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Issue #694 Crisci Associates, Harrisburg, PA Oct.

16, 2017

PA Environment Digest Blog Twitter Feed

Here Are Some GOOD Bills The Senate & House Could Pass To Help Solve Environmental
Problems

When the Senate and House came back into session after
Labor Day in September, there was hope they would take
action on a variety of environmental issues. With, at most, 21
voting days scheduled in the House and 15 in the Senate until
the end of the year, time is short to act.
Here are just a few bills they could finish work on and
make a positive difference for the environment when the
Senate and House return to session October 16--
Bills In The House
-- Recycling Program Shut Down: The House did not yet
take final action on legislation-- Senate Bill 646 (Killion-R- Delaware)-- to reauthorize the
$2/ton Recycling Fee to fund the states local material collection programs, although it was
reported out of the House Environmental Resources and Energy Committee with just a one year
extension and is now on the House Calendar for action.
DEP has already shutdown applications for new local recycling implementation,
household hazardous waste and education grants due to the 2 to 3 year reimbursements required
for approved grants. Click Here for more.
-- Protect Existing Act 13 Drilling Impact Fee Income: A Commonwealth Court decision in
March on the definition of stripper well in Act 13 threatens to reduce revenue from the Act 13
drilling impact fee by another 10 percent ($16 million) a year. Although the Public Utility
Commission is appealing the decision, Rep. Pam Snyder (D-Fayette) introduced House Bill 1283
in April to fix the problem (sponsor summary). The bill is in the House Environmental
Resources and Energy Committee. Click Here for more.
-- Natural Gas Gathering Pipelines: On October 4, the House Consumer Affairs Committee
took action to report out Senate Bill 242 (Baker-R-Luzerne) adding unconventional and larger
conventional natural gas gathering pipelines to the PA One Call utility safety program. The bill
then went to the full House. This legislation represents a significant improvement in utility
safety by including the gathering lines. Click Here for more.
-- Storage Tanks: The Storage Tank Environmental Cleanup and Pollution Prevention Programs
in the Storage Tank and Spill Prevention Act expired on June 30, 2017 and with it the ability of
DEP to help certain tank owners remove or cleanup the mess left behind by leaking tanks.
Legislation to reauthorize the programs sponsored by Sen. John Yudichak (D-Luzerne),
Minority Chair of the Senate Environmental Resources and Energy Committee, was included in
House Bill 290 (Metzgar-R-Bedford) and passed by the Senate on July 8, returned to the House
for a concurrence vote and is in the House Rules Committee. Click Here for more.
-- Littering Penalties: On July 8 the Senate passed Senate Bill 431 (Scavello-R-Monroe) to
increase the fines for littering significantly. Currently, fines for littering under Title 18 (Crimes
and Offenses) run from $50 to $300 for a first-time offense, and $300 to $1,000 for a second and
subsequent offense. Under Senate Bill 431, fines would be increased up to $2,000 for multiple
offenses, based on the size and weight of litter. Click Here for more.
The bill is in the House Transportation Committee.
-- Game, Fish Commission Fees: Legislation passed the Senate in March giving the Game and
Fish and Boat Commissions the ability to set their own fees by regulation is now stalled in the
House Game and Fisheries Committee.
Senate Bill 30 (Eichelberger-R-Blair) authorizing the Fish and Boat Commission to adopt
its own fees saw no action on the bill in Committee. Senate Bill 192 (Stefano-R-Fayette)
authorizing the Game Commission to adopt its own fees was Tabled in the Committee. Click
Here for more.
-- Local Clean Energy Funding: House Bill 1722 (Harper-R-Montgomery) would authorize
local governments to create energy improvement districts to help fund energy efficiency,
renewable energy and water conservation projects by commercial and industrial buildings to
reduce their operating costs is pending in the House Local Government Committee (sponsor
summary). Thirty-three other states have adopted similar PACE Programs. A companion bill is
in the Senate Community, Economic and Recreational Development Committee-- Senate Bill
234 (Blake-D-Lackawanna)-- which is scheduled to consider the bill on October 17. Click Here
for more.
Bills In The Senate
-- Local Stormwater Fees: In June the House voted overwhelmingly to give communities the
ability to fund local stormwater and flood prevention projects by passing House Bill 913
(Everett-R- Lycoming) providing for the adoption of stormwater fees by incorporated towns,
House Bill 914 (Everett-R- Lycoming) providing for the adoption of stormwater fees by
boroughs, House Bill 915 (Everett-R-Lycoming) providing for the adoption of stormwater fees
by first class townships and House Bill 916 (Everett-R-Lycoming) providing for the adoption of
stormwater fees by Cities of the Third Class. Click Here for more.
The bills are necessary because the House and Senate continue to cut funding for local
stormwater and watershed improvement projects.
They are sponsored by Rep. Garth Everett (R-Lycoming) one of Pennsylvanias members
on the interstate Chesapeake Bay Commission.
The bills are in the Senate Local Government Committee.
-- Lawn Fertilizer Regulation/Education: Application of fertilizer by homeowners, golf
courses and athletic fields has long been known to be a source of nutrient runoff.
To deal with the issue, Sen. Richard Alloway (R-Franklin), one of Pennsylvanias
members on the interstate Chesapeake Bay Commission, in June introduced Senate Bill 792 that
will reduce the environmental impact of fertilizer by requiring all professional fertilizer
applicators to be certified in application techniques and creates an education program. Click
Here for more.
Similar legislation has already been enacted in Maryland, New Jersey and Virginia.
On June 26, the Senate Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee reported the bill out of
Committee unanimously and it was referred to the Senate Appropriations Committee on July 17.
-- Electronics Waste Recycling Program Reform: Over the last 3 years electronics waste
recyclers, nonprofit groups that run recycling events, DEP and counties have pointed to the
problems in Pennsylvanias Electronics Waste Recycling Program which many say is near
collapse or at best just limping along. The General Assembly has held hearings on the issue, but
so far has taken no action. Click Here for more.
At the end of June, Sen. Richard Alloway (R-Franklin) introduced Senate Bill 800 to
totally revamp the whole electronics waste recycling law and put in its place a new system that
he believes will fix many of the problems. Click Here for more.
The bill is in the Senate Environmental Resources and Energy Committee.
-- Local Clean Energy Funding: Senate Bill 234 (Blake-D-Lackawanna) would authorize local
governments to create energy improvement districts to help fund energy efficiency, renewable
energy and water conservation projects by commercial and industrial buildings to reduce their
operating costs. Thirty-three other states have adopted similar PACE Programs (sponsor
summary). The Senate Community, Economic and Recreational Development Committee has
scheduled a meeting on October 17 to consider the bill. A companion bill is also in the House
Local Government Committee-- House Bill 1722 (Harper-R-Montgomery). Click Here for
more.
-- Designating Eastern Hellbender PAs State Amphibian: A project of the Chesapeake Bay
Foundations Student Leaders group, Sen. Gene Yaw (R-Lycoming), one of Pennsylvanias
members on the interstate Chesapeake Bay Commission, introduced Senate Bill 658 in May to
name the Eastern Hellbender as Pennsylvanias state amphibian. Click Here for more.
The bill was reported out of the Senate State Government Committee on June 14, but
then was Tabled in the Senate on July 9 and has not moved.
(Photo: Eastern hellbender.)
[Posted: Oct. 11, 2017]

Op-Ed: Don't Be A Twit, Invest In Parks, Public Spaces, Recreation & Green
Infrastructure

By Tim Herd, CEO PA Recreation & Park Society

Roald Dahl, the celebrated author, wrote a delightfully disgusting story


for children about a wretched, extra-specially horrible couple named Mr.
and Mrs. Twit.
Not only are they dirty, ugly, and mean-spirited, they are also
stupid, and fall prey to their own nasty tricks.
The Twits built their house without any windows, because they
didn't want every Tom, Dick and Harry peeping in to see what they were
doing. It never occurred to them that it made it more of a prison than a
home.
It's the Twits I think about when I hear of another municipality cutting its recreation and
park budget.
Sure, you can build a house more cheaply without windows. It'll save on materials and
labor. It may reduce heating and cooling costs. It may even save on maintenance. But who would
want to live there?
I contend that recreation and park services are an integral, essential feature of any
well-built, open community. They must not be mere window-dressing-just a frivolity for good
times, but the first to discard when things turn grave.
Park and recreation services impact every aspect of modern living, from stimulating our
economic activity and mutual wellness, to safeguarding our natural environment and collective
resiliency, to strengthening our social capital and communal livability.
These essential services don't just offer benefits to be enjoyed only in prosperity, but
advance practical solutions to many of our most intractable issues. That these channels become
all the more critical to real people during economic downturns, societal distresses, and natural
calamities are all the more reasons to keep investing in their outcomes.
Where else are you going to find the resources and expertise to nurture physical, mental
and emotional therapy? Fortify economic development and tourism? Administer food
distribution programs? Reduce crime and increase community safety? Foster diversity and
cross-cultural cooperation? Create transportation alternatives and reduce traffic congestion?
Preserve and enhance biodiversity? Administer preventative treatment for drug abuse and risky
behaviors? Facilitate positive youth and family development? Strengthen motor and cognitive
skills in young children? Expedite medical recovery and boost immune systems? Raise student
performance and educational attainment? Establish a sense of place and belonging? And provide
many other critical services?
Through integral park and recreation systems, that's where.
Our collective wellbeing is framed in our communities' windows to recreation. Not only
do they enhance the desirability of living and working there, shed light on the issues, enable an
exchange of fresh ideas, and facilitate engagement between diverse groups where there had been
only walls before, they are the most effectual conduits for progress we have.
Curtailing or eliminating them only cuts off our nose to spite our face-which is also
counter to the resolve of sensible people.
A Penn State study revealed that 91 percent of Pennsylvanians support keeping existing
funds dedicated to parks, recreation, trails, conservation and open space. And 82 percent support
increasing funds for these purposes, even if it would cost the average household $10 more
annually.
Here's what we need to view from our window on the future: for our own good, we must
continue to invest in parks, public spaces, recreation and green infrastructure.
See, it's the windows that make the profound difference between a mausoleum and a
home. Just who are we investing for? Don't be a Twit.
For more information on programs, initiatives, special events, workshops and grant
opportunities, visit the PA Recreation and Park Society webpage. Click Here to sign up for
regular updates from the Society and Like them on Facebook. Click Here to become a member.
NewsClip:
Op-Ed: Dont Be A Twit, Curtailing Or Eliminating Park And Rec Services Only Cuts Off Our
Nose To Spite Our Face, Tim Herd
[Posted: Oct. 13, 2017]

Gov. Wolf, State Treasurer, LCB Continue Implementing Default State Budget

Gov. Tom Wolf this week took a series of actions to implement his
default state budget-- default because things were left hanging
when the House left town October 4 without voting on a revenue
package. Heres a quick rundown.
Farm Show Lease - $200 Million
While Senate and House members were off this week for Columbus
Day, Gov. Wolf Monday announced he will immediately take steps
to monetize the Farm Show Complex in Harrisburg using the
lease-back arrangement he proposed in his February budget.
He hopes to generate $200 million to help plug the states budget
deficit.
$217 Million In Savings
On Wednesday the Governor announced more than $217 million in savings during the
2016-17 fiscal year from his administrations efforts to modernize government operations to
reduce costs and improve efficiencies through the GO-TIME initiative.
The savings include reducing energy use in state buildings, building a solar farm at Fort
Indiantown Gap and streamlining oil and gas inspections through the use of a paperless system.
LCB Moves On $1.25 Billion Loan
The Liquor Control Board met Wednesday to map out the steps needed to put Gov.
Wolfs plan to borrow $1.25 billion using LCB revenues into action, seemingly putting that piece
of his budget plan on firmer ground. The LCB hopes to complete the transaction by years end.
Severance Tax
Also Wednesday Gov. Wolf went to Erie at the upper end of Marcellus Shale drilling
country to urge the adoption of a responsible natural gas severance tax to further help plug the
states budget holes.
The House Finance Committee Friday canceled a meeting it had scheduled for October
16 on another natural gas severance tax bill-- House Bill 1401 (DiGirolamo-R-Bucks). No
reason was given for the cancellation. PLS Reporter reported earlier Friday an amendment was
to be offered to direct all monies to the General Fund.
State-Related University Funding
Gov. Wolf Wednesday also urged the House to complete action on funding the
state-related universities of Pitt, Penn State, Temple, Lincoln University and the University of
Pennsylvania Veterinary School-- about $650 million worth.
The presidents of Temple and Penn State and the Chancellor at Pitt all said this week they
may have to raise tuition mid-year to make up for the lack of state funding.
$700 Million Temp Loan
State Treasurer Joe Torsella Thursday announced a temporary loan of $700 million to the
General Fund account so the state could pay Medicaid providers and public schools on time.
The money has to be paid back by October 20.
Torsella pointed out, however, that by October 27 the General Fund account will again be
out of money and remain in that condition for approximately five months. During that time,
expenditures are projected to exceed revenue by as much as $1.7 billion.
Torsella again urged the General Assembly to pass legislation to balance the budget.
Staff Reductions, Budgetary Reserve
There is no word yet from Gov. Wolf on any further staff reductions or on putting
additional funds in budgetary reserve to make the budget balance.
Whats Next?
The Senate and House come back to session the week of October 16 and the following
week-- October 23-- then break for the November 7 election.
Right now, 21 voting days scheduled in the House and 15 in the Senate until the end of
the year.
Will the House attempt to pass the funding bills for state-related universities? A Tax
Code bill? Administrative Code bill? A Fiscal Code bill? With or without the harmful
environmental riders?
There are some GOOD environmental bills the Senate and House could act on, including
legislation to address the shutdown of the Act 101 Recycling Program, local clean energy
funding, and even naming the Hellbender as the state amphibian if they want to. Click Here
for more on the good stuff.
Stay tuned. And in just a little over three months, Gov. Wolf will present his budget
proposal for FY 2018-19.
NewsClips:
Meyer State House Podcast: What Happens Next? Its Anyones Guess
Wolf Stumps In Erie For Common-Sense Marcellus Shale Gas Tax
Impact Fee Pays For Bridge Replacement In Washington County
AP: State Treasurer Makes $700 Million Temporary Loan So State Can Pay Bills
Murphy: PA Treasurer Authorizes Another Loan To Keep General Fund Afloat
Meyer: State Treasurer Announces Loan, Republicans Call Hypocrisy
Esack: Wolf Touts Cost Savings As Budget Stalemate Raises Specter Of Tuition Hikes
John Baer: Gov. Wolfs Scary Budget Fairy Tale, But Its For Real
Thompson: Wolf To Lease Farm Show Complex To Generate $200 Million
Meyer: Wolf Says Treasury Will Loan Money, Treasury Says Not So Fast
[Posted: Oct. 13, 2017]

Bills On Governor's Desk

The following bills were given final approval by the Senate and House and are now on the
Governor's desk for action--

Construction Code: House Bill 409 (Evankovich-R- Allegheny) making changes to the process
for adopting amendments to the Uniform Construction Code. A Senate Fiscal Note and
summary is available.

Senate/House Agenda/Session Schedule/Govs Schedule/ Bills Introduced

Here are the Senate and House Calendars for the next voting session day and Committees
scheduling action on bills of interest as well as a list of new environmental bills introduced--

Bill Calendars

House (Oct. 16): House Bill 1486 (Zimmerman-R-Lancaster) exempting high tunnel greenhouse
structures on farms from the Stormwater Management Act (sponsor summary); House
Resolution 284 (Moul-R-Adams) urging Congress to repeal the U.S. Environmental Protection
Agencys MS4 Stormwater Pollution Prevention Program (sponsor summary); Senate Bill 181
(Mensch-R-Montgomery) providing for a performance-based budgeting (exempting
appropriations to the General Assembly and the Judiciary) and creating a Performance-Based
Budget Board (House Fiscal Note and summary); Senate Bill 646 (Killion-R-Delaware)
extending the $2/ton Recycling Fee for one year until January 1, 2021 <> Click Here for full
House Bill Calendar.

Senate (Oct. 16): Senate Bill 663 (Langlin-R-Erie) amending the PA Construction Code to
provide for third party contracts to enforce the Code (sponsor summary); House Bill 1490
(Turzai-R-Allegheny) placing the Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority under the regulation of
the Public Utility Commission. <> Click Here for full Senate Bill Calendar.

Committee Meeting Agendas This Week

Note: This is still budget season. House and Senate committees can add and cancel meetings
with little notice.

House: the Commerce Committee meets to consider House Bill 1237 (Keefer-R- York) which
amends the Regulatory Review Act requiring the General Assembly to specifically approve
economically significant final regulations approved by the Independent Regulatory Review
Commission. If the General Assembly fails to adopt a resolution approving a regulation, it dies;
the Transportation Committee meets to consider House Bill 86 (Lawrence-R-Chester)
eliminate vehicle emissions testing for vehicle model years 1992-1995 (sponsor summary). <>
Click Here for full House Committee Schedule.

Senate: the Appropriations Committee meets to consider House Bill 790 (Pashinski-D-
Luzerne) repeal the Noxious Weed Control Law and replace with the Controlled Plant and
Noxious Weed Ac; the Environmental Resources and Energy Committee meets to consider
Senate Bill 799 (Alloway-R-Franklin) provides for nitrogen reduction measures in the
Chesapeake Bay Watershed, Click Here for more; Senate Resolution 168 (Langerholc-R-
Cambria) directing the Joint State Government Commission to establish an advisory committee
to review the vehicle emissions inspection program in Cambria County; the Community,
Economic and Recreational Development Committee meets to consider Senate Bill 234
(Blake-D- Lackawanna) would authorize local governments to create energy improvement
districts to help fund energy efficiency, renewable energy and water conservation projects by
commercial and industrial buildings to reduce their operating costs Click Here for more; the
House and Senate Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committees joint hearing on the impact on
agriculture of the Spotted Lanternfly. <> Click Here for full Senate Committee Schedule.
Other: the Joint Legislative Budget and Finance Committee meets to release a report on
review of PA One Call utility safety systems.; Environmental Issues Forum, Joint
Conservation Committee, featuring a presentation on DCNRs Penns Parks For All Survey.

Bills Pending In Key Committees

Check the PA Environmental Council Bill Tracker for the status and updates on pending state
legislation and regulations that affect environmental and conservation efforts in Pennsylvania.

Bills Introduced

The following bills of interest were introduced last week--

Green Buildings: House Bill 1830 (Harper-R-Montgomery) requiring state-owned or leased


buildings to comply with high performance building standards (sponsor summary).

Session Schedule

Here is the latest voting session schedule for the Senate and House--

Senate
October 16, 17, 18, 23, 24, 25
November 13, 14, 15
December 11, 12, 13, 18, 19, 20

House
October 16, 17, 18, 23, 24, 25
November 13, 14, 15, 20, 21, 22,
December 4, 5, 6, 11, 12, 13, 18, 19, 20

Governors Schedule

Gov. Tom Wolf's work calendar will be posted each Friday and his public schedule for the day
will be posted each morning. Click Here to view Gov. Wolfs Weekly Calendar and Public
Appearances.

