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Notable Books for a Global Society

Katharine Levin and Madison Young TCH-LRN 307 Fall Semester 2014

Notable Books for a Global Society Katharine Levin and Madison Young TCH-LRN 307 Fall Semester 2014

Winner

Notable Books for a Global Society Katharine Levin and Madison Young TCH-LRN 307 Fall Semester 2014
Notable Books for a Global Society Katharine Levin and Madison Young TCH-LRN 307 Fall Semester 2014
Notable Books for a Global Society Katharine Levin and Madison Young TCH-LRN 307 Fall Semester 2014
Notable Books for a Global Society Katharine Levin and Madison Young TCH-LRN 307 Fall Semester 2014

Honor

Notable Books for a Global Society Katharine Levin and Madison Young TCH-LRN 307 Fall Semester 2014

Honor

Notable Books for a Global Society Katharine Levin and Madison Young TCH-LRN 307 Fall Semester 2014
Notable Books for a Global Society Katharine Levin and Madison Young TCH-LRN 307 Fall Semester 2014

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CRITERIA

RED THREAD SISTERS --MEDAL WINNER-- By: Carol Peacock

Summary

Red Thread Sisters by Carol Peacock is a heartwarming story about Wen, a young 11-year-old girl who has lived her whole life in a small orphanage in a rural part of China. Here, she grew up with her best friend, Shu Ling in which they have made a promise to each other that whoever gets adopted first, will find the other one a home too. Soon after, a family adopts Wen and she is moved from China to her new home in America with a new mom, dad and little sister Emily. This story focuses on the changes that Wen goes through leaving her home in China and her grieving process of leaving her friend behind at the orphanage. While focusing on Wen’s new relationships with her family and classmates, it also

shows Wen’s determination to find her best friend a

home close to her.

Authentic Relationships

Throughout the story, Wen creates many relationships with the people around her in China and in America. One of her most important and personal relationships is to her friend Shu Ling. You see the connection the Wen and Shu Ling have in the beginning of the story, which influences Wens behavior throughout the entire story. They consider themselves sisters and look out for each other. You see the importance of Shu Ling when Wen is in America with her new family. She spends countless hours on the internet looking for a home for Shu Ling in America because she promised she would. Part of the

problem with her connection with Shu Ling is the fact that it prohibits her to extend out to her new family. You see, this problem occur mostly between Wen and her younger sister, Emily. Emily is constantly frustrated with Wen saying, “That is all you ever do. What about me? I’m your own sister. Emily pouted”(Peacock,2012,p

141). Her parents come into the story giving Wen advice and love. When Wen is too nervous to invite her family to the parent breakfast her mom comes in and says, “Of course we will be there”(Peacock, 2012,p. 90). This

show the true love of family and the role that parent play

in a child life. Wen’s last major relationship in the story

is with her new friend Hannah, a girl that she meets at school. This is a relationship that opens Wen up to the idea of making friends and Hannah acts as a protector of Wen from students that are not being nice in the classroom. These relationships are considered authentic

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because you would expect to see these same types of relationships in real life. You see the same trouble with sisters, friends and parents in real life and also the love that each show. Another part that makes these relationships authentic is their dialog between each other.

Authentic Dialog

Dialog is what helps make the reader feel like they are connected to a character. Without dialog, there would only be descriptions of actions and no emotional appeal. In Red Thread Sisters, there is an abundance of dialog that helps the reader feel like they are right along Wen through her journey in America. Some of the dialog that helps the characters come to life and feel authentic is during parts where her family shows worries about Wen.“ Do you know how worried we are when we can’t find you? Her mother demanded.” (Peacock, 2012,p 215) This makes her parents seem real because this is how you would expect a parent to act if they were upset

with their child if they had been lost or hadn’t talked to

them in a long time. More of this authenticity of the characters comes from Wen’s younger sister Emily when she feels that Wen is not paying attention to her and is always on the computer. “ That’s all you ever do. What about me? I’m your own sister.”(Peacock,2012,p 144) As a younger sister myself, I know that all you want is to have your older sister want to be with you and Emily is showing that through dialog which makes it feel more real. Without this dialog, there would not be as much emotional connection to the characters and you would not be able to feel for them.

In depth treatment of Cultural Issues

Girls in the family have less value or if a child is disabled physically or mentally, they are left on the streets to either be found or to die. One of the cultural issues that is present in this story is stated during the beginning when Wen is going over why she came to be at an orphanage. On page 109 her biological father says, “An extra her father said. Besides in cities, extra girls are against the law.” This problem of families leaving their little girls for the orphanages are sadly true in China and it is showing this cultural issue in the book with Wen as she was one of the little girls that was left for the orphanage by her parents. It is a common belief that boys in certain parts of China are considered more useful and they are limited to the amount of children that they are allowed to have as a population control and

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because girls are deemed as less useful in society.

Inclusion of Minorities

The inclusion of minorities is present in this story through the children that are in the orphanage in China versus children in America. Throughout the beginning of the story as Wen is in the orphanage, she shows examples of her minority group and how the aunties would shut off the furnaces when the nights got cold to save coal and Shu Ling and Wen would sleep together to keep warm (Page 31). You also see how there is a presence of minorities when Wen is in her new home in America with her new family. She is surprised when she

goes to the room that she gets the whole room to herself

and that there is an abundance of stuffed animals”

enough for almost every baby and little kid in the whole orphanage”(page 27) Although they are small differences in lifestyle, this story makes sure to emphasize the difference between Wens life and the

orphanage and her new life in America with the “Extras”

that Wen is given which represents the minorities in the story.

Rich in Cultural Detail

There are many small instances of rural Chinese and American culture in this story. At the beginning, Shu Ling talks about their tradition of Lunar New Years, which is the time that all Chinese individual increase in age, which is of cultural value to them. In America, it talks about Halloween and Thanksgiving, which Wen did not know about before and is introduced to them by her new family. It shows the differences in cultures and how each culture values different things.

Well Written

This book contains many of the elements that a well- written book must contain. Peacock makes sure to use very descriptive writing to bring the reader into the story

with the characters, for example, “Wen sank into her

soft bed, her sheets as fragrant as the peonies that grew behind the orphanage.”(Page 31). There are many similes, metaphors, dialog and foreshadowing that makes the story come to life, creating a well written story.

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CRITERIA

My Book of Life by Angel

By: Martine Leavitt

Summary

My Book of Life by Angel is about a sixteen-year-old girl named Angel who has run away from her home after her mother has died, and she isn’t getting along with her father.

