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Re-Using Parts of the Calendar Formulas

In the next Section we will apply the calendar formulas to the schedule in Section 21, but before we do, lets look
more closely at the formulas. You will notice that in Section 21 a duration is added to a start or stop, in three places:

- in column J, the lag duration is added to the start of the previous operation
- in column K, the lag duration is added to the stop of the previous operation
- in column N, the operation duration is added to the start

Here is an example of the calendar formulas applied to two durations from the same start:

Hours Days Start Calc1 Calc2 Calc3 Stop


7 0.291667 15/3 9:30 9 0.8125 12 ###
1 0.041667 15/3 9:30 9 0.8125 10 ###
Calc1 and Calc2 locate the start in the calendar and return the same values on each row, whereas Calc3 and Stop
use the duration in days. So we could re-use Calc1 and Calc2 as follows:

Hours 1 Days 1 Start Calc1 Calc2 Calc3 Stop 1 Hours 2 Days 2 Calc4
7 0.291667 15/3 9:30 9 0.8125 12 ### 1 0.041667 10

Note how these formulas refer back to Calc2

=MATCH(E19+I19,'Calendar 2'!$E$6:$E$100)+1
=INDEX('Calendar 2'!$D$6:$D$100,J19,1)-INDEX('Calendar 2'!$E$6:$E$100,J19,1)+E19+I19

You can also re-use the formulas when applying Calendar Formulas 2 (Section 18), to calculate the working hours
between two dates, as Calc1 and Calc2 are also common to this calculation:

Hours Days Start Calc1 Calc2 Calc3 Stop


7 0.291667 15/3 9:30 9 0.8125 12 ###
1 0.041667 ### 16 1.427083 16 ###

Working hours between the two start dates: 14.75 =(E31-E30)*24


- the difference between the results of the two Calc2 formulas is the result in days, then multiply by 24 to get hours
e we do, lets look
stop, in three places:

eas Calc3 and Stop

Stop 2
###

e the working hours

y by 24 to get hours