The Feds

Reaction To Proposed Repeal Of EPAs Clean Power Climate Plan

Here are some reactions from groups in Pennsylvania to the proposal to repeal the EPA Clean
Power Climate Plan--
Clean Air Council
The Clean Air Council Monday released the following statement in response to the
Trump administrations announcement that it plans to repeal the U.S. Environmental Protection
Agencys Clean Power Climate Plan--
This illegal action is not only an outright attack on clean air, and public health and
safety, but also completely contradicts science and recent EPA findings on the need for carbon
reductions, said Joseph Otis Minott, Executive Director and Chief Counsel of Clean Air
Council. It would take years and an absurd amount of taxpayer dollars for President Trumps
EPA to even attempt to repeal the Clean Power Plan, the United States first-ever standard to
reduce climate-changing carbon dioxide pollution.
EPAs announcement comes on the heels of three immensely destructive hurricanes
super-charged by warmer temperatures from climate change.
The Clean Power Plan builds on current industry trends to cost-effectively reduce carbon
pollution and other harmful pollutants.
Between 2005 and 2014, Pennsylvania reduced carbon dioxide pollution from its energy
sector by 12.8 percent, putting the state on a solid trajectory to achieve the Clean Power Plan
goal of reducing CO2 pollution 32 percent by 2030.
Repealing the Plan could potentially undermine Pennsylvanias growing clean energy
economy by rigging the system in favor of polluters. However, local efforts to grow renewable
energy are increasing even as Trumps EPA attempts to stall national requirements for carbon
reductions from power plants, said Minott.
Pennsylvanias two largest cities, Philadelphia and Pittsburgh, are moving forward with
solutions to address reduce air and carbon pollution and grow jobs in the clean energy economy
despite EPAs attempt to derail progress. Philadelphia and Pittsburgh have both recently
committed to powering city government by 100% renewable energy by 2030 and 2035,
respectively. The solar market in the Philadelphia metro area grew over tenfold and added over
200 jobs in 2016.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the Clean Air
Council website.
Chesapeake Bay Foundation
Chesapeake Bay Foundation President William C. Baker Tuesday issued this statement
concerning the rollback of the Clean Power Plan--
Ignoring the impacts of climate change is short-sighted and will damage the health of
the Chesapeake Bay. The Bay's trophy rockfish are struggling to find oxygen as the water gets
hotter. Species like soft shelled clams and eelgrass are being stressed by warmer waters that
eventually could eliminate them from the Chesapeake Bay. Sea-level rise is threatening coastal
marshes and low-lying lands like Tangier Island.
The air pollution reductions we would get from the CPP would go a long way to
improving the health of people living in the Bay Region -- including children, the elderly, and
the poor as well as meeting the nitrogen limit set in the Chesapeake Bay Clean Water
Blueprint.
Climate change is not a future threat for the Chesapeake Bay. We are already
experiencing impacts that will harm the communities and economies that depend on clean water
and make finishing the job of saving the Bay all that much harder. It is time to charge forward,
not retreat.
For more on Chesapeake Bay-related issues in Pennsylvania, visit the Chesapeake Bay
Foundation-PA webpage. Click Here to sign up for Pennsylvania updates (bottom of left
column). Click Here to support their work.
PA Coal Alliance
Pennsylvania Coal Alliance Executive Director Rachel Gleason Tuesday issued the
following statement on U.S. Environmental Protection Agencys decision to repeal the Clean
Power Plan--
Todays proposed rulemaking to repeal the Clean Power Plan means that this far
reaching and costly rule will no longer threaten our states economy and the jobs of over 30,000
hard working men and women in Pennsylvania.
The rule exceeded the EPAs authority and circumvented states rights by mandating
energy policy disguised as regulations, and was particularly discriminatory against Pennsylvania
as one of the top producers of affordable baseload generation.
The repeal protects the reliability and resiliency of the power grid, protects ratepayers
from significant electricity price increases, and protects our Commonwealths position as a net
energy exporter.
For more information on this and other issues, visit the Pennsylvania Coal Alliance
website.
NewsClips:
Pittsburghs Climate Is Changing And Some Are Fighting Back
AP: EPA Chief Says Administration To Roll Back Clean Power Climate Plan
EPA To Begin Repealing Clean Power Climate Plan Tuesday
Experts Say Clean Power Plan Repeal Unlikely to Impact Coal Industry
Whats At Stake With The EPA Clean Power Plan Repeal?
EPA Clean Power Climate Plan, 5 Things You Dont Know
Legere: Market Forces Reducing PA Emissions, But Killing Climate Plan Will Reverse That
Allegheny Front: Revoking Clean Power Climate Plan Could Have Big PA Impact
Eliminating EPA Clean Power Climate Plan Relief For Valley Coal Business Leaders
Puko: U.S. Power Companies Pushing Ahead In Renewable, Gas-Fired Electricity Generation
Report: 25% Of Remaining U.S. Coal Generation Headed For Retirement Or Conversion
Al Gore Coming To Pittsburgh For Climate Reality Leadership Workshop Oct. 17-19
DOEs Perry: Coal, Nuclear Power Proposal Not Be-All-End-All
DOE Secretary Faces Tough Sell On Coal, Nuclear Plant Subsidies
DOEs Perry Defends Trumps Plan To Save Nukes And Coal
Odd Bedfellows Fight Trump Bid To Boost Coal, Nuclear Energy
Column: The World Is On Fire As Trump Pours Fossil Fuels Onto The Blaze
Editorial: Renewable Energy Remains The Way Forward For The Future
Analysis: Trump Plays Down Health Hazard In Making Climate Rule Repeal
Activists Vow Fighting In The Streets Over EPAs Clean Power Climate Plan Repeal
EPAs Move To Repeal Clean Power Climate Plan Likely To Trigger Lawsuits
Scientists: Cost Of Capturing Carbon Dioxide Declining
NASA Probe Reveals Power Plants Emit More CO2 Than Volcanoes
Trump Taps Climate Skeptic For Top White House CEQ Environmental Post
Trump Taps AccuWeather CEO To Head NOAA
DOE: Coal, Nuclear Cost Recovery Rule Not A Directive For FERC
Op-Ed: Trump Wants Consumers To Pay For Keeping Coal
Related Stories:
Clean Air Council: Trumps Clean Power Climate Plan Repeal & Replace Cant Stop Clean
Energy In PA
Chesapeake Bay Foundation Calls Rollback Of EPA Clean Power Climate Plan Short-Sighted
PA Coal Alliance Statement On Repeal Of EPA Clean Power Climate Plan
Rep. Maher Announces Plans To Introduce PA Clean Power Bill

Rep. Maher Announces Plans To Introduce PA Clean Power Plan Bill

Rep. John Maher (R-Allegheny), Majority Chair of the House


Environmental Resources and Energy Committee, Tuesday circulated a
memo to all House members inviting them to co-sponsor a bill he plans to
introduce creating a Pennsylvania Clean Power Plan.
The content of the legislation is expected to be announced later at a
meeting of potential co-sponsors, according to the memo.
The text of the memo follows--
The federal government announced this week that EPA's Clean
Power Plan ("CPP"), which has been languishing in the courts for several
years, will be set aside permanently.
This news is unsurprising for a number of reasons; most
particularly, recognition that bureaucrats drafted regulations well beyond the fence-line of law.
Even so, many in Pennsylvania have invested considerable effort on advancing clean
power concepts and, with the hope of capturing that energy, I will be proceeding with legislation
for a Pennsylvania Clean Power Plan.
Pennsylvania has been a world leader in reducing carbon emissions and I want our
leadership to be sustainable!
Should you wish to be among the pioneers for a Pennsylvania Clean Power Plan, please
join as a cosponsor. Any questions, please contact Shelly Weaver at sweaver@pahousegop.com.
or call 717-783-1522.
I expect to convene a meeting of expected cosponsors before actually introducing
legislation so that you will not be signing a blank check by enlisting as a cosponsor now.
Click Here for a copy of the memo.
In February, Rep. Maher was quoted in the Washington Observer-Reporter as saying this
about EPAs Clean Power Plan at a public meeting on the loss of coal mining jobs in
Washington and Greene counties: If Pennsylvania were a nation, we would be the only nation in
the world that met the Kyoto Accord, he said of an international treaty that set limits on
greenhouse gas emissions that the U.S. government did not sign.
Pennsylvanias greenhouse gases have decreased by a third to 40 percent over the last 10
years. What has happened here in Pennsylvania has not happened anywhere else in the world,
but never gets mentioned.
If we really want to address global warming, if we really want to have cleaner air, when
success happens, it needs to be noticed because otherwise, why go to the trouble? It was market
forces that cleaned up Pennsylvanias air. It was using natural gas instead of other fuels.
Rep. Maher can be contacted by sending email to: jmaher@pahousegop.com.
NewsClips:
AP: EPA Chief Says Administration To Roll Back Clean Power Climate Plan
EPA To Begin Repealing Clean Power Climate Plan Tuesday
Legere: Market Forces Reducing PA Emissions, But Killing Climate Plan Will Reverse That
Allegheny Front: Revoking Clean Power Climate Plan Could Have Big PA Impact
Eliminating EPA Clean Power Climate Plan Relief For Valley Coal Business Leaders
Activists Vow Fighting In The Streets Over EPAs Clean Power Climate Plan Repeal
Related Stories:
Clean Air Council: Trumps Clean Power Climate Plan Repeal & Replace Cant Stop Clean
Energy In PA
Chesapeake Bay Foundation Calls Rollback Of EPA Clean Power Climate Plan Short-Sighted
PA Coal Alliance Statement On Repeal Of EPA Clean Power Climate Plan
[Posted: Oct. 10, 2017]

Resolution Asks For Support Of DOE Proposal For Higher Compensation For Coal,
Nuclear Power Plants

The Nuclear Energy and Coal Caucus members from the House Friday circulated a co-sponsor
memo asking members to co-sponsor a concurrent resolution supporting the federal Department
of Energys proposal on grid resiliency and higher compensation for electricity generated by coal
and nuclear power plants.
Later on Friday, Sen. Ryan Aument (R-Lancaster) and Sen. Donald White (R-Indiana)
the chairs of the Nuclear Energy and Coal Caucuses in the Senate sent out an identical
co-sponsor memo.
The text of the memo follows--
As the House co-chairs of the Nuclear Energy and Coal Caucuses, we have been raising
concerns over the loss of nuclear and coal power plants in Pennsylvania.
Our concerns have been focused on several issues, including the economic impact of
premature plant closures, the potential loss of coal and nuclear plants as a strategic asset for the
bulk power system, the environmental consideration of losing the largest and most reliable
carbon-free and other fuel-diverse electricity production, and the long-term impacts to consumers
should the overall electric grid become overly dependent on any one generation source.
Pennsylvania is fortunate to be a top electricity producer from many sources, including
nuclear, coal, gas and hydroelectric power. Together, coal, nuclear and hydroelectric power
produce 67 percent of our Commonwealths electricity and create fuel diversity in our supply of
energy.
As such, the loss of these fuel-secure resources matters greatly. For those who are not
aware, fuel-secure generation resources are unique in that they are capable of storing fuel for
their plants onsite for long periods of time.
On September 28, 2017, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) took a
significant step forward in addressing the loss of fuel-secure generation by issuing a new rule
directing the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) to ensure that fuel-secure
generators are adequately compensated so that they can remain a viable component of the bulk
power system.
In its rule, DOE noted the following:
The resiliency of the nations electric grid is threatened by the premature retirements of
power plants that can withstand major fuel supply disruptions caused by natural or man-made
disasters and, in those critical times, continue to provide electric energy, capacity, and essential
grid reliability services. These fuel-secure resources are indispensable for the reliability and
resiliency of our electric grid-and therefore indispensable for our economic and national security.
It is time for the Commission to issue rules to protect the American people from energy outages
expected to result from the loss of this fuel-secure generation capacity.
We agree, which is why we are seeking your support.
In the very near future, we will be introducing a concurrent resolution urging the FERC
to swiftly consider DOEs proposed Grid Resiliency Pricing Rule and implement policies and
adopt tariffs to ensure fuel-secure generation resources receive proper compensation for the
positive attributes they provide our nations and Commonwealths electric system in this case,
reliability and resiliency.
Our goal is to promote Pennsylvanias energy resources to the betterment of our
economy, people and overall prosperity and to protect against unforeseen challenges that could
threaten our electric grid, such as the polar vortex in 2014.
We are all aware of the challenges that the coal and nuclear sectors of our energy
economy have been facing in recent years. Please join us to encourage the federal government to
finally address these very serious issues.
Click Here for a copy of the co-sponsor memo.
A concurrent resolution is one passed by both the House and Senate.
NewsClips:
DOEs Perry Defends Trumps Plan To Save Nukes And Coal
DOE Secretary Faces Tough Sell On Coal, Nuclear Plant Subsidies
DOE: Coal, Nuclear Cost Recovery Rule Not A Directive For FERC
Odd Bedfellows Fight Trump Bid To Boost Coal, Nuclear Energy
Op-Ed: Trump Wants Consumers To Pay For Keeping Coal
Middletown Boro Backs Nuclear Industry By Passing Resolution Unanimously
Altoona Council OKs Resolution To Preserve PA's Nuclear Energy Plants
Nuclear Plant Closures To Test Sufficiency Of Decommissioning Funds
[Posted: Oct. 13, 2017]

Straight Talk: Draining The Swamp, Reducing Headwaters Stream Protection Not Good
Ideas

By John A. Arway, Executive Director, Fish & Boat Commission

The phrase Draining the Swamp was coined many years ago to
address the malaria problem, which caused the alarming deaths of
millions of people around the world.
Malaria is a disease caused by a parasitic protozoan, in the genus
Plasmodium, that is spread to humans and other warm-blooded animals
by a species of mosquitos in the genus Anopheles.
The most common methods for controlling mosquito
populations include spraying insecticides and draining swamps.
Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) was one of the first chemicals
used to kill mosquitos during the second half of World War II.
Fortunately, thanks to Pennsylvanias own Rachel Carson and her 1962 book Silent
Spring, we recognized the need to better evaluate the fate and effects of persistent
cancer-causing chemicals and banned the agricultural use of DDT in 1972.
We continue to use pesticides and biocides to treat standing and flowing waters to combat
waterborne diseases and nuisance species. For example, the Pennsylvania Department of
Environmental Protection (PA DEP) spends millions of dollars treating water bodies throughout
our Commonwealth for mosquito control with insecticides to combat West Nile Virus and with
the biocide Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (BTI) to control nuisance black fly populations.
If you have ever spent time fishing one of Pennsylvanias large rivers, you, like me, have
been sprayed with BTI that is aerially applied by helicopter or fixed-wing aircraft.
Fortunately, BTI is a United States Environmental Protection Agency (US
EPA)-approved chemical, and according to the manufacturer, Arbico Organics, is harmless to
beneficial insects, wildlife, humans, pets or livestock.
The other method to deal with mosquitos living in swamps (a.k.a. wetlands) was to
subsidize farmers to drain swamps, which not only took care of the mosquito problem but also
provided more land to farm.
We eventually realized that draining swamps was a bad idea since swamps provided
many public benefits to society.
Early in my career, my staff and I assisted the United States Fish & Wildlife Service
(USFWS) with an assessment of wetlands in Pennsylvania, which contributed to a national
wetlands inventory (Tiner 1984).
Tiner defined wetlands to include the variety of marshes, swamps and bogs that produce
many benefits for society including flood control, water quality maintenance, erosion control,
timber and other natural products for mans use, and recreation besides providing homes for
many fish and wildlife species.
Tiner reported that approximately 215 million acres of wetlands existed in the
conterminous United States at the time of the nations settlement.
In the mid-1970s, only 99 million acres remained, just 46 percent of our countrys
original wetlands acreage. In 1984, wetlands covered about 5 percent of the land surface of the
lower 48 states.
Between the mid-1950s and the mid-1970s, about 11 million acres of wetlands were lost,
while 2 million acres of new wetlands were created. A net loss of 9 million acres of wetlands
occurred over that 20-year period.
Annual wetlands losses averaged 458,000 acres. Agricultural development was
responsible for 87 percent of the national wetlands losses. Urban development and other
development caused only 8 percent and 5 percent of the losses respectively.
President George H. W. Bush (1989-1993) vowed that America would lose no
wetlands under his watch and a government wetlands manual was created that provided
regulatory agencies like US EPA and the US Army Corps of Engineers guidance to protect the
nations wetlands, just as intended by the Clean Water Act.
Draining the Swamp has also been commonly used by politicians from all parties as a
promise to change the bureaucracy at either the state or national level. Most recently, it was a
campaign slogan for President Donald Trump that described his plan to fix problems in
Washington, D.C.
However, a part of that campaign promise may literally change the rules that protect our
nations swamps and headwater streams.
Current US EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt along with Mr. Douglas W. Lamont, Acting
Assistant Secretary of the Army (Civil Works), signed a proposed rule, Docket ID No.
EPA-HQ-OW-2017-0203 which was published in the Federal Register on July 27, 2017, that
would revise the definition of Waters of the United States (WOTUS).
This proposal is considered by the current administration to be consistent with the
Executive Order signed on February 28, 2017, Restoring the Rule of Law, Federalism, and
Economic Growth by Reviewing the Waters of the United States Rule. The public comment
period closed on September 27, 2017.
I recently joined Pennsylvania Secretary Patrick McDonnell (Department of
Environmental Protection), Secretary Russell C. Redding (Agriculture) and Secretary Cindy
Adams Dunn (Department of Conservation and Natural Resources) in signing a letter in response
to the proposed WOTUS rule, which explains the Commonwealths position on draining our
swamps and reducing protections to our headwater streams.
[Click Here for a copy of the letter.]
We ask that Pennsylvania anglers and boaters join Rachel Carson, President George H.
W. Bush, our Commonwealth agencies, many of our nations conservation groups and over
20,000 scientists who have already spoken out about how draining Americas swamps and
allowing impacts to our headwater streams puts aquatic resources at risk not only in
Pennsylvania but across the entire nation.
Remember fish cant talk, so only we can speak out in defense of our aquatic resources.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the Fish and
Boat Commission website. Click Here to read other Straight Talk columns. Click Here to sign
up for eNews from the Commission.
[Posted: Oct. 13, 2017]

News From The Capitol

House Finance Committee Cancels Meeting On Natural Gas Severance Tax Bill

The House Finance Committee Friday canceled a meeting scheduled for October 16 to consider
House Bill 1401 (DiGirolamo-R-Bucks) imposing a 3.2 percent natural gas severance tax in
addition to the Act 13 drilling impact fee.
No reason for the cancellation was given.
The proposed tax would raise an estimated $300 to $400 million annually, according to
the sponsor, and be distributed to: basic education accountability block grants-- 40 percent; state
pension funds-- 30 percent; human service programs-- 15 percent; and the Environmental
Stewardship (Growing Greener) Fund-- 15 percent ($75 - $100 million).
However, PLS Reporter reported Friday an amendment was to be offered to direct all
monies to the General Fund.
Click Here for a sponsor summary of the bill.
Rep. Bernie ONeill (R-Bucks) serves as Major Chair of the Committee and can be
contacted by sending email to: boneill@pahousegop.com. Rep. Jake Wheatley (D-Allegheny)
serves as Minority Chair and can be contacted by sending email to: jwheatley@pahouse.net.
NewsClips:
Wolf Stumps In Erie For Common-Sense Marcellus Shale Gas Tax
Impact Fee Pays For Bridge Replacement In Washington County
[Posted: Oct. 13, 2017]

House Committee To Consider Bill Oct. 16 Allowing The General Assembly To Kill A
Regulation By Doing Nothing

The House Commerce Committee is scheduled to meet October 16 to consider House Bill 1237
(Keefer-R-York) which amends the Regulatory Review Act requiring the General Assembly to
specifically approve economically significant final regulations approved by the Independent
Regulatory Review Commission.
The bill requires the Senate and House to each pass a concurrent resolution approving a
final regulation which has an estimated direct or indirect cost of $1 million or more to the
Commonwealth, political subdivisions and to the private sector.
While not specifically referenced in the bill, Section 9 of Article III of the state
Constitution requires a concurrent resolution to be presented to the Governor for his action to
sign or veto.
If the Senate and/or House fail to each pass a concurrent resolution, a final regulation
would be deemed disapproved and could not go into effect.
Since there was no action needed by the General Assembly to kill a regulation, the
Governor would not have an opportunity to sign or veto their action in the usual checks and
balances established in the state Constitution between the Executive and Legislative branches of
government.
The bill also requires estimates of cost impacts to the verified by the Independent Fiscal
Office prior to submitting a proposed regulation to the IRRC for review. There is no similar
requirement for final regulations.
All other provisions of the Regulatory Review Act requiring a review at the proposed and
final regulations by Senate and House Committees and the IRRC and follow-up actions of an
IRRC-approved final-form regulation are not changed by the bill.
This legislation is similar to a bill-- Senate Bill 561 (DiSanto-R-Dauphin)-- passed on
June 13 by a party-line vote (Republicans supporting) also allowing the General Assembly to kill
regulations by doing nothing. This bill is in the House State Government Committee. Click
Here for more.
A 2013 study by Rutgers University presented to the House State Government
Committee found Pennsylvanias regulatory adoption process is already more complex and has
more veto points than the federal government does. Click Here for more.
The committee meeting will be held in Room B-31 Main Capitol and will be called Off
the Floor by the House Speaker at some point during a break in floor action October 16.
Typically, House committee meetings are webcast through the House Republican Caucus
website, if the viewer knows what time the meeting is called.
Rep. Brian Ellis (R-Butler) serves as Majority Chair of the Committee and can be
contacted by sending email to: bellis@pahousegop.com. Rep. Curtis Thomas (D-Philadelphia)
serves as Minority Chair and can be contacted by sending email to: cthomas@pahouse.net.
NewsClip:
Cusick: Bill Would Overhaul PA Process For Adopting Regulations
[Posted: Oct. 12, 2017]

Senate Committee To Consider Bill Oct. 17 To Fund Energy Efficiency Projects Thru
Property Assessed Clean Energy Programs

The Senate Community, Economic and Recreational Development Committee is scheduled to


meet on October 17 to consider Senate Bill 234 (Blake-D-Lackawanna) would authorize local
governments to create energy improvement districts to help fund energy efficiency, renewable
energy and water conservation projects by commercial and industrial buildings to reduce their
operating costs (sponsor summary).
The Property Assessed Clean Energy program is a proven-successful economic
development tool that enhances property values and employment opportunities; lowers the cost
of doing business; and expands the use of energy saving technologies, said Sen. John Blake
prime sponsor of the bill. Our legislation would give Pennsylvania businesses an opportunity to
make costly energy-saving upgrades with a creative, market-driven funding mechanism that does
not spend a dime of taxpayer money.
Under Senate Bill 234, PACE financing which can be used to purchase new heating and
cooling systems, lighting improvements, solar panels, water pumps and insulation would be
repaid in the form of a voluntary property tax assessment on the specific, improved building.
PACE is a commonsense, voluntary program, that doesnt cost taxpayers a penny.
PACE increases the use of energy-saving and environmentally-conscious technology, saves
businesses money, and will create family-sustaining jobs throughout the commonwealth because
of sales and installations, said Sen. Guy Reschenthaler (R-Allegheny) a co-sponsor of the bill.
I look forward to working with my colleagues and the dozens of organizations that support the
proposed PACE legislation.
A local government would be able to choose to participate in or develop a PACE
financing program.
PACE financing would not require any public funds; participating local communities
would be tasked with collecting the assessment on the improved building and remit it for
payment on the debt incurred from the buildings energy-efficiency and clean energy technology
upgrades.
A companion bill-- House Bill 1722 (Harper-R-Montgomery)-- is pending in the House
Local Government Committee.
The meeting will be held in the Rules Room off the Senate Floor at the call of the Senate
President.
Sen. Mario Scavello (R-Monroe) serves as Majority Chair of the Committee and he can
be contacted by sending email to: mscavello@pasen.gov. Sen. Larry Farnese (D-Philadelphia)
serves as Minority Chair and can be contacted by sending email to: farnese@pasenate.com.
NewsClip:
Legere: Energy Efficiency Loan Bill Gathers Support In Harrisburg
Related Story:
Senate Bill Funds Energy Efficiency Thru Property Assessed Clean Energy Programs
[Posted: Oct. 13, 2017]