She finds herself caught in the wrong crowd after she meets a boy named Call whom she meets at the mall after stealing a pair of shoes. He is very nice to her, which swoons Angel into loving him. She ends up moving in with

Call and he gives her “candy” which she is soon addicted

to. Call starts asking Angel to do favors for his friends and he says is his entrepreneurship deal to become a big business man. Angel is forced to make money for Call, as she is stuck in the relationship being threatened by him that he will kill her brother Jeremy, whom she loves, if she tries to leave him. One day, Call brings home another younger girl named Melli who is thirteen years old. Angel acts as an older sister to Melli and tries to protect her from the world that she has slipped into herself and realizes that they need to both get out. Her friend Serena has disappeared off of the roads which as been the worry for girls like Angel; disappearing out of nowhere. Angel tries to find a way to get out of her unhealthy relationship and find a way back into her old life.

Authentic Relationships

There are many relationships that Angel has in the story that have influenced her as a character. Many of these relationships are unhealthy, like her relationship with Call and her father. Her relationship with Call has dragged her into a lifestyle that is risky and ugly. As Leavitt says at the

end of the story, “ It is true that a young girl is commonly

lured into prostitution because the man she thinks is her boyfriend turns out to be a pimp”( Leavitt, 2012,p 243). The relationship that is very unhealthy that Angel has towards Call by the end of the story makes it very authentic and makes the reader feel like they need to help Angel get out of the relationship too. At the beginning of the story, her struggle with her father can be relatable to many readers. There are also other relationships that Angel has, like the one with Widow, another prostitute that stands on the road with Angel. She is seen almost as a mother figure to Angel and says that she does not want to look after her but in reality she actually does and cares about her. You can see this kindness from Widow towards the end of the book when Angel has to earn double the profits to make up

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for Melli not working. When Angel comes up short in cash to give Call, Widow gives Angel her cash that she made that night so that Angel can go home.

Authentic Dialog

Although it is the dialog in a story that brings the readers closer to the characters, it is the thoughts that Angel has that allow readers to connect with her emotions. Throughout the book, Angel lets the reader into her head through her addictions and fear, which makes her seem more authentic and similar to what someone in the real world might feel. There are many instances where I found myself worried or concerned for Angel as she went through her daily routines and was introduced to new clients, not knowing what was going to happen. There were many powerful thoughts that Angel had through the story. On page 146 she thinks, “ Without candy I saw. When afterwards his face was disgusted, when his face said, why do I do this? I cannot stand myself. And I can’t stand you…that’s what I saw on his face without candy.” There

are many passages like this that show the fear and hurt in

her character, which allows you to be more connected with her as a character and individual.

In depth treatment of Cultural Issues

There are many cultural issues that come to mind when you think of what this book stands for. One of the biggest cultural problems that this story of Angel faces is the abduction of young girls and turning them into prostitutes. This is something that is even seen in civilizations today. There is also the cultural issue of young girls being taken off of the side of the road and then never come back, which is shown with Angel’s friend Serena. There is a culture of prostitution that is prevalent in this story.

Inclusion of Minorities

There are many examples in My Book of Life by Angel that reflect on the minorities in the story. You see examples of this while Angle is out on the side of the street waiting for her clients saying, “ Drive-by eyes couldn’t get enough of us. They stared like bullets, broke their necks to see us. Some even spat on us as they drove by. Everybody laughed. We are so funny.” (Leavitt, 2012, p 148) This shows the inequality in the town and people like Angel who are considered prostitutes, who live in the minority, were not favored in the society. Many cases of where you see that Angel is in the minority are during her time out on the streets. It shows the hate that is projected onto her for what she does.

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Rich in Cultural Detail

There are many facts that show the cultural details of prostitution. From the details of what is common in prostitution to what it is like inside Angel’s head being a prostitution, the readers are given a snapshot of what it might be like to be one. In the authors note in the back of the books, Leavitt states some facts about prostitutions saying that “Often, once she is turned-out, she takes drugs to help her tolerate the lifestyle.” (Leavitt, 2012,p 243)Many of the cultural details that are given about prostitution are negative and looked down upon because of their lifestyle.

Well written

This story shows many examples of extraordinary, well written writing. It has many examples of foreshadowing while she is in the house with Call and gives just the right amount of description to keep the readers wanting more. It contains dialog that is authentic between the characters, which make them believable.

 

CRITERIA

Each Kindness

By: Jacqueline Woodson

Summary

Each Kindness is about a little girl in elementary school who has a new girl join her class. Instead of being welcoming and kind, she is distant and unfriendly to her new classmate Maya. She and her classmates make fun of Maya because she wears clothes that are second hand and continue to be mean to her for weeks on end. Pretty soon, Maya stops coming to school and she starts to feel bad about not being nice and welcoming Maya. Her teacher explains why it is important to be kind to others and she realizes that she needs to start being kind, too.

Authentic Dialog

There is very little dialog in this story. Most of it is

told through narrative. “She smiled at me and I didn’t

smile back” (Woodson, 2012,p 4). The instances where there is dialog, it is dialog that you would expect a young child to speak. Throughout the story, it uses that dialog to make the story more appealing and authentic for younger readers who are learning about being kind.

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Authentic Relationships

Because the dialog is something that you would expect from the age group represented in the story, there are

also authentic relationships. Although there isn’t any

definitive relationships that the little girl has, her interactions with her peers is what makes it seem realistic and their conversations make it even more apparent.

In depth treatment of Cultural Issues

The cultural issue of kindness is prevalent in the story and is not only relatable to this classroom in the story but it could go further saying that it is an issue in many young classrooms in societies today. You see the un-kind side of the children when there is a new girl, Maya and she is introduced to the classroom. Here is when you see the judgment of Mayas clothes and where she comes from. “…Laughing at her clothes, her shoes, her strange food she brought to lunch.”(Woodson, 2012,p 13)

Inclusion of Minorities

The inclusion of minorities comes from one of the little girls, Maya who comes from a lower income

family. “Her coat was open and the clothes beneath it

were ragged. Her shoes were spring shoes not meant for the snow.”(Woodson, 2012,p 4) This shows the financial minority that Maya is compared to her class because she is then continually made fun of because she is considered different.

Rich in Cultural Detail

There are only a few instances that supply cultural detail in this story. Besides the fact of letting you into the life of the little girl Maya and the other little girl that is considered the bully, you are not give much detail about anything else except differences in social classes through the descriptions that are given.

Well Written

Although it is a picture book, you can tell that this is a well-written book because it is very descriptive and brings potential youth readers into the story to understand the message and theme of kindness. I think that this would be a great book to read into a classroom to help teach students about the importance of being kind because it shows the emotions of how someone would feel if they were being bullied and could help youth realize the effects they can have on someone else.

