, 18
Gauges, 8, 11 Lumber-core plywood, 45, 50
Glass; joining metal and, 96
joining wood and, 88-89 Magazine rack, 131
Glides; for metal legs, 43 Mallet and chisel; uses of, 12

212 Index
Marble; joining wood and, 92 Power tools; uses of, 9-16
Marking materials for cutting, 8 Pulls; drawer or door, 75-76, 99
Metal; joining wood and, 90
Rabbet; for door stop, 56
joining plate glass and, 96
panel in, 28, 34
Metal joints, 94-95
tools for, 14
Middle frame joints, 33
Rabbet joints, 19, 22, 38
Middle rail joints, 24-26
Radio-phonograph cabinets, 146, 148, 151
Milled corner joint, 30
Raffia, 110, 118
Mirror; attaching to wood, 88-89
Rail joints, 22, 24, 27, 29
drop-top, 82
Rails; joining legs to, 37-38
Miter joints; edge, 52
Rasp; use of, 13
frame, 30-31
Record storage cabinet, 145
mortise-and-tenon, 23
Router; uses of, 13-16
tongue, 24
Rubber; foam, see Foam rubber
Miter'stop, 56
joining metal and, 97
Molded plastic, 99
joining wood and, 93
Molded plywood, 51
Rubber knife edge, 121
Molding; with panel, 28
Rubber straps, 114--121
Molder; uses of, 12-14
Mortise-and-tenon joints; basic, 19-20 Sanders, II
leg, 37-38 Sandpaper, 6
middle rail, 24-26 Saw kerfing, 50
rail,22-23 Sawing, 3, 9-10, 14-16
with wedge, 27 of plastic, 98
Mortising; tools for, 15 Scarf joint, 21
Screw joint; for legs, 40
Seasoning of lumber, 4, 18
Natural finishes, 7 Seats; chair, 109-114
Night tables, 202, 210 Selection of wood, 5
"No-Sag" Springs, 112, I! 9 Service cart, 132
Shaper; uses of, 11-16
Open-shelf breakfront, 151 Shellac; choice of, 7
Shelves; adjustable, 77-78
Shiplap joint, 20
Paint, 7, 52 Shrinkage; of wood, 4, 5, 18,29
Panels, 18, 28, 34 Side table, 140
hollow plywood, 46 Slides; for drawers, 85-87
curved, 47, 50 Sliding doors, 69-70
fabric-covered, 53 Sofas, 179, 180
Phonograph-radio cabinets, 146, 148, 151 frames for, 103
Pipe; metal, 'see Tubing Sofa-bed, 184
pivot hinges, 63-64 Speaker cabinet, 151
Planes; uses of, 11-16 Splined miter joint, 31
Planks; selection and handling of, 3-4, 18 Spokeshave; uses of, 13
Plant box, 134 Springs; upholstery, 105, 114--116
Plasfic; molded, 99 Steam bending, 50
Plastic drawers, 84 Stool, 162
Plastic wood, 7 vanity, 190
Plate glass; joining metal to, 96 Stop; door, 56-57, 93
Plywood, 5, 45-52 drawer, 87
hollow frame of, 46 miter, 56

Index 213
Surfacing; wood, tools for, II Upholstery. 100-121
see also Finishing Upholstery materials, 105-107
Surfacing material; application of, 98-99 Upholstery tools, 105

Table hinges, 61 Vanity dressers, 186, 188


Tables; coffee, 138-139 Vanity stool, 190
dining, 141, 168, 176 Varnish; types of, 7
end, 135-137 Venee~ 23, 45, 47, 52
night, 202, 210
side, 140
Wardrobe, 191
telephone, 133
television, 144 Warping of planks, 4, 18
"Tee nut" for butt joint, 36 Wax finishes, 7
Telephone cabinet, 133 Webbing chair seats, 110-111
Television table, 144 Wedge-and-dowel joint, 39
Tension scarf joint, 21 Wood; changes in, 4
Three-way joint, 34, 38 finishing of, 6-7
"Tite-joint fastener", 36 marking of, 8
Tongue-and-groove edge, 52 selection and buying of, 5
Tongue-and-groove joint, 19-20, 31 structure of, 3
Tool cabinets, 130 Wood rasp; uses of, 13
Tools; upholstery, 105 Woodworking operations, 9-16
woodworking, 9-16 Workbench; family, 126
Tree; growth characteristics, 3 professional, 128
Try square, 8
Tubing; metal, 91, 94-95 Zigzag butt joint, 21

214 Index