Oct. 16 Environmental Issues Forum Features Presentation On State Parks Strategic Plan
The Joint Legislative Air and Water Pollution Control and
Conservation Committee will host its first Environmental Issues
Forum of the fall legislative session on October 16 at noon in
Hearing Room 8E-A of the Capitol East Wing in Harrisburg.
The topic of the October forum will be the Department of
Conservation and Natural Resources new strategic initiative,
Penns Parks for AllPlanning for the State Parks of
Tomorrow.
The department is updating their state park master plan for the
first time in 25 years, incorporating a more modern, holistic approach to park management. The
presentation will review their efforts in depth, including a new survey used to gather public
opinion on park amenities, services and stewardship.
Paul Zeph, planning section chief for DCNRs Bureau of State Parks, will cover the
history of Pennsylvanias award-winning park system, opportunities and challenges currently
facing the system, and how the Bureau hopes to make our parks more accessible and enjoyable
for future generations.
Questions regarding the October forum should be directed to Mike Nerozzi, Assistant
Director, by sending email to: mnerozzi@jcc.legis.state.pa.us or call 717-787-7570.
November 13 Forum
The Joint Committee will hold a second Environmental Issues Forum on November 13
on the topic of pumped storage hydropower. Click Here for more.
Sen. Scott Hutchinson (R-Venango) serves as Chair of the Joint Conservation
Committee.
For more information, visit the Joint Conservation Committee website, Like them on
Facebook or Follow them on Twitter. Click Here to sign up for regular updates from the
Committee.
NewsClips:
Survey Will Point Way For Future Of PAs Park System
DCNR Gets Input On State Park System
[Posted: Oct. 12, 2017]

News From Around The State

DEP Proposes Changes To Process For Developing Regulations, Technical Guidance And
Using Advisory Committees

The Department of Environmental Protection published notice in the October 14 PA Bulletin of


proposed changes to several technical guidance documents guiding public participation efforts
within the agency--
-- Developing Technical Guidance: DEP ID:012-0900-001. Title:Policy for the Development
and Publication of Technical Guidance. This policy explains to the public and the regulated
community the Department's process for developing TGDs. The purpose of this policy is to
outline the Department's key considerations for the development of TGDs, tools available to
enhance transparency in the TGD process, public comment periods, and the maintenance and
distribution processes of TGDs. This draft TGD was significantly simplified from the previous
version by removing internal direction and procedures for the Department's staff. The
interim-final version published at 45 Pa.B. 2675 (May 30, 2015) is withdrawn with this notice.
Questions regarding this action should be directed to Abbey Cadden at 717-705-3769 or by
sending email to: acadden@pa.gov.
-- Developing Regulations: DEP ID:012-0820-001. Title:Policy for the Development and
Review of Regulations. This policy explains the process the Department will follow to develop
regulations necessary to effectively implement Commonwealth and Federal environmental laws
for promulgation as appropriate, based on the expertise of the Department and other
Commonwealth agency staff, Departmental advisory committees, boards and councils, and based
on comments received during the public participation process. Several updates to this policy
were necessary to ensure that it remains relevant to current practice. Also, updates were required
to explain how amendments to the Regulatory Review Act (71 P.S. 745.1745.14) in 2012
impact how the Department carries out its regulatory review and development process.
Questions regarding this action should be directed to Laura Edinger at 717-772-3277 or send
email to: ledinger@pa.gov.
-- Advisory Committees: DEP ID:012-1920-002. Title: Advisory Committee Guidelines.
These guidelines establish the role and function of the Department's advisory committees. New
language was incorporated into the guidelines to clarify common areas of confusion for advisory
committee members. These revisions are intended to clarify the roles of the Department,
advisory committee members and the public when planning and holding advisory committee
meetings. Questions regarding this action should be directed to Hayley Jeffords at 717-772-3525
or send email to: hjeffords@pa.gov.
These updated policies will provide a clearer path for the public to engage with DEP
during the development of regulations and technical guidance documents, said DEP Secretary
Patrick McDonnell. Its essential that we have the best possible process to receive feedback
from Pennsylvanias residents and businesses in the development of policies that protect the
environment.
Comments on these guidelines will be accepted through December 13 and can be
submitted through DEPs eComment webpage. Copies can also be found on the same page.
NewsClip:
Cusick: Bill Would Overhaul PA Process For Adopting Regulations
[Posted: Oct. 13, 2017]

DEP To Pay For At Least 800 Farm Conservation Plans In PA Part Of Chesapeake Bay
Watershed

The Department of Environmental Protection Friday


announced it will reimburse farmers in Pennsylvanias part of
the Chesapeake Bay Watershed for the cost of preparing
hundreds of agricultural plans for clean water.
To prepare their plans, many farmers enlist technical experts,
whose services generally cost from $500 to $1,500 per plan,
depending on the size of the farm.
Farmers can now be reimbursed for plans developed after
January 1, 2017.
Consultants are coordinating the reimbursement program, conducting extensive outreach
to farmers, and supplying potential options for farmers who are seeking technical experts.
The deadline to register to participate in the program is April 1, 2018, and plans must be
submitted to the appropriate consultant by May 30.
We know it can be a challenge, especially for small operations, to afford fees for
technical help on plans for pollutant reduction in local streams and rivers, said DEP Secretary
Patrick McDonnell. Through reimbursements to farmers, our Agricultural Plan Reimbursement
Program will cover the cost of preparation of at least 800 and as many as 2,200 plans.
The program is part of a commitment that Gov. Wolf, the U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture announced in 2016 to make state and federal
funding available to improve water quality in Pennsylvanias 43 counties in the Bay watershed
for local benefit and, ultimately, all partner states in the watershed.
Farmers recognize the importance of conservation stewardship because they depend on
clean water and healthy soil, said Department of Agriculture Secretary Russell Redding.
Throughout the watershedand throughout the statethere are countless farmers who want to
do the right thing when it comes to protecting our natural resources. This reimbursement plan is
part of Governor Wolfs commitment to investing in Pennsylvania farmers, the viability of their
operations, and the health of our waterways.
State regulations require all farmers to implement manure management, nutrient
management, or agriculture erosion and sediment control plans and, in some cases, more than
one of these plans.
The regulations are a key component of Pennsylvanias effort to meet its EPA-mandated
water pollution reduction targets for the Chesapeake Bay.
Contacts For Information
Farmers in the Bay watershed in Bradford, Cameron, Carbon, Centre, Clearfield, Clinton,
Columbia, Elk, Jefferson, Lackawanna, Luzerne, Lycoming, McKean, Montour,
Northumberland, Potter, Schuylkill, Snyder, Sullivan, Susquehanna, Union, Tioga, Wayne, and
Wyoming Counties should contact:
Coordinator: Sara Bolton, Larson Design Group, Inc., email:
sbolton@larsondesigngroup.com, call: 570-374-5700, address: 1000 Commerce Park Dr.,
Williamsport, PA 17701
Farmers in the Bay watershed in Adams, Bedford, Berks, Blair, Cambria, Chester,
Cumberland, Dauphin, Franklin, Fulton, Huntingdon, Indiana, Juniata, Lancaster, Lebanon,
Mifflin, Perry, Somerset, and York Counties should contact:
Coordinator: Jedd Moncavage, TeamAg Inc., email: jeddm@teamaginc.com, call:
717-721-6795, address: 120 Lake St., Ephrata, PA 17522
By partnering on agricultural inspections compliance, providing federal grants for best
management practice implementation, helping to document farmers voluntary efforts, and now
sharing costs on agricultural plans, Secretary McDonnell said, DEP is doing everything it can
to assist farmers in their efforts to clean up our local waters.
For more information, visit DEPs Pennsylvanias Chesapeake Bay Plan webpage.
NewsClips:
Capital Region Water To Renovate HBG Parks To Help Decrease Stormwater Runoff
Editorial: Better Plan For Stormwater In Scranton
Researchers: Chesapeake Bay Dead Zones Biggest Since 2014
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here to subscribe to the Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here to support the Chesapeake Bay Journal
Follow Chesapeake Bay Journal On Twitter
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[Posted: Oct. 13, 2017]

Project Begins In Stroudsburg To Install Green Infrastructure, Urban Nature Space

The Brodhead Creek Watershed Association Tuesday


announced a portion of a vacant lot in Stroudsburg in Monroe
County will become an urban nature space a pocket park--
green oasis amid a busy downtown.
At the corner of Quaker Alley and Sixth Street, dumpsters and
loading areas are decorated by weeds, but the project by
Stroudsburg Borough, nonprofits Brodhead Watershed
Association and Pocono Alliance, and landscape designer
Robin Anglemyer of Strauser Natures Helpers will change
that.
A portion of the land, owned by Monroe County, will have
native flowers, grasses, shrubs, and shade trees, along with
paths and seating to attract the towns workers and residents.
Monroe County commissioners conceived the idea almost four years ago, and support the
project.
Tarah Probst, mayor of Stroudsburg, said, Bringing green spaces to our borough is
exactly what our constituents are asking for. This nature space will beautify our downtown and
bring people together.
The project will begin by carving out a 30- by 40-foot corner for a demonstration design
of how the larger parcel can eventually be used. The larger parcel will later be converted to a
green public space for festivals, concerts and similar activities.
Rain gardens and permeable pavers will demonstrate how green infrastructure can help
clean and purify runoff from streets and sidewalks before entering the nearby Brodhead Creek
and storm drains.
Strauser Natures Helpers; Vigon International, an East Stroudsburg manufacturer; and
the Greater Pike Community Foundation: Richard L. Snyder Fund have sponsored the project.
The Greater Pike Community Fund is a targeted, long-term community philanthropy.
More sponsorships and donations toward the project are welcome. Donations would be
used for installation costs as well as a maintenance plan to ensure the initial nature space remains
beautifully intact. Click Here to learn how you can support the project.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the Brodhead
Creek Watershed Association website.
NewsClips:
Capital Region Water To Renovate HBG Parks To Help Decrease Stormwater Runoff
Restore The Common In Newtown Borough, Bucks County Oct. 21
Plant Trees With Tredyffrin Environmental Advisory Council Oct. 14
Editorial: Better Plan For Stormwater In Scranton
[Posted: Oct. 10, 2017]

Volunteers Plant 1,000 Trees Along Buck Run In Coatesville, Chester County

Stroud Water Research Center and the


Brandywine Conservancy hosted a joint
tree planting Friday on a farm in
Coatesville, Chester County that was once
the base of the northern operations of the
historic King Ranch of Texas.
Known locally as Buck and Doe
Run Valley Farms, Inc., this land once
provided rich southeastern Pennsylvania
pasture to fatten Santa Gertrudis cattle, a breed developed by the King Ranch in Kingville,
Texas.
Located in East Fallowfield Township, the farm is within the Brandywine-Christina
Watershed, which provides drinking water to the city of Wilmington, Delaware. All of the land
forming the core of the Buck and Doe Run Valley Farms has been protected from development
through conservation easements.
Together, both organizations and dozens of volunteers planted 1,000 trees along Buck
Run, which is a tributary of the Brandywine Creek.
The planting will re-establish a riparian forest buffer along Buck Run to protect it by
filtering out contaminants from agriculture and other land uses before they can enter the stream.
A forest buffer provides a first line of defense (keeping sediment and nutrients out) as
well as a secondary line of defense (keeping sediment and nutrients from moving downstream)
for maintaining clean water in our streams and rivers.
Scientists at the Stroud Center have been studying the important effects of forested
buffers over the past 50 years, and each tree planting is another opportunity to learn more about
the relationship between trees and clean fresh water for all.
The strategic placement of trees along streams and rivers is a simple but very effective
way of reducing flooding and improving their water quality said Bern Sweeney, Ph.D.,
distinguished scientist and president of Stroud Water Research Center.
Employees and supporters of Cheshire Hunt Conservancy, Colonial Pipeline, Dansko,
Exelon Generation, Southern Chester County Chamber of Commerce Young Business Leaders,
and Wilmington Trust joined the roster of volunteers for the event.
Funding and supplies for this project were provided by Wilmington Trust and
TreeVitalize, respectively.
Bill LaFond, president of the Wilmington Trust Family Wealth division, said,
Wilmington Trust has been a longtime and proud supporter of the missions of both the Stroud
Center and the Brandywine Conservancy. Their important work on water conservation benefits
both our local and global communities. We appreciate the opportunity to directly participate in
the impactful work they are doing.
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the Stroud Water
Research Center website, Click Here to subscribe to the UpStream newsletter. Click Here to
subscribe to Strouds Educator newsletter. Click Here to become a Friend Of Stroud Research,
Like them on Facebook, Follow on Twitter, include them in your Circle on Google+ and visit
their YouTube Channel.
Visit the Brandywine Conservancy website. Click Here to sign up for regular updates
from the Conservancy (middle of the webpage.) Visit the Conservancys Blog, Like the
Conservancy on Facebook and Follow them on Instagram.
NewsClips:
Capital Region Water To Renovate HBG Parks To Help Decrease Stormwater Runoff
Restore The Common In Newtown Borough, Bucks County Oct. 21
Plant Trees With Tredyffrin Environmental Advisory Council Oct. 14
Editorial: Better Plan For Stormwater In Scranton
[Posted: Oct. 13, 2017]

Stormwater Program Communication Workshop Oct. 25 In Dauphin County

The Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay and its partners will host a Stormwater Program
Communication Workshop on October 25 at the Londonderry Township Building, 783 S. Geyers
Church Road in Middletown, Dauphin County from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
There will be three workshop sessions--
-- What Happens When Your Message Is Out There?
-- Ready, Air, Fire! Or Ready, Fire Aim?
-- Plan Your Work, Work Your Plan
Other partners in presenting this workshop are Water Words That Work, LLC provided
by the Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay, University of Maryland Environmental Finance Center
and Capitol Region Council of Governments.
The cost of the workshop is $20.
To register or for more information, visit the Stormwater Program Communication
Workshop webpage or contact Leslie Weller by sending email to: lweller@allianceforthebay.org
or call 717-517-8698.
NewsClips:
Storm Brewing Over Williamsport Stormwater System Transfer
Editorial: Better Plan For Stormwater In Scranton
[Posted: Oct. 12, 2017]

Ferris Passive Mine Drainage Treatment System Receives Maintenance In Butler County

In 1997, the Ferris passive treatment system complex


was installed to address four abandoned mine
discharges emanating from an old deep mine in the
coal mining ghost town of Ferris in the Slippery Rock
Creek Watershed in Butler County.
This complex consisted of two series of
Vertical Flow Ponds, one set treating the SR85 and
SR86 discharges and the other set treating the SR87
and SR88 discharges.
These VFPs then flowed into a large aerobic wetland created using an abandoned railroad
grade as an embankment. Eventually, the treated water empties into the main stem of Slippery
Rock Creek.
This system was evaluated by BioMost, Inc. after the Slippery Rock Creek Watershed
Coalition noticed possible water quality issues. The field pH at the outlet of wetland 2 on 2/18/17
was 3.78. After further investigation it was determined that maintenance to the SR 85/86
treatment cell was necessary.
Initially, flow from the forebay through VK1 was not present, causing raw water from the
forebay berm to bypass both vertical flow ponds directly to the treatment wetland. VK1
maintained a high water level but did not flow to VK2, which indicated the treatment media
and/or the underdrain was plugged. Several attempts were made to unplug the pipe and media.
A flush pipe was located within the forebay and found to be closed or blocked on the
inlet side.
An emergency overflow pipe was located and cleared within VK1 using a power snake
attachment, which dropped the water level in the pond approximately 2 feet. The treatment
media was backflushed using a 3 pump for approximately 20 minutes during three separate
attempts to gain a flow path within the media to the underdrain.
This netted a minimal increase in flow to the underdrain pipe.
After further backflushing attempts proved unhelpful in reestablishing flow through the
system, it was decided that exposing the underdrain pipes and examining the quality of the
treatment media would help to determine the next course of action.
A temporary berm to divert flow from the forebay was installed and VK1 was drained
over the course of a few days to accomplish this.
Once VK1 drained, an excavator was used to examine the quality of the treatment media
within the pond. The media was separated into two layers. The top layer was highly degraded
with no structure, and the lower layer was highly compacted and minimally permeable.
After determining it had little viability in continuing to provide water treatment, a
significant amount of the top layer of media was removed from the pond using a 6 shredder
pump.
The lower layer of media was then removed to examine the underdrain and surrounding
stone. This revealed a cemented together layer of stone with 4 perforated underdrain pipe that
still had no flow exiting the flush pipe. A redesign of VK1 was determined to be necessary to
regain treatment within the component.
A spillway was installed between VK1 and VK2 to allow water treatment in VK2 without
flowing through the VK1 media. Stop logs regulating water level within VK2 were removed to
help determine the permeability of the stone within the pond.
A layer of sediment approximately 6-8 thick was discovered on top of the treatment
media stone.
Although VK2 drained, it would benefit from stirring the media and removing sediment
using a 6 shredder pump to rejuvenate the stone. This was performed after work was completed
within VK1.
Hopefully, in the coming year, additional funding can be acquired to make the necessary
changes to this treatment system.
(Reprinted from the October edition of The Catalyst newsletter, Slippery Rock Watershed
Coalition in Butler County. Click Here to sign up for your own copy.)
[Posted: Oct. 10, 2017]

October Catalyst Newsletter Now Available From Slippery Rock Watershed Coalition

The October edition of The Catalyst newsletter is now


available from the Slippery Rock Watershed Coalition
in Butler County featuring stories on--
-- Student Symposium On The Environment,
Westminster College Dec. 7, Submit Abstracts
-- Blacks Creek Watershed Restoration Plan Presented
At Public Meeting
-- Students Present De Sale Phase 2 Mine Drainage
Treatment System Data Oct. 12 (photo)
-- Ferris Passive Mine Drainage Treatment Complex
Receives Maintenance
-- The KIDS Catalyst - Color A Pumpkin!
-- Click Here to sign up for your own copy.
The Catalyst newsletter is distributed to over 1,200 individuals in over a dozen countries
including: Brazil, Peru, South Korea, Mexico, England, Wales, Venezuela, South Africa, New
Zealand, Australia and Germany.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the Slippery
Rock Watershed Coalition website.
Clean Creek Products
Looking for a unique gift that will please the most discriminating taste and help the
environment? Consider pottery products from Clean Creek.
Clean Creek Products, a division of Stream Restoration Inc., a nonprofit watershed
restoration organization, was formed to market the metals recovered in treating abandoned mine
drainage. One of the uses for these metals is in ceramic pottery glazing.
Every product you purchase from Clean Creek will not only support the artists that create
them, but also helps support watershed groups doing local projects to help restore Pennsylvania's
over 16,500 miles of polluted waterways.
Click Here to see a video on Clean Creek pottery.
[Posted: Oct. 10, 2017]

Stroud Water Research Center Helps Berks Farmers Connect With Land, Water,
Customers

Deanne Boyer and her parents, Linford and Florence


Weber, jointly operate Willow Run Farm in Berks
County, Pennsylvania.
They have adopted a sustainable philosophy that
includes grass-fed cattle, chickens that feast on
watermelon and cucumbers, and a stream being
restored-- with help from the Watershed Restoration Group at the Stroud Water Research Center
in Chester County-- through the recent planting of native trees along its banks.
Boyer describes how that philosophy has shaped a relationship between environment,
farmer, and customer.

By Deanne Boyer, Willow Run Farm

Our customers are often surprised the first time they drive down our farm lane to pick up a dozen
eggs or purchase a pound of ground beef. Tucked away in the midst of suburbia, our customers
are delighted to discover our quiet farm in the bustle of their daily lives.
They are often bursting with questions about what we do and why we do it. Why do you
raise your cattle on grass? Do your chickens like it outside? What are all those white posts?
These questions are opportunities for us to share how the best management practices we
implement work for our animals and how they benefit our neighbors and the environment.
Fascinated by the white tubes in our stream buffer, a recent customer asked me what we
were growing. I explained how each tube protects a small tree.
As they grow, the 500 baby trees act as a filter to keep our stream clean and create a
habitat for birds and other animals. I could see the lightbulb moment as she understood and
became excited about how those little trees impact her neighborhood and her water.
Young customers enjoy shouting hello to our chickens as their parents pick up eggs and a
customer stops to talk to our cows and calves on her commute past our farm.
Our farm provides food for our local neighbors, but it also uniquely connects them with
our animals and the natural processes in grass farming.
In the words of a neighbor down the road, I love to see farms that clearly value animals
lives, the health of the environment, and the health of people. I admire your open-minded
approach to allow natural processes to work their magic.
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the Stroud Water
Research Center website, Click Here to become a Friend Of Stroud Research, Like them on
Facebook, Follow on Twitter, include them in your Circle on Google+ and visit their YouTube
Channel.
(Photo: Behind Linford Weber and daughter Deanne Boyer is a young forest buffer planted
along the stream that runs through their farm.)
NewsClips:
Hilltop Urban Farm In South Pittsburgh Set To Become Largest Urban Farm In The Country
Crable: Ag Jobs That Pay Apprenticeship Announced In Lancaster
Schneck: Did PAs All-Time Pumpkin-Growing Champ Beat His 2,020 Pound Record?