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CRITERIA

Ganesha’s Sweet Tooth

By:Emily Haynes and Sanjay Patel

Summary

Ganesha’s Sweet Tooth is about a young elephant named Genesha who breaks his tusk eating a candy called Ladoo. In doing so he is incredibly embarrassed until he runs into an old man. The old man asks him to use his tusk to write a very long story, which is of Hindu mythology. After finishing the long book, the old man is very thankful of Genesha.

Authentic Dialog and Relationships

I combined authentic dialog and relationships for this story because some parts are authentic and then some parts are not. There is authentic dialog in this story because they use every day language, except when he talks about Ladoo and other Hindu aspects. His best friend in the story, Mr. Mouse, shows an authentic relationship because they are sharing and acting as children would. What is not authentic about the characters in the story is that Ganesha is an elephant and Mr. Mouse is a mouse. Because they are given dialog and can speak to people, it is not believable.

In depth treatment of Cultural Issues

There were no pressing cultural issues that were presented in this story. I think the closest that you could get to a cultural issue is that the old man, named Vyasa, had broke his pen writing the story of Mahabharata in which Genesha saves him buy writing with his tusk.

Inclusion of Minorities

Although there was no representation of minorities in this story, there was a representation of Hinduism and the beliefs and tales of Hindu mythology.

Rich in Cultural Detail

This story had a great deal of Hindu cultural detail throughout each page. It is based on the Hindu Mythology of how the Mahabharata was transcribed which is said to be written by a tusk. It is essentially retelling the story in a fun way so that young students will be interested and will learn at the same time. I think that this story was chosen to be added to the Notable list because of it enriched detail of the Hindu culture.

Well written

This is a picture book that focuses mostly on cultural details. Although it does not hit all the criteria, there are many aspects that show that the story is well written. It uses language that young students would understand and also incorporated an old Hindu mythology. It also is illustrated in vibrant colors that add to the text, which makes it more appealing to younger students. Because

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there is a great deal of Hindu culture in this book, I think it would be great to add it to a classroom library.

 

Criteria

Endangered

Honor Medal

By Eliot Schrefer

Summary

Endangered tells the story of a young girl named Sophie who travels to the Congo one summer to visit her mother. Along the way, Sophie spies a homeless man trying to sell a young bonobo monkey. The girl buys the monkey and names him Otto. Her mother owns a bonobo sanctuary and prides herself in saving as many bonobos from danger as possible. Sophie learns to care for Otto during his precious youth, and eventually they grow very close. A revolution occurs in Congo while Sophie is there, and soon a group of soldiers attacks the sanctuary. It is up to Sophie to save as many bonobos from the soldiers invading the sanctuary. She and a group of monkeys, including Otto, escape and must survive together in the Congo jungle during the time of war.

Authentic Relationships

This book contained several authentic relationships. Endangered was told from the perspective of Sophie, and so as the book continues, we see the many relationships she forms along her journey in Congo. Sophiel is very close with her father. She lives with him in the United States where she attends school. During the time of war, her father is frantic in trying to communicate with her. He even flies to Congo when the airport opens back up during the time of war, which goes to show that he deeply loves her. Her parents are divorced, but she has a close relationship with both of them. Her mom is stricter than her father. She forces Sophie to take responsibility for her actions, such as making sure her daughter is the only one who cares for Otto after she buys him off the street vendor. After the war is over, we truly see how close the two are when they reconnect in a nearby town after not seeing each other for months. The strongest and most authentic relationship in this story is the relationship between Sophie and the monkey she rescues named Otto. Described in the book, young bonobo monkeys need the love and attention of a mother-like figure to survive. They need to feel a sense of connection or else they lose their will to live. When Sophie rescues Otto, Otto

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immediately bonds with her and thinks of her as his mother. Throughout the whole story we see Otto running to Sophie when he is frightened by something because he depends on her for comfort. We also see the sense of love between the two during the times they are playing or tickling one another. There is a very strong friendship between the two, and their actions clearly show how much love the two have for each other.

Authentic Dialog

The dialog in Endangered was also very authentic. Being that the story takes place in Congo, the main character in the story had to use a variety of languages to communicate with others, mainly by speaking in French and English. The common language in the Congo was French so Sophie spoke with her mother and those who worked at the sanctuary in French. When speaking with the members of the United Nations she met along the way, Sophie mainly spoke English. Knowing how to speak in both French and English was very helpful for her in the novel because this broadened her chance to communicate with others and get help along the way. The

soldiers who invaded the mother’s sanctuary spoke in

another language, which acted as a barrier to the main character because upon spying on them because she could never determine what they were saying. The dialog in this story was used to determine how the characters were really feeling throughout the story. Fortunately for the reader, the perspective of the story was told in Sophie’s point of view, so it was very easy to determine her feelings by the content of her monologues. She commonly spoke about how she was afraid of what was happening in Congo and how she worried for the others around her, including her mother and all the bonobos in the sanctuary. The majority of the dialog between Sophie and Otto was mainly communicated through actions, not words. She spoke to Otto occasionally, and Otto returned murps when he wanted something, but most of their communication was through physical actions. When Otto was scared, he would climb on Sophie’s head for protection. When she wanted to show she cared for him, she would open her arms out wide and welcome him in for a hug. They shared fun times by playing with each other, and Otto often showed his affection by finding branches for food for her, or by showing her physical affection.

In-depth Treatment of Cultural Issues

Cultural issues were very prominent throughout this whole story. From the beginning, the author describes all

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the police barricades and corruption occurring downtown. The Revolution that happened during the story was a dominant theme and was very vividly described during the story. The attack by the soldiers on the sanctuary was very cruel. The author describes the bloody shooting of all the sanctuary workers and the murder of all the young bonobos in the sanctuary nursery. The main character even personally witnesses a bonobo monkey being shot in the head. The harshness of war is described in every chapter of this book in such detail that it is very eye opening as a reader. People are starving and have nothing left. Soldiers defending the capital are burning down towns and dead bodies are lying all over the streets. The cultural issues of this time are very well depicted and portray the Revolution very accurately.

Inclusion of Minorities

Being that this story takes place in Congo, our main character is the person who is of minority. Her father is white while her mother is black, and this plays a huge role in the story. Sophie easily sticks out in Congo because she has much lighter skin than those who currently live there. Because she is a minority as an American in Congo, she is often given privileges over those who live in Congo. When war broke out, she was sought by the United Nations because she was an American. She could have left on a flight and escaped war with her ethnicity, but she decided to stay instead. Because she was different than others, the natives also had a harder time trusting her. They were unsure of her intentions because she did not look fully Congolese and so she had to work harder to demonstrate to people that she meant no harm.

Rich in Cultural Detail

This book was full of cultural detail. The aspects of the story that were most intriguing were the way the author described the rich Congo jungle. The trees above and the lush foliage described really transported me to Congo in my mind. The wide, raging Congo River was also described in great detail, for it played a large part of the story at one point. During the story, Sophie had to survive off the land by finding her own food. The papayas and plants described were very vivid and when she tasted what she ate, I, too, felt as if I could taste it.

Well Written

This story is very well written. It contains many rich cultural details and focuses on how people lived during a horrible time in war. This story, despite the cruel war aspects, is a wonderful story of friendship and helping for others. This book was full of emotions and rich

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characters I deeply enjoyed this novel.

Criteria

Shadow on the Mountain

HONOR MEDAL

By Margi Preus

Summary

Shadow on the Mountain tells the story of a young boy named Espen who lives in Norway during the time of World War II. During the story, Germany invades Norway and the town Espen grew up in is soon filled with Nazi soldiers. Espen and his group of friends decide to join the Nazi Resistance, promising to do anything they can to stop the invasion. First Espen is asked to deliver anti-Nazi newspapers to specific houses. As time goes on, he is asked to perform more top-secret tasks such as delivering certain items and mapping out an entire Nazi Prisoner of War Camp. Espen falls in love during the story, and he loses friends along the way. Two of his friends decided to join the Nazi Army, and others are lost during their time of performing Resistance tasks. Eventually Espen has to escape to Sweden during the war, and encounters troubled along the way. Overall this was a very interesting and exciting story.

Authentic

Shadow on the Mountain contains many authentic relationships.

see relationships between people and political parties. Espen’s two

Relationships

Beginning with the main character, Espen, we see many

relationships in his life develop and deteriorate. Espen is very close with his younger sister. He is very protective of her and does not want her to know anything about his time serving in the Resistance. Espen later finds out that his sister is also working for the Resistance and he become upset because he never wants his sister to get hurt. She also demonstrates constant worry for her brother when he does not come home at night and grows to be very suspicious of her brother when he begins to sneak around. The two grow very close during the story and it is very visible that the two care for each other deeply. Espen also develops a close bond with his friends who also join the Resistance. They meet at a secret location and become very supportive of one another during the time of war because they all fulfill top-secret missions for the Resistance together. The boys first met when they played on the same soccer team. Their love for soccer was what originally brought them close, but when they all decided to stop the Nazis, they became even closer pals. In this book, not only do we see relationships between people, but we also

friends who joined the Nazi army became very attached to their roles as soldiers and left behind everything they have ever known.

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Both boys lost their friends when they became soldiers, and one boy even faced difficulty in his family life because his principles had changed him into a different man. Espen and his friends were also very loyal to the Resistance movement. They went as far as picking up secret items in the woods, and Espen even faked having polio so he could act as a spy and gain information on the Nazi Prisoner of War camp.

Authentic Dialog

The dialog between characters was very authentic in this novel. Because this book was set during a time of war, and the main character was apart of a resistance movement, special terms such as code names were commonly used. Characters often called each other by their code names to ensure the real identity of spies were not given away. Also, both Norwegian and German terms were used frequently throughout the novel, which made the book seem much more real because that was actually how people spoke during that time. By using authentic names for items, such as when the characters used the Norwegian name for cake any time cake was mentioned, the reader feels more culturally aware and in tune to the cultural aspects of the book. The dialog between characters was very strong as well. Dialog was helpful in determining how characters

felt in the novel, such as when Espen’s sister always spoke to her

parents about where Espen was. It was clear to see that she cared and was deeply worried about him.

In-depth Treatment of Cultural Issues

The treatment of cultural issues in this novel was very in depth. The affects and fear of war were very common throughout this whole book. By the blackout window curtains and the dialog of the

characters, it was clear that the Norwegian’s feared the invasion of the Nazis. People became very secretive and quiet when the Nazis arrived. Espen always had to lie about where he was going, even to his friends because there was such a fear of being captured and imprisoned by the Germans. The aspects of war were very dominant in this story too. Countless times there were occasions of people being arrested or even shot by the Nazi soldiers. Also, the reign of Nazis in the town was very well described. Citizens had to rid themselves of many possessions, such as guns, food, and even

Espen’s Boy Scouts Uniform. People were given ration cards for

food and were immediately imprisoned for very small offences such as for possessing a radio. The author did a great job at accounting for the emotions and feelings of those living in an invaded town during the time of World War II.

Inclusion of

There were predominately two majority groups in this story, either

Minorities

the Norwegians or the Germans. Both were equally talked about and it was never distinguished which one was treated as the minority. Both were equally common in the story.

Rich in Cultural Detail

This story was very rich in cultural detail. The Norwegian mountains were depicted beautifully and it was easy to tell just how

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large of a role the mountains played in this story. Skiing was also a huge cultural factor that played a large role in this story. On several occasions the author wrote about how the Norwegians travel by skies and are much better at cross-country skiing than the Germans. Skiing was a common activity for all the school students and this was how the group of friends traveled in order to complete their missions. The use of Norwegian and German words for common phrases or objects were also used often in this story, which contributed to the overall cultural affect of the novel.

Well Written

Overall this book was very well written. The plot was always very capturing and kept me interested the whole length of the story. I enjoyed how the book was written in the perspective of several characters in the novel. It made the book seem more complete because we were able to receive Norwegian and German opinions of that specific time. The author wrote this novel beautifully and each character was very unique in his or her own way. This book also contained many of the criteria needed to make a successful book, such as rich figurative language and an intriguing plot.

 

Criteria

Hands Around the Library: Protecting Egypt’s Treasured Books

By: Susan L. Roth and Karen Leggett Abouraya Collages by: Susan L. Roth

Summary

Hands Around the Library tells the beautiful story of an event that occurred in Egypt on January 25 th , 2011. Egypt was in the middle of a revolution and thousands of violent people swarmed the streets begging for liberation. The beautiful Alexandria Library stood in the middle of the protests and was in danger of being destroyed in the revolution. As shown in the novel, several thousands of people gathered and held hands around the library, protecting the beautiful building that represented freedom for all. The protestors stood

around the library for a long time while shouting, “We love you, Egypt,” hoping for freedom at last.

Authentic

Although there were not direct personal relationships in this story,

Relationships

there was a clear relationship between the citizens of Egypt and the country of Egypt and the Alexandria Library. To the citizens, the Alexandria Library was a symbol of freedom in Egypt, even if outside the library was not. While in the library, citizens could lose themselves in books and forget about all their troubles going on outside. People were protesting because they loved their country and wanted to see it improve. By taking a stand and holding hands outside the library and chanting, it was clear to see that the citizens cared about their country and the library and only wanted to see it become a stronger nation.