(Reprinted from the latest UpStream newsletter from Stroud Water Research Center. Click
Here to subscribe to UpStream. Click Here to subscribe to Strouds Educator newsletter.)
[Posted: Oct. 13, 2017]

Latest Stroud Water Research Center UpStream Newsletter Now Available

The latest edition of the UpStream newsletter is now


available from the Stroud Water Research Center in
Chester County featuring articles on--
-- Prince Of Monaco: Water Should Bring Us Together
-- Berks County Farmers Connect With Land, Water And Customers
-- Thank You 2017 Summer Interns!
-- A Day Of Education For Budding STEM Scholars (photo)
-- Enter Your Design For A Boy, Girl Scout Patch
-- Remembering Bill Anderson, Stroud Center Adjunct Research Associate
-- The First 50 Years: Stroud Water Research Center
-- Click Here to subscribe to UpStream
-- Click Here to subscribe to Strouds Educator newsletter
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the Stroud Water
Research Center website, Click Here to become a Friend Of Stroud Research, Like them on
Facebook, Follow on Twitter, include them in your Circle on Google+ and visit their YouTube
Channel.
[Posted: Oct. 13, 2017]

Green Roof & Wall Symposium In Pittsburgh Nov. 6

Green Roofs for Healthy Cities and University of Pittsburgh


invite you to attend the Pittsburgh Green Roof and Wall
Symposium on November 6 at the University of Pittsburgh,
4200 Fifth Avenue in Pittsburgh from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
This one-day event will feature industry experts and local
leaders presenting on green roofs and walls, local standout
projects and the importance of strong green roof and wall
policy.
The Symposium will also feature a trade show for local green
roof and wall companies, interactive panel discussions and
workshops to help develop policy locally.
Attendees will have the opportunity to learn about:
-- The benefits of green roofs and walls;
-- Emerging green roof and wall design practices;
-- Green roof best practices for the Pittsburgh area;
-- New opportunities to advance the Pennsylvania green roof and wall industry;
-- Examples of green roofs thriving in and around Pittsburgh; and
-- Effective policies that encourage investment in green roofs and walls.
The event will bring together public, private, and NGO stakeholders to explore how to
make Pittsburgh a leader in the application of green roofs and walls to benefit the environment
and economy.
Click Here to download How Your Community Will Benefit From Green Roof Policy.
To register or for more information, visit the Pittsburgh Green Roof and Wall
Symposium webpage.
[Posted: Oct. 13, 2017]

Pittsburgh To Have Largest Urban Farm In U.S. On Old Public Housing Site
The City of Pittsburgh will soon be the home to the
largest urban farm in the United States-- Hilltop Farm &
Homes-- on the site of a former public housing
development.
Located atop a107-acre piece of City property on
the site of the former St. Clair Village public housing
development, Hilltop Urban Farm will occupy 23 acres
of farmland, with an additional 67 acres of hillside
purposefully left undeveloped, 12 acres set aside for
green spaces and other development, and 14 acres
allocated for future housing.
Plans call for Hilltop Urban Farm including a production farm, a farmer incubation
program, greenhouses, compost processing, a community farm market, youth farm, events barn,
and community plots.
The farm is a project of Hilltop Alliance, a nonprofit and community reinvestment
organization representing 11 South Pittsburgh neighborhoods.
To date, more than five acres have been cleared of brush to become farmland, including
the laying of compost and planting cover crops such as rye, oats, and winter peas to prepare the
soil for future farming.
Clearing and soil amendment will continue in phases as old building foundations
continue to be removed.
In a September 2017 ribbon cutting ceremony, Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto said, I can't
imagine the last time that a mayor had the opportunity to cut a ribbon on a farm in the City of
Pittsburgh, and not just a farm, but the largest urban farm in America.
Click Here to see the full plan for the Hilltop Farm & Homes project.
To learn more about green innovation in the Pittsburgh Region, visit the Pittsburgh Green
Story website.
NewsClips:
Hilltop Urban Farm In South Pittsburgh Set To Become Largest Urban Farm In The Country
Crable: Ag Jobs That Pay Apprenticeship Announced In Lancaster
Schneck: Did PAs All-Time Pumpkin-Growing Champ Beat His 2,020 Pound Record?
[Posted: Oct. 10, 2017]

Susquehanna River Basin Commission Hearing Nov. 2 On Water Withdrawal Projects

The Susquehanna River Basin Commission will hold a hearing on November 2 to take public
comments on a series of water withdrawal projects. (formal notice with project list)
The meeting will be held in Room 8E-B East Wing of the Capitol Building in Harrisburg
from 2:30 to 5:00 p.m.
For a list of the projects and more information, visit SRBCs Public Participation Center
webpage. Questions should be directed to Jason Oyler, General Counsel, 717-238-0423, Ext.
1312, fax 717-238-2436.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the
Susquehanna River Basin Commission website. Follow SRBC on Twitter.
NewsClip:
Coxton Railroad Bridge Removal Over Susquehanna Set To Begin In Wilkes-Barre
[Posted: Oct. 13, 2017]

Student Symposium On The Environment Dec. 7 Westminster College, Submit Abstracts


Now

The Slippery Rock Watershed Coalition in Butler County


is again partnering with Westminster College to host the
annual Student Symposium on the Environment on
December 7 at the Witherspoon Rooms and Mueller
Theater on the Westminster campus in Lawrence County.
Student abstracts can be submitted through the
Westminster Student Symposium webpage. The deadline
for abstracts is November 10.
For more information, visit the Westminster Student
Symposium on the Environment webpage. Questions
should be directed to Cliff Denholm, Stream Restoration,
Inc., by sending email to: sri@streamrestorationinc.org or call 724-776-0161.
NewsClip:
Allegheny Included In Green College Guide

(Reprinted from the October edition of The Catalyst newsletter, Slippery Rock Watershed
Coalition in Butler County. Click Here to sign up for your own copy.)
[Posted: Oct. 10, 2017]

K-12 Student Video Contest By Society For Mining, Metallurgy & Exploration Accepting
Entries

The Society for Mining, Metallurgy and Exploration


is challenging teams of K-12 students to answer this
question in a 3-minute video, Why is mining
important in our lives? in the Move Mining Next
Gen Contest to win cash prizes of up to $1,000.
The deadline for entries is November 1.
This competition is the perfect way to encourage a child you know to think critically
about the world around them and encourage them to explore how the things they use every day
are made.
By applying STEM skills, creativity, teamwork and research, the Move Mining Next Gen
competition will challenge students in a fun and competitive way.
For all the details, and resources to help students with the videos, visit the Move Mining
Next Gen website.
NewsClip:
Allegheny Included In Green College Guide
Related Stories:
Society For Mining, Metallurgy & Exploration Holds College-Level Student Poster Contest
PAs Harvey Mine Team Places Second In 2017 National Coal Mine Rescue Contest
[Posted: Oct. 9, 2017]

Society For Mining, Metallurgy & Exploration Holds College-Level Student Poster Contest

The Society for Mining, Metallurgy and Exploration


Environmental Division is inviting undergraduate and
graduate students in geology, geological engineering,
environmental engineering and environmental scientists to
submit entries to its 2018 student poster contest.
The deadline for entries is October 31. Entries should be
submitted to Barbara Nielsen by sending email to:
bnielsen@fmi.com.
Students have the opportunity to show off their work and a chance to put cash in their
pockets to further their education. The first-place winner receives $1,000; the second-place,
$500; and the third-place, $250. In addition, each poster submission receives a complimentary
ticket to the ED Luncheon.
Students submit their abstracts online and then display their posters at the ED Luncheon
held during the SME Annual Conference & Expo February 25-28 in Minneapolis, MN. They
explain their research in person to a panel of judges selected from industry, academia and the ED
leadership, who review the quality of abstracts, posters and presentations to determine the
winners.
Beyond the monetary incentive is the invaluable chance to network. Held just before the
ED luncheon for all SME members to attend, the poster presentations provide a platform for
professionals to talk with the students about their work.
Business cards are often exchanged, providing students with a professional contact that
might be able to provide some insight into their research as well as a point of contact with a
company or organization that could be helpful when looking for a full-time position.
Click Here for all the details. Questions should be directed to Barbara Nielsen by
sending email to: bnielsen@fmi.com, or Lisa Gonzales by email to:
lisa_gonzales@savci-env.com.
NewsClip:
Allegheny Included In Green College Guide
Related Stories:
K-12 Student Video Contest By Society For Mining, Metallurgy & Exploration
PAs Harvey Mine Team Places Second In 2017 National Coal Mine Rescue Contest
[Posted: Oct. 9, 2017]

PA Environmental Educators Call For 2018 Conference Workshop Proposals

The PA Association of Environmental Educators have


issued a call for presentation and workshop proposals
for its 2018 Conference to be held on March 12-13 in
State College. The deadline for proposals is
December 17.
The theme of the Conference Growing from Our Roots explores how programs can
include local lore and native cultures to increase people's attachment to the environment in their
community.
Presentations and workshops should be interactive, engaging and fun, applying best
practices in environmental education and interpretation.
Workshop proposals should include the following conference strands:
-- Our Roots: Words & Wisdom: Using lore, local history and storytelling to infuse your
lessons and activities with life.
-- Our Strength: Tasks & Challenges: Guidance for gaining confidence to put on the many
hats we wear for staff development and organizational management.
-- Our Reach: Community & Colleagues: Strengthening the connections with the
environmental education community of today and tomorrow.
Click Here for all the details and to submit a proposal. Click Here for more on the
Conference.
For more information on programs, initiatives, resources and other upcoming events, visit
the PA Association of Environmental Educators website. Click Here to sign up for the PAEE
newsletter (bottom of page, left). Click Here to become a member. Click Here to support
PAEEs work.
NewsClip:
Allegheny Included In Green College Guide
Related Story:
Nominations Now Being Accepted For 2018 PA Environmental Educator Awards
[Posted: Oct. 12, 2017]

Nominations Now Being Accepted For 2018 PA Environmental Educator Awards

PA Association of Environmental Educators is now


accepting nominations for the 2018 PAEE Awards For
Excellence In Environmental Education.
The annual awards are an important way that
environmental educators in Pennsylvania can recognize one
another and celebrate the great work that is happening
throughout the state.
The Award categories include--
-- Keystone Award recognizing an educator who has
dedicated their life to advancing the quality of environmental education;
-- Daisy S. Klinedinst Memorial Award recognizing educators with fewer than five years
experience;
-- Outstanding Contribution to Environmental Education Award
-- Outstanding Environmental Educator
-- Outstanding Environmental Education Program
-- Business Partner Award
-- Government Partner Award
This year, the awards will be presented at the 2018 PAEE Conference March 12-13 in
State College.
Click Here for all the details and to submit a nomination.
For more information on programs, initiatives, resources and other upcoming events, visit
the PA Association of Environmental Educators website. Click Here to sign up for the PAEE
newsletter (bottom of page, left). Click Here to become a member. Click Here to support
PAEEs work.
(Photo: PAEE President Scott J. Cope with Ruth Roperti, 2017 Keystone Award winner.)
NewsClip:
Allegheny Included In Green College Guide
Related Stories:
PA Assn. of Environmental Educators 2017 AWard Recipients Honored
PA Environmental Educators Call For 2018 Conference Workshop Proposals
[Posted: Oct. 12, 2017]

Keep PA Beautiful: Still Time To Join The International Coastal Cleanup

Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful Thursday reminded


residents there is still time to volunteer or to
organize your own litter cleanup event as part of
the International Coastal Cleanup, the worlds
largest volunteer effort aimed at improving the
health of our oceans.
This global initiative aims to prevent trash from
entering our waterways and runs through
October 31. Keep PA Beautiful coordinates the
effort in Pennsylvania.
If you are looking to make a difference in your community this fall, join the
International Coastal Cleanup! Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful and the Ocean Conservancy depend
on individuals, families, friends, civic groups, organizations and businesses who care about our
natural resources to collect and document the trash they pick up. The documented trash helps
provide insight into other ways to help tackle the enormous worldwide problem of ocean litter,
said Shannon Reiter, President of Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful. Were proud to be a part of this
global movement and we encourage you to join us.
Last year, the organization reported that 14,000 volunteers from 39 counties removed
over 864,000 pounds of trash and debris from Pennsylvanias lands, waterways and coastal
regions during the International Coastal Cleanup event.
The International Coastal Cleanup, a program of the Ocean Conservancy.
Register your event with Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful and receive free gloves and bags,
while supplies last. Any cleanup site, land or water, is eligible since we all live in a watershed
and all waterways flow into our coastal waters.
Click Here for cleanup tools and resources to help organize a safe and successful cleanup
event.
For more information, visit KPBs International Coastal Cleanup webpage. Questions
should be directed to Michelle Dunn at 1-877-772-3673 Ext. 113 or send email to:
mdunn@keeppabeautiful.org.
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the Keep
Pennsylvania Beautiful website. Click Here to become a member. Click Here to sign up for
regular updates from KPB, Like them on Facebook, Follow on Twitter, Discover them on
Pinterest and visit their YouTube Channel.
Also visit the Illegal Dump Free PA website for more ideas on how to clean up
communities and keep them clean and KPBs new Electronics Waste website.
NewsClips:
Tire Collection Event In Luzerne County Saturday
Pittsburgh Walkabout: Its Delightful To De-Litter
[Posted: Oct. 12, 2017]

PEC: Volunteers Needed For Illegal Dumpsite Cleanups In Potter County Oct. 28, 30, 31

The PA Environmental Council is seeking volunteers to


assist in the cleanup of three illegal dumpsites this fall in
Potter County--
-- October 28:
-- Hector Township along Loucks Mill Rd., 10:00 a.m.
to 12:00 p.m.
-- Bingham Township along Rowley Rd., 12:00 p.m. to
2:00 p.m.
-- October 31: Roulette Township along a creek on
Burleson Ave., 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.
Two additional cleanups are scheduled for
October 30, in partnership with the Potter County Probation Community Service Office.
PEC will provide volunteers with gloves, bags, vests, snacks, drinks and lunch. We will
also cover the costs of transportation, as well as disposal and/or recycling of all trash, scrap
metal, and tires collected from the sites.
Since 2015, PEC has spearheaded, coordinated, conducted, and funded 112 illegal
dumpsite cleanups within four Northern Pennsylvania counties.
With help from partners and volunteers, the PEC Community Illegal Dumpsite Cleanup
Program has eradicated 30 illegal dumpsites in Potter County, 52 in Susquehanna County, 15 in
Wayne County, and 15 in Pike County.
Funding for these projects was obtained via the settlement of a Department of
Environmental Protection enforcement action.
To volunteer, or for additional information, please contact Program Coordinator Palmira
Miller at 570-592-7876 or send email to: pmiller@pecpa.org to ensure enough food and supplies
are available.
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the PA
Environmental Council website, visit the PEC Blog, follow PEC on Twitter or Like PEC on
Facebook. Visit PECs Audio Room for the latest podcasts. Click Here to receive regular
updates from PEC.
NewsClips:
Tire Collection Event In Luzerne County Saturday
Pittsburgh Walkabout: Its Delightful To De-Litter
[Posted: Oct. 10, 2017]

Susquehanna River Basin Commission Water Monitoring Again Finds No Impacts From
Natural Gas Drilling

The Susquehanna River Basin Commission Thursday


released its 2016 report monitoring water quality in the
watershed for impacts from unconventional natural gas
drilling and found none.
A water quality monitoring network with more than
50 stations was put into place in 2010, as the natural gas
industry was rapidly growing in the Basin. Most of the
activity was located near headwater streams where water
quality observations and data were scarce.
To date, the Commissions network of monitors has
not detected discernible impacts on the Basins water
resources, but continued vigilance is warranted.
The Commission takes very seriously its role in monitoring water quality conditions in
the Basin, in order to collect the necessary data to make informed decisions, said Executive
Director Andrew Dehoff, P.E. This report provides more information as part of the
Commissions mission to sustainably manage the water resources of the Susquehanna River in a
way that supports both ecological health and economic development.
Click Here for the full report and past reports.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the
Susquehanna River Basin Commission website. Follow SRBC on Twitter.
NewsClips:
Groups Map Well Sites, Schools, Claim Risk To Children
Tenaska Natural Gas Power Plant To Pay For More Water System Upgrades
Plums Council OKs Shale Drill Pad Permit Despite Opposition
Monroeville Restricts Oil, Gas Wells
Impact Fee Pays For Bridge Replacement In Washington County
Governors Vote For Fracking Ban In Delaware River Basin
Op-Ed: Many Benefits To Fracking In Delaware River Basin
[Posted: Oct. 12, 2017]

Nov. 2 Hearing On Air Permit For Natural Gas-Fired Power Plant In Greene County

The Department of Environmental Protection Thursday announced it will hold a public hearing
November 2 on an Air Quality Plan Approval application for the proposed Hill Top Energy
Center located in Cumberland Township, Greene County.
The proposed natural gas-fired combined cycle power plant has a 620 megawatt
generating capacity. Hill Top applied for air quality plan approval in March 2017.
The hearing will be held at the Carmichaels Area Senior High School Auditorium at 215
N Vine Street, Carmichaels, PA 15320.
The hearing will be preceded by brief presentations by DEP and the applicant and an
open question and answer session beginning at 6:00 p.m. The public hearing will start at 7:00
p.m.
Members of the public will have the opportunity to present testimony on the departments
intent to issue the Plan Approval. Comments must be limited specifically to the application and
conditions of this application.
DEP requests that individuals wishing to testify at the hearing submit written notice to
Lauren Fraley, Community Relations Coordinator, by sending email to: lfraley@pa.gov, care of
DEPs Southwest Regional Office, 400 Waterfront Drive, Pittsburgh, PA 15222, or by phone at
412-442-4203.
Each individual will have 5 minutes to testify and there will also be an opportunity to
register on site on the evening of the hearing.
Individuals who cannot attend the hearing may submit written public comments to the
attention of Alexander Sandy, Department of Environmental Protection, 400 Waterfront Drive,
Pittsburgh, PA 15222 by email to: asandy@pa.gov, or fax to 412-442-4194.
Written testimony must include the commenters name, address, and phone number and
reference the proposed Hill Top Energy Center Plan Approval (PA-30-00233B).
Public comments will be accepted until November 12, 2017 at 11:59 PM.
A copy of Hill Top Energy Centers application, DEPs technical review memo, and
other relevant information is available for review at DEPs Southwest Regional Office at 400
Waterfront Drive, Pittsburgh, PA 15222. Appointments to review the application materials can
be made by calling 412-442-4000.
Copies are also available by visiting Flenniken Memorial Library, 102 E. George Street,
Carmichaels, PA 15320 or electronically on DEPs Southwest Regional Office Community
Information webpage.
NewsClip:
Tenaska Natural Gas Power Plant To Pay For More Water System Upgrades
[Posted: Oct. 13, 2017]

DEP Collects $220,000 Penalty From Ohio Laboratory For Violations

The Department of Environmental Protection Thursday announced it collected a $220,000


penalty from Summit Labs in Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, for violations related to testing drinking
water samples and failure to notify DEP and public water suppliers in cases of Maximum
Contaminate Level exceedances, among others.
We rely on accredited, third-party labs for testing to ensure the safety and validity of
drinking water treatment, and those labs must meet our standards and provide the proper
notification, said DEP Secretary Patrick McDonnell.
Among the violations Summit Labs was cited for include:
-- Failure to properly notify public water supplier and the Department of an MCL exceedance
-- Failure to control laboratory conditions, to identify and correct contamination
-- Failure to generate accurate and valid data
-- Failure of the laboratory supervisor to properly certify results
-- Failure to have proper staffing, management structure, quality assurance/quality control to
ensure Summit generated accurate, valid data
DEP reached a settlement agreement with Summit Labs to address these violations, in
which Summit Labs agreed to pay $220,000 in penalties.
None of these violations are known to have affected public health, however that does
not excuse the actions of Summit Labs, said McDonnell. Ensuring that accurate and timely
information is made available to DEP and public water systems from labs like this is a crucial
part of providing clean, safe drinking water to the people of Pennsylvania.
For more information on the lab program, visit DEPs Laboratory Accreditation Program
webpage.
[Posted: Oct. 12, 2017]

PUC OKs Energy Conservation Plans For PPL, PGW To Lower Energy Burdens For
Low-Income Customers

The Public Utility Commission Wednesday acted on Universal Service and Energy Conservation
Plans for PPL Electric Utilities Corporation and Philadelphia Gas Works.
In doing so, the PUC reaffirmed its ongoing commitment to evaluating and improving
these programs, while ensuring they continue to make utility service more affordable for
low-income Pennsylvanians.
The Commission voted 4-0 to direct changes to PPLs USECP prior to final approval.
PPLs USECP is a three-year plan extending through 2019, with a renewed emphasis on
a Commission directive to reduce both energy burden levels of low-income customers as well as
reducing program costs to implement its four major USECP components: OnTrack, PPLs
Customer Assistance Program; the Winter Relief Assistance Program (WRAP), the companys
Low Income Usage Reduction Program (LIURP); PPLs Hardship Fund, Operation Help; and
the Customer Assistance and referral Evaluation Services Program (CARES).
The Commission voted 4-0 to approve PGWs USECP.
PGWs USECP extends through 2020, highlighted by a modified recertification process
for the companys Customer Responsibility Program (CRP) as well as a new pilot program for
greater health and safety measures under PGWs LIURP, known as Home Comfort.
Additionally, PGW pledges to continue to improve upon its outreach efforts to increase
low-income customer participation in these programs.
On March 16, 2017, the PUC moved to initiate a study regarding affordable home energy
burdens for low-income Pennsylvanians. Conducted by the PUCs Bureau of Consumer
Services, the study is evaluating the affordability of current energy burden levels as outlined in
the Commissions 1992 Customer Assistance Program (CAP) Policy Statement.
A report detailing the findings of the study will be delivered to the Commission within
one year.
On April 6, 2017, as part of a broad evaluation of Public Utility Commission policies
related to USECPs, the PUC voted to explore the framework and structure of existing universal
service programs and gather stakeholder feedback addressing concerns and suggestions for
amending or improving these programs.
The Pennsylvania Public Utility Code requires utility services be universally affordable,
and that universal service and energy conservation programs be developed, maintained, and
appropriately funded to ensure such affordability.
The current portfolio of PUC-required universal service programs includes payment
programs intended to help reduce the size of monthly bills and make service more affordable for
low-income households, generically referred to as Customer Assistance Programs or CAPs;
weatherization and energy efficient usage reduction programs to assist low-income families in
lowering their consumption and energy costs, known as LIURPs; referral programs to connect
consumers with other assistance services, or CARES; and utility hardship funds.
Collectively, these programs serve residents with incomes at or below 150 percent of the
Federal Poverty Guideline, roughly $36,900 a year for a family of four.
For more information, visit the PUCs Energy Assistance Programs webpage.
[Posted: Oct. 11, 2017]