Authentic Dialog

There was not much dialog between the characters in this novel, but there were lines in the story that were very powerful and authentic. The chanting of “We love you, Egypt,” was very authentic because

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it happened during the real event in Egypt. It was also very strong in saying that the citizens greatly care for their country and want to see reformation.

In-depth treatment of

This book described the protest of January 2011 very well. The

cultural issues

whole story was very informational about what was happening in Egypt at the time and what occurred on January 25 th . The information in this children’s book is also very appropriate for the

ages it was designated for. It is honest and tells the story of the revolution, but also highlights how good can come from war as well.

Inclusion of

Most of the characters in the novel were of Egyptian decent and this

Minorities

story tells of a specific event that occurred in Egypt, so there really was no inclusion of a minority group.

Rich in Cultural Detail

This book is very rich in cultural detail. It highlights what was happening at the time in Egypt and showed the reader the event to stop the destruction of the Alexandria Library. The pictures in this story were also very rich in cultural detail. On page 22-23, there is a beautiful image of the Egyptian flag and hands of all colors holding a side of the flag. This specific image represents how a variety of citizens in Egypt were able to come together for one cause and support one another. It really is a beautiful image. I also really enjoyed how there were real life images of the event in the back of the book. The vivid images show the reader what the library looks like and all the people who were apart of the movement. I felt transported to Egypt as I read this book. It was very rich in detail.

Well Written

This book was very well written. As a picture book, I found it appropriate to read to elementary school children. It was very well written in the sense that its plot flowed very smoothly and the images were very supportive and told a different perspective of the text. I also really enjoyed how the back of the book contained real life pictures of the event and also more details of how the library was created. That was very interesting to read and it added to the complete story.

 

Criteria

Monsieur Marceau

By: Leda Schubert Illustrated by: Gerard Dubois

Summary

Monsieur Marceau tells the wonderful life story of Marcel Marceau and his life as a mime. Marceau grew up in France. When he was 16, World War II broke out and Marceau and his family were forced to leave their hometown. Marceau decided to join the resistance movement against the Nazis and he helped several thousands of people escape to Switzerland where they would be safe. After the war was over, Marceau decided to study miming. He became a very successful mime and played for several thousands of people all over the world. He

is known today as the world’s most famous mime in history.

Authentic

There were not very many relationships described in this story because

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Relationships

the book mainly focused on telling the readers about Marceau’s life as

a mime. It was very easy to see, however, that Marceau had a passion

for entertaining others with his miming. He had an incredible way of capturing an audience and had a very close relationship with all of his audience. He wanted to make them laugh and please them with his shows. It was also very clear that Marceau cared for others because he helped several thousands of people escape to Switzerland during the time of war.

Authentic Dialog

The dialog in this story was mainly told from the perspective of the narrator, but it was still authentic nonetheless. With the few lines Marceau did speak, they were very powerful phrases and really showed

his passion for miming. On page 37, Marceau said, “The mime must make reality into dreams and dreams into reality.” This just goes to

show how important it was for Marceau to mime and showed he cared for the members of his audience. His true feelings about his life were captured in this book, and as a reader, I was able to capture who Marcel Marceau was as a person inside and out.

In-depth Treatment of Cultural Issues

This book treated the issue of World War II with some detail, but I thought the book could have been more in-depth about what was happening. The book briefly states that the war was happening and

Marceau’s family was forced to move, but it doesn’t necessarily

explain why they had to move and doesn’t go further into detail about

the war. I thought the culture of miming was represented very well, but could have been more in-depth about what was happening in France during that time period.

Inclusion of

This book mainly focuses on Marceau and the people of France. This

Minorities

book briefly mentions the Jewish population and how they had to keep silent, but other than that the majority of those in the story were of French decent.

Rich in Cultural

The cultural detail of this story was very strong. The illustrations in the

Detail

novel greatly helped me as a reader understand what Marceau’s life

was like living in France during the time of war, and what it was like for him to perform as a mime in France. The rich images of Marceau’s family leaving France during the war were very well illustrated and I could easily see families carrying as many possessions as they could as they left their beloved homes. The illustrations of Marceau leading

people to Switzerland were also very rich in cultural detail. The image of the Swiss Alps looked very real and it helped me to understand what their journey must have been like. The images of Marceau performing on stage when he mimed were very vivid, as well. The detail of his face and actions clearly went along with the text and the culture of mimes. His face was always painted white and images of him tugging a rope or falling in the wind were very well depicted.

Well Written

I thought this book was very well written. I thoroughly enjoyed it and

understood more information on Marcel Marceau’s life in France and

his profession as a mime. The illustrations were very wonderful and

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they helped met to experience the French culture of the time. I would read this book to my class, and I recommend it to others.

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The medal winner: Red Thread Sisters by Carol Peacock

In order to make the list on the Notable Books for a Global Society, a book must

have authentic relationships and dialog, in depth treatment of cultural issues, inclusion of

minorities, must be rich in cultural detail and needs to be well written. After reading eight

books from the Global Society 2013 book list, we have decided that Red Thread Sisters

by Carol Peacock deserves to be awarded with the medal for Notable Books for a Global

Society. After reading Red Thread Sisters, we agreed that it met and went above the

criteria that a book must meet to become apart of the list and therefore deserved this

medal.

There is an abundance of examples in Red Thread Sisters that shows authentic

relationships and dialog. In order to have the authenticity, the characters must be

believable and act and say what you would expect to hear in every day life. Some of the

dialog that helps the characters come to life and feel authentic is shown during parts

where her family shows concerns about Wen.“ Do you know how worried we are when

we can’t find you? Her mother demanded” (Peacock, 2012, p 213) This is how you

would expect a parent to act if they were upset with their child if they had been lost or

hadn’t talked to them in a long time. If Wen’s parents had not cared or had just left her

when she was lost, the reader would not think that it was very believable. More of this

authenticity of the characters comes from Wen’s younger sister Emily when she feels that

Wen is not paying attention to her and is always on the computer. (Peacock,2012,p 144) “

That’s all you ever do. What about me? I’m your own sister.” As a younger sister myself,

I know that all you want is to have your older sister want to be with you and Emily is

20

showing that through dialog which makes it feel more relatable. Without this dialog,

there would not be as much emotional connection to the characters and you would not be

able to feel for them.

The next criteria that this story goes over is the in depth treatment of cultural

issues. One of the cultural issues that are present in this story is stated during the

beginning when Wen is going over why she came to be at an orphanage. On page 109 it

says, “An extra her father said. Besides in cities, extra girls were against the law.” This

problem of families leaving their little girls for the orphanages are sadly true in China and

it is showing this cultural issue in the book with Wen as she was one of the little girls that

was left for the orphanage by her parents. It is a common belief that boys in certain parts

of China are considered more useful and they are limited to the amount of children that

they are allowed to have as a population control and because girls are deemed as less

useful in society. As a result of this there were many girls and children with disabilities in

the orphanage, which is shown with her friend that has a clubfoot.

There are also cultural details that are given for Chinese and American cultures.

Throughout the story, there are many different instances where Peacock adds in elements

of each culture. At the beginning, Shu Ling talks about their tradition of Lunar New

Years, which is the time that Chinese families cleanse their house and get ready for the

New Year and is considered the most important festivity that they have. Also along with

Chinese culture, they talk about the old legend that “an invisible red thread connects

people who are meant to meet, no matter what. And even if that thread tangles or

stretches, it never breaks”(Peacock, 2012,p 130). As for the American culture, it talks

about Halloween and Thanksgiving, which Wen did not know about before and is

21

introduced to. She makes sure to show the differences throughout the story of both

cultures in the Chinese orphanage and in America and how each culture values different

things.

The most important criterion that is shown in this book is that it is well written.

There are many factors that go into writing a well written book like choosing the right

words, having dialog, and having unexpected insights.(Turnell, Jacobs, Young, Bryan,

2012, p17) You see many descriptive choices that Peacock chooses in her writing and

many can be seen through similes. An example of one of her descriptive devices is “Wen

sank into her soft bed, her sheets as fragrant as the peonies that grew behind the

orphanage.”(Peacock, 2012,p 31) There is also a wide range of dialog that allows the

reader to feel connected to the characters emotionally and many insights. Ever since

being left on the gate of the orphanage, Wen was always afraid that she would be left by

her new family and given back to the orphanage. You see this fear come up later in the

story when she is left at school and she does not think that her mom is going to come

back for her. “ She sat against the brick wall…then she knew: Her mother wasn’t

coming.” (Peacock,2012,p 61) Throughout the story, peacock uses many devices so that

the readers can be visualize and be emotionally connected to the characters which makes

the story very well written.

There are many factors that go into creating a story that will be represented by the

Notable Books for a Global Society. Reading eight of the books, we noticed that Red

Thread Sisters was the one that stood out to us the most and marked all of the criteria for

this award, which is why we have chosen it to win the medal. Not only does this book

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deserve the medal for the Notable Books for Global Society, but also it is a book that we

believe will be a great asset in any elementary school classroom across the world.

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Notable Books for a Global Society honor winners: Endangered by Eliot Schrefer and

Shadow on the Mountain by Margi Preus

In addition to choosing Red Thread Sisters by Carol Peacock as the Notable

Books for a Global Society 2013 medal winner, we also selected two books that we

thought should earn the title of being honorable mentions. After much discussion and

critique, we selected Endangered and Shadow on the Mountain as the two books that

deserve to be awarded an honor medal. Both of these books contained the elements

needed to win this medal such as having authentic relationships and dialog, in depth

treatment of cultural issues, inclusion of minorities, rich in cultural detail and needs to be

well written.

To begin, both of these books contained authentic relationships that were

very genuine and believable. Endangered was told from the perspective of a young girl

named Sophie. As the book continues, we see the many relationships she forms along her

journey in Congo. Sophie is very close with her father. She lives with him in the United

States where she attends school. During the time of war, her father is frantic in trying to

communicate with her. He even flies to Congo when the airport opens back up during the

time of war, which goes to show that he deeply loves her. Her parents are divorced, but

she has a close relationship with both of them. Her mom is stricter than her father. She

forces the girl to take responsibility for her actions, such as making sure her daughter is

the only one who cares for Otto after she buys him off the street vendor. Upon the first

day of bringing Otto to the sanctuary, her mother is displeased with Sophie and has a

really heartfelt conversation with her about how what she did was wrong. Since Sophie

24

decided to buy Otto off street vendor’s hands, her mother told her that Otto is “[her]

responsibility” and she must provide for his needs at the nursery. (Schrefer, 2012, p17)

After the war is over, we truly see how close the two are when they reconnect in a nearby

town after not seeing each other for months. The strongest and most authentic

relationship in this story is the relationship between the young girl and the monkey she

rescues named Otto. Described in the book, young bonobo monkeys need the love and

attention of a mother-like figure to survive. They need to feel a sense of connection or

else they lose their will to live. When Sophie rescues Otto, Otto immediately bonds with

the young girl and thinks of her as his mother. Throughout the whole story we see Otto

running to Sophie when he is frightened by something because he depends on her for

comfort. We also see the sense of love between the two during the times they are playing

or tickling one another. There is a very strong friendship between the two, and their

actions clearly show how much love the two have for each other. Shadow on the

Mountain also contains many authentic relationships. Beginning with the main character,

Espen, we see many relationships in his life develop and deteriorate. Espen is very close

with his younger sister. He is very protective of her and does not want her to know

anything about his time serving in the Resistance. Espen later finds out that his sister is

also working for the Resistance and he becomes upset because he never wants his sister

to get hurt. She also demonstrates constant worry for her brother when he does not come

home at night, and grows to be very suspicious of her brother when he begins to sneak

around. The two grow very close during the story and it is very visible that the two care

for each other deeply. Espen also develops a close bond with his friends who also join the

Resistance. They meet at a secret location and become very supportive of one another

25

during the time of war because they all fulfill top-secret missions for the Resistance

together. The boys first met when they played on the same soccer team. Their love for

soccer was what originally brought them close, but when they all decided to stop the

Nazis, they became even closer pals. Espen’s best friend named Kjell joined the Nazi

party when Germany invaded Norway. Kjell and Espen used to be very close friends, but

upon Kjell’s enlistment, the boys grew apart and we unable to associate together

anymore. Espen was deeply trouble by the loss of his friend. He “thought he knew his old

friend, but now it seemed that Kjell saw everything the opposite way he did.” (Preus,

2012, p 73) Their joining of opposing parties deteriorated their friendship, and this

happened to many people during this time in history. Close friends and even families

were torn apart because they had conflicting views and eventually they could not stand to

have a relationship any longer. In this book, not only do we see relationships between

people, but we also see relationships between people and political parties. Espen’s two

friends who joined the Nazi army became very attached to their roles as soldiers and left

behind everything they have ever known. Both boys lost their friends when they became

soldiers, and one boy even faced difficulty in his family life because his principles had

changed him into a different man. Espen and his friends were also very loyal to the

Resistance movement. They went as far as picking up secret items in the woods in order

to help the Norwegian natives, and Espen even faked having polio so he could act as a

spy and gain information on the Nazi Prisoner of War camp. There was strong devotion

on each side to their political parties and these are authentic because many during the

time of war in actual Norway and Germany acted in similar manors to the characters in

the story.