PA Environmental Council Supports Bill To Create Local Energy Efficiency, Clean Energy
Funding Program

The PA Environmental Council Monday wrote to members of the House Local Government
Committee supporting House Bill 1722 (Harper-R-Montgomery) to authorize local governments
to create energy improvement districts to help fund energy efficiency, renewable energy and
water conservation projects by commercial and industrial buildings to reduce their operating
costs is pending in the House Local Government Committee (sponsor summary).
The text of the letter follows--
On behalf of the Pennsylvania Environmental Council, I am writing to express our
support for House Bill 1722 (P.N. 2416). The proposed legislation will allow local government
entities, such as county economic development agencies and municipalities, to unlock clean
energy potential in their jurisdictions.
Property assessed clean energy (PACE) financing can be an important tool for increasing
energy efficiency, renewable energy, and green infrastructure projects in the commercial sector
because it ties both the value and the cost of improvements to the property, rather than the
owner.
This removes a significant barrier to energy improvements as the repayment
responsibility, as well as the benefits of the improvement, will remain with the new owner if the
business must move before receiving its full return on investment.
For well-structured projects, the monthly savings may be equal to the monthly repayment
fee.
This financing tool can be especially important to projects that have longer payback
periods, which are often the projects that result in longer term savings.
For instance, property owners may choose to replace lighting systems, but maintain
inefficient appliances, heating and cooling systems, and poor quality insulation because of the
longer return on investment.
Not only does the business owner miss out on the potential savings, but this also reduces
the potential for economic growth in the energy efficiency industry.
According to a recent report (Clean Jobs Pennsylvania, presented by Environmental
Entrepreneurs and Keystone Energy Efficiency Alliance, September 2017), nearly 70,000
Pennsylvanians are employed in the clean energy sector.
Unlike many industries, this employment number is growing every year. These are jobs
in local communities that cannot be outsourced. Further, these jobs are spread across every
county in Pennsylvania, urban and rural alike.
Finally, we are pleased to see that the bill also provides for water conservation projects.
However, we ask you to consider expanding the definition of Water Improvement Projects
(page 5, line 11) to also include green infrastructure projects for stormwater management.
As more and more Pennsylvania cities struggle with stormwater management and
consider charging fees to property owners based on the amount of impervious surface, PACE
financing could be an important tool to allow owners to reduce their future financial liability by
investing in green infrastructure improvements.
Establishing this enabling legislation at the state level allows municipalities the option to
offer PACE financing if and when stormwater fees are put into place.
In addition, under Section 4302 Definitions, a Clean Energy Project is defined as
qualifying sources under the states Alternative Energy Portfolio Standard. We recommend that
this definition be revised to include only Tier I sources, or that the definition specify those
sources that result in reductions in carbon emissions.
Finally, we suggest including a requirement that the state create standardized forms
which local municipalities could use when establishing their own PACE programs. This
standardization would reduce the eliminate a hurdle for municipalities by reducing
administrative burden and would be easier for contractors who perform services across
jurisdictions.
Because this bill simply allows for the creation of PACE financing programs, rather than
mandating it, each local government entity is free to determine what is the right choice for its
community.
We commend the sponsors, and hope you will join them to support this important
legislation. Thank you for your consideration.
Sincerely,
Lindsay Baxter
Program Manager, Energy and Climate
John Walliser
Senior Vice President, Legal and Government Affairs
Click Here for a copy of the letter.
A companion bill is in the Senate Community, Economic and Recreational Development
Committee-- Senate Bill 234 (Blake-D-Lackawanna)-- which is scheduled to consider the bill on
October 17.
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the PA
Environmental Council website, visit the PEC Blog, follow PEC on Twitter or Like PEC on
Facebook. Visit PECs Audio Room for the latest podcasts. Click Here to receive regular
updates from PEC.
NewsClip:
Legere: Energy Efficiency Loan Bill Gathers Support In Harrisburg
[Posted: Oct. 11, 2017]

Reminder: 7th Annual Pittsburgh Solar Tour Oct. 14

PennFuture will mark October as Energy Awareness


Month with its 7th Annual Pittsburgh Solar Tour on
October 14, featuring residents and business owners
who have made the switch to clean energy.
Held from noon to 2 p.m., and again from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., participants can choose which
bus tour works best for their schedules. During the tour, participants will meet homeowners and
business owners showcasing their solar installations, implemented by various installers
throughout the region.
The Pittsburgh Solar Tour is a great opportunity for residents to learn that going solar is
possible, and they can hear firsthand from those who have already made the switch, said
PennFuture President and CEO Larry J. Schweiger. Moving our state to a clean energy future
that relies on renewable energy rather than fossil fuels means changing the hearts and the minds
of people one at a time, in addition to work on state policy and beyond.
The two bus tours start at the Frick Environmental Center, one of 11 structures in the
world to be a certified Living Building.
In addition to bus tours, participants of the tour have the option of taking an East End
Bike Tour, which begins at solar homeowner and advocate Fred Kraybills, house in Point
Breeze.
Post-tour libations will be held at East-End Brewing Company for all registered
attendees.
Bike Pittsburgh also provided other bike routes throughout the Greater Pittsburgh area,
featuring the Solar Tour homes, businesses, and Sustainable Pittsburghs Sustainable
Restaurants.
Participants will have the opportunity to engage with home and business owners at tour
stops, ask questions, hear personal stories, and see firsthand how owners have utilized solar to
meet their needs.
Featured stops on this years tour include: Phipps Conservatory, Homewoods Oasis
Farm & Fishery Bio Shelter, and The Aquaponics Project.
"This year, we wanted to make the tour even more accessible to the public," said
PennFuture's Western PA Outreach Coordinator Annie Regan. "Were happy to provide various
venues for people to engage in this tour and an interactive map that makes it easier than ever.
Two researchers at Yale and the University of Connecticut found the single most important
factor driving people to go solar was peer influence. Were hoping that when people see solar
promoted in their neighborhood through the tour, they will consider doing it themselves.
The Pittsburgh Solar Tour is held in conjunction with the American Solar Energy
Society's 2017 National Solar Tour. This event is sponsored by Levin Furniture.
This event is free and open to the public. Those interested should visit the Pittsburgh
Solar Tour website to register for this rain-or-shine event, view the interactive map, find
additional information, and download the free guidebook.
For more information on programs, initiatives and other upcoming events, visit the
PennFuture website.
(Photo: 2014 Pittsburgh Solar Tour Guidebook, 7211 Thomas Blvd, Pittsburgh.)
NewsClips:
Solar Panels Shining On Washington High Stadium
PECO: No $45K Bill For Homeowner To Connect Solar
Al Gore Coming To Pittsburgh For Climate Reality Leadership Workshop Oct. 17-19
Editorial: Renewable Energy Remains The Way Forward For The Future
Legere: Market Forces Reducing PA Emissions, But Killing Climate Plan Will Reverse That
Allegheny Front: Revoking Clean Power Climate Plan Could Have Big PA Impact
Eliminating EPA Clean Power Climate Plan Relief For Valley Coal Business Leaders
Activists Vow Fighting In The Streets Over EPAs Clean Power Climate Plan Repeal
Op-Ed: Trump Wants Consumers To Pay For Keeping Coal
Puko: U.S. Power Companies Pushing Ahead In Renewable, Gas-Fired Electricity Generation
Scientists: Cost Of Capturing Carbon Dioxide Declining
[Posted: Oct. 12, 2017]

CEOs For Sustainability Launch Speakers Series To Educate, Inform Western PA


Business Leaders Oct. 25

Recognizing the executives critical role in


driving transformational sustainability strategies,
CEOs For Sustainability, an executive council of
CEOs from throughout the Pittsburgh region, are
hosting a morning program: How C-Suites are
Responding to Increasing Stakeholder Demand
on October 25 at the Energy Innovation Center,
1435 Bedford Avenue in Pittsburgh from 7:30 to
9:30 a.m.
Seeing a strong link between corporate
sustainability performance and financial
performance, more than 70 percent of investors say sustainability is central to their investment
decisions, per a 2016 survey by MIT Sloan Management Review and The Boston Consulting
Group.
This trend will only grow with rising customer pressures, fueled by demographic shifts
and the proliferation of non-financial ratings and data.
The October 25 keynote speaker and BrownFlynn Senior Advisor Mike Krzus will
describe global drivers of change in business valuation, including demographic and technological
trends, and opportunities in business sustainability for companies and the executives who lead
them.
Krzus focuses on helping clients understand how integrated reporting links to building
trust, attracting long-term investors, and creating value for shareholders and society.
An integrated report, as defined by the International Integrated Reporting Council, is a
concise communication about how an organizations strategy, governance, performance, and
prospects, in the context of its external environment, lead to the creation of value in the short,
medium, and long term.
More than ever, consumers prefer to patronize businesses with good environmental,
social and governance records and, more than ever, that data is available at their fingertips, said
Krzus. CEOs must drive the integration of sustainability into their companys long-term
strategy. In doing this, they put their organization in a better position to deliver superior financial
performance in an ethical and responsible way.
A panel of CEOs for Sustainability participants will discuss How Leaders are
Responding. Panelists include:
-- Steve Guy, President and CEO, Oxford Development Company
-- Ciannie Rodriguez, Manager, IKEA Pittsburgh
-- Jack Scalo, President and CEO, Burns & Scalo Roofing
CEOs for Sustainability participants recognize that prosperous businesses are the
foundation of a successful, strong region, said Ron Gdovic, CEO of WindStax Energy. To that
end, the group is spearheading the CEOs Speaker Series and other efforts to increase the number
of businesses that practice, measure, and publicly report their sustainable business performance.
Jerry MacCleary, president of Covestro LLC, said, Research has shown that investors
are increasingly basing their decisions on sustainability-related data. To address this shifting
investment landscape, companies of all types and sizes are well-advised to develop sustainable
business strategies that create shareholder value.
CEOs for Sustainability is co-chaired by Gdovic and MacCleary.
The group provides a forum for CEOs of the regions leading companies to share best
practices in sustainable business and collaborate in growing the ranks of businesses around the
region that pursue sustainability.
IKEA Pittsburgh and Covestro are sponsors of the Speaker Series.
Individuals who would directly benefit from attending this event include:
-- Executives in Finance, Procurement, O&M, HR, Marketing, Strategy, Business Development
-- Sustainability and Corporate Social Responsibility Leaders
-- Institutional Investors, Asset Managers, Wealth Advisors
More about CEOs for Sustainability, along with tools, case studies and other resources
for sustainable business strategy and practices, can be found by visiting the CEOs For
Sustainability website.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the Sustainable
Pittsburgh website. Click Here to sign up for regular updates. Like them on Facebook, Follow
them on Twitter. Click Here to support their work.
To learn more about green innovation in the Pittsburgh Region, visit the Pittsburgh Green
Story website.
NewsClip:
Allegheny Included In Green College Guide
[Posted: Oct. 12, 2017]

PAs Harvey Mine Team Places Second In 2017 National Coal Mine Rescue Contest

The Harvey Grey Team from Consols Harvey


longwall coal mine in Sycamore, in Greene County
wins second place in the 2017 National Coal Mine
Rescue Contest hosted by the U.S. Mine Safety and
Health Administration.
Coal mine rescue teams compete in several
categories including preshift, safety equipment, first
aid and mine rescue techniques.
The Harvey Mine is one of three Consol
mines in Southwest Pennsylvania making up the
largest underground coal mining complex in North
America. The other mines are the Bailey and Enlow Fork.
Click Here for more details results from the competition.
Related Stories:
K-12 Student Video Contest By Society For Mining, Metallurgy & Exploration
Society For Mining, Metallurgy & Exploration Holds College-Level Student Poster Contest
[Posted: Oct. 9, 2017]

DCNR Kicks Off Driving Toward Sustainability Tour At New Buchanan State Forest HQ
In Fulton County

Department of Conservation and Natural Resources


Secretary Cindy Adams Dunn today joined State
Forester Dan Devlin and other officials in marking the
opening of the new Buchanan State Forest headquarters
in Fulton County.
The energy efficient building features exhibits that
transform the lobby space into an interactive experience
for state forest district visitors.
DCNR manages more than 4,700 buildings within its
complex and geographically diverse state park and forest systems, creating many opportunities to
deploy energy efficient systems and materials, Dunn noted at a dedication today. The green
features for the new headquarters for the Buchanan State Forest District are in line with the
departments pledge to use green and sustainable design techniques for all new and renovated
building, infrastructure and site projects.
The secretarys visit to the Buchanan headquarters kicked off a fall Driving Toward
Sustainability tour in which DCNR is highlighting the Wolf Administrations commitment to
high-performing, energy efficient buildings today; commitment to efficiency of fleet vehicles by
visiting charging stations for the departments newly added electric vehicles in Harrisburg
Thursday; and ending Friday with a visit to Caledonia State Park in Franklin County where a
solar array will power lights and hand dryers in a remote bathroom at the park.
At the dedication, Dunn said Pennsylvania also manages state forests using sustainable
practices to conserve them for the future, and the new exhibits at the Buchanan center will help
tell that story.
Its all highlighted in the exhibits -- the unique forest habitat in Buchanan; the impacts
of forest pests; forest products; recreation opportunities on public lands; and how DCNRs
Bureau of Forestry works to conserve the Commonwealths forests and native plants, Dunn
said.
The facility will be known as the Buchanan Forest District Resource Management
Center.
The 9,700-square-foot building serves as the districts office and support center for forestry
programming and operations. It houses the districts staff of foresters, entomologists, rangers,
administrative personnel, and management staff.
The sustainable features of the new building include enhanced daylighting and views;
automatic energy control systems for efficiency; landscaping with native plants; and sustainable
stormwater management features.
Like many recent DCNR structures, the new Resource Management Center has been
designed under the U.S. Green Building Councils Leadership in Energy and Environmental
Design (LEED) Green Building Rating System.
As one of DCNRs 19 LEED registered projects, it is anticipated the building will receive
LEED certification.
Buchanan State Forests more than 71,000 acres occupy upper slopes in the southern
portion of the ridge and valley region of Pennsylvania. The district is named in honor of James
Buchanan, the 15th President of the United States.
The address for the building is 25185 Great Cove Road, McConnellsburg, PA, 17233.
The phone number is 717-485-3148.
For more information on state parks and forests and recreation in Pennsylvania, visit
DCNRs website, Click Here to sign up for the Resource newsletter, Visit the Good Natured
DCNR Blog, Click Here for upcoming events, Click Here to hook up with DCNR on other
social media-- Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr.
(Photo: New Buchanan State Forest HQ building uses wood pellets for heat, native plantings
and rain gardens to help control stormwater runoff.)
NewsClips:
Survey Will Point Way For Future Of PAs Park System
DCNR Gets Input On State Park System
Related Stories:
New Solar Array At Caledonia State Park Saves Money, Reduces Carbon Footprint
DCNR Names Weiser State Forest HQ After Fmr Sen. Edward Helfrick In Columbia County
[Posted: Oct. 12, 2017]

New Solar Array At Caledonia State Park Saves Money, Reduces Carbon Footprint

Department of Conservation and Natural


Resources Secretary Cindy Adams Dunn Friday
joined state park and other DCNR officials in a
visit to a solar array recently installed at
Caledonia State Park in Franklin County.
A 1.74 kilowatt (kW) roof-mounted array
with battery storage will help provide power for a
restroom building at the park.
Using clean energy from the sun, DCNR
is deploying small scale solar arrays to take
certain buildings and facilities off the grid, saving money and reducing the departments carbon
footprint, Dunn said.
By the end of this year, DCNRs solar installations should:
-- Save more than $30,000/year on electric;
-- Reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 160 tons/year (the average car emits 6 tons per year); and
-- Reduce energy consumption by 220,000 kilowatt hours/year (the average American home uses
10,812 kWh per year)
The secretarys visit to Caledonia concluded a fall Driving Toward Sustainability tour
in which DCNR is highlighted the Wolf Administrations commitment not only solar energy, but
also to high-performing, energy efficient buildings at the new Buchanan State Forest
headquarters in Fulton County Wednesday; and commitment to efficiency of fleet vehicles with
a visit to charging stations for the departments newly added electric vehicles in Harrisburg
Thursday.
Other planned or installed solar arrays in state parks include:
-- Presque Isle State Park, Erie County A ground-mounted array for the Tom Ridge
Environmental Center was completed September 2016, which will result in a savings of
$1,200/year and a reduction of 8 tons of carbon dioxide/year
-- Fort Washington State Park, Montgomery County A ground-mounted array should reduce 20
tons of carbon dioxide/year and allow the park to operate at net zero energy consumption
-- Moraine State Park, Butler County -- A103 kW ground-mounted array will supply 50 percent
of the sewage treatment plants energy reducing 64 tons of carbon dioxide/year
-- Scenic View at Laurel Hill State Park, Somerset County A ground-mounted array aims to
reduce 68 tons of carbon dioxide/year
The 1,125-acre Caledonia State Park is in Adams and Franklin counties, offering many
opportunities for recreation including camping, hiking, fishing, as well as summer stock theater
at the historic Totem Pole Playhouse.
Click Here to find more information on sustainable practices on DCNR lands. Click
Here to watch a short video about DCNRs sustainable practices.
For more information on state parks and forests and recreation in Pennsylvania, visit
DCNRs website, Click Here to sign up for the Resource newsletter, Visit the Good Natured
DCNR Blog, Click Here for upcoming events, Click Here to hook up with DCNR on other
social media-- Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr.
NewsClips:
Survey Will Point Way For Future Of PAs Park System
DCNR Gets Input On State Park System
Solar Panels Shining On Washington High Stadium
PECO: No $45K Bill For Homeowner To Connect Solar
Related Stories:
DCNR Kicks Off Driving Toward Sustainability Tour At New Buchanan State Forest HQ In
Fulton County
DCNR Names Weiser State Forest HQ After Fmr Sen. Edward Helfrick In Columbia County
[Posted: Oct. 13, 2017]

DCNR Names Weiser State Forest HQ After Fmr Sen. Edward Helfrick In Columbia
County

Department of Conservation and Natural Resources


Secretary Cindy Adams Dunn Tuesday joined State
Forester Dan Devlin and other officials in marking the
opening of the new Weiser State Forest headquarters in
Columbia County.
The energy efficient building features exhibits that
transform the lobby space into an interactive experience for
state forest district visitors.
Visitors who enter here learn about the forest
history of Pennsylvania and the Weiser State Forest,
DCNR Secretary Cindy Adams Dunn noted. Its all here -- the unique forest habitat, forest
pests, forest products, recreation opportunities, and how the Bureau of Forestry works to
conserve the commonwealths forests and native plants.
The facility will be known as the Weiser Forest District Edward W. Helfrick Resource
Management Center in honor of former Sen. Edward W. Helfrick.
Sen. Helfrick was well-known as an outdoors enthusiast who promoted outdoor
recreation opportunities, Dunn said, speaking at a dedication outside the resource center. He
was instrumental in the transfer of land that established the Roaring Creek Tract of the Weiser
State Forest to provide recreational opportunities and to conserve the land for the citizens of the
commonwealth.
Sen. W. Helfrick served the 27th Senatorial District from 1981 through 2003.
Senator Helfrick was an avid outdoorsman who strongly believed that his generation
should make sure that there were ample opportunities for the next generation to enjoy the many
outdoor activities throughout the Commonwealth, said Sen. John Gordner (R-Columbia),
speaking at the event. Sen. Helfricks involvement in securing the expansion of the Weiser
Tract to the Brush Valley area was a perfect example of that belief.
The new building features sustainable and green elements, including enhanced
daylighting and views; automatic energy control systems; native landscaping species; and
sustainable stormwater management features.
Like many recent DCNR structures, the new Resource Management Center has been
designed under the U.S. Green Building Councils Leadership in Energy and Environmental
Design (LEED) Green Building Rating System.
As one of DCNRs 19 LEED registered projects, it is anticipated the building will receive
LEED certification by the end of the year.
Weiser State Forest is located in the ridge-and-valley region of eastern Pennsylvania.
Named for the frontier diplomat, Conrad Weiser, the forest covers almost 30,000 acres on 16
tracts throughout the region.
For more information on state parks and forests and recreation in Pennsylvania, visit
DCNRs website, Click Here to sign up for the Resource newsletter, Visit the Good Natured
DCNR Blog, Click Here for upcoming events, Click Here to hook up with DCNR on other
social media-- Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr.
(Photo: Senators Gordner and Helfrick with Secretary Dunn.)
NewsClips:
Survey Will Point Way For Future Of PAs Park System
DCNR Gets Input On State Park System
Related Stories:
DCNR Kicks Off Driving Toward Sustainability Tour At New Buchanan State Forest HQ In
Fulton County
New Solar Array At Caledonia State Park Saves Money, Reduces Carbon Footprint
[Posted: Oct. 10, 2017]

Latest Fall Foliage Report Now Available From DCNR, Many Areas At Peak

The Department of Conservation and Natural Resources


Thursday issued its fourth Fall Foliage Report showing
the next week will see fall foliage in many areas of the state at its peak.
The central part of the state is absolutely bursting with color, especially in Rothrock and
Bald Eagle state forests. Poplar, hickory, stiped maple, sassafras, and black birch are painting
Commonwealth forests with colorful cheer.
Northeastern and northwestern regions are also at or nearing peak, with vibrant displays
of northern hardwoods, oaks, and hickories.
Areas not currently at peak will be soon, so the time for getting out and appreciating this
wonderful yearly spectacle is now!
For more information on the status of foliage around the state, visit DCNRs Fall Foliage
Reports webpage.
NewsClips:
Schneck: Best Fall Foliage Vistas In Pennsylvania
Crable: Fall Foliage Driving Tour In Stony Valley Returns Sunday
Experts: Fall Foliage Coming To Lehigh Valley Just Delayed
Schneck: Forecasting Winter Through The Trees Of Fall
Scranton Forester: Newly Planted Trees Require Attention Before Winter
Restore The Common In Newtown Borough, Bucks County Oct. 21
Plant Trees With Tredyffrin Environmental Advisory Council Oct. 14
[Posted: Oct. 12, 2017]

Wild Excellence Films: WQED Pittsburgh To Show Cook Forest Film Oct. 14

Wild Excellence Films Monday announced their film--


Cathedral: The Fight to Save the Ancient Hemlocks of
Cook Forest-- will play on WQED Pittsburghs
Filmmakers Corner program on October 14 at 10 p.m.
The documentary tells the story of the hemlock trees
of Cook Forest State Park in Clarion County which are
under attack by the Hemlock Woolly Adelgid, a
destructive insect that has already killed thousands of
trees in the eastern United States.
Were pleased that WQED is going to show our film, said Melissa Rohm, filmmaker
on the project. The more people we can reach with this project, the better it will be for the trees
in Cook Forest. Many people, even local residents, arent aware of what is happening to the
hemlocks.
Cathedral includes interviews with park staff and is narrated by Old-Growth Forest
Network founder Joan Maloof. The film takes the viewer on a journey through the forest in all
seasons and shows the important work being done by the Department of Conservation and
Natural Resources Bureau of Forestry.
Click Here to view the film online.
The public can donate to the PA Parks and Forest Foundations fund for Hemlock Woolly
Adelgid treatment in Cook Forest State Park.
For more information on this and other films and projects, visit the Wild Excellence
Films website.
NewsClips:
Schneck: Best Fall Foliage Vistas In Pennsylvania
Crable: Fall Foliage Driving Tour In Stony Valley Returns Sunday
Experts: Fall Foliage Coming To Lehigh Valley Just Delayed
Schneck: Forecasting Winter Through The Trees Of Fall
Scranton Forester: Newly Planted Trees Require Attention Before Winter
Restore The Common In Newtown Borough, Bucks County Oct. 21
Plant Trees With Tredyffrin Environmental Advisory Council Oct. 14
[Posted: Oct. 10, 2017]

PA Horticultural Society Selected As Partner For TD Trees Days To Plant Trees In


Philadelphia Oct. 20

TD Bank has selected the PA Horticultural Society to


participate in TD Tree Days, a community-based
program that expands urban forests and green spaces
in low- to moderate-income neighborhoods.
Staff and volunteers of PHS will join local employees
of TD Bank to plant 19 trees, along with shrubs and
ornamental grasses, at the Orinoka Civic House at
2771-2777 Ruth Street in Philadelphia on October 20
at 9 a.m.
Orinoka Civic House is a mixed-use development on the site of the former Orinoka Mills
factory in the Kensington neighborhood that will offer 51 units of sustainable, affordable housing
and an indoor community area, as well as a small commercial space and room for the main
offices of the New Kensington Community Development Corporation, which is leading the
project.
"We're proud to partner with PHS during TD Tree Days to nurture the Kensington
community and the environment from the ground up," said Joseph Doolan, TD Bank's Head of
Environmental Affairs. "Trees do much more than beautify our communities they produce
oxygen; improve air quality and slow climate change by reducing carbon emissions, airborne
pollutants and smog; provide cooling shade to reduce energy costs; and enhance the quality of
life."
PHS is grateful for the opportunity to partner with TD Tree Days in the Kensington
neighborhood, said PHS President Matt Rader. These tree plantings engage and empower
residents to transform their communities through green projects.
PHS is one of 18 organizations in the United States that was chosen to participate in TD
Tree Days through an application process. TD Bank provides grants for the community tree
plantings.
Now in its seventh year, TD Tree Days will bring together more than 1,000 community
members and TD employees from September through early November to plant approximately
850 trees in 21 communities across the United States.
TD Tree Days will be managed with support from The Arbor Day Foundation. Founded
in 2010, the program has made a significant positive impact for communities and the
environment as TD's flagship volunteer and urban greening program, planting more than 285,000
trees and shrubs, primarily in Canada and the U.S.
In addition to Philadelphia, TD Tree Days events are scheduled in these communities this
fall: Delray Beach, Miami and Tampa, Florida; Mattapan, Massachusetts; Auburn, Maine;
Detroit, Michigan; Asheville and Wilmington, North Carolina; Camden, Jersey City, Newark
and Westampton, New Jersey; the Bronx and Brooklyn, New York; Chester, Pennsylvania;
Warwick, Rhode Island; Columbia and Greenville, South Carolina; and Alexandria, Virginia.
Follow TD Tree Days on Twitter #TDTreeDays and on Facebook.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the PA
Horticultural Society website, Like PHS on Facebook, Join PHS on Instagram and Follow on
Twitter. Click Here to sign up for regular updates from PHS. Click Here to become a member.
NewsClips:
Schneck: Best Fall Foliage Vistas In Pennsylvania
Crable: Fall Foliage Driving Tour In Stony Valley Returns Sunday
Experts: Fall Foliage Coming To Lehigh Valley Just Delayed
Schneck: Forecasting Winter Through The Trees Of Fall
Scranton Forester: Newly Planted Trees Require Attention Before Winter
Restore The Common In Newtown Borough, Bucks County Oct. 21
Plant Trees With Tredyffrin Environmental Advisory Council Oct. 14
[Posted: Oct. 10, 2017]

Allegheny Land Trust: First PA Master Naturalist Program Coming To Southwest PA

The Allegheny Land Trust Wednesday announced the


Pennsylvania Master Naturalist Program is coming to
Southwest Pennsylvania for the first time.
Founded in 2010, Pennsylvania Master Naturalist
is a statewide partnership initiative that aims to connect
people with their local ecosystems through intensive
natural science training and local conservation service
work.
It is a venture directed toward developing a local
corps of master volunteers and service providers to offer
education, outreach and service dedicated to the understanding and management of natural areas
within their communities.
A Pennsylvania Master Naturalist is an individual with a passion for the natural world
who participates in an intensive training program and uses his or her knowledge by giving back
to the community through volunteer service.
This year-round program has three components to the 55-hour training: an initial
volunteer training course, volunteer service hours, and advanced training classes.
Funding for the program is provided by the Foundation for Pennsylvania Watersheds,
Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, Department of Environmental Protection,
National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, National Science Foundation and Rocky Mountain Elk
Foundation.
Click Here to read about the Program and qualifications. Click Here to apply.
For more information, visit the Pennsylvania Master Naturalist Program webpage.
Questions should be directed to Ellyn Nolt by calling 717-368-4899 or send email to:
enolt@pamasternaturalist.org.
More information about programs, initiatives and upcoming events is available at the
Allegheny Land Trust website. Click Here for ALTs most recent newsletter.
[Posted: Oct. 11, 2017]

Creative Makers Of The PA Wilds Traveling Art Show Opens Nov. 3 at Winkler Gallery
In DuBois

The public is invited to attend an opening reception for


the Creative Makers of the Pennsylvania Wilds A
Traveling Art Show, from 6 to 9 p.m. on November 3
at the Winkler Gallery of Fine Art, 36 N. Brady St.,
DuBois, Clearfield County.
This unique exhibit features profiles and photographs
of 22 members of the Wilds Cooperative of
Pennsylvania, a juried arts business development
program that includes artisans and producers from
across the 12.5-county region known as the Pennsylvania Wilds.
The artisans and producers are shown working in their own creative spaces through the
lens of Katie Weidenboerners camera. A Wilds Cooperative member and photojournalist,
Weidenboerner spent months traveling across the region tallying over 2,060 miles to capture
images that tell the story of these creative makers.
Participating makers include: A Touch of Nature, Alabaster Coffee, Alpaca Creations,
Amanda Lewis, Brenda Nicklas, Carol Cillo, Chris DeStefano, CF Lawrenson, Ellen Paquette,
Highland Chocolates, Hughes Pottery, Jack Northrop, Kim Gates Flick, Laughing Owl Press,
Lynn Kibbe, Paul Stanizsweski, Perry Winkler, Rich Horner, Shandra Wilson, Stephanie Distler
Artisan Jewelry, Steve Getz and The Muddy Moose Bath Boutique.
The Creative Makers of the Pennsylvania Wilds A Traveling Art Show is a recent
undertaking by the PA Wilds Center for Entrepreneurship, Inc., a nonprofit continuing work that
started at the state level over a decade ago when the Pennsylvania Wilds Initiative was born.
This groundbreaking effort brought together 13 counties seeking to brand a quarter of the
Commonwealth as the Pennsylvania Wilds and market it as a destination.
The goal was to boost local economies while simultaneously inspiring stewardship of
communities and natural assets.
Engaging regional artists and craftspeople was key to building a meaningful regional
brand, and the Wilds Cooperative of Pennsylvania is the product of the initiative. Today, nearly
200 local artists and craftspeople participate in the program.
One thing that has become clear over the years is that the Pennsylvania Wilds has many
talented artists, craftspeople and entrepreneurs. Weve found that our regions rural landscape
can make it difficult for people to find these hidden gems, said Abbi Peters, Managing Director
at the PA Wilds Center. In fact, many of our artisans and producers practice their craft in a
room at their house on a backcountry road, out of sight. We want to bring their talent to the fore
by showcasing our members and their stories in this traveling art show.
This exhibition was supported in part by the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state
agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the National Endowment for the Arts,
a federal agency.
The opening reception is free to attend. To register, visit the Creative Makers Exhibit
webpage.
The exhibit will be on display at the Winkler Gallery of Fine Art through November 30,
2017. Future exhibition dates and locations will be announced at the Creative Makers webpage.
For more information on the Pennsylvania Wilds region, visit the Pennsylvania Wilds
website.
[Posted: Oct. 12, 2017]

Game Commission: Lead Poisoning In PA Bald Eagles On The Rise

An increasing number of bald eagles


have been admitted to
wildlife-rehabilitation centers across
Pennsylvania exhibiting signs of illness
such as weakness, lethargy, emaciation,
labored respiration and drooping wings.
Blood tests often reveal that the
eagles are suffering from lead toxicity.
Lead poisoning occurs when toxic
levels of lead are absorbed into the body.
Raptors are particularly susceptible to lead poisoning because when they ingest lead
particles, the acidic nature of their stomach causes rapid absorption of the metal, said Game
Commission Wildlife Veterinarian Justin Brown.
Lead poisoning is a debilitating disease in bald eagles, said Brown. You have this
powerful bird and you find it in the field limp and weak. You can pick it up and it doesnt even
know you are there.
After a blood test reveals that a bald eagle has lead toxicity, intensive treatments can
begin. Drugs treatments can take the metal out of the bodys tissue and blood. And if metal is
detected in an eagles digestive system, it can be flushed out and removed. But treatment often is
unsuccessful because the eagles have already absorbed too much lead.
In the past year, Red Creek Wildlife Center [in Schuylkill Haven, Schuylkill County] has
treated 12 bald eagles with lead toxicity and only one of those eagles survived, said center
director Peggy Hentz. (Click Here for more on how the Center treats lead poisoning.)
As there are more eagles in the wild, we are getting more eagles in the
wildlife-rehabilitation centers and the problem has become evident, Hentz said.
Since 2006, the Game Commission has been conducting necropsies on bald eagles that
die to monitor causes of death and potential diseases.
The data from 2006 to 2016 reveals that approximately one-third of the states known
bald-eagle mortalities are associated with a toxin, with lead being the most common. In fact, lead
toxicity is a significant cause of death in all raptors, not just eagles.
Lead is a heavy, relatively inexpensive, malleable metal, which often is used in fishing
lures, ammunition and other materials. Research has shown that fragments of lead can be found
as far as 18 inches from a bullets point of impact.
In addition, 30 to 40 percent of the lead can remain in the target after the bullet has
passed through. Small-game carcasses and big-game entrails that remain in the field could
contain lead that might be ingested by opportunistic scavenging eagles and other wildlife.
The main source of ingested lead has not been clearly identified. However, hunters can
help to reduce the potential that bald eagles ingest lead fragments from the remains of harvested
game animals by burying the carcasses and gutpiles, or by covering them with branches.
Doing so will make it less likely that aerial scavengers will find and consume the
remains, which might contain lead particles. Hunters also could consider eliminating lead from
their harvests by using non-lead ammunition.
Although lead toxicity has been identified as a leading cause of mortality among the
states eagles, the eagle population continues to thrive and increase in number.
In the early 1980s, there were only three active bald eagle nests in Pennsylvania. Today,
thanks to the restoration efforts of the Game Commission and partners, there are more than 250
active bald eagle nests in the state.
Bald eagles met the requirements for removal from the state threatened species list in
2014 and are now classified as a protected species.
For more information, visit the Game Commissions PA Bald Eagle webpage.
(Photo: Bald Eagle with lead poisoning found in Berks County and treated by the Red Creek
Wildlife Center.)
NewsClips:
Scientists Urge Caution Around Potentially Poisonous Caterpillar
AP: Dirty Old Birds Shed Light On Key Global Warming Particle
Brunch With Owls, Celebrate 3 New Species At National Aviary In Pittsburgh
Editorial: Bird Research Essential At Presque Isle
Controlled Burns To Begin At Fort Indiantown Gap
Viral Disease Infects More Than 1,000 Deer In Beaver County
Pennsylvanias Golden Harvest: Deer Urine
Frye: Looking At The Future Of Hatcheries, Trout Stockings
New York City On Board With New Delaware Water Release Plan To Meet Oct. 10 Deadline
[Posted: Oct. 13, 2017]

Jim Lanning, Spring Creek Trout Unlimited Centre County, Wins National Honors

The Spring Creek Chapter of Trout Unlimited in Centre County


Friday announced Jim Lanning, Chair of their Veterans Service
Program, was awarded the National Trout Unlimited 2017
Distinguished Service Award Veterans Service Program at the
Trout Unlimited Annual Meeting held in Roanoke, VA in
September.
Jim started with a small group of members, mostly veterans
themselves, and designed the Chapter's program around his
belief that supporting a veteran extends to all members of the
veteran's family.
Never one to go small, Jim also envisioned an extremely active
program that extended beyond fishing - into conservation, mentoring and community service. He
succeeded on all counts.
The result is a large, highly organized volunteer network supporting a program that
reaches more than 500 veterans and their family members annually with more than 20 fishing
and fly tying events each year.
In addition, the VSP participates in multiple community events such as Veterans and
Memorial Day services and parades, conservation projects and youth outreach.
As chair of the program, Jim Lanning actively develops, organizes, and implements many
aspects of the VSP, including:
-- Individual fishing and fly tying lessons by trained guides and mentors;
-- Assisting with active and inactive member reintegration into civilian life and assisting with
personal and family issues;
-- Providing special events for members, and volunteers, such as guided fishing on private
streams in the area;
-- Arranging training to volunteer mentors including, but not limited to, mental health assistance,
CPR, and first aid;
-- Developing conservation classes and workgroups with the VSP group taking on stewardship
activities for the chapter;
-- Fundraising to supplement chapter funding with support from local veteran organizations and
fundraiser;.
-- Acquiring donations of equipment and supplies from local businesses and individuals;
-- Arranging transportation for elderly veterans who wish to attend events;
-- Assisting with employment opportunities and other community activities;
-- Managing over 1,500 volunteer hours expended each year; and
-- Building strong community outreach with groups such as the YMCA, Penn State and Veteran
organizations.
Jim has gone beyond the chapter level to both the state and national levels in assisting
other chapters to develop their own Veteran Service Programs.
He serves on the National VSP Advisory Board of Directors and has made key
presentations to this board regarding the structure and administration of the program. He serves
as a Regional Vice President on the PA Trout Unlimited Council and as the state Chairman of
the Veteran Service Program.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the Spring
Creek Chapter of Trout Unlimited website.
(Photo: Jim Lanning (Middle) with John Wood (left) and Bob Vierck (right))
NewsClip:
Frye: Looking At The Future Of Hatcheries, Trout Stockings
[Posted: Oct. 13, 2017]

Public Participation Opportunities/Calendar Of Events

This section lists House and Senate Committee meetings, DEP and other public hearings and
meetings and other interesting environmental events.
NEW means new from last week. [Agenda Not Posted] means not posted within 2 weeks
of the advisory committee meeting. Go to the online Calendar webpage for updates.

Note: DEP published its 2017 schedule of advisory committee and board meeting in the
December 17 PA Bulletin, page 7896.

Note: This is still budget season. House and Senate committees can add and cancel meetings
with little notice.

October 16-- NEW. Senate Appropriations Committee meets to consider House Bill 790
(Pashinski-D-Luzerne) repeal the Noxious Weed Control Law and replace with the Controlled
Plant and Noxious Weed Act. Rules Room. Off The Floor.

October 16-- CANCELED. House Finance Committee meets to consider House Bill 1401
(DiGirolamo- R-Bucks) imposing a 3.2 percent natural gas severance tax in addition to the Act
13 drilling impact fee (sponsor summary). Room 140 Main Capitol. 11:00. Typically, House
committee meetings are webcast through the House Republican Caucus website.

October 16-- NEW. House Commerce Committee meets to consider House Bill 1237
(Keefer-R- York) which amends the Regulatory Review Act requiring the General Assembly to
specifically approve economically significant final regulations approved by the Independent
Regulatory Review Commission. If the General Assembly fails to adopt a resolution approving
a regulation, it dies. Click Here for more. Room B-31 Main Capitol. Off the Floor. Typically,
House committee meetings are webcast through the House Republican Caucus website, if the
viewer knows what time the meeting is called.

October 16-- NEW. House Transportation Committee meets to consider House Bill 86
(Lawrence-R-Chester) eliminate vehicle emissions testing for vehicle model years 1992-1995
(sponsor summary). Room 205 Ryan Building. Noon. Typically, House committee meetings are
webcast through the House Republican Caucus website.

October 16-- Environmental Issues Forum, Joint Conservation Committee featuring a


presentation on DCNRs Penns Parks For All Survey. Room 8E-A East Wing. Noon. Click
Here for more.

October 17-- Time Change. Senate Environmental Resources and Energy Committee meets to
consider Senate Bill 799 (Alloway-R-Franklin) provides for nitrogen reduction measures in the
Chesapeake Bay Watershed, Click Here for more; Senate Resolution 168 (Langerholc-R-
Cambria) directing the Joint State Government Commission to establish an advisory committee
to review the vehicle emissions inspection program in Cambria County. Room 8E-B East Wing.
10:00. Committee meetings are frequently webcast through the Senate Republican Caucus
website.

October 17-- NEW. Senate Community, Economic and Recreational Development Committee
meets to consider Senate Bill 234 (Blake-D-Lackawanna) would authorize local governments to
create energy improvement districts to help fund energy efficiency, renewable energy and water
conservation projects by commercial and industrial buildings to reduce their operating costs
(sponsor summary). Rules Room. Off the Floor. Click Here for more.
October 17-- CANCELED. Senate Aging & Youth and Health & Human Services Committees
hold a joint hearing on an update on the Lyme Disease Task Force Report. Hearing Room 1
North Office Building. 10:00.

October 17-- Agenda Posted. Environmental Quality Board meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 9:00. DEP Contact: Laura Edinger, Environmental Quality Board, 400 Market Street,
Harrisburg, PA 17101, 717-772-3277, ledinger@pa.gov.
-- Proposed Noncoal Mining Program Fee Increases
-- Proposed Comprehensive Storage Tank Regulations

October 17-- Agenda Posted. DEP Citizens Advisory Council meeting. Room 105 Rachel
Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Lee Ann Murray, Executive Director of the Citizens
Advisory Council, 717-787-8171, LeeMurray@pa.gov.
-- Presentation On The Impact Of Conowingo Dam On Water Quality Now That Reservoir Is
Full
-- DEPs October Report To Council

October 17-- DEP State Board For Certification Of Water and Wastewater Systems Operators
meeting. 10th Floor Conference Room, Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Cheri
Sansoni, csansoni@pa.gov, 717-772-5158.

October 17-- 7th Annual Lehigh Valley Watershed Conference. Lehigh University, Bethlehem.

October 17-18-- Coalition For The Delaware River Watershed. 5th Annual Delaware River
Watershed Forum. Skytop Lodge in Skytop, Monroe County.

October 18-- Time Change. House and Senate Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committees joint
hearing on the impact on agriculture of the Spotted Lanternfly. Hearing Room 1 North Office
Building. 9:00. (Click Here to see if the hearing will be webcast closer to the hearing date.)

October 18-- Joint Legislative Budget and Finance Committee meets to release a report on
review of PA One Call utility safety systems. Room 8E-B East Wing. 10:15.

October 19-- Agenda Posted. DEP Radiation Protection Advisory Committee meeting. 14th
Floor Conference Room, Rachel Carson Building. 9:00. DEP Contact: Joseph Melnic,
jmelnic@pa.gov, 717-783-9730.