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Upon critiquing these two novels, it was important they both had elements of

authentic dialog. Both of these books excelled in this area. The dialog in Endangered was

very authentic. Being that the story takes place in Congo, Sophie had to use a variety of

languages to communicate with others, mainly by speaking in French and English. The

common language in the Congo was French so Sophie spoke with her mother and those

who worked at the sanctuary in French. When speaking with the members of the United

Nations she met along the way, the young girl mainly spoke English. Knowing how to

speak in both French and English was very helpful for Sophie in the novel because this

broadened her chance to communicate with others and get help along her journey to

safety. The soldiers who invaded the mother’s sanctuary spoke in Swahili, which acted as

a barrier to the main character because upon spying on them because she could never

determine what they were saying. Sophie used the phrase kata-kata to describe the

invading soldiers, for it was a term the Congolese used in the past. The dialog in this

story was used to determine how the characters were really feeling throughout the story.

Fortunately for the reader, the perspective of the story was told in the young girl’s point

of view, so it was very easy to determine her feelings by the content of her monologues.

She commonly spoke about how she was afraid of what was happening in Congo and

how she worried for the others around her, including her mother and all the bonobos in

the sanctuary. The majority of the dialog between the young girl and Otto was mainly

communicated through actions, not words. The young girl spoke to Otto occasionally,

and Otto returned murps when he wanted something, but most of their communication

was through physical actions. When communicating, Sophie “held herself to the standard

of [her] thoughts and ideals, but Otto held [her] to the standard of her actions” (Schrefer,

27

2012, p173). These physical actions were really their only way to communicate how they

were feeling at any given moment in time. When Sophie first saw the damage being done

to the town outside the sanctuary, all she could do was think in her head how much she

loved Otto, but Otto would never know what Sophie was feeling until she physically

showed him affection. Otto and Sophie both showed each other their feelings through

actions. When Otto was scared, he would climb on Sophie’s head for protection. When

she wanted to show she cared for him, she would open her arms out wide and welcome

him in for a hug. They shared fun times by playing with each other, and Otto often

showed his affection by finding branches for food for Sophie, or by showing her physical

affection such as kisses. The dialog between characters in Shadow on the Mountain was

also very authentic in this novel. Because this book was set during a time of war, and the

main character was apart of a resistance movement, special terms such as code names

were commonly used. Characters often called each other by their code names to ensure

the real identity of spies were not given away. Espen’s code name was Odin and he had

to use this whenever he performed a secret mission for the resistance (Preus, 2012, p 20).

Also, both Norwegian and German terms were used frequently throughout the novel,

which made the book seem much more real because that was actually how people spoke

during that time. The term for the Germans who invaded Norway was hird and Espen and

his friends used this term as a derogatory statement when they were talking about the

Nazis (Preus, 2012, p72). By using authentic names for items, such as when the

characters used the Norwegian names for common items, the reader feels more culturally

aware and in tune to the cultural aspects of the book. The terms mor and far were used by

Espen when referring to his mother and father. This really helped us to picture what

28

culture was like in Norway and how their culture varied from our own. Instead of saying

mother and father, they use mor and far which is important to recognize as to how

countries are different from one another. The dialog between characters was very strong

as well. Dialog was helpful in determining how characters felt in the novel, such as when

Espen’s sister always spoke to her parents about where Espen was. It was clear to see that

she cared and was deeply worried about him. Espen and his sister shared jokes about the

Nazis on a regular basis. This dialog and amusement between the two siblings shows how

against the family was of having Germany invade Norway. They tried to come up with

the funniest joke about the Nazi party and shared them almost daily. The true feelings of

hatred and mockery prove the feelings of Norwegians when the Germans invaded. Some

despised the Germans for what they did and making jokes of the political party

demonstrates how families may have reacted to the invasion.

The next two pieces of criteria needed to win an honorable mention for the

Notable Books for a Global Society are that a book must be in-depth about cultural issues

and must be rich in cultural detail. Beginning with Endangered, this book exceedingly

demonstrated the two qualities. Cultural issues were very prominent throughout this

whole story. From the beginning, the author describes all the police barricades and

corruption occurring downtown. As soon as Sophie entered Congo, she was immediately

in areas where “it was risky to be out of the car” she was traveling in, even in the capital

where one would expect to find the most peace (Schrefer, 2012, p 4). When Sophie

arrived at her mother’s sanctuary, she still could not consider herself safe from the

civilians in town. Especially since she was a young girl, the moment night fell, you had

29

Imagining what that must have been like is terrifying. There were clearly many cultural

issues going on in Congo during the time because no one felt safe. Violence was

reoccurring and the country never seemed to avoid war. In prior years, Congo had been in

wars with Uganda, Rwanda, Zambia, and other Congolese (Schrefer, 2012, p 29). The

Revolution that happened during the story was a dominant theme and was very vividly

described during the story. The attack by the soldiers on the sanctuary was very cruel.

Schrefer describes the bloody shooting of all the sanctuary workers and the murder of all

the young bonobos in the sanctuary nursery. The main character even personally

witnesses a bonobo monkey being shot in the head. The harshness of war is described in

every chapter of this book in such detail that it is very eye opening as a reader. People are

starving and have nothing left. Soldiers overthrowing the capital are burning down towns,

and dead bodies are lying all over the streets. The cultural issues of this time are very

well depicted and portray the Revolution very accurately. This book was also full of

cultural detail. We really enjoyed the way the author described the rich Congo jungle.

The trees above and the lush foliage described really transported us to Congo in our

minds. The wide, raging Congo River was also described in great detail, for it played a

large part of the story at one point. The most horrifying aspect of the cultural detail

written in this novel, however, was the harsh description of the town Sophie was staying

in. All Sophie saw entering town were the “swamps of trash kicked over by street kids

and chickens with wrung necks thrown down flailing into ditches” (Schrefer, 2012, p 7).

Clearly the town was facing serious troubles and by Sophie’s descriptions, it sounded as

if the town she was visiting was very underdeveloped and poor. When war broke out,

Sophie even saw piles of bodies lying everywhere on the street. It was a very horrifying

30

time in history for Congo, and the culture of what was happening at that time was very

easy to see as a reader. Troubles were everywhere and the town was a clear

representation of the culture in Congo. The treatment of cultural issues in Shadow on the

Mountain was also very in depth. The affects and fear of war were very common

throughout this whole book. By the blackout window curtains and the dialog of the

characters, it was clear that the Norwegian’s feared the invasion of the Nazis. People

became very secretive and quiet when the Nazis arrived. Espen always had to lie about

where he was going, even to his friends because there was such a fear of being captured

and imprisoned by the Germans. The aspects of war were very dominant in this story,

too. Countless times there were occasions of people being arrested or even shot by the

Nazi soldiers for everyday tasks that were considered crimes. Civilians were to be shot if

they were caught with a weapon in hand or if they were affecting construction serving

purpose for traffic and military reasons (Preus, 2012, p 66). The Nazis also made illegal

normal activities such as dancing in public and owning a radio (Preus, 2012, p 66-67).