October 19-- Manada Conservancy. Building Community-Based Solutions To Climate


Resiliency. Derry Presbyterian Church, 248 E. Derry Road, Hershey, Dauphin County. 7:00
p.m.

October 20-- NEW. PA Horticultural Society. TD Trees Day Tree Planting. Orinoka Civic
House at 2771-2777 Ruth Street in Philadelphia.

October 21-- Natural Lands. 4th Annual ChesLen Chase Race For Open Space. ChesLen
Preserve in Coatesville, Chester County.

October 21-- PA CleanWays of Cumberland County Tire Collection Event. Pre-Registration is


Required. Cumberland County Service Center, 310 Allen Road, Carlisle. 9:00 a.m. to 1 p.m.

October 21-- Brodhead Creek Watershed Association. Water Wiser Kids Frogsicles and Fall
Leaves Program. Ice Lake in Barrett Township in Cresco, Monroe County. 10:30.

October 22-- Brodhead Creek Watershed Association. Get Outdoors Poconos Hike - The Big
Woods Natural Area. Monroe County. Registration Required. 10:00.

October 23-- House Consumer Affairs Committee holds a hearing on House Bill 1782
(Delozier-R-Cumberland) providing for alternative ratemaking for natural gas and electric
distribution companies (sponsor summary). Room B-31 Main Capitol. 11:00.

October 24-- Senate Aging and Youth and Health and Human Services Committees hold a joint
hearing on Lyme Disease Task Force Report. Room 156. 9:30.

October 24-- Agenda Posted. DEP Climate Change Advisory Committee meeting. Room 105
Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Mark Brojakowski, 717-772-3429 or send email
to: mbrojakows@pa.gov. (formal notice)
-- Volkswagen Air Settlement Overview
-- 2018 PA Climate Change Action Plan Update Discussion

October 25-- Agenda Posted. DEP Small Business Compliance Advisory Committee meeting.
12th Floor Conference Room, Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Nancy Herb,
nherb@pa.gov, 717-783-9269.

October 25-- NEW. CEOs For Sustainability First Speakers Series Event. Energy Innovation
Center, 1435 Bedford Avenue, Pittsburgh. 7:30 to 9:30 a.m.

October 25-- NEW. Alliance For The Chesapeake Bay. Stormwater Program Communication
Workshop. Londonderry Township Building, 783 S. Geyers Church Road in Middletown,
Dauphin County. 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

October 26-- DEP Agricultural Advisory Board meeting. DEP Southcentral Regional Office,
909 Elmerton Ave., Harrisburg. 9:00. DEP Contact: Jay Braund, jbraund@pa.gov,
717-772-5636. (formal notice)

October 26-- DEP Small Water Systems Technical Assistance Center Board meeting. Room
105 Rachel Carson Building. 9:00. DEP Contact: Dawn Hissner, 717-772-2189 or
dhissner@pa.gov. (formal notice)

October 26-- Northeast PA Environmental Partners Awards Dinner. Woodlands Inn and Resort
in Wilkes-Barre.
October 26-- PA Chamber of Business & Industry Valley Forge Fall Environmental Conference.
Crowne Plaza Valley Forge, King of Prussia.

October 26-- DCNR Public Meeting On Bloody Skillet & Whiskey Springs ATV Trails In
Centre, Clinton Counties. Durrwachter Alumni Conference Center, Lock Haven University,
Lock Haven. 6:00 to 8:00 p.m.

October 27-- Penn State Chesapeake Stormwater Summit - Overcoming Barriers To Green
Infrastructure Solutions. Penn State - Harrisburg Campus. 9:00 to 4:00.

October 28-- PA Resources Council/PA American Water. Drug Take Back Event. Green Tree
Borough Building, 10 W. Manilla Ave., Green Tree, Allegheny County. 10:00 to 2:00.

October 28-- PA Resources Council/PA American Water.. Drug Take Back Event. Medical
Rescue Team South, 315 Cypress Way, Mt. Lebanon, Allegheny County. 10:00 to 2:00.

October 28-- PA Resources Council/PA American Water. Drug Take Back Event. The Mall at
Robinson, Sears parking lot, 100 Robinson Centre Dr., Robinson, Allegheny County. 10:00 to
2:00.

October 28-- NEW. PA Environmental Council. Potter County Cleanup Event. Hector
Township along Loucks Mill Rd., Potter County. 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

October 28-- NEW. PA Environmental Council. Potter County Cleanup Event. Bingham
Township along Rowley Rd., Potter County. 12:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.

November 1-- Oil and Gas Technical Advisory Board meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Todd Wallace 717-783-9438 or send email to: twallace@pa.gov.
(formal notice)

November 1-- DCNR, PA Recreation & Park Society Grant Application Workshop. Camp Hill,
Cumberland County, Giant Food Store Community Room. 9:00 a.m. to Noon.

November 2-- NEW. DEP Hearing On Hill Top Energy Center Natural Gas-Fired Power Plant
Air Quality Plan Approval. Carmichaels Area Senior High School Auditorium at 215 N Vine
Street, Carmichaels. Q/A -6:00, Hearing- 7:00.

November 2-- NEW. Susquehanna River Basin Commission holds a hearing on water
withdrawal projects. Room 8E-B East Wing of the Capitol Building in Harrisburg. Questions
should be directed to Jason Oyler, General Counsel, 717-238-0423, Ext. 1312, fax
717-238-2436. 2:30 to 5:00. Click Here for more. (formal notice with project list)

November 2-- Capital Chapter Society For Women Environmental Professionals. Annual
Regulatory Update. DEP Southcentral Regional Office, 909 Elmerton Avenue, Harrisburg. 8:00
to 3:30.

November 3-- Schuylkill Action Network Annual Meeting. Reading Area Community College.
9:30 to 3:00.

November 3-- NEW. Creative Makers Of The Pennsylvania Wilds - A Traveling Art Show.
Winkler Gallery of Fine Art, 36 N. Brady St., DuBois, Clearfield County. 6:00 to 9:00 p.m.

November 6-- DCNR Public Meeting On Bloody Skillet & Whiskey Springs ATV Trails In
Centre, Clinton Counties. Durrwachter Alumni Conference Center, Lock Haven University,
Lock Haven. 6:00 to 8:00 p.m.

November 6-- NEW. Green Roofs For Healthy Cities/University of Pittsburgh. Green Roof &
Wall Symposium In Pittsburgh. University of Pittsburgh, 4200 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh. 8:30
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

November 8-- CANCELED. DEP Climate Change Advisory Committee meeting. Rescheduled
for December 4. DEP Contact: Mark Brojakowski, 717-772-3429 or send email to:
mbrojakows@pa.gov. (formal notice)

November 8-- DEP Hearing On GE Transportation-Erie RACT II Air Quality Plan (if
requested). DEP Northwest Regional Office, 230 Chestnut Street, Meadville. 10:00.

November 8-- DCNR, PA Recreation & Park Society Grant Application Workshop. Nanticoke,
Luzerne County, Luzerne County Community College Educational Conference Center. 9:00 a.m.
to Noon.

November 8-- Academy of Natural Sciences Of Drexel University Delaware Watershed


Research Conference. Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia.

November 9-- Sponsorships Available. PA Resources Council Annual Awards Celebration.


Villanova University Hotel and Conference Center, Philadelphia.

November 9-- Energy Coordinating Agency Fall Energy Conference. Temple University
Student Faculty Center, 3340 N. Broad Street, Philadelphia. 8:45 to 4:15.

November 10-11-- Bucknell University 12th Annual Susquehanna River Symposium. Bucknell
University Campus, Lewisburg, Union County.

November 11-- Westmoreland Cleanways & Recycling. Household Hazardous Waste


Collection Event. Westmoreland Cleanways Recycling Center, 113 Innovative Lane in Latrobe.
9:00 to 1:00.

November 13-- Environmental Issues Forum, Joint Conservation Committee featuring a


presentation on pumped storage hydroelectric facilities. Room 8E-A East Wing. Noon. Click
Here for more.

November 13-14-- Northeast Recycling Council 30th Anniversary Fall Conference. Amherst,
Massachusetts.

November 14-- Environmental Quality Board meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building.
9:00. DEP Contact: Laura Edinger, Environmental Quality Board, 400 Market Street, Harrisburg,
PA 17101, 717-772-3277, ledinger@pa.gov.

November 14-- DEP Citizens Advisory Council meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building.
10:00. DEP Contact: Lee Ann Murray, Citizens Advisory Council, P. O. Box 8459, Harrisburg,
PA 17105-8459, 717-787-8171, LeeMurray@pa.gov.

November 14-- DEP Environmental Justice Advisory Board meeting. 16th Floor Conference
Room, Rachel Carson Building. 8:30. DEP Contact: Carl Jones, caejone@pa.gov or
484-250-5818 or Glenda Davidson 717-783-4759 or gldavidson@pa.gov.

November 14-- DCNR, PA Recreation & Park Society Grant Application Workshop. Clarion,
Clarion County, Trinity Point Church of God. 9:00 a.m. to Noon.

November 15-- DCNR, PA Recreation & Park Society Grant Application Workshop. Allison
Park, Allegheny County, Hampton Township Community Center. 9:00 a.m. to Noon.

November 16-- CANCELED. Oil and Gas Technical Advisory Board meeting. Room 105
Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Todd Wallace 717-783-9438 or send email to:
twallace@pa.gov. (formal notice)

November 16-- DEP Small Water Systems Technical Assistance Center Board meeting. Room
105 Rachel Carson Building. 9:00. DEP Contact: Dawn Hissner, 717-772-2189 or
dhissner@pa.gov. (formal notice)

November 16-- PA Grade Crude Development Advisory Council meeting. Location TBD.
1:00.

November 16-- DCNR, PA Recreation & Park Society Grant Application Workshop. Blue Bell,
Montgomery County, Montgomery County Community College, Central Campus. 9:00 a.m. to
Noon.

November 16-- PennTAP: How To Move Your Company Toward Sustainability Webinar.
Noon to 1:00 p.m.

November 16-- Penn State Extension. Abandoned Oil & Gas Wells, Whats A Reasonable
Estimate? Webinar. 1:00 to 2:00.

November 16-- 9th Annual Sustainability Conference: Engineering A Sustainable Economy.


August Wilson Center, 980 Liberty Avenue in Pittsburgh. 8:00 a.m. to 3:00.

November 18-- CANCELED. Westmoreland Cleanways & Recycling. Household Hazardous


Waste Collection Event. Westmoreland Cleanways Recycling Center, 113 Innovative Lane in
Latrobe. 9:00 to 1:00.

November 21-- DCNR, PA Recreation & Park Society Grant Application Workshop. State
College, Centre County, Penn Stater Hotel and Conference Center, Deans Hall 1. 9:00 a.m. to
Noon.

December 4-- DEP Climate Change Advisory Committee meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Mark Brojakowski, 717-772-3429 or send email to:
mbrojakows@pa.gov. (formal notice)

December 5-- DEP Storage Tank Advisory Committee meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Dawn Heimbach, 717-772-5599 or send email to:
dheimbach@pa.gov. (formal notice)

December 5-- DEP Board Of Coal Mine Safety meeting. DEP Cambria Office 286 Industrial
Park Road, Ebensburg. 10:00. DEP Contact: Allison Gaida, agaida@pa.gov, 724-404-3147.

December 5-7-- National Brownfields Conference - Sustainable Communities Start Here.


LEED-certified David L. Lawrence Convention Center, Pittsburgh.

December 7--10,000 Friends Of Pennsylvania Commonwealth Awards Program. The Bond,


134 E. King Street, York.

December 7-- NEW. Westminster College Student Symposium On The Environment.


Witherspoon Rooms and Mueller Theater on the Westminster campus, Lawrence County.

December 12-- Environmental Quality Board meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building. 9:00.
DEP Contact: Laura Edinger, Environmental Quality Board, 400 Market Street, Harrisburg, PA
17101, 717-772-3277, ledinger@pa.gov.

December 13-- DEP Cleanup Standards Scientific Advisory Board. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 9:00. DEP Contact: Michael Maddigan, mmaddigan@pa.gov, 717-772-3609.

December 13-- DCNR, PA Recreation & Park Society Grant Application Webinar. 10:00 to
11:30.

December 14-- DEP Air Quality Technical Advisory Committee meeting. Room 105 Rachel
Carson Building. 9:15. DEP Contact: Kirit Dalal, kdalal@pa.gov or 717-772-3436.

December 14- DEP State Board For Certification Of Water and Wastewater Systems Operators
meeting. 10th Floor Conference Room, Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Cheri
Sansoni, csansoni@pa.gov, 717-772-5158.

January 11-- DCNR, PA Recreation & Park Society Grant Application Webinar. 10:00 to 11:30.

February 7-10-- PA Association For Sustainable Agriculture Annual Conference. State


College.

February 23-24-- Keystone Coldwater Conference. State College. (Note: PA Environment


Digest is a Conference sponsor.)

March 12-13-- NEW. PA Association of Environmental Educators. 2018 Annual Conference.


State College, Centre County.

April 17-19-- National Forum On Low-Zero Energy Buildings. Wyndam Grand Hotel,
Pittsburgh.

May 2-4-- PA Association Of Environmental Professional. Annual Conference. State College.

Visit DEPs Public Participation Center for public participation opportunities. Click Here to sign
up for DEP News a biweekly newsletter from the Department.

Sign Up For DEPs eNotice: Did you know DEP can send you email notices of permit
applications submitted in your community? Notice of new technical guidance documents and
regulations? All through its eNotice system. Click Here to sign up.

Check the PA Environmental Council Bill Tracker for the status and updates on pending state
legislation and regulations that affect environmental and conservation efforts in Pennsylvania.

DEP Regulations In Process


Proposed Regulations Open For Comment - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through DEPs eComment System
Proposed Regulations With Closed Comment Periods - DEP webpage
Recently Finalized Regulations - DEP webpage
DEP Regulatory Update - DEP webpage
August 2017 DEP Regulatory Agenda - PA Bulletin, Page 4922

DEP Technical Guidance In Process


Draft Technical Guidance Documents - DEP webpage
Technical Guidance Comment Deadlines - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through DEPs eComment System
Recently Closed Comment Periods For Technical Guidance - DEP webpage
Technical Guidance Recently Finalized - DEP webpage
Copies of Final Technical Guidance - DEP webpage
DEP Non-Regulatory/Technical Guidance Documents Agenda (July 2017) - DEP webpage
Other DEP Proposals For Public Review
Other Proposals Open For Public Comment - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through DEPs eComment System
Recently Closed Comment Periods For Other Proposals - DEP webpage
Other Proposals Recently Finalized - DEP webpage

DEP Facebook Page DEP Twitter Feed DEP YouTube Channel

Click Here for links to DEPs Advisory Committee webpages.

DEP Calendar of Events DCNR Calendar of Events

Note: The Environmental Education Workshop Calendar is no longer available from the PA
Center for Environmental Education because funding for the Center was eliminated in the FY
2011-12 state budget. The PCEE website was also shutdown, but some content was moved to
the PA Association of Environmental Educators' website.

Senate Committee Schedule House Committee Schedule

You can watch the Senate Floor Session and House Floor Session live online.

Add Green Works In PA To Your Google+ Circle

Grants & Awards

This section gives you a heads up on upcoming deadlines for awards and grants and other
recognition programs. NEW means new from last week.

October 16-- DEP Coastal Zone Project Grants


October 23-- SBA Flood Assistance Clearfield, Washington, 8 Other Counties
October 25-- PPL Community Roots Tree Funding Program
October 31-- CBF Pay For Success Green Infrastructure Funding
October 31-- PA Resources Council Lens On Litter Photo Contest
October 31-- NEW. Society For Mining, Metallurgy College Student Poster Contest
November 1-- Delaware River Basin Commission Photo Contest
November 1-- NEW. Society For Mining, Metallurgy K-12 Student Video Contest
November 6-- POWR, DCNR 2018 PA River Of The Year
November 9-- PennDOT Green Light-Go LED Traffic Light Grants
November 17-- DEP Alternative Fuels Public Refueling Facilities Grant
November 17-- DCNR 2018 Pennsylvania Trail Of The Year
November 17-- Recyclebank Green Schools Project Grants (in their service territory)
November 26-- Hawk Mountain Sanctuary Digital Photo Contest
December 1-- DEP Small Business Advantage Grant Program (First-Come, First-Served)
December 1-- NEW. PA Assn. Of Environmental Educators Excellence Awards
December 15-- DEP Alternative Fuels Incentive Grants
December 15-- Coldwater Heritage Partnership Watershed Grants
December 20-- DCNR Forested Stream Buffer Grants
December 20-- DCNR Snowmobile, ATV Trail Grants
December 31-- DEP Alternative Fuel Vehicle Rebates (First-Come, First-Served)
February 1-- U.S. Healthy Watersheds Consortium Grant Program
April 1-- NEW. DEP Farm Conservation Plan Grant Chesapeake Bay Watershed
May 23-- SBA Flood Assistance Clearfield, Washington, 8 Other Counties

-- Visit the DEP Grant, Loan and Rebate Programs webpage for more ideas on how to get
financial assistance for environmental projects.

-- Visit the DCNR Apply for Grants webpage for a listing of financial assistance available from
DCNR.

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Environmental NewsClips - All Topics

Here are NewsClips from around the state on all environmental topics, including General
Environment, Budget, Marcellus Shale, Watershed Protection and much more.

The latest environmental NewsClips and news is available at the PA Environment Digest Daily
Blog, Twitter Feed and add us to your Google+ Circle.

Air
Erie Coal Coke Hearing Wednesday In Meadville
Alternative Fuels
Philly Refiners Urge Trump To Protect Their Embattled Industry
Philly-Area Refiners Urge Trump To Reform Biofuels Program
New Domestic Market Opens For Marcellus Ethane, Via Philly Refinery
Awards & Recognition
Allegheny Included In Green College Guide
Schuylkill River Trail Guide Honored By British Cartographers
Biodiversity/Invasive Species
Crable: Not All PA Lawmakers On Board With October As Biodiversity Month
Budget
Meyer State House Podcast: What Happens Next? Its Anyones Guess
Wolf Stumps In Erie For Common-Sense Marcellus Shale Gas Tax
Impact Fee Pays For Bridge Replacement In Washington County
AP: State Treasurer Makes $700 Million Temporary Loan So State Can Pay Bills
Murphy: PA Treasurer Authorizes Another Loan To Keep General Fund Afloat
Meyer: State Treasurer Announces Loan, Republicans Call Hypocrisy
Esack: Wolf Touts Cost Savings As Budget Stalemate Raises Specter Of Tuition Hikes
John Baer: Gov. Wolfs Scary Budget Fairy Tale, But Its For Real
Thompson: Wolf To Lease Farm Show Complex To Generate $200 Million
Meyer: Wolf Says Treasury Will Loan Money, Treasury Says Not So Fast
Chesapeake Bay
Capital Region Water To Renovate HBG Parks To Help Decrease Stormwater Runoff
Editorial: Better Plan For Stormwater In Scranton
Researchers: Chesapeake Bay Dead Zones Biggest Since 2014
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
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Climate
Pittsburghs Climate Is Changing And Some Are Fighting Back
AP: EPA Chief Says Administration To Roll Back Clean Power Climate Plan
EPA To Begin Repealing Clean Power Climate Plan Tuesday
Experts Say Clean Power Plan Repeal Unlikely to Impact Coal Industry
Whats At Stake With The EPA Clean Power Plan Repeal?
EPA Clean Power Climate Plan, 5 Things You Dont Know
Legere: Market Forces Reducing PA Emissions, But Killing Climate Plan Will Reverse That
Allegheny Front: Revoking Clean Power Climate Plan Could Have Big PA Impact
Eliminating EPA Clean Power Climate Plan Relief For Valley Coal Business Leaders
Puko: U.S. Power Companies Pushing Ahead In Renewable, Gas-Fired Electricity Generation
Report: 25% Of Remaining U.S. Coal Generation Headed For Retirement Or Conversion
Al Gore Coming To Pittsburgh For Climate Reality Leadership Workshop Oct. 17-19
DOEs Perry: Coal, Nuclear Power Proposal Not Be-All-End-All
DOE Secretary Faces Tough Sell On Coal, Nuclear Plant Subsidies
DOEs Perry Defends Trumps Plan To Save Nukes And Coal
Odd Bedfellows Fight Trump Bid To Boost Coal, Nuclear Energy
Column: The World Is On Fire As Trump Pours Fossil Fuels Onto The Blaze
Editorial: Renewable Energy Remains The Way Forward For The Future
Analysis: Trump Plays Down Health Hazard In Making Climate Rule Repeal
Activists Vow Fighting In The Streets Over EPAs Clean Power Climate Plan Repeal
EPAs Move To Repeal Clean Power Climate Plan Likely To Trigger Lawsuits
Scientists: Cost Of Capturing Carbon Dioxide Declining
NASA Probe Reveals Power Plants Emit More CO2 Than Volcanoes
Trump Taps Climate Skeptic For Top White House CEQ Environmental Post
Trump Taps AccuWeather CEO To Head NOAA
DOE: Coal, Nuclear Cost Recovery Rule Not A Directive For FERC
Op-Ed: Trump Wants Consumers To Pay For Keeping Coal
Coal Mining
AP: EPA Chief Says Administration To Roll Back Clean Power Climate Plan
EPA To Begin Repealing Clean Power Climate Plan Tuesday
Experts Say Clean Power Plan Repeal Unlikely to Impact Coal Industry
Whats At Stake With The EPA Clean Power Plan Repeal?
EPA Clean Power Climate Plan, 5 Things You Dont Know
Legere: Market Forces Reducing PA Emissions, But Killing Climate Plan Will Reverse That
Allegheny Front: Revoking Clean Power Climate Plan Could Have Big PA Impact
Eliminating EPA Clean Power Climate Plan Relief For Valley Coal Business Leaders
EPA Has Plenty of Tools To Battle Climate Change Without Clean Power Plan
DOEs Perry: Coal, Nuclear Power Proposal Not Be-All-End-All
EIA Report: Coal Generation To Grow As Natural Gas Prices Rise
Report: 25% Of Remaining U.S. Coal Generation Headed For Retirement Or Conversion
Odd Bedfellows Fight Trump Bid To Boost Coal, Nuclear Energy
Puko: U.S. Power Companies Pushing Ahead In Renewable, Gas-Fired Electricity Generation
Al Gore Coming To Pittsburgh For Climate Reality Leadership Workshop Oct. 17-19
Editorial: Renewable Energy Remains The Way Forward For The Future
Analysis: Trump Plays Down Health Hazard In Making Climate Rule Repeal
EPAs Move To Repeal Clean Power Climate Plan Likely To Trigger Lawsuits
DOE: Coal, Nuclear Cost Recovery Rule Not A Directive For FERC
DOE Secretary Faces Tough Sell On Coal, Nuclear Plant Subsidies
DOEs Perry Defends Trumps Plan To Save Nukes And Coal
Bloombergs Charity Donates $64 Million To War On Coal
Op-Ed: Trump Wants Consumers To Pay For Keeping Coal
Delaware River
Governors Vote For Fracking Ban In Delaware River Basin
Op-Ed: Many Benefits To Fracking In Delaware River Basin
Delaware RiverKeeper Oct. 13 RiverWatch Video Report
New York City On Board With New Delaware Water Release Plan To Meet Oct. 10 Deadline
Drinking Water
Tenaska Natural Gas Power Plant To Pay For More Water System Upgrades
Pittsburgh Water Authority To Vote In 2 Weeks On Service Shutoffs
Drought
Heres How Hurricane Nate Will Actually Help PA Rainfall Deficit
New York City On Board With New Delaware Water Release Plan To Meet Oct. 10 Deadline
Economic Development
Shell Urges Veterans To Train For Beaver County Ethane Plant Jobs
Education
Allegheny Included In Green College Guide
Energy
AP: EPA Chief Says Administration To Roll Back Clean Power Climate Plan
EPA To Begin Repealing Clean Power Climate Plan Tuesday
Experts Say Clean Power Plan Repeal Unlikely to Impact Coal Industry
Whats At Stake With The EPA Clean Power Plan Repeal?
EPA Clean Power Climate Plan, 5 Things You Dont Know
Legere: Market Forces Reducing PA Emissions, But Killing Climate Plan Will Reverse That
Allegheny Front: Revoking Clean Power Climate Plan Could Have Big PA Impact
Eliminating EPA Clean Power Climate Plan Relief For Valley Coal Business Leaders
EPA Has Plenty of Tools To Battle Climate Change Without Clean Power Plan
Tenaska Natural Gas Power Plant To Pay For More Water System Upgrades
Puko: U.S. Power Companies Pushing Ahead In Renewable, Gas-Fired Electricity Generation
Op-Ed: All-Of-The Above Energy Strategy Needed To Fuel Reliable Electric Grid
EIA Report: Coal Generation To Grow As Natural Gas Prices Rise
DOEs Perry: Coal, Nuclear Power Proposal Not Be-All-End-All
Odd Bedfellows Fight Trump Bid To Boost Coal, Nuclear Energy
Al Gore Coming To Pittsburgh For Climate Reality Leadership Workshop Oct. 17-19
Editorial: Renewable Energy Remains The Way Forward For The Future
Activists Vow Fighting In The Streets Over EPAs Clean Power Climate Plan Repeal
EPAs Move To Repeal Clean Power Climate Plan Likely To Trigger Lawsuits
Analysis: Trump Plays Down Health Hazard In Making Climate Rule Repeal
Scientists: Cost Of Capturing Carbon Dioxide Declining
NASA Probe Reveals Power Plants Emit More CO2 Than Volcanoes
Middletown Boro Backs Nuclear Industry By Passing Resolution Unanimously
Altoona Council OKs Resolution To Preserve PA's Nuclear Energy Plants
Nuclear Plant Closures To Test Sufficiency Of Decommissioning Funds
DOE: Coal, Nuclear Cost Recovery Rule Not A Directive For FERC
DOE Secretary Faces Tough Sell On Coal, Nuclear Plant Subsidies
DOEs Perry Defends Trumps Plan To Save Nukes And Coal
DOEs Vision Of Hot Tub-Sized Nuclear Power Plants Isnt Far-Fetched
Op-Ed: Trump Wants Consumers To Pay For Keeping Coal
Column: The World Is On Fire As Trump Pours Fossil Fuels Onto The Blaze
Energy Conservation
Legere: Energy Efficiency Loan Bill Gathers Support In Harrisburg
Environmental History
Project Preserves Agnes Flood Memories In Wilkes-Barre
Farming
Crable: Ag Jobs That Pay Apprenticeship Announced In Lancaster
Schneck: Did PAs All-Time Pumpkin-Growing Champ Beat His 2,020 Pound Record?
Flooding
Buildings Demolished At Flood-Prone Wilkes-Barre Area Recreation Complex
FEMAs Slow Floodplain Mapping Leaves Homeowners Vulnerable
Project Preserves Agnes Flood Memories In Wilkes-Barre
Column: Behind Spiraling Hurricane Costs, Human Activity
Forests
Schneck: Best Fall Foliage Vistas In Pennsylvania
Crable: Fall Foliage Driving Tour In Stony Valley Returns Sunday
Experts: Fall Foliage Coming To Lehigh Valley Just Delayed
Schneck: Forecasting Winter Through The Trees Of Fall
Scranton Forester: Newly Planted Trees Require Attention Before Winter
Restore The Common In Newtown Borough, Bucks County Oct. 21
Plant Trees With Tredyffrin Environmental Advisory Council Oct. 14
Column: The World Is On Fire As Trump Pours Fossil Fuels Onto The Blaze
Green Infrastructure
Capital Region Water To Renovate HBG Parks To Help Decrease Stormwater Runoff
Restore The Common In Newtown Borough, Bucks County Oct. 21
Plant Trees With Tredyffrin Environmental Advisory Council Oct. 14
Editorial: Better Plan For Stormwater In Scranton
Land Conservation
Monroeville, Churchill, Wilkins Planning Future Together
3 Southest PA Towns Join Forces To Save Money And Land
The Nature Conservancy PA: Keith Fisher, Director Of Conservation Programs
Land Recycling
Pittsburghs Last Major Steel Mill Development Site Renamed Hazelwood Green
Littering/Illegal Dumping
Tire Collection Event In Luzerne County Saturday
Pittsburgh Walkabout: Its Delightful To De-Litter
Oil & Gas
Wolf Stumps In Erie For Common-Sense Marcellus Shale Gas Tax
Groups Map Well Sites, Schools, Claim Risk To Children
Tenaska Natural Gas Power Plant To Pay For More Water System Upgrades
Plums Council OKs Shale Drill Pad Permit Despite Opposition
Monroeville Restricts Oil, Gas Wells
Impact Fee Pays For Bridge Replacement In Washington County
Governors Vote For Fracking Ban In Delaware River Basin
Op-Ed: Many Benefits To Fracking In Delaware River Basin
Shell Urges Veterans To Train For Beaver County Ethane Plant Jobs
Experts Say Clean Power Plan Repeal Unlikely to Impact Coal Industry
Whats At Stake With The EPA Clean Power Plan Repeal?
EPA Clean Power Climate Plan, 5 Things You Dont Know
Puko: U.S. Power Companies Pushing Ahead In Renewable, Gas-Fired Electricity Generation
Editorial: Renewable Energy Remains The Way Forward For The Future
Legere: Market Forces Reducing PA Emissions, But Killing Climate Plan Will Reverse That
Allegheny Front: Revoking Clean Power Climate Plan Could Have Big PA Impact
Activists Vow Fighting In The Streets Over EPAs Clean Power Climate Plan Repeal
EPAs Move To Repeal Clean Power Climate Plan Likely To Trigger Lawsuits
DOEs Perry: Coal, Nuclear Power Proposal Not Be-All-End-All
DOEs Perry Defends Trumps Plan To Save Nukes And Coal
DOE Secretary Faces Tough Sell On Coal, Nuclear Plant Subsidies
Eliminating EPA Clean Power Climate Plan Relief For Valley Coal Business Leaders
Odd Bedfellows Fight Trump Bid To Boost Coal, Nuclear Energy
Al Gore Coming To Pittsburgh For Climate Reality Leadership Workshop Oct. 17-19
Analysis: Trump Plays Down Health Hazard In Making Climate Rule Repeal
EPA Has Plenty of Tools To Battle Climate Change Without Clean Power Plan
Scientists: Cost Of Capturing Carbon Dioxide Declining
EIA Report: Coal Generation To Grow As Natural Gas Prices Rise
Bloombergs Charity Donates $64 Million To War On Coal
Philly Refiners Urge Trump To Protect Their Embattled Industry
Philly-Area Refiners Urge Trump To Reform Biofuels Program
New Domestic Market Opens For Marcellus Ethane, Via Philly Refinery
Gasoline Prices Decline In Pittsburgh Area
Gasoline Prices Fall In Lancaster County To $2.63/Gallon
Pipeline
Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Protesters Form Car Blockade In Lancaster
Cusick: Protesters Park Cars To Blockade Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Work Site
Protesters Block Access To Work Entrance Of Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline
Water Problems Persist Along Mariner East 2 Pipeline Route Despite Court Intervention
Trump Administration: Court Cant Suspend Keystone XL Pipeline Decision
Judge Allows Dakota Access Pipeline To Keep Running
Radiation Protection
Middletown Boro Backs Nuclear Industry By Passing Resolution Unanimously
Altoona Council OKs Resolution To Preserve PA's Nuclear Energy Plants
Odd Bedfellows Fight Trump Bid To Boost Coal, Nuclear Energy
Nuclear Plant Closures To Test Sufficiency Of Decommissioning Funds
DOE: Coal, Nuclear Cost Recovery Rule Not A Directive For FERC
DOE Secretary Faces Tough Sell On Coal, Nuclear Plant Subsidies
DOEs Perry Defends Trumps Plan To Save Nukes And Coal
DOEs Vision Of Hot Tub-Sized Nuclear Power Plants Isnt Far-Fetched
Recreation
Survey Will Point Way For Future Of PAs Park System
DCNR Gets Input On State Park System
Schneck: Best Fall Foliage Vistas In Pennsylvania
Crable: Fall Foliage Driving Tour In Stony Valley Returns Sunday
Experts: Fall Foliage Coming To Lehigh Valley Just Delayed
Schneck: Forecasting Winter Through The Trees Of Fall
Dream Drives: Wissahickon Valley Park
5 Places You Have To See In Philly By Kayak
Capital Region Water To Renovate HBG Parks To Help Decrease Stormwater Runoff
Schuylkill River Trail Guide Honored By British Cartographers
Crable: Pedestrian Bridge Arches Over Route 222 For Enola Rail Trail Users In Quarryville
Dallas Twp Receives $75K Private Donation To Fund Park Restoration
Dallas Twp Park Adding Nature-Based Playground
All-Abilities Dream Playground Opens In Chester County
Editorial: Bike Lanes Promote Safety In Philadelphia
Scranton To Analyze Fill Dumped At Crowley Park
How Lehigh Valley Parks Got Their Names
Allegheny County Man Visits All 59 National Parks
Recycling/Waste
Editorial: TRASH Act Matter Of Responsibility On Waste Imports
Regulations
Cusick: Bill Would Overhaul PA Process For Adopting Regulations
Renewable Energy
Solar Panels Shining On Washington High Stadium
PECO: No $45K Bill For Homeowner To Connect Solar
Al Gore Coming To Pittsburgh For Climate Reality Leadership Workshop Oct. 17-19
Editorial: Renewable Energy Remains The Way Forward For The Future
Legere: Market Forces Reducing PA Emissions, But Killing Climate Plan Will Reverse That
Allegheny Front: Revoking Clean Power Climate Plan Could Have Big PA Impact
Eliminating EPA Clean Power Climate Plan Relief For Valley Coal Business Leaders
Activists Vow Fighting In The Streets Over EPAs Clean Power Climate Plan Repeal
Op-Ed: Trump Wants Consumers To Pay For Keeping Coal
Puko: U.S. Power Companies Pushing Ahead In Renewable, Gas-Fired Electricity Generation
Scientists: Cost Of Capturing Carbon Dioxide Declining
Stormwater
Storm Brewing Over Williamsport Stormwater System Transfer
Editorial: Better Plan For Stormwater In Scranton
Susquehanna River
Coxton Railroad Bridge Removal Over Susquehanna Set To Begin In Wilkes-Barre
Sustainability
Allegheny Included In Green College Guide
Watershed Protection
Storm Brewing Over Williamsport Stormwater System Transfer
Researchers: Chesapeake Bay Dead Zones Biggest Since 2014
Capital Region Water To Renovate HBG Parks To Help Decrease Stormwater Runoff
Restore The Common In Newtown Borough, Bucks County Oct. 21
Plant Trees With Tredyffrin Environmental Advisory Council Oct. 14
Centre County Emergency Watershed Protection Project Completed
Editorial: Better Plan For Stormwater In Scranton
Heres How Hurricane Nate Will Actually Help PA Rainfall Deficit
New York City On Board With New Delaware Water Release Plan To Meet Oct. 10 Deadline
Delaware RiverKeeper Oct. 13 RiverWatch Video Report
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
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Wildlife
Scientists Urge Caution Around Potentially Poisonous Caterpillar
AP: Dirty Old Birds Shed Light On Key Global Warming Particle
Brunch With Owls, Celebrate 3 New Species At National Aviary In Pittsburgh
Editorial: Bird Research Essential At Presque Isle
Controlled Burns To Begin At Fort Indiantown Gap
Viral Disease Infects More Than 1,000 Deer In Beaver County
Pennsylvanias Golden Harvest: Deer Urine
Frye: Looking At The Future Of Hatcheries, Trout Stockings
New York City On Board With New Delaware Water Release Plan To Meet Oct. 10 Deadline
Other
Delaware Valley Chapter Assn. For Preservation Technology: Lehigh County Cement Kiln Tour
Oct. 28
Wildfires
Deadly, Vast California Wine Country Wildfires Could Gain Momentum
California Wildfires: Winds Fuel Spread Of Catastrophic Event, Death Toll At 21
California Wine Country Wildfires Leave 15 Dead, 150 Missing
Wind-Whipped Wildfires Sweep Into California Wine Country, 10 Dead
Maria
White House Lets Jones Act Waiver Expire For Puerto Rico
Only 1 Ship Headed to Puerto Rico Under Jones Act Waiver
Column: Behind Spiraling Hurricane Costs, Human Activity
Nate
Hurricane Nate: Pennsylvania Is In Storms Path
Heres How Hurricane Nate Will Actually Help PA Rainfall Deficit
Federal Policy
AP: EPA Chief Says Administration To Roll Back Clean Power Climate Plan
EPA To Begin Repealing Clean Power Climate Plan Tuesday
Experts Say Clean Power Plan Repeal Unlikely to Impact Coal Industry
Whats At Stake With The EPA Clean Power Plan Repeal?
EPA Clean Power Climate Plan, 5 Things You Dont Know
Legere: Market Forces Reducing PA Emissions, But Killing Climate Plan Will Reverse That
Allegheny Front: Revoking Clean Power Climate Plan Could Have Big PA Impact
Eliminating EPA Clean Power Climate Plan Relief For Valley Coal Business Leaders
Analysis: Trump Plays Down Health Hazard In Making Climate Rule Repeal
EPAs Move To Repeal Clean Power Climate Plan Likely To Trigger Lawsuits
Activists Vow Fighting In The Streets Over EPAs Clean Power Climate Plan Repeal
EPA Has Plenty of Tools To Battle Climate Change Without Clean Power Plan
DOEs Perry Defends Trumps Plan To Save Nukes And Coal
DOE Secretary Faces Tough Sell On Coal, Nuclear Plant Subsidies
DOEs Perry: Coal, Nuclear Power Proposal Not Be-All-End-All
Trump Taps Climate Skeptic For Top White House CEQ Environmental Post
Editorial: Renewable Energy Remains The Way Forward For The Future
Scientists: Cost Of Capturing Carbon Dioxide Declining
NASA Probe Reveals Power Plants Emit More CO2 Than Volcanoes
DOE: Coal, Nuclear Cost Recovery Rule Not A Directive For FERC
DOEs Vision Of Hot Tub-Sized Nuclear Power Plants Isnt Far-Fetched
Op-Ed: Trump Wants Consumers To Pay For Keeping Coal
Column: The World Is On Fire As Trump Pours Fossil Fuels Onto The Blaze
Trump Administration: Court Cant Suspend Keystone XL Pipeline Decision
FEMAs Slow Floodplain Mapping Leaves Homeowners Vulnerable

Click Here For This Week's Allegheny Front Radio Program

Regulations, Technical Guidance & Permits

No new regulations were published this week. Pennsylvania Bulletin - October 14, 2017

Sign Up For DEPs eNotice: Did you know DEP can send you email notices of permit
applications submitted in your community? Notice of new technical guidance documents and
regulations? All through its eNotice system. Click Here to sign up.

Check the PA Environmental Council Bill Tracker for the status and updates on pending state
legislation and regulations that affect environmental and conservation efforts in Pennsylvania.

DEP Regulations In Process


Proposed Regulations Open For Comment - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through DEPs eComment System
Proposed Regulations With Closed Comment Periods - DEP webpage
Recently Finalized Regulations - DEP webpage
DEP Regulatory Update - DEP webpage
August 2017 DEP Regulatory Agenda - PA Bulletin, Page 4922

Technical Guidance & Permits

Note: DEP published 60 pages of public notices related to proposed and final permit and
approval/ disapproval actions in the October 14 PA Bulletin - pages 6383 to 6443.

The Department of Environmental Protection published notice in the October 14 PA Bulletin of


proposed changes to several technical guidance documents guiding public participation efforts
within the agency--
-- Developing Technical Guidance: DEP ID:012-0900-001. Title:Policy for the Development
and Publication of Technical Guidance. This policy explains to the public and the regulated
community the Department's process for developing TGDs. The purpose of this policy is to
outline the Department's key considerations for the development of TGDs, tools available to
enhance transparency in the TGD process, public comment periods, and the maintenance and
distribution processes of TGDs. This draft TGD was significantly simplified from the previous
version by removing internal direction and procedures for the Department's staff. The
interim-final version published at 45 Pa.B. 2675 (May 30, 2015) is withdrawn with this notice.
Questions regarding this action should be directed to Abbey Cadden at 717-705-3769 or by
sending email to: acadden@pa.gov.
-- Developing Regulations: DEP ID:012-0820-001. Title:Policy for the Development and
Review of Regulations.This policy explains the process the Department will follow to develop
regulations necessary to effectively implement Commonwealth and Federal environmental laws
for promulgation as appropriate, based on the expertise of the Department and other
Commonwealth agency staff, Departmental advisory committees, boards and councils, and based
on comments received during the public participation process. Several updates to this policy
were necessary to ensure that it remains relevant to current practice. Also, updates were required
to explain how amendments to the Regulatory Review Act (71 P.S. 745.1745.14) in 2012
impact how the Department carries out its regulatory review and development process.
Questions regarding this action should be directed to Laura Edinger at 717-772-3277 or send
email to: ledinger@pa.gov.
-- Advisory Committees: DEP ID:012-1920-002. Title:Advisory Committee Guidelines.
These guidelines establish the role and function of the Department's advisory committees. New
language was incorporated into the guidelines to clarify common areas of confusion for advisory
committee members. These revisions are intended to clarify the roles of the Department,
advisory committee members and the public when planning and holding advisory committee
meetings. Questions regarding this action should be directed to Hayley Jeffords at 717-772-3525
or send email to: hjeffords@pa.gov.
Comments on these guidelines will be accepted through December 13 and can be
submitted through DEPs eComment webpage. Copies can also be found on the same page.

DEP published notice of a final technical guidance document on Government-Financed Mine


Reclamation Construction Contracts in the October 14 PA Bulletin.

DEP published notice of changes to the list of companies certified to perform radon-related
activities in Pennsylvania in the October 14 PA Bulletin (page 6442).

The Fish and Boat Commission published notices in the October 14 PA Bulletin of additions to
the list of Class A Wild Trout Waters and additions, revisions and removals from the list of Wild
Trout Streams.

DEP Technical Guidance In Process


Draft Technical Guidance Documents - DEP webpage
Technical Guidance Comment Deadlines - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through DEPs eComment System
Recently Closed Comment Periods For Technical Guidance - DEP webpage
Technical Guidance Recently Finalized - DEP webpage
Copies of Final Technical Guidance - DEP webpage
DEP Non-Regulatory/Technical Guidance Documents Agenda (July 2017) - DEP webpage

Other DEP Proposals For Public Review


Other Proposals Open For Public Comment - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through DEPs eComment System
Recently Closed Comment Periods For Other Proposals - DEP webpage
Other Proposals Recently Finalized - DEP webpage

Visit DEPs Public Participation Center for public participation opportunities. Click Here to sign
up for DEP News a biweekly newsletter from the Department.

DEP Facebook Page DEP Twitter Feed DEP YouTube Channel

Click Here for links to DEPs Advisory Committee webpages.

DEP Calendar of Events DCNR Calendar of Events

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