People were very unsatisfied with these new restriction and they disobeyed the Nazis by

doing these tasks secretively. Also, the reign of Nazis in the town was very well

described. Citizens had to rid themselves of many possessions, such as guns, food, and

even Espen’s Boy Scouts Uniform. People were given ration cards for food and were

immediately imprisoned for very small offences such as for possessing a radio. The

author did a great job at accounting for the emotions and feelings of those living in an

invaded town during the time of World War II. This story was very rich in cultural detail.

The Norwegian mountains were depicted beautifully and it was easy to tell just how large

of a role the mountains played in this story. Skiing was also a huge cultural factor that

31

played a large role in this story. On several occasions the author wrote about how the

Norwegians travel by skies and are much better at cross-country skiing than the Germans.

Skiing was a common activity for all the school students and this was how the group of

friends traveled in order to complete their missions. The use of Norwegian and German

words for common phrases or objects were also used often in this story, which

contributed to the overall cultural affect of the novel. People often spoke in short phrases

in their native language and then the phrase was written again in English. The use of

other languages really helped to capture the true essence of the Norwegian and German

Cultures.

Along with the above criteria, to be considered for an honor for the Notable

Books for a Global Society, a book must include an inclusion of minorities. In

Endangered, being that this story takes place in Congo, our main character is the person

who is of minority. Her father is white while her mother is black, and this plays a huge

role in the story. Sophie easily sticks out in Congo because she has much lighter skin than

those who currently live there, and her freckles are much more visible. She is often called

mundele, which was a sarcastic way to call someone white and stuck up (Schrefer, 2012,

p 51). No one saw her as someone who shared both ethnicities; she was “either bled-

through Congolese or the mundel” (Schrefer, 2012, p 51). Because she is a minority as an

American in Congo, she is often given privileges over those who live in Congo. When

war broke out, she was sought by the United Nations because she was an American. She

could have left on a flight and escaped war with her ethnicity, but she decided to stay

instead. Because Sophie was different than others, the natives also had a harder time

trusting her. They were unsure of her intentions because she did not look fully Congolese

32

and so she had to work harder to demonstrate to people that she meant no harm. In

Shadow on the Mountain there were predominately two majority groups in this story,

either the Norwegians or the Germans. Both were equally talked about and it was never

distinguished which one was treated as the minority. Both were equally common in the

story, and because of this reason, we believe this is why the book deserves the title of an

honor instead of a winner. It was clear that there were two very different, opposing

cultures in this group. Because both perspectives told the story, we consider the book to

not a have a minority group, but instead have two major majority groups. Each culture

was represented very well, but we cannot say that a minority was included in this book.

Finally, both books were very well written. They both contained wonderful

elements depicting the culture of the setting and characters, and each book contained

elements of a well-written book. According to the Children’s Literature textbook, a well-

written book should define characters, make the story believable, move the plot along,

and establish a mood (Turnell, Jacobs, Young, Bryan, 2012, p. 17). Both of these books

did an excellent job with the above criteria. Endangered especially did an excellent job at

setting the mood of the story. It was easy to tell by Sophie’s writing just how scared she

was of war and how horrifying of an experience that was for her. As readers, we, too,

were horrified experiencing the terrors of war along with Sophie. In this book, though,

there were also clear moods of love and appreciation for other characters in the novel,

such as with the relationship between Sophie and Otto. Shadow on the Mountain

particularly did a wonderful job with defining each character. The characters in the book

were so unique and each had a completely different personality. As the story progressed,

the reader was able to see how each character developed and changed during the course

33

of a few years. The characters were so strong and true to themselves throughout the

whole story, and they were very believable.

Overall these two books are very wonderful candidates for the Notable Books for

a Global Society honor. They both displayed expertise in the categories of having

authentic relationships and dialog, in depth treatment of cultural issues, inclusion of

minorities, rich in cultural detail and being well written. Endangered and Shadow on the

Mountain are very well deserving of this honor, but we believe that Red Thread Sisters

excelled greater in the needed criteria for this award.

34

WORKS CITED

Haynes, E. (2012). Ganesha’s sweet tooth. Illus. Sanjay Patel. San Francisco, CA:

Chronicle

Leavitt, M. (2012). My book of life by Angel. New york, NY: Farrar, Straus and Giroux/MacMillan.

Notable books for a global society. (2011) About NBGS. Retrieved from http://clrsig.org/nbgs.php

Peacock, C. A. (2012). Red thread sisters. New York, NY: Viking/Penguin

Preus, M. (2012). Shadow on the mountain: A novel inspired by the true adventures of a wartime spy. New York, NY: Amulet

Roth, S. L,. and Abouraya, K. L. (2012). Hands around the library: protecting Egypt’s treasured books. Illus. Susan L. Roth. New York, NY: Dial/The Penguin Group.

Schrefer, E. (2012) Endangered. New York, NY: Scholastic .Illus. G. D. New York, NY:

Roaring Brook Press/MacMillan

Tunnell, M. O., Jacobs, J. S.,Young, T. A., Bryan, G. (2012) Children’s literature: how to recognize a well-written book. London: Pearson

Woodson, J. (2012). Each kindness. Illus. E.B. Lewis. New York, NY: The Penguin Group

35

COLLABORATION FORM

Working together on an assignment or project means sharing the responsibilities for completing that assignment. While each member will naturally shoulder different responsibilities while working on the project, collaboration does not mean merely tacking someone else’s name to the project so that they can earn credit for completing it. Listed below are the members of our collaborative group along with our signatures. We have also specified the aspects of the project for which each one of us was responsible and rated ourselves on our collaborative work.

Names of Group

Responsibilities

Self-

Members & Signature

Assessment

 

~4 books and matrixes:

250pts

Katharine Levin

Red Thread Sisters By Carol Peacock My book of Life by Angel By Martine Levitt

Katharine Levin (signature)

Each Kindness Jaqueline Woodson Ganesha’s Sweet tooth Emily Haynes ~Essay for Medal winning book ~Citations ~First round of editing

 

~4 books and matrixes:

250pts

Madison Young

Shadow on the mountain By Margi Preus Monsieur marceau By Linda Schubert. Endangered By Eliot Schrefer

Madison Young

Hands around the library By Karen Leggett Abouraya

(Signature)

~Essay for two honors books ~Second round edits

Our signatures above attest that we all contributed equally in this project.